19 Burst results for "National Housing Law Project"

"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:07 min | 4 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Com Your first California report on the way very soon. Former speaker of the House. John Boehner joins us on the next Commonwealth Club of California radio program here. The former Ohio congressman's candid take on his experiences and lessons from 25 years in Congress. Tonight at eight. P.m. on KQED morning Low clouds some of that patchy fog along the coast and bay, all giving way to sunny skies later today, windy along the coast and also the higher elevations. Today, Bay Area highs low sixties upper seventies to the eighties inland today. Good morning. It's 5 51. This is the California report. Good morning. I'm Lily Jamali. After waiting months for an update on their unemployment claims nearly a million out of work, Californians will likely have to wait through even more red tape to access their benefits. California reports Mary Franklin Harvin has more this week Et de confirmed it's disqualified more than 900,000 applications. The claims are part of the more than 1.4 Million. The agency froze late last year in an attempt to tamp down on fraud. In many of these cases, a DD was waiting for applicants to provide identity verification documents. Process that's supposed to be mostly digital. But people are often forced to resort to Edie's dreaded Cole Center's issues with your unemployment insurance payment. Press four. Your call cannot be completed at this time. Please try your call again later. And if you are lucky enough to get through, it takes about 4 to 6. Weeks for E. T. T T even review the documents submitted in response Idea verification. Daniella Urban, executive director of the Center for Workers, Rights, says it's a process often it takes the second sending They get a re determination, which they then appeal. Then they wait. 14 weeks have see why be hearing. Then they wait for that decision another two weeks then it's another couple of weeks before DVD implements that decision. And pays back benefits that see you II be she mentioned. That's where you go when you want to appeal a disqualification at the beginning of the year, many appeals were from people like these more than 900,000, who are missing identity paperwork. But of those nearly 90% won their appeals, meaning the people a d d disqualified from that group. They were eligible all along. For the California report. I'm Mary Franklin Harvin, a federal judge struck down the CDC is nationwide eviction moratorium yesterday, a decision the Justice Department is appealing. The ruling could have major ramifications for millions of 10 and struggling to pay rent during the pandemic. But it's KQED is Molly Solomon Reports. It doesn't directly impact California renters. California has a statewide moratorium that prevents anyone with a pandemic related hardship. From being evicted for non payment of rent. Some local cities and counties like Oakland and San Francisco go even further. We're nearly all addictions are on hold unless there's a health and safety risk, or if the landlord pulls the rental off the market. Famous roller is the executive director of the National Housing Law Project, so it has no impact on either state or local addiction moratoriums in California. Those remain. And are no less legally sound because of this ruling, But those protections do have an expiration date. They're set to sunset at the end of June for the California report. I'm Molly Solomon in San Diego This week, the county Board of Supervisors approved an extension of a temporary moratorium. Which would prohibit residential evictions without just cause. The moratorium will expire 60 days after the state lifts All cove in 19 related stay at home orders, which for now is set to happen on June 15th. Ordinance would also limit the ability of landlords to increase rent rent won't be completely forgiven for those behind on payments, landlords will be able to recoup 80% through a state Emergency rental assistance program. Supervisor Nora Vargas introduced the measure at this week. San Diego supervisors meeting. A lot of people are still struggling, but put on the table and keep a roof over their head. And when we find ourselves on the road to recovery, and many families in our community are still struggling when the impact created by the current health crisis well, many residents spoke up in support of the measure at the board meeting. Landlords and property owners expressed their disapproval, saying it was counterproductive and would harm them. Even Maura's. They've struggled during the pandemic. Turning to state politics, reality TV celebrity Caitlyn Jenner caused a media frenzy when she jumped into the California governor's race two weeks ago. Last night, the transgender activists sat down for an interview on Fox News. Take you Ladies Politics Editor Scott Shaffer has that the Sean Hannity show on Fox is a friendly platform for conservative Republicans like Jenner, who supported President Donald Trump. General said she disagreed with Trump on some things like transgender rights, but she supported Trump's border wall. I am for securing this state. I am pro Law enforcement I pro border protection. Okay, eyes, pro eyes. We need these people, and they do a wonderful job on a wide range of issues, including water policing and the pandemic. Jenner offered mostly anecdotes and generalities, and Hannity didn't press for many specifics. Asked a great governor Gavin Newsom's management of the state. She said he was too beholden to special interests. I have common sense. Okay, I see what's going on, and I see no common sense of politics. And why they're doing it. Besides only for political reasons, Jenner describes herself as a compassionate disruptor, someone who will challenge the status quo. Asked about an earlier comment that she couldn't have run for governor before transitioning to a woman. Jenner gave a heartfelt answer. I'm just trying to be myself and I could be myself now. I couldn't do it before because I have too many secrets. I have no secrets anymore. And I just wake up and be myself all day. But I still feel like I'm doing the right thing. And that's the most important thing. Despite generous high name identification, she'll have to convince many voters that she has what it takes. To govern a state with more than 40 million people during a pandemic for the California report, I'm Scott Shaffer. Much of the focus of the recall effort has been focused squarely on Governor Newsome's response to the pandemic. His loudest critics say he had too much power. The pandemic hit the state. The legislature gave Newsome broad authority to make unilateral decisions for the state. The governor issued several executive orders, including setting rules for last year's election to Republican Assemblyman sued, saying Governor Newsome had overstepped after a lower court ruled against Newsome last year, a Sacramento based appeals court ruled yesterday. The governor did not overstepped his authority because the Legislature can always bring his emergency powers to.

Caitlyn Jenner John Boehner Daniella Urban Lily Jamali Mary Franklin Harvin Trump Jenner San Diego June 15th 80% Oakland San Francisco Bay Area 14 weeks Gavin Newsom Center for Workers, Rights 25 years Sacramento Scott Shaffer Nora Vargas
"national housing law project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:04 min | 4 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the next all of it. The BAFTA nominated film Limbo tells the story of a Syrian refugee named Omar, who finds herself stuck in a small town on a remote Scottish island. I'll speak with writer and director Ben Scherick plus Allison Beck Oh, on her new graphic memoir, the secret to superhuman strength about her lifelong obsession with exercise. Units, all of it weekdays at noon on W N. Y C. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Noel King and I'm Steve Inskeep. President Biden's administration says it wants vaccine makers to share what they know that's right. The administration says it supports what's called a waiver for intellectual property rights on vaccines. That waiver has to come from the World Trade Organization. This is an effort to speed up vaccinations around the world, especially in really hard hit countries like India. Now pharmaceutical companies are resisting, saying this will not work like it's expected to NPR as a pharmaceuticals correspondent. Sidney Lumpkin, who's on the line. Good morning. Good morning. How is this waiver supposed to work? So this is a proposed waiver of parts of a 1995 global intellectual property agreement through the World Trade Organization. There are a few things in there. But the most important thing is that it would allow other countries to jump in on the vaccine patents, allowing them to start making vaccines on their own without waiting for companies like Fizer and Johnson and Johnson to supply them. Here's James Love, director of Knowledge Ecology International, a nonprofit public interest group that supports the waiver. If you look at the sequence of things that have to happen again, scaling up manufacturing First for a company insist they have to make it. Is it legal for me to do this thing? Um, I'm gonna go to jail and I'm gonna be it was a big infringement claim. So countries could bypass the exclusive rights of the patents, maybe with a royalty payment of some kind and other countries really are struggling. While about a third of the U. S population is now fully vaccinated in India. That number is only 2%. So overall, this would remove a barrier for them. Yeah, and India, of course, has huge manufacturing capacity. If they can get it, scaled up and get the things directed to themselves, But With the with the patents be the only barrier here. No vaccines are made from living cells, so they're really complicated to make much more complicated than, say generic drugs. So patent sharing doesn't solve the issue of having factories with the right manufacturing capabilities. For instance, companies also need trained workers, raw ingredients, equipment supplies and know how And in the United States, where companies had the patents because they belong to them to begin with. They ran into these issues. So I spoke with John Grabenstein, a former Merc executive who now works at the end there Immunization Action Coalition. Here's how he explained it to me. When you have a cookbook, it doesn't count necessarily the way the originator wrote the recipe, so waving the patents won't be a magic wand, he says. Nevertheless, this is an effort to hand over the recipe, which is one step. Why would vaccine makers resist? Yeah, This is basically the opposite of what they hoped for. And the pharmaceutical industry has come out and strong Opposition Pharma, The industry trade group, says the Biden administration support for the waiver undermines the pandemic response. They say it will wreak it weaken, already strained supply chains. There's also the argument that this could have repercussions for innovation. Remember the companies like Fizer and Madonna? Researched and developed these vaccines in record time. It usually takes 5 to 10 years and they did it in a few months. And for that effort, some say they should be able to hang on to their intellectual property and you don't make a profit. So, of course, the companies that you know had help and money from the United States, government and others and we're in the middle of a global health crisis and it's far from over. I do have to ask also, aren't we talking here? Other countries? Filling a demand that companies like Johnson and Johnson can't fill at the moment. They can't make enough vaccine, So it's not like they're losing money now. Is that correct? You know, they do view the intellectual property as a competitive advantage. And, you know, they think it could hurt them in the long run. So so, um So So, yeah, I mean, it's it's something that they are able to do right now. Okay, Sydney. Thanks so much. Thank you. NPR's sitting often. Uh huh. At some point, people who fell behind on the rent during the pandemic will have to pay. A court ruling yesterday came close to saying the bill is due now, you might remember the CDC imposed a moratorium on evictions because you cannot isolate at home. If you don't have a home yesterday, a judge overturned that moratorium. But then she restored it temporarily to allow for an appeal. NPR's Chris Arnold is reporting on a case that could affect millions of people. Chris Good morning, they good morning, Steve. What is the legal arguments here? Well. The case was brought by the Alabama Association of Realtors, and they were basically arguing that look that the CDC doesn't have the power to tell landlords that they can't evict their tenants if they want to, even in the middle of the worst pandemic in 100 years. And the judge agreed the judges Dabney Friedrich, She was appointed by the tribe ministrations and CDC that the CDC does, though it's clear that the CDC has the ability Order certain things to prevent the spread of disease, especially in times like this, But the judge that here the CDC overreached. There have been conflicting decisions. Other judges have come to other conclusions with the bottom line and all this is that this Decision or this ruling goes far beyond any of the others, and on its face. It would strike down this eviction moratorium nationwide. But there's a bottom line below the bottom line, a sort of bottom bottom line that the judge held off imposing her own ruling. Why Yeah, this this is getting into the weeds and the main reason that the judge did that appears to be that the Department of Justice immediately appealed this case on behalf of the CDC. Talkto shameless roller about this. He's a lawyer, he heads up the National Housing Law Project. The underlying ruling in this case is pretty weak, in my opinion, because Congress In December extended the CDC order so curly Congress thinks that the CDC has this authority. And as you said, we found out late last night that the judge has agreed to put her ruling on hold for at least a week where we're not exactly clear s. Oh, there's not gonna be an immediate effect, but The judge stressed that she is standing behind her ruling. And Waller says, Look, we just don't know how this appeals process is going to play out. And he says it's true that the CDC order was issued. During the Trump administration. But Trump appointed a lot of conservative federal judges and roller suspects that they, too would could be likely to rule against the CDC exerting its power in this way, telling landlords you can't evict tenants. And he says, You know all this is going to be decided by a panel of just three judges, so the outcome of that'll affect so many people is going to depend greatly on which three judges get selected. One of the landlord saying. Well. Housing groups are are worried the landlord, so they're not really celebrating that this but they're saying Look that the economy is picking up and they want things to get back to normal, and they want to have control over their properties again. They've got bills to pay. And in a statement, the Realtor Group said, Look, you know what we need to be focusing on emergency rental assistance to tenants and So landlords don't have to a victim. NPR's Chris Arnold. Thanks for the update, really Appreciate it. Thanks, Steve. Mm hmm..

