8 Burst results for "National Institute of drug"

"national institute drug" Discussed on The Holistic Healing Project

The Holistic Healing Project

05:16 min | 10 months ago

"national institute drug" Discussed on The Holistic Healing Project

"For political reasons been done to allow people to say they're being tough on drugs, even though you don't need to be tough on drums and addictive. They're not us that most people who use a recreation. You don't go on rampages. They just tend to. Reflect a little bit on themselves and often come out being better people city. You think that the propaganda was so powerful in the sixties and seventies that accounts for some of the the huge lack time, because it seems that there's actually science now that suggests that yes, these drugs all they can be used for so many conditions in the right sentence setting in the right context and yet. Yet there still seems to be a real lag with the actual drug policy of governments, especially in the UK oversee. Countries like Portugal Canada seem to be ahead of the game here I mean the UK straight. Even more bizarre and PSYCHEDELIC drugs policy don't even allow people to grow native plants in a garden if they make the but many many of Puritan base, Western countries have gone extremely. Oppressive druglords and it's because the lies that were told were powerful. Darwin said full. Sfax are very injurious to science. For the. Long! And the point is people have been lying around these drugs so long that most people now think there must be some truth that. Is No smoke without fire. Why would health professionals in this is health professionals? It's organizations like. The National Institute Drug Abuse in the states. I've told people for forty years I could do. It's a really dangerous drugs I mean. They couldn't all be. There's a sort of sense in which there must be some truth in it, so let's air on the side of caution and let's assume that they're going to be dangerous. Not doing a proper analysis of the risk benefits. And is binary of drugs is. Bad or good is extremely. It's very primitive. It's scientific. and. That's one of the things I've been trying to do..

UK National Institute Drug Abuse Portugal Canada
"national institute drug" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

