6 Burst results for "National Institute Of Mental Health"

"national institute mental health" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

The Addicted Mind Podcast

11:31 min | 1 year ago

"national institute mental health" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

"On when it really on the France and one of his ways we know that's even faster than taking a drug is using cold water because it if you take take your face in yeast submerged in cold water not even necessarily ice water Barry Goldwater and get your temples and right underneath your eyes is on your forehead. What we know is that affects that nerve. I was mentioning and it brings down your emotional intensity very rapidly coach people to do that for twenty thirty seconds. They're facing that cold cold water amount for thirty seconds jude again and do that for Rita five minutes at least and see how you feel then if you're really emotionally on that very rich you're panicking. You're it's so painful on intense see what happens and that that can reset things or at least brings down in a very rapid way. It doesn't feel as good as drugs or at least as those drugs go initially but it can change things really rapidly in the same way that overeating self injury in thinking suicide can all actually help people's emotions down because creating an escape lit beside. It's getting some relief from that eight or suffering. So can you talk about that. One part a little a bit the one the one part you mentioned about thinking about suicide gives you relief. Can you tell me about that a little bit. What people don't know. Is that got suicide. Thinking about suicide is like taking a drug. It can be for some people thinking about suicide is a very scary thing for some people. It is something that they're bringing learns how to do as a way to escape away that it's healing because it's if I'm not here and there's it's no pain and people get some people anyway get calmer so extremely important to know because while it makes sense that your brain wants to get relief and that may they actually were ultimately you're training your brain towards suicide and it's not it's not a safe way to go right so but it's it makes sense that those thoughts actually bring relief because the the you know our brain sometimes like fantasy are bring can react a fantasy as reality and and we can create those emotions in our body as well so that makes a lot of sense and I never really thought of it that way but I think that's really insightful and just just helpful to be able to know that that's what makes those thoughts in some ways. I WanNa see normal. Normal is not the right word but make sense they make sense yes but yeah. I find that this is helpful not only for people who are going through it but also for their family members and friends who really don't understand stand it so they can understand no business what's happening. There's this real events that makes sense that we've identified and then even for healthcare providers suze. You don't get it right. There's also another way to think about it too. Is that some of us. We were just born. Being more attuned or sensitive to our environment or we are just weren't having stronger longer lasting emotions its way we're wired or biology or we live in environments that that maybe wasn't safe and where that developed over time or maybe it's a combination for those of us who live that way. We're our motion. State is naturally higher. Were just operating walking through the day. More emotionally aroused compared to other people whose common motion optional baseline is is much lower but you can't tell from the outside and you if you're someone who's at higher person. You don't know that you're higher than the lower person. Lower person doesn't know your higher and when people are just more emotionally arousing in when something painful hits emotions go up. If you're that higher person in your motions glummer quickly they stay there for longer. They take longer to calm down but if anyone had their motions that high they would be struggling so that I got the lower emotional baseline in something painful happens or not that high already. They don't understand why the other person is so upset or struggling so much but if they were in that state they would understand yeah. I think that's such an important point to make that people feel their emotions differently. Not everybody really feel their emotions the same way and yes some people just they feel their emotions in an intense way more than other people and then it's harder to cope and it's harder to bring back down down and that's a struggle and we have to appreciate that and let and give people like you said you know. I think some of these skills should be learned in kindergarten. You know mindful says breathe in emotion regulation so that yeah anybody has these intense emotions can learn to regulate faster and easier and and how success awesome and actually use them to thrive yeah exactly. I look forward to that day when we are. We understand that emotions make sense in that. It makes sense that some some people have the more intensely and that's not because there's something wrong with them but that's because that's how they're wired in. They need special strategies to harness that so that they can take the good part of it and use those emotions to create a better world or had alleged that they weren't or emotions make amazing things happen when you Arnesen. I mean we can have a different world. There's if we supported people who were this way. It would be really amazing. Yeah I totally agree what what about you had mentioned