Allison Beck John Grabenstein Steve Inskeep Chris Arnold Sidney Lumpkin Noel King World Trade Organization James Love Steve Ben Scherick Dabney Friedrich Fizer 5 Chris Congress yesterday Omar Alabama Association of Realtor Waller December
"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:57 min | 7 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

"If we allow it, But first this news Life from NPR News. I'm Janine Herbst. The Senate has voted not to convince former President Donald Trump of inciting the insurrection of the U. S. Capitol on January 6th. NPR's Brian Naylor reports. The vote was 57 to 43 today, short of the two thirds majority needed to convict Trump. Seven Republicans voted with all 50 Democrats in favor of the article of impeachment, but it was still short of the 67 votes needed to convict Trump. Vote came after a five day trial. Lead. House manager Jamie Raskin, a Maryland Democrat, argued Trump was worse than those who stormed the capital. He named the date he named the time And he brought them here and now he must pay the price. But Trump Attorney Michael Vander Gene called the impeachment the result of a vendetta by Democrats. This impeachment has been a complete charade from beginning to end, Trump issued a statement calling the impeachment another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our country. Brian Naylor. NPR NEWS The Biden administration has forced to Georgia to pause plans to limit the expansion of Medicaid in the state. Sam Whitehead of member station W Baby reports. Georgia wants to include a work requirement. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services says it's considering whether to withdraw a previous approval of George's plan issued by the Trump administration. State wants to expand Medicaid health coverage to some low income Georgians who work volunteer or job train for 80 hours a month. But the bite administration says that requirement has become infeasible because of the cove in 19 pandemic, and that it doesn't meet the objectives of the public insurance program for low income individuals. A spokesman for Governor Brian Kemp, who spearheaded the state's plan, says his office is reviewing the administration's concerns. For NPR News. I'm Sam Whitehead in Atlanta. Some landlords are evicting renters during the pandemic, despite an order from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention aimed at stopping evictions to limit the spread of covert 19. As NPR's Chris Arnold reports, housing rights groups are pushing the administration to beef up the protections. Studies have found that evictions can lead to Mork over deaths because people end up forced into more crowded living situations with a catch and spread the coronavirus, a CDC orders supposed to stop evictions for people who have no other good housing options. But critics say it is loopholes and landlords can too easily get around it. So the simplest way to fix this this to just have a universal eviction band right now. Which means that all the people who need our protected shame is roller is with the National Housing Law Project. He says. A strong eviction band should be coupled with rental assistance money. Congress has approved billions of dollars for that. And he says more is needed so landlords can get paid without evicting people. Chris Arnold NPR NEWS This is NPR news. From KQED News. I'm Kate Wolf. The state has passed a plan to distribute the $2.6 billion from the federal government to pay off rent debt. However, some advocates are worried that California's most vulnerable tenants who most need rent relief will be left out. Securities housing reporter Molly Solomon joins me now Somali. The issue here is that landlords have to apply for the rent belief, and that raises a lot of questions for people living in nontraditional housing situations. Yeah, that's right, Kate. So you know, if you're a tenant, and your limo doesn't apply for this, you're still in hope to pay for the majority of that rent dead. So what people are really concerned about here is that there are so many tenants who live in the Bay Area who are actually not living in these traditional landlord least situations. Maybe they're renting a room there in an illegally converted garage or some people or even just renting a bed. I think advocates are worried that those people will be left out of this program and will have to pay for that rent eventually. So seeing the Clara County passed resolution this week to Dole out some of this money to nonprofits already working with these communities. How is that gonna help? Yeah. Nonprofits and Santa Clara County have really done a lot of work distributing over $30 million so far to over 14,000 households in the Valley since the start of the pandemic and what they found when they looked at who they were giving money to was that 40% of the people that they helped are in nontraditional leases. So these were really people living on the edge. They are vulnerable to losing their housing. Ah, lot of them are undocumented, or, you know they've lost work, and some of them might have a negative relationship with their landlord because they already owe thousands of dollars in background. So what's in it, Clara County has said, is that they want to continue to use the money that's been earmarked for them to get rent and other aid to those especially vulnerable renters. Now it's.

Chris Arnold Janine Herbst Brian Naylor Molly Solomon Trump Kate Wolf $2.6 billion Atlanta Centers for Disease Control an Congress George 57 Kate 40% January 6th Jamie Raskin Sam Whitehead 67 votes NPR five day
"national housing law project" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 7 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KCRW

"Learn more at SMC Daddy to you. Coming up news headlines from NPR and then more music on the other side from NPR News. I'm Janine Herbst. The Senate has voted not to convict former President Donald Trump of inciting the insurrection with US capital on January 6th. NPR's Brian Naylor reports. The vote was 57 to 43 today, short of the two thirds majority needed to convict Trump. Seven Republicans voted with all 50 Democrats in favor of the article of impeachment, but it was still short of the 67 votes needed to convict Trump. Vote came after a five day trial. Lead. House manager Jamie Raskin, a Maryland Democrat, argued Trump was worse than those who stormed the capital. He named the date he named the time And he brought them here, and now he must pay the price. But Trump Attorney Michael Vander Wien called the impeachment the result of a vendetta by Democrats. This impeachment has been a complete charade from beginning to end, Trump issued a statement calling the impeachment another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our country. Brian Naylor. NPR news Biden administration has forced to Georgia to pause plans to limit the expansion of Medicaid in the state. Sam Whitehead of member station W Baby reports. Georgia wants to include a work requirement. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services says it's considering whether to withdraw a previous approval of George's plan issued by the Trump administration. State wants to expand Medicaid health coverage to some low income Georgians who work volunteer or job train for 80 hours a month. But the bite administration says that requirement has become infeasible because of the cove in 19 pandemic, and that it doesn't meet the objectives of the public insurance program for low income individuals. A spokesman for Governor Brian Kemp, who spearheaded the state's plan. Says his office is reviewing the administration's concerns. For NPR News. I'm Sam Whitehead in Atlanta. Some landlords are evicting renters during the pandemic, despite an order from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention aimed at stopping evictions to limit the spread of covert 19. As NPR's Chris Arnold reports, housing rights groups are pushing the administration to beef up the protections. Studies have found that evictions can lead to Mork over deaths because people end up forced into more crowded living situations where they catch and spread the coronavirus. A CDC orders supposed to stop evictions for people who have no other good housing options. But critics say it is loopholes and landlords can too easily get around it. So the simplest way to fix this is to just have a universal eviction band right now. Which means that all the people who need it are protected. Shame is roller is with the National Housing Law Project, he says. A strong eviction band should be coupled with rental assistance money. Congress has approved billions of dollars for that, and he says more is needed so landlords can get paid without evicting people..