10:33 min | 1 year ago

"national institute drug" Discussed on Here & Now

"And marketplace the e cigarette maker Jew all said yesterday that it will stop selling flavored e cigarettes online the company has already pulled them from stores as the number of vaping related illnesses continues to rise is and now there's a new battle ahead for the industry lawmakers are trying to regulate the high level of nicotine in e cigarettes Dr Meltzer Tori physician and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota Dr Welcome thank you so much for having me and first year response to Jules decision to now suspend all sales of flavored e cigarettes is that a meaningful move I think it is I think there's a lot of evidence that the flavoring is a lot of what is drawing the youth into the market and the flavoring is likely to contribute to the long term health effects of e cigarettes so I think that is potentially a helpful move for our youth one of the other issues that public health officials are pointing to which also plays a role they say in getting kids addicted is a high level of nicotine that's in e cigarettes Is that is much of a problem as these flavors and can you explain how that works so they're both the problem the nicotine however is what makes them so addictive and e cigarettes are an extremely efficient way to deliver high doses of nicotine and one thing we do have to keep in mind is that the concentration of the nicotine is only part of how much nicotine gets into the user the devices themselves can be changed and tweaked and modified to deliver larger and larger quantities of vapor and so really it's the most concerning is how much nicotine is coming out per puff from these devices can we talk about that because there are some numbers out that are kind of remarkable typical jewel pod for instance has fifty nine milligrams per milliliter compare that to a traditional cigarette with an average of twelve milligrams so there's a huge difference there in a conventional cigarette a lot of that nicotine is burned away as the cigarette combust and so we think about one or two milligrams of nicotine actually make it into a smoker per cigarettes and that can vary with e cigarettes the user controls when the cigarette is on and the way the vapor gets delivered potentially more of that nicotine is actually absorbed by the user and so we zinc allowing for some losses a user vaping an entire jewel pod is probably exposed to the same amount of nicotine as a smoker are smoking a whole pack of cigarettes if you measure how much long term nicotine metabolite is present in someone who's vaping frequently it can be even higher than the levels we see someone who smokes say a pack of cigarettes a day okay so there's a new law that was proposed this month in the House of Representatives would cap nicotine content at twenty milligrams per milliliter and by the way the Europeans have this cap already It will this make a difference do you think is that a meaningful piece of legislation I think that piece of legislation is a good first step it's also worth keeping in mind that these high nicotine concentrations are pretty recent develop went in east cigarettes until recently most e cigarettes had significantly less than twenty milligrams per milliliter of course we're still popular and being used by adult smokers so I think next steps in terms of legislation need to consider the actual nicotine output of an individual device and an individual nicotine containing liquid will the President of the American vaping association about this law said that we should not forget his words about the lives of adult ex smokers who rely on high nicotine products to stay smoke free so that's the line from the Industry Dr Meltzer Pulmonary and critical care physician and assistant professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota thanks for speaking with US thank you so much for having me so nicotine can be hard to quit but marijuana it can be to nick MMA city was a proud pothead for decades that is until he tried to stop and couldn't here's his story This is Drummers Grove in prospect park in Brooklyn New York this right by my house I used to come here a lot until I quit smoking marijuana drum circles and pot are free companions but here's the thing about the city these days we'd is everywhere I smell it all the time sometimes it's no big deal and sometimes it's triggering because I'm an addict addicted to weed you might not take that seriously but I'm GonNa make the case that you should recap had a big heartbreak in high school we'd helped dropped out of college we'd helped arrested for dealing smoked before court got a slap on the wrist celebrated with a joint crashed my car broke my neck and toss the weed out the window none of that made me want to quit then one day years later I realized I was paranoid all the time rushing home every night after work to smoke alone I tried to stop I couldn't cold Turkey didn't work therapy didn't help neither anti-depressants and every time I thought about checking out a recovery program I think of half baked that cults donor flick starring Comedian Dave Chapelle his character is a pothead he tries to quit smoking to my name is Thurgood he's standing on a stage addressing all the other addicts okay because I'm addicted to marijuana you would hear marijuana marijuana's not a drug it's funny yeah some experts aren't laughing anymore climate and I'm a policy analyst by training I run the crime and justice program at the Nyu Maraniss Jute Mark Works at New York University he's written a few books on marijuana policy in the US many people like me are there how many people are there do we know that identify as potheads who want to stop something like four million and yeah looks like about a third of the people oh who use every day or almost every day meet the diagnostic criteria forget it was uses order the criteria according to climate trying to cut back and failing knowing marijuana has messing with your life goals and still getting high all the same climate says there's a growing number of people in the US like me people who want to cut down or stopped using pot altogether he thinks maybe it's because the weed itself is more potent now these days anything less than fifteen percent THC is considered low potency weed and it doesn't sell all back in the nineteen seventies it was three to six percent. THC THC is the chemical we associate with the head hi feeling that lower amount was harder to get addicted to climbing says about thirty years ago when researchers looked at people who had said they used marijuana in the past month eleven percent of them were daily users today mark says that number is around thirty five percent again about a third of them report the symptoms of cannabis user and those heavy users. account for about eighty five percent of the week consumes one of these things that I encounter all the time people who like to tell me that I can't be an addict what do I say to these people I mean nightside with him but I can't say on the Air I talked to Dr J. Michael Bostick he's a professor of psychiatry at the Mayo Clinic who specializes in addiction counseling I told him the same thing people say you can't get addicted to weed that that is complete garbage but again if you go with the definition that there's a problem as a result of you use whether you're meeting your goals is the family member or as a parent or as a spouse says an adult or whether potentially your substance uses interfering with your problem CBS Then it doesn't much matter what other people say so I tell him about how I started breaking promises to myself smoking earlier and earlier every day for apple since it is psychoactive I would say you probably liked the way that it made you feel and on one level wanted to feel that way all the time but on the other level may have Aalto you'll have to speak to this uncomfortable a when you weren't High when you got up in the morning I did feel that way and as it went on I began to feel more and more uncomfortable all the time and you probably increased your the amount that you were taking in I sure did which is almost ZAC description of any kind of addictive substance or practice anyway that's how smoking every day made me feel but I also wanted to know what using pot daily was doing to my brain so for that I reached out to Susan Rice a psychologist and senior science adviser at the National Institute drug abuse cannabis is a very interesting drug because there is an entire signaling system called the Endo Cabinet System Wise told me this system runs through different parts of your brain and body there's hit the campus which is an area of the brain that's important for memory and we know that marijuana impairs memory and there's also the cortisol areas which has to do with judgment and sensory areas so people may find that things taste different or better I didn't know it but I was fussing with this entire system multiple times a day and when you do that if you do it repeatedly then the system itself will start to down regulate which means it starts to become less sensitive and that's how it starts to develop so these experts all tell me the addiction can be real at the same time legalization on the march so he took my concerns to p people who argue for legalization I expected them to be like hey relax it's just a plant but what they said surprised me normal not here can make the case that cannabis is somehow harmless or innocuous because it isn't that's Paul Armand Tano he's the deputy director of normal Appro legalization group the fact is if we are going to acknowledge that cannabis poses some potential risks then it only follows that those risks are best mitigated by legalization regulation and Public Ed.