earlier when we were talking about how other people can just listen to someone who's struggling but for people out there that aren't struggling with this but they maybe they have a friend or a family member or a son or daughter who is struggling with suicidal idealization or thoughts of suicide. What do you want to tell them. I think a couple things wine. Suicidal thoughts are not uncommon and adolescence. Adolescence is a time when this is a very common experience in standard treatment getting any kind of medical advice here but is oftentimes sometimes to send people to the emergency room the hostile on but that's shifting because what we found is that oftentimes you sent to the emergency room they don't get in or they go to inpatient unit and they don't necessarily have a useful experience. There's not there's not evidence to say that inpatient stays are helpful they they are in some cases if somebody is a stretch with reality but in an ideal world. I think the direction we're going as people will be managed by their primary care doctor and with the support of their family with their own skills to manage experience so for the family member a Friday thing. It's not that uncommon sending someone to the emergency room calling nine one actually isn't in most cases the best thing to do but really when I have a team of people had to settle experienced guide the research of a do when driven development training and they say really it is that don't panic just be with me and basically what happens is if we're with somebody who said I don't we start to get upset. We're struggling with our own emotions. You know like is about us us and we need to remember that lake. This person is saying they're struggling and we need to be there for them and be aware okay. My emotions are on panicking right now. I don't know what to do while I'm going to tell you what to do. Your job is to just be with that person and say I'm GonNa get you sandwich. Get you wonder we're gonna sit on the couch. You can talk if we want to. We can watch movie if you can describe it. I'd love to hear it. I'm just WANNA listen and being present like you're really listening without trying to solve a problem album more. Tell them they should feel a different way or say. You're on and then ultimately at the end making sure you you communicate hope for them not in a sense of lake. It's just it's all going to be okay because you want to be careful about that. They should never said but more in the sense of like true statements about I. I see that you know how to do hard think been through hard things before. I'm going to help you get through. You know I I believe in you. I really like you. I care about you I want. I want you in my life's communicating that like them. You WanNa see them through this that you know you have hope because you've seen him do hard things. They may not agree but the fact that you believe that and you like them. I think is pretty powerful. A lot of people who are suicidal feel lake. Nobody likes them in actually a lot of times a burnt a lot of bridges so you being. I knew says you don't have to like everything their baby but he linking all along ways to just being there with them a lot of times give them the time for for this to these feelings to pass can see the other side role now you you also have another website called now matters now now. Can you tell me a little bit about that and I was looking at that and I think that's super powerful to this website. We developed because the treatment I was telling you about dialectical behavior therapy. It's very effective. It's very expensive toget- I wanted people that have easier access to some of the elements of that treatment though this now matters now like mindfulness now matters now is a website that has teaching of how to cope with your emotions some of it's just straight teaching but some of its videos of people talking about how they got through really hard times using the strategies from that dialectical behavior therapy like you said skills stress tolerance deals and that was funded by the National Institutes Mental Health in the American Foundation nation for suicide prevention and built by people who have had these experiences so you know like I said I have this team of people we developed together and in fact last Monday it was just collecting film addiction videos so that will be able to add more information about the substance you struggles that people have and how that relates to DVD's goes goes in dialectical behavior therapy has been tested with people who had opioid addiction and I mean it makes a lot of sense because this is all about and we have these overwhelming overwhelming emotions especially painful ones you know we want them to end Houghton to stop because they don't feel good and sometimes we we go to these extreme lengths to do that. We were excited just in May to publish a paper. What we found is that people who visited the website and who when asked said they were very suicidal. They're suicidal. Thoughts decreased in Herschel Times under ten minutes. They had at least some relief and so I think that that can be a place. You can go to even distract yourself for a little while if you're startling in some of the same things are true so you know. I was thinking about the old water and not making any decisions. The same is true for managing cravings that and the emotions that along with that that the same things apply so there's a there's steps there and there's video crisis lines age. There's a video there of how do you get through an overwhelming crisis and the steps for how to do that include goldwater water.