Janine Herbst Brian Naylor Trump Chris Arnold January 6th Congress Jamie Raskin Atlanta NPR Sam Whitehead 57 67 votes Centers for Disease Control an George 43 NPR News today SMC Senate Centers for Medicare and Medic
"national housing law project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:44 min | 7 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's been two months since vaccination began about 15% of Americans have received at least one dose of vaccine. You can Noguchi NPR news. Some landlords are evicting renters during the pandemic, despite an order from the CDC aimed at stopping addictions to limit the spread of covert 19. NPR's Chris Arnold reports, housing rights groups are pushing the administration to beef up the protections. Studies have found that evictions can lead to Mork over deaths because people end up forced into more crowded living situations with a catch and spread the coronavirus, a CDC orders supposed to stop evictions for people who have no other good housing options. But critics say it is loopholes and landlords can too easily get around it. So the simplest way to fix this is to just have a universal eviction band right now. Which means that all the people who need it are protected. Shame is roller is with the National Housing Law Project, he says. A strong eviction band should be coupled with rental assistance money. Congress has approved billions of dollars for that, and he says more is needed so landlords can get paid without evicting people. Chris Arnold NPR news and you're listening to NPR news. You're listening to W n Y C Good evening on my own, Levinson. For homeless people were stabbed in the course of a 24 hour period on the same subway line of the 42 died from their injuries. The two murders happened on either end of the day Line, one in Far Rockaway, Queens, and another and in one Manhattan. In response, the NYPD will deploy an additional 500 officers on the trains. York City, Interim president Sarah Feinberg says the most wrote the recent horrifying attacks demonstrate that these officers are a strong step forward, but more must be done. We continue to face an acute mental health crisis that has been exacerbated by the pandemic, and we need additional dedicated resource is to adjust address this challenge. Single male suspect is wanted in both cases. Mayor de Blasio announced a two vaccination sites will open it. Retirement communities in Coney Island in Upper Manhattan next week In a new effort to reach homebound seniors. De Blasio says residents had war boss cares for seniors and Morningside retirement and health services will be the first among the many to receive these services. There's a lot of seniors who can't get here. They can't get to Community center there, homebound. There's a lot of our loved ones. Our elders who can't leave their apartment they need help to part of the plan includes vaccinating 25,000 home health aides, many of whom care for elderly New Yorkers. Mayor noted that if the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is authorized medical personnel will be sent to homes to vaccinate individuals. We do have a winter weather advisory.

Chris Arnold NYPD Coney Island Levinson Congress De Blasio Far Rockaway Johnson and Johnson CDC Manhattan 24 hour first Upper Manhattan two months two murders next week 42 500 officers National Housing Law Project one
"national housing law project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:23 min | 7 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I need to buy food. In November, her landlord's son Lake Apartments of filed an eviction case against her, Albert says she's got nowhere else to go is all our families in Puerto Rico. It's a family is like the Amber. It's that the CDC order is supposed to help and Amber. It says she followed the rules. In a court filing. She said she gave the required paperwork from the CDC to her landlord. And I thought, OK, so I'm okay. I'm good. You're also supposed to try to make partial rent payments. She did that too. She told the court. You're supposed to try to get rental assistance money to pay the landlord and she did that $4515 and laid that out in a court filing, too. But none of that seemed to matter. The landlord pressed ahead with the case, and she ended up getting an email from the court, saying that it was giving the landlord the green light to go ahead and evict her family. I saw that email coming in, and I was like here shaking, trying to process trying tol old my emotions because I try to do my best and then show him oceans. In a statement, The landlord tells NPR that evictions are a last resort, and that quote we turn to the courts for cases where eviction is legal and warranted by the facts. After NPR contacted a local legal aid group to ask if the landlord was following the CDC rules, a lawyer with the group ended up taking her case. If I could have an angel client for this matter, she is it because she's done everything that's it. Breezy hex with Community legal services of mid Florida she filed in a murder. Agency motion to stop the infection and says in a hearing she helped Amber to show the judge that she had checked all the necessary boxes to be protected from eviction. She also was able to testify to the judge. That before the pandemic, she was never laid on her rent. The judge put the eviction on hold for now. But most people facing eviction don't have a breezy hicks or any lawyer, so landlords. In some cases they're just pretending that they didn't receive the declaration and moving forward with the eviction process. Shame is roller is the executive director of the nonprofit National Housing Law Project. He says the CDC order should be strengthened it to be a blanket eviction ban. Wait is now, he says. There's just too many requirements and loopholes, man. If it any step in the process, the renter fails to show up at the hearing or join a hearing zoom call. The landlord is often able to evict them conviction courts or conveyor belts. And so the loopholes in the CDC order mean that many people are being evicted who should be protected under the order? In the case of Shell Amber, the landlord is now arguing in a court filing that the CDC order should not apply it, says the amber. It's have quote made no effort at all to follow the requirements under the CDC declaration, Amber, it says. That's just not true. For example, she told the court she got that rental assistance, thousands of dollars paid to her landlord. The lawyer in the case for some, like apartments, declined to comment on ongoing litigation. Shameless roller says he can't be certain what's happening with this case, But if you are Misrepresenting the fax in a case in court documents. It seems very clear to me that that is a violation of the CDC order, ruler says on paper. There are stiff penalties for landlords who violate the order finds of hundreds of thousands of dollars, even jail time. But the problem is, is that there's been zero enforcement. There's no consequences for that, in practice in a statement, son like apartment, says quote sunlight has followed the law and exhausted every measure possible short of evicting the family. Meanwhile, Sheila Amber has found another job scheduling people for covert vaccinations, so she actually has money to start paying rent again. But the landlord is still trying to a victor, and that's making it very hard for her to find another apartment. She says. She just talked to another landlord. I was framed to find a place. I want to look at it. You know she was nice and she said, I don't look at credit. I don't look at this. I don't look at that. I look at affections and then he hit me. The public records. It's there. I feel like there's no options. So Amber. It's applying to a new rental assistance find and working to make money, and she desperately hopes her landlord will work out a repayment plan that she can afford.

Sheila Amber CDC Amber Lake Apartments NPR Puerto Rico Albert executive director Florida murder National Housing Law Project
"national housing law project" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:20 min | 9 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Nation's struggling renters will be getting some help in the new year, but housing advocates say it's only the beginning of what is needed. The covert relief bill coming out of Washington includes $25 Billion in rental assistance Shameless roller, the executive director of the National Housing Law Project, told CBS News has $25 million. We estimate that there is between 50 and $70 billion in background. That's likely to increase over the next couple of months. So it's not going to fix the problem by any means. We really think of it as a down payment. And Jim Tobin, the chief lobbyist for the National Association of Homebuilders, used similar language in an N H B podcast $25 million down payment in my mind from the federal government. They will flow from the Treasure Department through states and then be distributed directly to landlords. We got a lot of what we had wanted in this rental assistance program. I think it's gonna be a real boon for the industry, the Legislature Can also extends the federal eviction moratorium through at least January 31st, although housing advocates say the moratorium still has too many loopholes that permit many evictions to continue separately, the FAA J has extended its foreclosure and eviction moratoria through February. Both had been scheduled to expire at the end of December. November, sales of newly built single family homes fell more than analysts had expected. The government reports that sales were down 11% compared to October to a seasonally adjusted annual pace of 841,000 units. Still on a year over year basis, New Home sales were up 20.8% Mortgage delinquencies fell for the sixth month in a row in November. The national delinquency rate is now 6.3% down from 6.4 in October, according to figures from Black Knight. The company's director of market research, and the Walden said in the housing wire podcast that the current numbers four tell Maura Difficult times ahead. We're still seeing very elevated levels of overall mortgage delinquencies. We could be looking at elevated levels of mortgage delinquencies not only all the way through 2021 but into 2022 as well. Walden says The majority of those behind on their mortgages are in some kind of four parents plan. But he also says that could be as many as two million forbearance is that are still active when the first of them begin to expire next spring. Coming up in half an hour. How remote working inspired a lot of people.