eighty five percent thirty five percent fifteen percent eleven percent thirty years six percent one day
"national institute drug" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:34 min | 2 years ago

"national institute drug" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now, the opioid epidemic has gotten a lot of the headlines, but overdose deaths involving methamphetamines have more than quadrupled over a six-year period. That's according to the National Institute on drug abuse in Oregon Health authorities report that meth is now the leading cause of drug related deaths in the state, Dr Andy mendenhall is the chief medical officer for central city concern, that's a nonprofit agency providing housing and healthcare services to homeless and the medically underserved population in Portland, Oregon. He joins us now. Welcome to here. Now. Thank you. Jeremy a pleasure to be here. And when you look at the numbers here between twenty fifteen and twenty seventeen Oregon saw four hundred twelve deaths from meth and psychostimulants. What are you seeing when it comes to the meth crisis? There in Oregon will the meth crisis has had a long history in Oregon. But in the last couple of years in particular, we've seen methamphetamine related deaths out. Pace opioid related deaths for the last three years running and why primarily due to an uptick in the use of methamphetamines across the population of patients in particular that were serving people with very severe poly, substance use disorder and also in combination with the fact that there's a deeper supply chain for methamphetamines that are more, pure and more potent. So therefore patients are are using more substance and suffering fatal consequences, and when you talk about the deeper supply chain, whereas the meth coming from the information that I have that comes from a local and regional law enforcement gives us a window of understanding that this is foreign sourced methamphetamines, primarily from different Latin American countries and on the west coast of the United States much of this comes up, the I five quarter I five which means it's coming all the way up. Through California to get to where you are. That's correct. It's coming up from California to Oregon and Washington and who are the users. Is there a profile of the typical person who is getting addicted to meth the typical person who's using methamphetamines is a little bit difficult to characterize? We do see trends associated with poverty. We know that methamphetamines affect many people of lower socioeconomic class and disenfranchised communities with high unemployment in the Portland metropolitan area and the population. We're serving we're seeing methamphetamine use concurrent with opioid use in many of our homeless patients that have Polly substance use disorder. We see it ranging from young adults all the way to people in their fifties and sixties who are really treating the pain of their of their existence the pain of their their life experience. Depressed disenfranchise. Chai's with with very poor opportunities, or at least a belief that the opportunity to change is is a large reach for them, which gets to my next question. Which is why do people end up using it in the first place because we know that becomes very addictive, and it's hard for people to stop. But why did they use it in the first place? Well, let's take a step back. Just a great question. I think that it's a really important question to understand why do people seek relief for or seek reward through the use of any substance. I think that if we look at human history and look at how we've evolved as a species human beings have taken substances to change their consciousness for millennia. And I think that methamphetamines in a way or no different. I think that there is a great body of science that says that many human beings will seek reward to pathological levels. If we think about the National Institute. Drug abuse and their director doctrine revolt. Cow who talked about the disease state of addiction as a chronic relapsing brain disease that's characterized by compulsive use. Despite harm. We have to knowledge that many of us use substances, we use substances without significant harm in that represents the vast majority of people that do use substances, and that's really a ubiquitous part of the human condition. Whether we're talking about the social use of alcohol, the recreational use of cannabis the use of nicotine are all examples where people may or may not suffer any negative consequences when we're talking about substances like opioids heroin methamphetamines in particular to your question. We see that most patients have started with the use of alcohol or nicotine or cannabis. And there's good evidence. Not to say that those are gateway substances that. Lead directly to the use of more potent substances. But rather that individuals that have a propensity or proclivity to experiment with substances to use substances also are frequently at risk of using other substances. So when we consider the social demographics of who uses if you will methamphetamines, this is a community based disease state where people are exposed individuals using substances. They are exposed to people using stronger and stronger substances, and at some point people will will pick up methamphetamines, and at some point some of them decide that it's not what they want and they find their way to you. How patients find their way to you and to try to get some help. So we are proud to serve the homeless population. And population of patients who are impoverished within the Portland metro. Alton region. We have many ways in which seek care one of the primary. Portals of entry is our substance use disorders continuum. So we have people that present right off the streets seeking treatment for their substance use disorder seeking recovery. Many of our patients are concurrently seeking housing services. We have a large medical detoxification facility that people will start their journey with us as well presently. We're serving about six thousand patients in our substance use disorders continue on an annual basis and what did the treatments what's affective in treating people who use meth? So the primary treatment for stimulant use disorder in particular methamphetamine, use disorder is really an evidence based practice of outpatient longitudinal group-based treatment along with one on one psychotherapy. There are no FDA indicated medications for the treatment of methamphetamine use at this time. And there's a behavioral intervention called contingency management whereby people are essentially rewarded for having negative urine drug screens or provided with little little incentives. If you will for compliance with treatment, this is really the basis of best practice for the treatment of stimulant use disorder. Nothing Fateh means in particular and concurrent with that. It's important to note that the recovery community of mutual help groups the recovery community of people in sober living housing in. Supportive recovery. Housing type facilities. Creates an environment of recovery for people where they can have and develop new relationships with people that are on the same pathway, that's a literature based and also very important part of the work that we're doing it central city concern to help patients, you're using nothing vitamins. Okay. So let's go back to where we started with this, which is that there's been so much attention put on the opioid crisis in this country is that attention on opioids taking away funding that could be used to help with this growing meth crisis. Most definitely not I think that if we look at the history of addiction treatment in the United States. There's been a slow but successful volition towards the medicalisation of the treatment of addictive disease and over time with the passage of the two thousand eight mental health and addiction parodies act, which really went into full implementation in two thousand. Thousand twelve there has been an acknowledgement that addiction is in fact, a disease that patients and communities and populations who suffer from this disease deserve access to high quality treatment. I think the challenge right now is that in the face of the epidemic both with respect to opioids and with respect to methamphetamines. There's still a gal. Meaning there's a gap in access we need more funding for these services in order to provide access and capacity to the population. That's currently suffering right now. I wonder Dr mendenhall if you could just leave us with the personal story of one of your patients somebody who's come in to try to recover from this addiction and has had success. I think it's important to remember that recovery is possible. I work with patients every day who never expected if you will that they would would grow up or have an experience of developing severe substance use disorder. Millions of people are living in the United States today in long term successful recovery from stimulants. I remember a patient that that I saw about five or six months ago who had been living on the streets for seven or eight months twenty four year old gentleman. He was using almost exclusively methamphetamine, he was suffering really significant psychiatric consequences from from that substance and had gotten involved in the criminal Justice system was living in our recovery housing. And starting to benefit from our employment services and has been working and achieved one hundred twenty days of abstinence, which for him was the first time since he started using them Fateh means at the age of fifteen that he had a chief that that time line of abstinence good for him. That is.