Barry Goldwater France jude Rita Herschel Times suze National Institutes Mental Hea Houghton American Foundation twenty thirty seconds thirty seconds five minutes ten minutes
"national institute mental health" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

10:40 min | 2 years ago

"national institute mental health" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Of it to help patients with PTSD part of what helps the process is that MD constraints in the bond between the therapist and the patient enhancing, feelings of trust, emotional openness, and empathy. We spoke to LIZA gross a contributor to the verge for look into how MD could possibly transform psychiatry and it's been around for a really long time since early. Nineteen hundreds when Merck's developed it in the course of training to draw to step leading. It was rediscovered by a chemist is named Alexander children, is known for testing hundreds of psychedelic compounds in and synthesizing them. And so he's rediscovered it. And when he tested he tested all on himself, and when he did tested, he's found such a mazing properties that it produce such a on going feeling of well-being. Is he describe? And just as feeling before and he realized that some of his friends who are psychotherapists might find this view. So in the late seventies, there was sort of an underground Qadri of tiny ring, like therapists, and psychiatrists tease did to treat people. And you would get these remarkable case studies. So just one person in one without a the study, but one person after another was finding that they were able to recover from horrible traumatic events. There was one woman who had suffered a brutal rape, and had a young, you know, young kids and family and she just couldn't function and her therapist was downing at that time in the late seventies decided to take try out with her. But this might have been the early eighties, but it was still Wiegel and she reported pretty quick response. I mean so it started this fast acting enduring response that patients have, and so there were a lot of case reports like that. But then it got banned. In nineteen eighty-five was making its way through the party scene while all of this stuff was happening. And it prompted onerous to pass legislation to ban. All this person emergency banded. It actually even made it onto Phil Donahue because there were these anecdotal reports stuff was really great. And then Donahue heard about it because there were all these bus because people were having too much fun in the club scenes today. It was banned. So then, the only research that could be done on it was in animals to sort of prove toxicity. That's what was happening for a long time and the purpose of this. Now, though psychiatrists are looking at this, obviously, they're trying to help people that have PTSD symptoms part of the problem with people that suffered from the it's hard to relive that trauma. So when you're doing a session with somebody, it's hard for them to open up. It's hard for them to relive it. And that's where they're at. I think the department of veterans affairs has said that the only way to treat PTSD is through psychotherapy and that takes time psychiatrist one to use MTA as giving them. Edge helping them supercharge that and open these empathetic pathways and let the person opened up to that they're pissed little bit more. Hopefully they can work through some of the issues. Is that overcome a trauma, that has disabled as sort of really can't go out in public because you have panic attacks it started as fighter flight response that makes sense at the moment that you're under attack? But that never goes away, and so that's really disabling in your daily life when you just basically going through normal eventually going shopping, or whatever you're not supposed to have that kind of response. And so the way to deal with that way to treat that is just make people relive that trauma, but magin is really, really hard. And so the reason that, that doesn't always work is because people just give up just can't take it. And so what India may seems to do is melt the walls of these defenses that you record, as a way to deal with your term, but it's not really helping to deal with the term because you can live normal life. It seems to just rake down as well. And then what the consensus right now seems to be that it then allows you to be more comfortable with yourself thinking about it, and then also have more trust with therapist therapist can help you really face that trauma, and look at it in a new way and recognize that it's no longer going to harm you talk about some of the health effects, and some of the stigma of using MD does increase heart rate, and blood pressure. But there's also been words that it make holes in your brain, which has not panned out, actually, there was a paper that was published at said, putting holes in the brains of mice that they were giving it to. But that ended up being a huge blunder in that paper that was written, everybody clubs and all that nationalist toot of drug abuse to be very intent on proving that this was a really dangerous drug. They were putting it in the same class, which is scheduled one it's heroin, and cocaine and mess and phetamine. They spend millions of dollars to giving to researchers who also seem to be intent on proving that it was problematic. And so what? Are these researchers name was dirge Cardi had also a lot of grants testing methamphetamine, whether intentionally or through some blunder, he gave his animals methamphetamine, instead of 'em DNA and animals? Died nuts, probably give him a huge amount of mess. They had really bad effects to bring. So he published that paper would understanding that it was India may that he'd given the animals. And when paper came out in a really high profile journal, by the way, people