Walden National Housing Law Project National Association of Homebu CBS News executive director Washington Jim Tobin Treasure Department FAA Black Knight Legislature director Maura
"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:30 min | 10 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Bupkis from Congress on a deal for a relief package. And at the risk of repeating myself again. If Congress continues to not do anything this economy could get a whole lot worse. Tens of millions of people are unemployed as we know Small and medium business is hanging on by their fingernails and local eviction moratoriums winding down all over the country. The federal one from the Centers for Disease Control ends on New Year's Eve. According to the Census Bureau, about 33% of American adults are at risk of eviction or foreclosure, and for millions of people rental debt is piling up marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has more on that one. Paying rent used to be no big deal for 65 year old grass yellow weighed in Chicago. She's retired and on a fixed income but was getting help with bills from her granddaughter and her granddaughters. Then girlfriend Then the pandemic hit with my girls movie their jobs as me not being able to keep up with everything just makes it worse. Wade hasn't paid rent since July and is now $3500 behind and at risk of addiction, just like about 14 million other households. Says Emily Ben for who leads the American Bar Association's task force on Cove. In 19 related evictions. The mere fact of filing actually plummets credit scores, and it precludes people from seeking a mortgage in the future or a car title or even seeking employment. Plus even after someone is evicted. The debt stays with them. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia estimates more than a million households over $5000 in rent. We will see the impacts of debt owed by renters across this country. For years to come. Deborah Throat his deputy director at the National Housing Law Project, It's going to absolutely slow the economic recovery. And we know that there are millions of people at risk of eviction prior to the band Emmick and that number has on Lee grown Throat says of Congress does pass more covert legislation It needs to address the estimated tens of billions of dollars in past to rent in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. This program today is being brought to you pretty much the same way. It's been brought to you since mid March. 3 people to audio engineers and yours truly. In about 20,000 Square feet of really, really empty office space. And then a couple of dozen more people working from home. And if the latest report from Pew is any indicator, it might stay that way for a while, nearly 90% of people yes, 90% of people who've been able to work from home, a Pew says, have no desire to go back to the office full time once it's safe to do so. Marketplaces. Samantha Fields has more on what that might portend. Jonathan soon is in that majority of people who would very much like to keep working from home. Permanently home. I have a window by where I worked like an opening to get fresh air. Just look out the window. There are no windows in the I T department, where he works at a university in Southern California. He likes how quiet it is at home and not having to commute. You. Research found that more than half of people whose jobs have allowed them to work from home during Cove. It want to keep doing it all or most of the time. Another third say they'd like to at least some of the time that's creating a lot of conversation about how we're going to operate in summer 2021. Justin Draeger runs a nonprofit in D. C with about 45 people on staff, and nearly all of them now say they want to be able to divide their time between home and the office and Draeger's. Okay with that this idea of being in the office five days a week. I think is a bygone era for companies that have successfully moved to tell a work and a lot have Kate Lister with Global Workplace Analytics, says the company's she's talking to in tech law, banking and insurance are planning to keep doing it. After the pandemic ends. We've reached the tipping point whether it's enough companies that are going to be offering it That if you're a company that doesn't offer it or allow it. You're simply not going to be able to hold on to your people or attract the best talent that will be a welcome shift for people in industries were working from home is possible. But they're generally the Americans who are in the most for.

Kimberly Adams Congress Jonathan Deborah Throat Centers for Disease Control Justin Draeger Kate Lister Census Bureau Federal Reserve Bank American Bar Association Emily Ben Wade Chicago deputy director Samantha Fields Global Workplace Analytics Washington National Housing Law Project
"national housing law project" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:30 min | 10 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"From Congress on a deal for a relief package. And at the risk of repeating myself again. If Congress continues to not do anything this economy could get a whole lot worse. Tens of millions of people are unemployed as we know Small and medium business is hanging on by their fingernails and local eviction moratoriums winding down all over the country. The federal one from the Centers for Disease Control ends on New Year's Eve. According to the Census Bureau, about 33% of American adults are at risk of eviction or foreclosure, and for millions of people rental debt is piling up marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has more on that one. Paying rent used to be no big deal for a 65 year old grass yellow weighed in Chicago. She's retired and on a fixed income but was getting help with bills from her granddaughter and her granddaughters. Then girlfriend Then the pandemic hit with my girls movie their jobs. Had lied. Not being able to keep up with everything just makes it worse. Wade hasn't paid rent since July and is now $3500 behind and at risk of eviction. Just like about 14 million other households, says Emily Ben for who leads the American Bar Association's task Force on Cove. In 19 related evictions. The mere fact of filing actually plummets credit scores, and it precludes people from seeking a mortgage in the future or a car title or even seeking employment. Plus, even after someone is evicted, the debt stays with them. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia estimates more than a million households over $5000 in rent. We will see the impact of debt owed by renters across this country for years to come. Deborah Throat is deputy director at the National Housing Law Project. It's going to absolutely slow the economic recovery. And we know that there are millions of people at risk of eviction prior to the band Emmick and that number has on Lee grown Throat says of Congress does pass more covert legislation It needs to address the estimated tens of billions of dollars in past to rent in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. This program today is being brought to you pretty much the same way. It's been brought to you since mid March, 3 people to audio engineers and yours truly in about 20,000 Square feet of really, really empty office space. And then a couple of dozen more people working from home. And if the latest report from Pew is any indicator, it might stay that way for a while, nearly 90% of people yes, 90% of people who've been able to work from home, a Pew says, have no desire to go back to the office full time once it's safe to do so. Marketplaces. Samantha Fields has more on what that might portend. Jonathan soon is in that majority of people who would very much like to keep working from home permanently home. I have a window by where I work, so I can open it and get fresh air or just look out the window. There are no windows in the I T Department, where he works at a university in Southern California. He likes how quiet it is at home and not having to commute. Few research found that more than half of people whose jobs have allowed them to work from home during Cove. It want to keep doing it all or most of the time. Another third say they'd like to at least some of the time that's creating a lot of conversation about how we're gonna operate in summer 2021. Justin Draeger runs a nonprofit in D. C with about 45 people on staff, and nearly all of them now say they want to be able to divide their time between home and the office and Draeger's. Okay with that. This idea of being in the office five days a week, I think is a bygone era for companies that have successfully moved to tell a work and a lot have Kate Lister with Global Workplace Analytics says the company's She's talking to in Tak, law, banking and insurance are planning to keep doing it after the pandemic ends. We've reached the tipping point whether it's enough companies that are going to be offering it that if you're a company that doesn't offer it or allow it, you're simply not going to be able to hold on to your people or attract the best talent that will be a welcome shift for people in industries were working from home is possible. But they're generally the Americans who are in the most for most people working from home isn't an option. I'm Samantha Fields for marketplace. If your social media feed is anything like mine, you're seeing a whole lot of people posting their Spotify 2020 playlists the past couple of weeks, the details of all the listening they did this year. But for a lot of the artists behind those playlists, especially the smaller, independent ones. 2020 hasn't been so great. So with a year about toe mercifully wrap up We've got the wrapper and writer Desa back on the phone. Hey, it's good to have you back. Thanks, Esso. When we spoke at the beginning of this thing Back in March. Your calendar you're good calendar had just like vaporized on. I wonder eight months nine months later on How it's been through this whole summer and fall. E mean, in some ways, I think most musician they're still looking at, you know, at calendars that air don't have too much in condom. Yeah, I remember talking to my agent, and he was like, you know, use this time when this is all over. You want to look back and be able to say you really spent this time making something wonderful. And I remember like a month after getting that council I was just like This is not a writer's or treat, man. This is like a global crisis. I don't I don't want to know. I don't want to spend my days thinking what rhymes with plague, you know, like, just so In the beginning, there was sort of alone. But now eight months in You can. You can hear the wheels humming again. You know people of writing rad stuff, And I think it is a consumer of music, too. I think I've found myself leaning harder. On art for comfort and distraction and all the things that we turned to art for, so Yeah, Yeah, well, So look, we all turned to art for comfort and distraction. Those of us on the consuming and those of you on the producing end turned art to pay the rent. Um and I don't imagine you been able to do that. I mean, maybe you're making your and I don't know that's none of my business. But but the point is, you can't You can't really Profit off your art when your gig calendar has gone away. Right. And even before the pandemic, like the alchemy of turning music into groceries had gotten really complicated it had and for all the reasons that a consumer can anticipate most of us Listen to some streaming services. Very few of us have two walls of our bedroom covered in vinyl, and so In the beginning, there were a lot of virtual concerts, then I think a lot of us got pretty screened out, you know is this thing rolled on, But there have been some exceptions, the cultural phenomenon that is vs Where artists kind of battle it out. You know what I mean? That's that's been a big win, obviously, but also patri in. Oh, yeah, yeah, like the subscription models fart. Essentially those of really that is really boomed, which which is cool, right? I mean, that's great that there's that resource. For artists and musicians and others, but at some point You're going to have to and you're going to want to, and you're going to be able to get back into actually performing and there are going to be clubs it open and venues that open what you anticipate that's gonna be like because so many things in this economy have changed. And you have to believe that that Sector. That space has a swell. You know the scene in a movie where, like someone is sitting alone trying to figure out where the other survivors are. So they're tuning a radio might still be out there. Yeah, I think we're approaching that scene like We've got all these artists out here who are going to be watching the news to try to figure out what you know What's the timeline for the vaccine? What is it gonna be healthy and safe to go back on the road? But of course we're all gonna want to go..