methamphetamine Oregon Portland United States Dr Andy mendenhall California National Institute stimulant Jeremy relapsing medical officer Chai FDA Fateh Alton region Polly cannabis
"national institute drug" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

13:37 min | 2 years ago

"national institute drug" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Vitus and were over prescribed cough syrup with codeine and then hydro code for sore throat paid. You see them getting in snared in this and going from the pills, the pills get harder to get to get more expensive to get hooked up with dealers, and then they themselves start becoming dealers because they're dealing you know, they become their sort of middle manning as they call it the support their own habit. And then they recruit noon users because that's the way they can get their drugs, and it's just almost has just astonishing exponential effect. And and part of it goes back to this craving, doesn't it? I mean, you talk about my constituent, Don. Flattery in this book who lost his son? Sean had an apple attic accident was put on opioids and developed an addiction. And when he was in rehab when he couldn't get the pills heroin was readily available because it was more available, and it was cheaper. And and I think that's that's another reason why it's such an easy substitute as you said, they're chemical cousins. But it's also actually more readily available and more. Notable to maintain that craving that high that they developed an opioid. Right. And then could you describe a little bit? Then there's sentinel. So is it the opioid crisis isn't bad enough and the heroin flooding markets that were sort of advanced by opioids then this is synthetic drug called Benton Bentonville that's introduced to the market and often laced with heroin, and it's it's a it's a bad bad actor could you talk about that a little bit. Sure, it's a sentence. Fennel is a synthetic synthetic analog and it's fifty times stronger than heroin. There's also you've heard of car. No, that's an elephant sedative it's a hundred times stronger, and so just a little bit of that introduced into the heroin. They call cutting the heroin with these synthetic analogs makes it very very dangerous, and these people who are doing the cutting and the mixing or not chemists they're drug dealers and the people that work for them. And so it's easy for it to get you know, a batch a bad batch to get out. And I I started seeing this in my community of Roanoke in June two thousand fifteen or so when Fenton all started entering the supply. And it was you know, it was catastrophic at the time we had the highest we had the highest rate in the state Beth Macy journalists, south West Virginia. If by democratic congressman Gerry Connolly from northern Virginia her book duck. Is a really dangerous, and I was struck you make a reference to a police Caesar. Page three or one of your book. You talk about an August twenty seventeen police seizure of four point four pounds. Offensive will not tons. And then you say that's enough for one million, bagel overdoses. That's an extraordinary pack. And people are ordering it off the dark net, you know, from Hong Kong and China. So one of the things I'm happy about what the new opioid Bill in congress. Now is that there's money to be screening that coming in in the US postal service. I mean that seems like low hanging fruit. Let's be screening are male for this story. Oh that it's coming in. There's another story in the book about the catch a kid at Virginia western community college selling zanex, but it's actually press fat. I mean think they caught him with like seven hundred pill selling them in the parking lot. Think about had gotten out there. I mean, you can. It's shocking. How easy it is for people to get this and it's easy to smuggle. And it just makes everything so much more dangerous. That's why you're seeing most of the increases in desert overdose deaths are being fueled by fennel now. So let's talk a little bit about. Okay. So we've got an opioid crisis. We got heroin crisis. Now, we have a Fenton. Oh crisis. We have soaring addiction rates starting in a large part of rural America. But now spreading to the suburbs. And certainly the cities we're seeing skyrocketing rates not only of addiction, but of overdose deaths. So let's talk about treatment. Because one of the things that comes clear your book is a it's very hard to get somebody to read the treatment. Be it's hard to get them in because of long waiting lists. But see it's prohibitively expensive. And then finally, it isn't very efficacious. It doesn't work very well. Could you talk about that? Because the choices for desperate loved ones who want to help somebody with an addiction in their family, or friend are actually very limited and not very promising. No, I saw family after family like some mortgaging their houses or barring from their grandparents to spend thirty thousand dollars to get a kid to an abstinence only rehab facility and was actually not the right kind of treatment for opioid use disorder study. After study shows that the most effective treatment is medication assisted treatment. And that's offered usually in an outpatient setting with counseling and it cuts overdose deaths and relapse by fifty to sixty percent compared to abstinence which is more like ten percent. So I saw a lot of activity around a lot of herculean effort to get young adults sent off to rehabs, and then I would watch them sort of bomb out of that. And then relapse, and if they run into federal or car, they die. I mean, there were people in my book who died before I had a chance to type up my interview nuns. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, some of the stories you were people have been trying to get some someone who's addicted into a rehab treatment facility and and finally been accepted, and they died the day before. Right. That was in in that case. I think you're talking about the store Joey Gilbert. Yeah. Fall twenty seven year old girl who had been doing fine on suboxone, which is no medication assisted treatment. People nor phen-. And and in order to get to this face base rehab because she herself believed that that was the best way for her to be clean because of the stigma against people who are on a lot of people in the twelve step community believed that just substituting one drug for another absence worked for them with alcoholism white-cain at work with with this drug, but it's different. And so you see Joey. Wanting so badly to get clean that she starts cutting her suboxone pills in half because the rehab center that they've lined up for her is a faith based and doesn't permit any drugs at all not even any medications, and she relapses while she's trying so hard to get there. Because in her mind, that's the only way she's going to be well, and then she relapses and dies. And I mean just a tragedy for her and her beautiful family that tried so hard to get her help was so worn out by some of her behavior. And yet still I still see them at community meeting after community meaning telling the story that telling the fact that if Joey had had a way forward for continuing her for having, you know, back then Virginia hadn't yet approved the Medicaid expansion. That they believe she'd be a lot today. So. Exploring that just a little bit more. A lot of people look at the model, which is you. Go cold Turkey. You give it up. You're not on any kind of substitute for alcohol, and there's a twelve step program to get you sober, and and for a lot of people that therapeutic intervention works. And so we have rehab centers the crop up. Not always regulated certified. I might add. And that's a problem too. But who have a philosophy that if you're on any kind of drug including a substitute drug that is designed to help you come down off the addiction. That is a bad thing from their point of view philosophically. And as I recall in your book about two thirds of all rehab centers, refused to accept you as a patient. If you're on any kind of. That's right and only three percent allow all three kinds of maintenance drugs, which are viewpoint orpheum methadone and vitriol or now tracks down and there's just a huge bias against 'em and MIT being medical assistant assisted treatment. That's right. When the World Health Organization Ida, the national institutes, drug abuse, the CDC, all concur. That MIT is the best treatment for opioid use disorder. My constituent, Don flattery who lost a son certainly would hold that philosophy as as one of the reasons of son died because going cold Turkey was simply physically not possible, given the enormous power of the addiction, and he was therefore very susceptible to the heroin substitute. Right. And I see that play out over and over in my book, not only with Kevin flattery. But with with tests Henry, and I'm carrying a lock out right now wearing a locket with her picture in it that her mother gave me after her death, and she didn't die of an overdose. We sort of thought we would get a call one day saying that she had died of an overdose. But she died because lacking her access to her her some family members who didn't believe in it, and nor detach herself because she had abused it before she went off to a abstinence only treatment center in Las Vegas. And then when she relapsed and failed out of that she was living homeless and on the streets working amid prostitution and drug gangs. And she ended up murdered. Her body was discovered in a dumpster on Christmas Eve, and she was twenty nine. She was twenty eight at the time then. Yeah, she was twenty nine by by the time of her funeral. And I think of it is patient abandonment. We've just abandoned these people they become hard to deal with they're so driven by this drug, and what tests said to me the first time I interviewed her in late two thousand fifteen she described how she had initially been addicted by at an urgent care centre with two thirty day opioid prescriptions. And she said what we need. It should be an ironic. She said, well, we need is an urgent care for the addicted. And so that's the message. I'm trying to carry forward with this book, we need to make these medications lifesaving medications. The tests are self couldn't get that. Don, flattery son lost his access to we need to make them available. The way we made HIV medications available in a low threshold setting where everybody who needed to get it had axe. That's just the way everybody who needs to get heroin has access right? We need to make these these drugs as accessible as the street drugs are because they're really they really work when they're used correctly. Beth Macy on the impact of Oxycontin on a small rural community in Virginia interview. By democratic congressman Gerry Connolly, the book Duke. Not a quick fix. I'm sorry. I didn't mean I said in your book to your point that they work you compared the relapse rate and the recovery sustainable recovery rate, and they're pretty dramatic differences. When you're on MIT brushes cold Turkey, not being on. Could you got fifty to sixty percent with them AT versus about ten percent on abstinence only, sandy? These kids. Yeah. So many of these kids. I have seen one or two of their friends succeed and rehab, and then they also have been you know, they've been in the NFL meetings where they've been felt to be unclean. I watched tests go to NA meetings and asked to be sponsored and no one sponsor because they gained her unclean. Because she was taking suboxone or buprenorphine. And so she herself believe this notion that going away out of state to abstinence only facility was the only way for her to get clean..