who are familiar with India may mmediately recognized that it couldn't possibly been may because it just couldn't produce this affects, but the damage was pretty lasting because that gave the drug officials amunition they were looking for to ban the drug. It's so comical, that something like that could lead to something that could have been potentially studied for so long now, we could have had a better understanding of it, and that one paper, a hold on that, so it took researchers almost twenty years to get these bands lifted to get federal permission to test MBA as an experimental therapy. The hope right now is that MD may could gain FDA approval for PTSD within two years, possibly tell us about some of the clinical trials that are going on. So the other studies that have been performed on this PTSD trouser are the most well known, and they are actually going into what's called phase, three clinical trials. So this is gonna go from just proving that this is a feasible thing to do what you do face to face. Three do it in hundreds of people in this is just starting recruiting people in three countries in Canada, the US in Israel fifteen sites. This will be hundreds of people. And so if that goes, well then yes, it could be approved by twenty twenty one and it's also been used in office, most studies for people with life. Threatening illnesses. So, basically, as you came really hard to be confronted with your own death, and it can be very traumatic for families. And this is really shown that it really reduces anxiety in these intense therapy sessions using this drug, and it's also been used in other studies, did for adults so adult to autism, but suffered from crippling social anxiety, it's helped him speak out how to be in social situations to qualify for the trial. You have to have had PTSD tried multiple other therapies that didn't work. So it's not just anybody can say, hey, I want to try this. I have the wanna try this out, but that second part that you just mentioned how they were trying it out with adults for social interactions. That's an interesting point too, because, as we're talking about how the drug does help break down some of these barriers, you know, everybody and totally knows. Oh, it makes kind of love everybody that was one of the other things that they were looking to for, because it helps breakdown that social awkwardness may be. And they were looking for other possibilities in that room. Let's why researchers are actually trying to end a probe in the brain to figure out how normal social behaviors mediated by the brain. It's the only one of these so called psychedelic drugs, that produces enhanced empathy and enhance Goodwill's towards self and other just call these pro social sex. This is really a remarkable thing. And so why they're hoping that they can figure out how that's happening in the brain is so they can maybe find other drugs, which is gonna be a big challenge. I think many people realize that acting a similar ways so that you don't have any of the risks that NDA has even know they're minimal, there are still risks so attitudes about MD may have been changing. What are people in the medical field psychiatric field? How are they reacting to resurgence interesting because I was actually at this dog science meeting in Oakland and twenty seventeen and Tom insult, he's to head the National Institute, mental health was very excited about this research. Search and you can't get more mainstream medicine and science than that, but he's really supports this idea of trying to really figure out how the brain works at the design drugs that have a more they call them rational drug design, so that you can have more targeted drugs that hopefully will be more effective, because most of the psychiatric drugs, we have today, just basically all the receptors in your brain, which is why they have so many terrible side effects. And so this is starting to actually it seems like more people are embracing it than the certainly than had even ten years ago because they're seeing the data from the trials that it's being affected even though it's in groups of people, but it's being affected and it's relatively safe. It's an interesting discussion because one of the quotes article this is where psychiatry meets anesthesia. It's this fast acting potent thing that can help kick off the process that would help people with PTSD symptoms. And there's a lot of stuff that needs to be looked into, you know, if they're taking other medications, you know, you might have to win them off of that to give them this stuff. So. It's interesting how this discussion is unfolding. And as we said this clinical trials that are happening right now face three, it's pretty far along in that process. I talked to so many people so many psychiatrists and people who've us Andy may and mall trials are really just hopeful that things goes flow e- enough. So it doesn't the same thing that happened before where in the seventies psychiatrists were just face remarkable results, and they just haven't seen anything like that again. And then that amazing magic drug was taken away from them. And that's the one concern that some of the psychiatrist I spoke with voiced that we just need to go. Slow we need to make sure that it's used in the proper setting with the properly trained people. And they're very excited about its potential to help people who have not been helped by anything else lies a gross independent journalist writing for the verge. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks so much for having me. You're listening to the daily dive weaken edition. I'm bluecross blueshield believes everyone should have access to healthcare, no matter who you are or where you live. That's why in every state are companies are working to improve health and expand access to care from training..