Congress Kimberly Adams Samantha Fields writer Centers for Disease Control Justin Draeger Census Bureau Chicago plague American Bar Association Deborah Throat Federal Reserve Bank Wade Emily Ben Washington Spotify Jonathan
"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:29 min | 10 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On a deal for a relief package. And at the risk of repeating myself again. If Congress continues to not do anything this economy could get a whole lot worse. Tens of millions of people are unemployed as we know Small and medium business is hanging on by their fingernails and local eviction moratoriums winding down all over the country. The federal one from the Centers for Disease Control ends on New Year's Eve. According to the Census Bureau, about 33% of American adults are risk of eviction or foreclosure and for millions of people rental debt is piling up marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has more on that one. Paying rent used to be no big deal for 65 year old grass yellow weighed in Chicago. She's retired and on a fixed income but was getting help with bills from her granddaughter and her granddaughters. Then girlfriend Then the pandemic hit with my girls movie their jobs as me not being able to keep up with everything just makes it worse. Wade hasn't paid rent since July and is now $3500 behind and at risk of eviction. Just like about 14 million other households, says Emily Ben for who leads the American Bar Association's task Force on Cove. In 19 related evictions. The mere fact of filing actually plummets credit scores, and it precludes people from seeking a mortgage in the future or a car title or even seeking employment. Plus, even after someone is evicted, the debt stays with them. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia estimates more than a million households over $5000 in rent. We will see the impact of debt owed by renters across this country. For years to come. Deborah Throat his deputy director at the National Housing Law Project, It's going to absolutely slow the economic recovery. And we know that there are millions of people rescued eviction prior to the band Emmick, and that number has on Lee grown throat says of Congress does pass more covert legislation It needs to address the estimated tens of billions of dollars in past to rent in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. This program today is being brought to you pretty much the same way. It's been brought to you since mid March, 3 people to audio engineers and yours truly in about 20,000 Square feet of really, really empty office space. And then a couple of dozen more people working from home. And if the latest report from Pew is any indicator, it might stay that way for a while, nearly 90% of people yes, 90% of people who've been able to work from home, a Pew says, have no desire to go back to the office full time once it's safe to do so. Marketplaces. Samantha Fields has more on what that might portend. Jonathan soon is in that majority of people who would very much like to keep working from home. Permanently home. I have a window by where I worked like an open and get fresh air. Just look out the window. There are no windows in the I T department, where he works at a university in Southern California. He likes how quiet it is at home and not having to commute. You. Research found that more than half of people whose jobs have allowed them to work from home during Cove. It want to keep doing it all or most of the time. Another third say they'd like to at least some of the time that's creating a lot of conversation about how we're going to operate in summer. 2021 Justin Draeger runs a nonprofit in D. C with about 45 people on staff. Nearly all of them now say they want to be able to divide their time between home and the office and Draeger's okay with that this idea of being in the office five days a week. I think is a bygone air for companies that have successfully moved to tell a work and a lot have Kate Lister with Global Workplace Analytics, says the company's She's talking to in tech law, banking and insurance are planning to keep doing it. After the pandemic ends. We've reached the tipping point whether it's enough companies that are going to be offering it That if you're a company that doesn't offer it or allow it. You're simply not going to be able to hold on to your people or attract the best talent that will be a welcome shift for people and industries were working from home is possible. But they're generally the Americans who earn the most for most.

Kimberly Adams Jonathan Congress Justin Draeger Centers for Disease Control Kate Lister Census Bureau Deborah Throat Federal Reserve Bank American Bar Association Emily Ben Wade Chicago deputy director Samantha Fields Global Workplace Analytics Washington National Housing Law Project
"national housing law project" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:09 min | 10 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KCRW

"The federal one from the Centers for Disease Control ends on New Year's Eve. According to the Census Bureau, about 33% of American adults are at risk of eviction or foreclosure, and for millions of people rental debt is piling up marketplaces. Kimberly Adams has more on that one. Paying rent used to be no big deal for 65 year old grass yellow weighed in Chicago. She's retired and on a fixed income but was getting help with bills from her granddaughter and her granddaughter. There's the girlfriend. Then the pandemic hit with my girls movie, their jobs and me not being able to keep up with everything just makes it worse. Wade hasn't paid rent since July and is now $3500 behind and at risk of eviction. Just like about 14 million other households, says Emily Ben for who leads the American Bar Association's task Force on Cove. In 19 related evictions. The mere fact of filing actually plummets credit scores, and it precludes people from seeking a mortgage in the future or a car title or even seeking employment. Plus, even after someone is evicted, the debt stays with them. The Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia estimates more than a million households over $5000 in rent. We will see the impact of debt owed by renters across this country. For years to come. Deborah Throat his deputy director at the National Housing Law Project, It's going to absolutely slow the economic recovery and we know that there were millions of people rescued eviction prior to the band Emmick, and that number has Only grown throat says of Congress does pass more covert legislation It needs to address the estimated tens of billions of dollars in past to rent in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. This program today is being brought to you pretty much the same way. It's been brought to you since mid March, 3 people to audio engineers and yours truly. In about 20,000 Square feet of really, really empty office space. And then a couple of dozen more people working from home. And if the latest report from Pew is any indicator, it might stay that way for a while, nearly 90% of people yes, 90% of people who've been able to work from home, a Pew says, have no desire to go back to the office full time once it's safe to do so. Marketplaces. Samantha Fields has more on what that might portend. Jonathan soon is in that majority of people who would very much like to keep working from home. Permanently home. I have a window by where I work, so I can open it and get fresh air. Just look out the window. There are no windows in the I T department, where he works at a university in Southern California. He likes how quiet it is at home and not having to commute. Few research found that more than half of people whose jobs have allowed them to work from home during Cove. It want to keep doing it all or most of the time. Another third say they'd like to at least some of the time that's creating a lot of conversation about how we're gonna operate in summer 2021. Justin Draeger runs a nonprofit in D. C with about 45 people on staff, and nearly all of them now say they want to be able to divide their time between home and the office and Draeger's. Okay with that. This idea of being in the office five days a week, I think is a bygone air for companies that have successfully moved to tell a work and a lot have Kate Lister with Global Workplace Analytics says the company's She's talking to in tech law, banking and insurance, are planning to keep doing it after the pandemic ends. We've reached the tipping point whether it's enough companies that are going to be offering it that if you're a company that doesn't offer it or allow it, you're simply not gonna be able to hold on to your people or attract the best talent that will be a welcome shift for people and industries were working from home is possible, but they're generally the Americans who earn the most for.

Kimberly Adams Jonathan Justin Draeger Centers for Disease Control Deborah Throat Census Bureau Kate Lister Chicago Federal Reserve Bank American Bar Association Emily Ben Wade Samantha Fields deputy director Global Workplace Analytics Washington Philadelphia National Housing Law Project
"national housing law project" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:43 min | 10 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KCRW