heroin Virginia Don flattery Turkey Joey Gilbert America congressman Beth Macy Gerry Connolly pills manning Vitus Sean apple congress MIT codeine Hong Kong West Virginia
"national institute drug" Discussed on Do By Friday

Do By Friday

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"national institute drug" Discussed on Do By Friday

"Come what you're sorta side effects f y you're taking some sort of nar can sorta helps people not yet no no it's it's get hooked on opioids no causes liver toxicity hold on hold on well everything called like all everything causes respiratory depression yeah i'm fine everything's fine cleese taking the three of them oh my god no you're supposed to take ten okay sit down with the most drink taste it does taste like actually first time i had this it was as a t and it tastes like really bad much aotea that you would get like making them your they're they're it's it's trying stop god or ten your shit take ten no because look they're just giant whore their pills powder alex alex coastas nauseous the patient's spine everything spy no allergies taking them stocked up it's too many oh my god what is this rate crate cray cray tim paine toxicity let's see intestinal problems muscle pains coughing diarrhea also withdraw you'll get withdrawal withdrawal that's that's like like couldn't nobody if you had with a much to drink can elicit pain relief and euphoria i was going to be high during all work shirt sure the full pharmacological street signs that's cool logical properties of crate helm are not properly understood that's nice oh my god rachel remains a great deal of debate over the safety of the drug detection in body this same thing is in fact the national institute drug abuse has identified as an emerging drug of abuse.