PTSD MD India Phil Donahue Merck Alexander bluecross blueshield methamphetamine rape Wiegel Goodwill magin dirge Cardi MTA Canada twenty twenty Oakland heroin
"national institute mental health" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

10:39 min | 2 years ago

"national institute mental health" Discussed on 600 WREC

"What helps the process is that MD can strengthen the bond between the therapist and the patient enhancing, feelings of trust, emotional openness, and empathy. We spoke to LIZA gross a contributor to the verge for look into how MDA could possibly transform psychiatry and it's been around for a really long time since early. Nineteen hundreds when Merck's developed it in the course of. Trying to develop a drug to stop leading. It was rediscovered by a chemist. His name is L exander shoulder is known for testing hundreds of psychedelic compounds and synthesizing them and so he's rediscovered it. And when he tested he tested all on himself, and when he did tested, he's phones, such a mazing properties that it produced such a ongoing feeling of well-being is way he described it and just as feeling of euphoria and you realize that some of his friends who are psychotherapists might find is of us. So in the late seventies, there was sort of an underground country of playing nearing like therapists, and psychiatrists used it to treat people, and you, you would get these remarkable case studies. So just one person in one without a controlled study, but one person after another was finding that they were able to recover from horrible traumatic events. There was one woman who had suffered a brew. Title rape, and had a young, you know, young kids and family. And she just couldn't function. And her therapist, isn't it was downing at that time in the late seventies decided to try this out with her, but this might have been the early eighties, but it was still Wiegel, and she reported pretty quick response. I mean so it started as fast acting enduring response that patients have, and so there were a lot of case reports like that. But then it got banned in nineteen eighty five. It was making its way through the party scene while all of this stuff was happening. And it prompted onerous to pass legislation to ban. All this person emergency ban. It actually even made it onto Phil Donahue because there were these anecdotal reports stuff was really great. And then Donahue heard about it because they're all these busts because people were having too much fun in the club sees so that it was banned. So then the only research they could be done on it was an animals to sort of prove toxicity. That's what was happening for a long time. And the purpose of this now. Now, though psychiatrists are looking at this, obviously, they're trying to help people that have PTSD symptoms part of the problem with people that suffered from PTSD. It's hard to relive that trauma. So when you're doing a session with somebody, it's hard for them to open up. It's hard for them to relive it. And that's where they're at the department of veterans affairs, has said that the only way to treat PTSD is through psychotherapy and that takes time psychiatrist one to use MD as giving them an edge helping them supercharge that and open these empathetic pathways and let the person opened up to the therapists a little bit more. Hopefully they can work through some of the issues. Is that overcome from that has disabled, he's sort of really can't go out in public because you have panic attacks? It's started. It's fight or flight response that makes sense at the moment that you're under attack. But then that never goes away. And so that's really disabling in your daily life when you just basically going through normal events like going shopping, or whatever you. You're not supposed to have that kind of response. And so the way to deal with the way to treat that is just make people relive that trauma, but as you can imagine is really, really hard. And so the reason that, that doesn't always work is because people just give up. They just can't take it. And so what MD amaze seems to do is melt the walls of these defenses that you've wrecked it as a way to deal with your trauma, but it's not really helping to deal with the trauma because you can't live a normal life. It seems to just rake down those walls, and then what the consensus right now seems to be that it then allows you to be more comfortable with yourself thinking about it, and then also have more trust with therapist, so the therapists can help you really face that trauma, and look at it in a new way and recognize that it's no longer going to harm you talk about some of the health effects, and some of the stigma of using MDA does increase heart rate, and blood pressure. But there's also been words that make holes in your brain, which. Has not panned out. Actually, there was a paper that was published that said, putting holes in the brains of mice that they were giving it to. But that ended up being a huge blunder in that paper that was written everybody in clubs and all that initially of drug abuse to be very intent on proving that this was a really dangerous drug. They were putting it in the same class, which is scheduled one is heroin, and cocaine and mess and phetamine. They spend millions of dollars to giving to researchers who also seem to be intent on proving that it was problematic. And so what are these researchers name was dirt? Riccardi had also a lot of grants testing methamphetamine, whether intentionally or through some blunders, he gave his animals methamphetamine, instead of 'em, DNA and animals died. That's probably when you give them a huge amount of mess. They had really bad affects the brain. So he published that paper with the understanding that it was MD may that