"Shame is roller heads up the nonprofit national housing law projects. That means you're you've run out of your savings. You've Probably run out of the calls that you can make the family members to get them to loan you money, he says. Nationwide. There's a federal order aimed at preventing infections. But it's not an outright ban, and many people don't know that it exists or how it can protect them. So he says. It's not working very well, he says. Already, we've seen thousands of evictions in Houston, Memphis, Richmond, Virginia. Columbus, Ohio. The list goes on. That's just it's bad for public health. It's bad for the families that are involved. It's bad for all of us as a country. It could also just be the tip of the iceberg, And it's not just housing rights groups that are worried. Mark Zandi is the chief economist of Moody's Analytics. He estimates about 10 million Americans owe back rent and without another robust relief bill from Congress. I think there's gonna be mass eviction, you know, starting early next year. Just think about that for a second. This is all gonna be happening in the dead of winter in the middle of a raging pandemic can't even construct a darker scenario. Yeah, Zandi says millions of other people will just fall deeper into debt and all that could tip the economy back into recession. So he says it's critical that lawmakers pass another big relief bill he and roller would both like to see an effective nationwide eviction moratorium. And money to pay landlords the rent that they're owed to keep them from going under two. Chris Arnold. NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. The new Netflix film. Mosul puts viewers right in the middle of the action as an Iraqi SWAT team goes on a deadly mission against Isis. U. S led coalition efforts to liberate the Iraqi city from Isis saw thousands of civilian casualties. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans says the film provides an important perspective that of Iraqis living on the front lines and a warning. Sounds of gunfire will follow. It's not a surprise. The film Mosul begins explosively. As the story kicks off. Isis is leaving the Iraqi city of Mosul, but they're still skirmishes between Isis fighters and Iraqi police In the opening scene. Two police officers are ducking gunfire. Taking cover in a building while holding two Isis fighters captive. Yes to the police are about to run out of ammo. They hear a heavy barrage of gunfire. In silence. None of a SWAT team. A group of Iraqi police were now for fighting. Isis ambushed the Attackers saving the policeman. This steering seen drops viewers inside the chaos, danger, confusing agendas and devastation of the fight over Mosul. It turns out the SWAT team has one more mission to fulfill, and they want the youngest police officer they rescued to join. Honey model for a hand model Fennimore and make them off tomorrow from could come. Let's just Michael and I don't know where we're going or what our mission is, or any of you, says the young officer, played by French Tunisian actor below Adam Bessa. Why should I listen, the SWAT team's commander, given a weary yet steely confidence by Iraqi actors who hailed a Bosch says, simply where the good guys The use of language here is important. The dialogue is entirely in Arabic, with the actors working hard to speak in the.

Isis Mosul Mark Zandi NPR officer Chris Arnold Columbus Netflix Fennimore Ohio Adam Bessa Virginia chief economist commander TV critic Bosch Eric Deggans Moody
"national housing law project" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:25 min | 10 months ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Handle on the block. Over the past few months. By the way tomorrow, eight o'clock to 11. I get asked questions have gotten haven't gotten asked asked questions about evictions. My landlord wants me out. I can't pay the rent. What do I do? And I said, Well, there's a moratorium going on so you can't be evicted. However, you still owe the rent. And I assumed that the state the county would Come up with a plan that allowed you to pay the rent over a course of a year year and a half that never came to being the moratorium is over in many jurisdictions, and you owe the rent. But during the moratorium Was asked time and time again. My landlord wants me out. What do I do? And I said, you have to do anything at this point. Oh, yes. Let me tell you what has been going on. Renters nationwide say their landlords have tried to skirt the eviction moratorium, changing locks, removing trash containers. Arguing that they violated tenant rules like smoking cigarettes inside the house, failing to take hitches off their mobile homes. I mean, literally, making it impossible for a renter to stay renting. Because they weren't getting any money and I find it kind of interesting that you can't evict. Well, that's not true. You couldn't have picked with, But if you got the tenant out, anybody wanted to move in its first and last. You don't let him move in until you get the check. So you have these landlords and this is not a issue. That's aberrational. This is going on big time around the country Landlord skirting the rules. Now sometimes. Well, they stuff to pay the mortgage. So there's a rhyme for this reason. But at the same time runners are taking it in the shorts because they're effectively being kicked out illegal evictions, retaliatory evictions, But here's the problem. And I've told them you have to take it to court. The only way you can stop the eviction is to take it to court either Go and ask for an emergency order or file a lawsuit for wrongful eviction. It's a court issue. And who has the money for that? When you can't pay the rent. And so what these landlords have done is they've been able to deal with renters, unbridled and most moratoriums have expired. And so it's wide open now. And it's very, very tough now. Even with the moratorium expiring you have Certain jurisdictions where you have rent control. Well, those are being aggregated those rules. Are simply being ignored by landlords who just want the tenants out. And will circumvent the law. And I don't think it was a big deal. I thought it was. You know, small numbers, I would say you're you have a problem, But not everybody does. But let me deal with U Turns out a whole lot of people. The eviction moratoriums under the federal Cares Act. Expired July 25. And many states also had moratoriums. That ended in the summer or ended in the fall. I don't know of any that are still going on. Well, there's one There's a current CDC order set to expire the end of the year and That specifies that evictions for non payment can be prevented if renters fill out of form, declaring they may like make less than $99,000 are making partial payments or trying and would likely be homeless. If evicted rents. Still a cruise is still do And the CDC order comes with criminal pelant penalties if a landlord violates those orders. However, you know many people who prosecuted And there are thousands of complaints that have been filed, which means there are tens of thousands, if not more of actual cases. How many criminal penalties have been given None. The U. S Department of Justice. The CDC would not answer questions on whether a single landlord had been prosecuted. It's terrible, and we're talking about minute violations, a satellite dish of the least violation. Ah, boyfriend stays over 15 days instead of 14 days that's allowed in the guest portion of the lease. And under the CDC order. Non renewals of leases. Well, that's a gray area, non renewal and then eviction. Now the city of L A. Has rent control city of Santa Monica. If you rent you own the building. Which is why a lot of people don't like owning buildings in Santa Monica. But even outside of those rent control areas, it's still very difficult. The National Housing Law Project estimates 900,000 legal evictions in the U. S every year. Well, the numbers have exploded, and that's just one of the aspects of the pandemic than when it's all said and done. We're gonna look back and go. This is not a good chapter in the way human beings are treating each other for sure. End of life planning. I mean, you know, we all do that where we should do that when we get older, How about young adults? Looking at wills and trusts and directives. What do I do when my life is ending? No heroic acts. I'll tell you what's going on. This one is interesting. This is K f. I am 6 40. Let's check in. With Jennifer the.

CDC Santa Monica Jennifer U. S Department of Justice National Housing Law Project
"national housing law project" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This marketplace podcast is supported by transfer wise. The smart new way to send and receive money internationally transfer wise gives you the real exchange rate every time you send money abroad you can even get an account that holds up to fifty four currencies at once and convert between them anytime join over eight million customers more than eighty countries who are already saving. Try them out for free at transfer wise dot com slash marketplace, or download the APP. In lieu of debate last night, it was the simultaneous townhall discussions with president trump in Miami and former vice president Biden in Philadelphia the pandemic was front and center at both, but the economy was seldom far away marketplace's Jasmine gorst reports. Candidates were asked questions about the ongoing pandemic and the economic crisis. Vice President Joe Biden said, there should be a national pandemic response he criticized President Trump's plan as being too focused on Wall Street, he didn't do that. He didn't talk about what needed to be done because he kept worrying in my view about the stock market. He worried if he talked about how bad this could be unless we took these precautions precautionary actions. Then in fact, the market down and his barometer of success that economies the market last night president trump promised. Vaccine is on the way and said the economy is quote rounding the corner. We would just hitting one hundred and sixty million jobs companies pouring into our nation because of the tax rate and Biden comes in and raises taxes on everybody including middle income taxes which wants to do you will blow this thing and you'll end up with depression the likes of which you've never had taxes are a major bone of contention between the candidates. Vice President Biden said he would raise corporate taxes and taxes on the wealthy. I'm Jasmine Guard for marketplace. Some property owners around the country are suing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Federal Agency ordered an emergency ban on evictions in cases where tenants are unable to pay rent. The CDC says evictions amid covert or a public health risk bought landlords say the moratorium puts their livelihoods at risk Stephanie. STOKES has the story from WABC IN ATLANTA. So new Jones produces chicken eggs on her farm in southeast Georgia as she's earned money over the past twenty years, she's invested in rental properties more than a dozen of them. When you work by yourself, you don't really happened tournament. So that's what I'm trying to just build that so that. I will have them, but but recently, attendant and one of those properties kept falling behind on her monthly four, hundred, fifty dollar rent and when Jones tried to evict the tenants in court she learned the CDC has halted residential evictions for now, what do they have to tell me I can't have my own property. Now Jones is part of lawsuit with other landlords from around the country. It says the CDC doesn't have the right to interfere with local eviction laws. The CDC places landlords in an impossible position says, Robert Pinnacle. He's president of the National Apartment Association. Another plaintiff in the case in the industry is trying to work as much as possible with residents to be able to help them bridge this gap. But with every passing month, it does a challenge he says landlords may not be able to survive. They have mortgages. The government has to help the amount of missed rent. This year could total thirty, four billion nationwide according to a report by the National Council, of State Housing Agencies. Eric. Done with the National Housing Law Project agrees that landlords need financial help. Still he says challenging the Eviction Moratorium is the wrong move. There's no. Right to victims. The government can prohibit evictions done says as long as there's a rational basis and when there's a pandemic. Absolutely the rational basis to curb these sort of things, and this is the CDC's argument. It says he fictions could hurt measures to control the spread of covid nineteen. The moratorium could last until December thirty first. I'm Stephanie Stokes for marketplace. and New Jersey's governor Phil Murphy yesterday ordered Electric Gas and water companies in that state to keep customers connected through March. Now with pandemic four, hundred, forty, thousand residential customers forty-three thousand businesses are more than three months late on utility bills. For, today's developments in our business economics markets and money beat listened for my colleague Kai Ryssdal host of marketplace on many public radio stations or marketplace dot org. I'm David Brancaccio with the morning before from APM American public media. Just in Ho with marketplace, the economy is changing so fast it's hard to keep up to our latest podcast is here to help. It's called the marketplace minute give just sixty seconds and we'll bring you the latest on what's happening in the economy three times a day market updates business news in hell the numbers affects your personal economy. We'll tell you what you need to know and why it matters just ask your smart speaker to play the marketplace minute or find it wherever you get your podcasts..