rachel tim paine national institute
"national institute drug" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"national institute drug" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The fish the fat no two other opioid addiction all the evidence suggests deficit melts coming from china neither directly into the united states viist precursors pink cooked in mexico and shipped back in bike gangs why doesn't san francisco's take precedence steffl saying we want china to stop killing americans we're going to take chinese goods that are sold in san francisco and what kind of charge one hundred percent additional tax on on until china stop sending sentinel into the united states let's kick that money and put it into treatment and outreach let's put that money the better law enforcement to stop the sale of these poisons on the street why doesn't why don't we get asked though problem and not just make the self destructive missed that is the problem uh less uh visible to people so that they feel uncomfortable they should feel uncomfortable because people like guy let's do something about it some three she's very much for being with us thank you thank you john walters is codirector of the center for substance abuse policy research at the hudson institute and served as director of the white house office of national drug control policy under president george w bush let me go back to you alex growl uh there is some a couple of statements that i think you probably need to respond to one is that the science is is really fabricate of at the end of this people aren't necessarily getting the help that may be designed or may be good intentions this notwithstanding out yeah i i you know wearing agreement about the fact that we do need more medical assistant treatment in the us at the director of the national institute drug abuse nor volkov i think published.

china united states mexico san francisco codirector hudson institute director president john walters white house george w bush national institute one hundred percent
"national institute drug" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"national institute drug" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To problems the problem that's causing people to die here in large numbers get these fish the fat no two other opioid addiction all the evidence suggests that set most coming from china neither directly into the united states or via precursors p cooked in mexico and shipped back in bike gangs why doesn't san francisco's taken unprecedented steps will saying we want china to stop killing americans we're going to take chinese goods that are sold in san francisco and work on the charge one hundred percent additional tax on them until china stop sending sentinel into the united states let's kick that money and put it into treatment amount reach let's put that money the better law enforcement to stop the sale of these poisons on the street why doesn't why don't we get asked them problem and not just meet the self destructive nece that is the problem uh less uh visible to people so that they feel uncomfortable they should feel uncomfortable because people are guy let's do something about it chretien very much of being with us thank you thank you somewhat is his codirector of the center for substance abuse policy research at the hudson institute and served as director of the white house office of national drug control policy under president george w bush let me go back to you alex growl uh there is some a couple of statements that i think you probably need to respond to one is that the science is is really fabricate of at the end of this people aren't necessarily getting the help that may be designed or may be good intentions notwithstanding out yeah i i you know wearing agreement about the fact that we do need more medical assist the treatment in the us at the director of the national institute drug abuse nor volkov adding published.

china united states mexico san francisco codirector hudson institute director president chretien white house george w bush national institute one hundred percent
"national institute drug" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"national institute drug" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"If we have two things that you could argue whether we should have or not you're argument is to allow the third one because what the how well the alright how about we legalized her win well you know with the way things are going right now you might as well because so many people have been driven to it thanks to the fact that you will legalized marijuana and we're stuck with these oh peoria addicted painkillers but every study as the governor jeers said is not true to go jeff them and he's blog the national is the to run drug abuse which is federal agency questions whether marijuana is really gate we drove stating further researchers needed to explore this question so so so much reefer madness do you think marijuana should be legal and also you known aside if you were going to if you're going to discuss you offense giving a sides what would you be shooting from the thanksgiving table if you showed up stoned riches in pennsylvania our new jersey one oh one point five average how much amended from national i mean so wasn't from hour one and we win thanks give it indian we're here poker came over starving a that you know the schmoe if he only and you're saying i was in these guys getting andy indians games this program fifteen spice this month to know we everybody got to munchies thanks giving i love it rich comes up with the very first thanksgiving and right and we have not had hot _p's pipe on thanksgiving since then you know what i can i can argue with that no one eleven know what was in the piece by but we do know that it that he smoked that they were quite hungry alex's in sharing you know a new jersey twenty five what do you think gobs of wieters ever breakthrough yeah i hello alex i see no the gun i'm doing i'm in that stressed it sure dancers the marijuana question yeah so that national instituted drug abuse eight in the i read a study from them the other day that looked at the comparison between marijuana out all in down that one i was less fifty thing out on at very similar mexican brain assistant so this is it it's it's safe with an alcohol and governor chris these argument for not legalizing marijuana is three rawlings.

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