he'd given the animals. And when paper came out in a really high. Oh, file journal, by the way, people who are familiar with India may mmediately recognized that it couldn't possibly been MD may because it just couldn't produce this affects, but the damage was pretty lasting because that gave the drug officials the ammunition they were looking for to ban the drug. It's so comical, something like that could lead to something that could have been potentially studied for so long now we could have had a better understanding of it. And that one paper, hold on that, so it took researchers almost twenty years to get these bans lifted to get federal permission to test MBNA, as an experimental therapy v hope right now is that India may could gain FDA approval for PT as within two years, possibly tell us about some of the clinical trials that are going on so many other studies that have been performed on this PTSD trials are the most well known, and they are actually going into what's called phase, three clinical trials. So this is gonna go from just proving that this is a feasible thing to do what you do face to face three do it in hundreds of people. And this is just starting recruiting people in three countries in Canada, the US and in Israel fifteen sites. This will be hundreds of people. And so if that goes, well then yes, it could be approved by twenty twenty one and it's also been used in office. Most study. For people with life threatening illnesses. So, basically, as you can imagine it really hard to be confronted with your own death, and it can be very traumatic for families. And this is really sure that it really reduces anxiety in these intense therapy sessions using this drug, and it's also been used another study used it for autistic adult so adults who have autism, but suffered from crippling social anxiety, it's helped him figure out how to be in social situations qualified for the trial. You have to have had PT as the tried multiple other therapies that didn't work. So it's not just anybody can say, hey, I want to try this. I have the wanna try this out, but that second part that you just mentioned how they were trying it out with autistic adults for social interactions. That's an interesting point too, because, as we're talking about how the drug does help break down some of these barriers, everybody and notably knows. Oh, it makes you of love everybody that was one of the other things that they were looking to NBA for, because it helps breakdown that social awkwardness may be. And they're looking for other possibilities. That row. Why researchers are actually trying to use MD I may as a probe in the brain to figure out how normal social behaviors mediated by the brain. It's the only one of these so called psychedelic drugs, that produces enhanced empathy and enhance Goodwill's towards self and others. Just call these pro social sex. This is really a remarkable thing. And so why they're hoping that they can figure out how that's happening in the brain is so they can maybe find other drugs, which is going to be a big challenge. I think many people realize that act in similar ways so that you don't have any of the risks that NDA has even know their minimal. There are still risks attitudes. About may have been changing. What are people in the medical field psychiatric field? How are they reacting to its resurgence? It's interesting because I was actually at this dog science meeting in Oakland in twenty seventeen and Tom insole. He's had the national institutes mental health. Was very excited about this research and you can't get more mainstream medicine and science than that, but he's really supports this idea of trying to really figure out how the brain works at the design drugs that have a more, they call them rational drug design, so that you can have more targeted drugs that hopefully will be more effective, because most of the psychiatric drugs, we have today, just basically hit all the receptors in your brain, which is why they have so many terrible side effects. And so this is starting to actually it seems like more people are embracing it than the certainly than had even ten years ago because they're seeing the data from the trials that it's being affected even though it's in groups of people, but it's being affected and it's relatively safe. It's an interesting discussion because one of the quotes article this is where psychiatry meats, and it's this fast acting potent thing that can help kick off the process that would help people with PTSD symptoms. And there's a lot of stuff that needs to be looked into, you know, if they're taking other medications. You know, you might have to win them off of that to give them this stuff. So it's interesting how this discussion is unfolding and as we said, this clinical trials that are happening right now phase three it's pretty far along in that process. I talked to so many people, so many psychiatrists and people who views India may, and we'll trials are really just hopeful that things go slowly enough. So it doesn't the same thing that happened before where in the seventies psychiatrists were just face remarkable results, and they just haven't seen anything like that again. And then that amazing magic drug was taken away from them. And that's the one concern that some of the psychiatrist I spoke with voiced that we just need to go slow we need to make sure that it's used in the proper setting with the properly trained people. And they're very excited about its potential to help people who have not been helped by anything else lies a gross independent journalist writing for the verge. Thank you very much for joining us. Thanks for having. Having. You're listening to the daily dive weakened addition. I'm Oscar Ramirez. We'll be right back with.