Vice President Biden president vice president CDC Stephanie Stokes Jones President Trump Jasmine gorst Kai Ryssdal David Brancaccio Jasmine Guard National Apartment Association National Housing Law Project Miami Philadelphia National Council
"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:44 min | 1 year ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The arts to develop a common language so that they can better understand and speak to one another more information is as Sloan dot org and the listeners of KQED we do expect a high of seventy degrees in San Francisco later on today seventy six will be the high in Oakland eighty one in San Jose eighty six in Concord in Santa Rosa this is weekend edition from NPR news thanks for being with us I'm Scott Simon the number of Americans who have died from the corona virus now approaches a hundred thousand president trump threatens to override governor's who refused to reopen religious houses of worship and once again contradicts guidance on coronavirus precautions from the CDC and Joe Biden apologizes for remark joining us now is NPR senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving run thanks so much for being with us I deem it essential to be with you this morning Scott I can do it and you are you are are essential worker my friend to let's begin with Joe Biden was being interviewed by radio personality Charlamagne the god and Mr Biden said quote if you have a problem figuring out whether you're for me or trump then you ain't black so within hours by an apologized said he should have been trying to be what he called a wise guy but isn't it amazing someone who owes his nomination to black voters in the primaries can still have such a team here when it comes to race you remember back a dozen years ago when he called his rival candidate Barack Obama clean and articulate and when he referred to the peach impeachment of Bill Clinton as a lynching but he'll pay a price for his latest Prat fall because he reinforces here the argument the Democrats take black votes for granted and we should add my name is also stepping on his own talking points Friday because of the run of bad news president trump had this week and and and let's list some of that of course it's not just in trump's bad news but nearly a hundred thousand people the United States have died from from covert nineteen nearly forty million people are out of work and so far how did the president respond he has called for all flags to be flown at half mast to salute the victim's body is also urged that shutdowns in quarantine to be lifted and threaten the governors who hesitate to green light people congregating for religious services he has cast doubt on the actual death toll suggesting the numbers might be cooked to make him look bad and he continues to look for a magic bullet in a therapy or vaccine or to wear a mask in public he also took the time to to criticize the possibility of voting by mail this week more states obviously looking at that because of the pandemic yeah and this is become the new focus for very long standing allegations from the president of voter fraud or illegal voting but voting by mail is kind of a curious focal point especially for a president who himself voted by mail absentee ballots generally have tended to be used more by Republicans than Democrats but now course the issue is that voting by mail keeps millions of people safe from viruses or for that matter long lines in her **** meant at actual in person polling places the polls you number Senate races in a number of key stage show Republicans falling behind how concerned is the party reasonably concerned about half a dozen Republican seats are now vulnerable not just Colorado and Maine we've known about but also Arizona North Carolina and possibly others Montana possibility and winning even half of those states could give the Democrats their first Senate majority since twenty fourteen if they win the presidency in get the tiebreaking vote of vice president I have to ask about one other Senate races because there's been a an overnight development Jeff sessions former Attorney General Mr trump's president trump's first Attorney General and he recused himself from the Russia probe president trump has criticized him a lot but yesterday slammed him as untrustworthy and endorse his rival in the Republican primary and Jeff sessions fired back at me yes he has endured endless abuse from the president since that refusal in March of twenty seventeen now he's running to get his old Senate seat back and the president is still trash talking him on Twitter so last night he finally struck back telling the president that his refusal was legally required and that the investigation that followed the Robert Muller investigation ultimately worked in the president's favor so the president should just back off and let the people of Alabama choose their own senator thank you very much Mr president and bless your heart mmhm what why open that up now what's the logic the the logic it would be at this point I suspect for the standpoint of Jeff sessions that even if he is going to lose and polls show him trailing his opponent to Tommy Tuberville the former football coach he was trying to reclaim some dignity perhaps on his way to retirement NPR's Ron Elving thanks so much for being with us again thank you Scott tenants behind on their ranch can be kicked out of their homes in Texas the state has lifted its moratorium on evictions some Texas cities are taking additional steps to protect renters many of whom of lost jobs because of the pandemic Houston is not one of them it's now the largest city in the United States were evictions can resume Elizabeth drove all of Houston public media reports before cove in nineteen life was good for Houston resident ridiculous all of the heck grandma taking care of her great job just going about my everyday living doing what I do wake up in the morning and say my prayers for my coffee then coronavirus hit everything out wow yeah it is like my life do you know that he would talk to me over the phone from her apartment where she lives alone she used to make money babysitting her granddaughter and niece that ended with covert nineteen and her eight hundred dollar disability check doesn't cover her monthly rent of nine hundred dollars she said her apartment manager warned her eviction notices are on their way nobody needs to be stressed out whether they're going to have a place to live today in the homeless to March I can't think like that right now you know I can't I can't think like that I'm not only I don't want to think like that people like you it are vulnerable now that the Texas Supreme Court lifted a ban on objections this week attorneys who work with low income clients are preparing for the worst Donna Carney works for Lone Star legal aid which provides free legal representation to low income Texans Carney expects more families on the streets in the months ahead and we anticipate that there will be a tsunami of affections files I have no doubt about it we are going to see homelessness nationally there's been a patchwork of protections in place for renters other statewide moratorium's are expected to expire in the coming weeks and unemployment is through the roof James roller is with the national housing law project forty percent of households under forty thousand dollars your income loss of job in March and since it's staggering to sort of like to try to get your head around what that means in practice ruler says there's still a federal moratorium on evictions through late July but that only applies to rental properties with federally backed mortgages and that that's only a third of all properties for now moratoriums and government assistance like expanded unemployment benefits have kept invitations at bay in cities like Houston but as these protections expire experts say a wave of evictions is on its way and with corona virus spreading roller says these evictions create a public health risk displacing people from their housing and sending them out looking for additional housing or sending them into homelessness a danger for all of us in Houston so many people applied online for the city's rental assistance program that it ran out of funding in just ninety minutes rejects you it was one of the lucky few who were able to submit an application but she's still waiting for final approval if the rent money doesn't come through she expects to be forced out of her home waiting in hope that if I do that I'll be able to get into a shelter among doctors who opened the door to the thing will open to the mall she would like many Americans will be at the mercy of friends and family when looking for a place to live for NPR news I'm Elizabeth Troy fall in Houston Sheindlin circle the earth one combat medals was a U. S. senator ran for president and went back into space in his late seventies he was unreservedly considered a hero his hero was his wife of seventy three years Anne Klein who died this week of complications of coronavirus she was one hundred as John Glenn once wrote I saw Annie's perseverance and strength through the years and it just made me admire her and love her even more I don't know if I would have had the courage an England stuttered for much of her life she and John Glenn were childhood playmates in new Concord Ohio and she remembered how she got up to recite a poem in a grade school class and the words just stayed in her throat a classmate laughed she was bright wires and funny but because she stuttered for most of her life any claim couldn't talk on the phone tell a joke order coffee arrest for directions hello used to be so hard for me to say she once wrote in people magazine I worried that my children will be injured needed doctor that I somehow find the words to get the information across on the phone I can remember some very painful experiences especially the ridicule but at the age of fifty three anyone found a program at Hollins university in Virginia that was able to help or speak she couldn't see your family for three weeks until the course was done but when she called and said hello on the phone John Glenn who had seen the earth from space cried the woman who once couldn't talk without stuttering began to speak tirelessly across the country on behalf of those with speech challenges calling for people to recognize the courage and ingenuity they use to navigate the world I got to meet in England a few times she could have a sharp wit to make jokes only she could she said when John was a test pilot she worried the phone might ring to bring bad news of an accident but you wouldn't be able to talk so whoever called might say because it's the wrong number and just hang up it is sad to think of this lively person living to one hundred but like so many people in this time of the corona virus having to die in a nursing home without the touch and embrace of her family even if she was beloved by so many any Glenn found her voice and then she raised it for others.