MD PTSD India Phil Donahue Merck MDA department of veterans affairs Oscar Ramirez rape methamphetamine Wiegel Oakland Goodwill NBA MBNA Riccardi FDA
"national institute mental health" Discussed on Here We Are

Here We Are

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"national institute mental health" Discussed on Here We Are

"Yes. Where are we here? Why are we here not entirely clear? We are misfits thrust into by random chance with no has less to post. It's. We. Hello everybody in volume to the here. We are podcast today. It is my pleasure to be at the Washington state university Vancouver talking with us so see a professor in the school of molecular biosciences, Dr Steve Sylvester joining me today. Steve thank you so much. You bet I have to say, I'm a hair intimidated for this one. You sent me, you know, I used to used to hide that when I started this podcast. I would go into interview. I be like what the heck am I even doing here? I have no business interviewing scientists, and then I would get on. And I would try to sound smart enough to act like I would belong in the room. I'm for years in I'm done hiding my. My insecurities from people as put them out. I have many gaps still in my knowledge that I'm trying to fill in. And I think you're going to really help me out today because we're going to be talking a little bit about stuff at the molecular level, we usually don't get down there quite scaled down that far and maybe bit a chemistry as well. Never talk about chemistry on the show. It's one of the ones that I didn't pay attention in school when I was in high school. I feel like I coulda got chemistry, but I've been paying attention. So it's not in there. I'll have to take some online courses or something at some point. And you sent me this list of this fantastic list of a zillion things that you do ranging from figuring out ground water contamination possibly leading testicular cancer to helping contamination with oil stors to maybe some genetic or molecular kind of cause of home. Homosexuality. Who who knows you have all sorts of so many things that we could talk about we might even do another. Who knows I live in the in the area? Maybe we'll do another episode sometime if we really get into something. But but you have were were meeting. I'm kinda just getting started in in a real scientific pursuit with my life. I've been I've been taking science I've always had a pretty a passive but interest in science, and I've been taking it pretty seriously for the last seven years or so and then especially with this podcast. I started four years ago that that much more seriously. And now here you are having a conversation. You're nearing retirement. On your way out. You've you've lived a Cording to everything that you've researched. You've you clearly lived a long interesting life and have an interesting history within academia Caen, just it's been fun. Can you get up to speed a little bit also tells a little bit about your life? I so I started school college as a chemistry major because it was hard for most people, but I seem to be able to do it. And as I got closer to graduation. I was taking courses in psychology. And I found the human mind fascinating. So I stayed another year and got a degree in physiological psychology along with my chemistry degree, and then president Nixon changed my life. He cut funding to the national institutes to mental health and the program that I was seeking which would be the molecular basis of behavior. We didn't call it that back then we called it neuropharmacology or something. I had to make a change. So I was very fortunate. I tell young people that I speak to frequently that chance favors the prepared mind, and I had some chances because I was prepared as a chemist insect collagen that made me kinda unique, and I got the opportunity to learn experimental neuro surgery and. So I applied for graduate school and the advice. They gave us was apply for what you want and apply for what you know, you can get and I was recruited by a chemist biochemist. And after I applied that's when the cuts to the national institutes mental health came along. And so I didn't get into any of those programs, but I got into a biochemistry program at university of Dayton a master's degree. I didn't know anything about the university of Dayton turned out. It was Marinus to figure out. What that was. What is it was Marian? Est. It's a Catholic school. Oh, okay. Yeah. I didn't know that. And I was raised Catholic and Protestant. But love the brothers got to know him and and appreciated what they do. So I went in I walked into the Biochemists, and he was

Dr Steve Sylvester university of Dayton president Nixon testicular cancer Washington state university Va Catholic school academia Caen Cording professor Marian seven years four years
"national institute mental health" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"national institute mental health" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"His room and we've been shown zero footage of em carrying anything through the hotel let's just flat out bazaar why there have been multiple reports of possible accomplice accomplices but we've not been shown a photo or video footage of him in the hotel lobby hotelcasino has more cameras than a federal prison the truth is is this attack should be the most well documented crime in history but for some reason we're not seeing the footage and that just needs to be addressed and the footage needs to be released because what's going to happen is more conspiracy theories are going to be coming out this is enabling people from isis to alex jones to come up with their own claims for what drove paddock to commit his crime how do we not know what his motive was how do we not know every single detail that happened at least in the casino despite what we don't know there is no question that this man was deeply disturbed since the early nineties the number of people treated for depression has tripled in america the number of people on antipsychotic medicine medication is greater than that a survey by the national institute mental health found that an astonishing forty six percent has at least one kind of mental illness forty six percent from two thousand to two thousand ten the suicide rate among americans 35 to 64 increased thirty percent for men in steven paddocks age range that number goes up by 50 percent out of every one hundred thousand men in the fifties and sixties thirty we'll kill themselves.

hotelcasino alex jones america national institute forty six percent thirty percent 50 percent
"national institute mental health" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"national institute mental health" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"For information called the national instituted mental health at one eight six six six one five and i mean with that for black suspects are facing hate crime another charges in connection with the beating of a mentally disabled why commanded streamed on facebook lives the assault when on for up to today's until chicago police found a victim in distress walking along the st the for people charge to women to man to be heard on the video using profanities against white people and president elect donald trump detective kevin duffy says both race and the eighteen year old victims mental state played into the hate crimes charge it's half a dozen won six of the other nick gael chicago convicted charleston church shooter dylan rios handwritten jail house diary was read to jurors today as prosecutors earlier said it's stated roof did not regret his actions speaker paul ryan says republicans would cut federal money for planned parenthood as part of their repeal of obama care he associated press says veteran action nationally would result in roughly four hundred thousand women losing access to hear and i would who's that thinking about life insurance what if you could make one free phone call and learn your best price from nearly a dozen highly rated price competitive companies well that's exactly what happens when you call select quote life for example george is forty he was getting sky high quotes from other companies because he takes meds to control his blood pressure but when i shopped around i found him a ten year five hundred thousand dollar.

facebook assault president kevin duffy chicago dylan rios paul ryan life insurance george blood pressure donald trump nick gael obama five hundred thousand dollar eighteen year ten year