KQED San Francisco Sloan dot
With Moratorium Lifted, Houston Becomes Largest U.S. City Where Evictions Can Resume

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:41 min | 1 year ago

With Moratorium Lifted, Houston Becomes Largest U.S. City Where Evictions Can Resume

"Tenants behind on their ranch can be kicked out of their homes in Texas the state has lifted its moratorium on evictions some Texas cities are taking additional steps to protect renters many of whom of lost jobs because of the pandemic Houston is not one of them it's now the largest city in the United States were evictions can resume Elizabeth drove all of Houston public media reports before cove in nineteen life was good for Houston resident ridiculous all of the heck grandma taking care of her great job just going about my everyday living doing what I do wake up in the morning and say my prayers for my coffee then coronavirus hit everything out wow yeah it is like my life do you know that he would talk to me over the phone from her apartment where she lives alone she used to make money babysitting her granddaughter and niece that ended with covert nineteen and her eight hundred dollar disability check doesn't cover her monthly rent of nine hundred dollars she said her apartment manager warned her eviction notices are on their way nobody needs to be stressed out whether they're going to have a place to live today in the homeless to March I can't think like that right now you know I can't I can't think like that I'm not only I don't want to think like that people like you it are vulnerable now that the Texas Supreme Court lifted a ban on objections this week attorneys who work with low income clients are preparing for the worst Donna Carney works for Lone Star legal aid which provides free legal representation to low income Texans Carney expects more families on the streets in the months ahead and we anticipate that there will be a tsunami of affections files I have no doubt about it we are going to see homelessness nationally there's been a patchwork of protections in place for renters other statewide moratorium's are expected to expire in the coming weeks and unemployment is through the roof James roller is with the national housing law project forty percent of households under forty thousand dollars your income loss of job in March and since it's staggering to sort of like to try to get your head around what that means in practice ruler says there's still a federal moratorium on evictions through late July but that only applies to rental properties with federally backed mortgages and that that's only a third of all properties for now moratoriums and government assistance like expanded unemployment benefits have kept invitations at bay in cities like Houston but as these protections expire experts say a wave of evictions is on its way and with corona virus spreading roller says these evictions create a public health risk displacing people from their housing and sending them out looking for additional housing or sending them into homelessness a danger for all of us in Houston so many people applied online for the city's rental assistance program that it ran out of funding in just ninety minutes rejects you it was one of the lucky few who were able to submit an application but she's still waiting for final approval if the rent money doesn't come through she expects to be forced out of her home waiting in hope that if I do that I'll be able to get into a shelter among doctors who opened the door to the thing will open to the mall she would like many Americans will be at the mercy of friends and family when looking for a place to live for NPR news I'm Elizabeth Troy fall in

Texas
Texas Lifts Moratorium On Evictions, Leaving Renters Vulnerable

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Texas Lifts Moratorium On Evictions, Leaving Renters Vulnerable

"Tenants behind on their ranch can be kicked out of their homes in Texas the state has lifted its moratorium on evictions some Texas cities are taking additional steps to protect renters many of whom have lost jobs because of the pandemic Houston is not one of them it's now the largest city in the United States were evictions can resume Elizabeth drove all of Houston public media reports before cove in nineteen life was good for Houston resident ridiculous all of the hefty grandma taking care of her great job just gone about my everyday living doing what I do wake up in the morning and say my prayers for my coffee then coronavirus hit everything got why yet it's like my life do you know that he would talk to me over the phone from her apartment where she lives alone she used to make money babysitting her granddaughter and niece that ended with covered nineteen and her eight hundred dollar disability check doesn't cover her monthly rent of nine hundred dollars she says her apartment manager warned her eviction notices are on their way nobody needs to be stressed out whether they're going to have a place to live today in the homeless tomorrow I can't think like that right now you know I can't I can't think like that I'm not only I don't want to think like that people like you it are vulnerable now that the Texas Supreme Court lifted a ban on objections this week attorneys who work with low income clients are preparing for the worst Donna Carney works for Lone Star legal aid which provides free legal representation to low income Texans Carney expects more families on the streets in the months ahead and we anticipate that there will be a tsunami of affections files I have no doubt about it we are going to see homelessness nationally there's been a patchwork of protections in place for renters other statewide moratorium's are expected to expire in the coming weeks and unemployment is through the roof Janus roller is with the national housing law project forty percent of households under forty thousand dollars your income loss of job in March and since it's staggering to sort of like to try to get your head around what that means in practice ruler says there's still a federal moratorium on evictions through late July but that only applies to rental properties with federally backed mortgages and that that's only a third of all properties for now moratoriums and government assistance like expanded unemployment benefits have kept evictions at bay in cities like Houston but as these protections expire experts say a wave of evictions is on its way and with corona virus spreading roller says these evictions create a public health risk displacing people from their housing and sending them out looking for additional housing or sending them into homelessness is a danger for all of us in Houston so many people applied online for the city's rental assistance program that it ran out of funding in just ninety minutes rejects you it was one of the lucky few who were able to submit an application but she's still waiting for final approval if the rent money doesn't come through she expects to be forced out of her home I hope that if I do that I'll be able to get into a shelter among dogs who opened the door to the thing will open to the mall she would like many Americans will be at the mercy of friends and family when looking for a place to

Texas
"national housing law project" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Sixty two to sixty seven England but fifties to low sixties in the mountains Cindy was most accurate forecast I'm meteorologist Angelica Campos downtown San Diego right now seventy degrees koco news time six fifty two the prospect of a viable vaccine sparked a strong rally on Wall Street the Dow jumped nine hundred and twelve points close to four percent the S. and P. added ninety points more than three percent while the nasdaq gained two hundred and twenty point two point four percent Maduro not reported positive results from human trials of its coronavirus vaccine and the stock gained twenty percent earlier in the session it hit a record high and one analyst said McDermott could have quote potential blockbuster vaccine sales next year shares of companies benefiting from a lockdown fell since they may lose business if a vaccine opens everything up among the losers Netflix zoom and Clorox oil prices surged on the back scene hopes an onboard that Chinese demand has returned uber which has been decimated by stay at home restrictions is cutting another three thousand jobs and closing offices less than two weeks after laying off thirty seven hundred workers like Mona Rivera Bloomberg for news radio six hundred koko Samoa budget cuts in the governor's proposal hit the environmental projects in California then the governor's revised budget proposal environmental programs took a large hit due to the ongoing pandemic among those are a one billion dollar fund to provide low interest loans for environmental projects a four point seven five billion dollar initiative to help local leaders fight climate change cut payroll for overseers of energy producers and a reduced budget for a new state park a fifty thousand acre ranch in the bay area California touts itself as a global leader in fighting climate change but now it may lose its ability offset in action by the White House which has rolled back almost a hundred environmental policies many of which affect air quality California has the nation's worst air quality Zachary Barnes koco news some people don't want to pay rent even when the restrictions the moratorium's are lifted here there is one group calling for the cancellation of back rent as a result of the pandemic San Diego rent strike twenty twenty is made up of community activists calling for a strike against rent and mortgage payments due to covert nineteen one of the group's lead organizers told the U. T. the initial twelve hundred dollar stimulus checks only cover so much Candace bell adds that canceling rent and mortgages is the most efficient way to help the most people during the economic crisis the pandemic is caused no well Porter is the director of government affairs for the national housing law project she says that a moratorium does not forgive or cancel rent that is owed Dan Noone cocoa news and finally here tonight's a.

Dan Noone director of government affairs twenty twenty Zachary Barnes Clorox Netflix analyst Angelica Campos Porter Candace bell U. T. England White House California Mona Rivera Bloomberg
"national housing law project" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"national housing law project" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"Don't have a job. It's tough to pay rent so it stands to reason with all those job losses. There's a whole lot of rent's not being paid a week into. May At least twenty percent of renters have yet to make any payment for the month. That's from a group that represents big landlords. It should be said and a whole lot more people. That group says didn't pay the full amount but the numbers are actually a lot better than people had been guessing for now. Marketplace's Amy Scott has more on that one. Forget this month's rent jona Montoya is still trying to come up with eight hundred twenty five dollars for last month nickel and diming everything. Montoya is twenty four and shares an apartment in a story queens. He's been furloughed from his job. As a Barista since March he got his twelve hundred dollars stimulus money and his first six hundred dollar pandemic unemployment check but he also has to pay for utilities food. And other essentials kind of fuse. Like you're on your own and you just have to figure it out how to survive and how to like stay sane at the same time and stay motivated given situations like that. Landlords are surprised. How many people have paid their rent this month? Doug Bibi is president of the national multifamily Housing Council. He says the eighty percent of households that paid on time is down only one and a half percentage points from this time last year the group represents owners of professionally managed apartments which skewed toward more affluent tenants and Bibi says many landlords have reduced rent or worked out payment plans but he also expects things to get worse with this number of unemployed and with the economy at a standstill. Right now. I just can't see this trend. Continuing a recent marketplace Edison Research poll found that sixty two percent of renters are worried about being able to pay and sh- Amos roller with the National Housing Law Project says paying the rent leaves less for everything else that means the you are spending less on food scrimping on medical bills and things like that while most communities have some kind of moratorium on evictions protections vary widely and some of them are already being lifted. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace..

jona Montoya Doug Bibi Amy Scott national multifamily Housing C National Housing Law Project Edison Research president