35 Burst results for "National Health Service"

'Captain Tom' Moore, Britain's Pandemic Hero, Gets Funeral Worthy

Masters in Business

00:24 sec | Last week

'Captain Tom' Moore, Britain's Pandemic Hero, Gets Funeral Worthy

"To a national hero. Funeral services were held today for World War two veterans or Tom Moore, who died earlier this month. Captain Tom as he became known, captured global attention raising millions of dollars for the U. K's and National Health Service. During the Corona virus pandemic. The 100 year old veteran gained fame for walking 100 laps of his garden to help raise funds for the NHS. I'm at Madison

Captain Tom Tom Moore National Health Service U. NHS Madison
World War II veteran who raised millions for British health service dies from COVID-19

Morning Edition

02:06 min | Last month

World War II veteran who raised millions for British health service dies from COVID-19

"Died. He was a British veteran of World War two and was 100 years old. He died of covert 19, but not before performing one more service and no. Well, you're just gonna have to help me if I choke up here. In his 100th year, he raised $40 million to help Britain's National Health Service fight the coronavirus that later killed him, and he did it by walking. There was this really popular video of more walking around and around his garden patio, All for charity, Mr Morris Grandson, Colin Ingram promised to pay his granddad £1.1 British pound Her lap. That challenge was posted on social media and turned into a widespread campaign to raise money for the health service. Here's the BBC capturing Mr Moore's final lap last May. Inches together. And there he is. Co congratulations. Wilde done. Absolutely amazing. Amazing achievement. Captain Tom, How do you feel this morning? Fine. Fine, Miss. I'm surrounded by the right sort of people. So, yes, I feel fine. I hope your own food and fine, too. Captain Tom Moore received a knighthood and here's British Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Became not just a national inspiration. The beacon of hope for the world. His doctor was clear allergies of the Royal College of Physicians, and she says, Every time he came for an appointment, he had a smile on his face. And brought the staff chocolates that he hoped would keep them going. He had many admirers years Lieutenant Colonel Tom Miller in a video from the Yorkshire Regiment, truly inspirational individual who had captured the hearts off the nation over these testing times with his infectious energy drive and determination. After his death at age 100, Britain's National health Service put out a one line tweet. Thanks for everything, Sir Tom.

Mr Morris Grandson Colin Ingram Mr Moore Captain Tom National Health Service Captain Tom Moore Britain Miss. Wilde BBC Boris Johnson Lieutenant Colonel Tom Miller Royal College Of Physicians Yorkshire Regiment Sir Tom
Capt. Tom Moore, WWII vet whose walk cheered UK, dies at 100

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Capt. Tom Moore, WWII vet whose walk cheered UK, dies at 100

"Captain Tom Moore a World War two veteran who walked into the hearts of Britain during the pandemic has died he was one hundred more shuffled up and down his garden using his Walker to raise money for health care workers I'm delighted the death of the we set up okay cool services will serve as tuned into this enormous sum of money all the calls is so good at once a story went viral captain Tom raised forty million dollars for the National Health Service he was even knighted by Queen Elizabeth so it almost sounds learn us but I'm still a little more prime minister Boris Johnson says captain Tom United Britney chit also up and he imported the triumph of the human spirit family says captain Tom Moore died after testing positive for the corona virus I'm a Donahue

Captain Tom Moore Captain Tom Britain Walker National Health Service Captain Tom United Britney Chit Queen Elizabeth Boris Johnson Donahue
More new COVID vaccination centres open in England

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

More new COVID vaccination centres open in England

"Over thirty new National Health Service vaccination centers open across England as of the drive to accelerate immunizations continues the government says vaccination of the most vulnerable groups organized by the joint committee on vaccination and immunisation will be completed by the middle of February in Mansfield senior operations manager Nina Marshall says it's been a massive endeavor getting inoculation sites like close up and running so swiftly I am very glad that we need to be able to get the vaccine supply we need to have the way to do it and we will be delivering in excess of twenty thousand a week so far Britain has vaccinated over six million people Charles the live as well London

Joint Committee On Vaccination National Health Service Nina Marshall England Mansfield Government Britain Charles London
COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:42 min | Last month

COVID-19 vaccine distribution faces logistical challenges

"Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew mullah my guests today sarah wheaton and dr arthur caplan sarah wheaton chief policy correspondent for politico europe. She joins us from brussels. And autho kaplan is professor of bioethics at new york. University's school of medicine. He joins us from the woods of connecticut. This first part of the show. I want to talk more domestically about what. The responsibilities and duties and possibilities are in terms of vaccinations and how domestic governments go about organizing them the second part of the show. We'll talk more about the global picture. But sarah i'll start with you not withstanding the united kingdom which is actually proceeding with the vaccinations at a reasonably impressive clip. The non uk european countries. Actually being too slow by half they'd seemed to have got off to a very sluggish. Start indeed and it's causing quite a bit of domestic problems around the block and as well it's also calling into question european union's unity in fact. There's a huge blame. Brussels faction basically saying that the eu was too slow to buy doses compared to the united states and the united kingdom on the other hand. You also see that many countries including germany. Which has been one of the most vocal in criticizing. Brussels is not doing a very good job of getting the doses out that they have. is it. just a question of polaroid if you will if we focus on one specific example you look at a country like the netherlands which would appear to have every imaginable advantage. Where doing something like. This is concerned. It is geographically tiny eddies rich. It is well organized you would think vaccinating. The netherlands would be relatively straightforward. Is these things go and yet one. They have barely started and to the government has picked this moment to resign on mass over. Something else entirely right. I think it's really fascinating if you look at the databases that lay out. How countries have been doing with their vaccination. There are some things that show number of doses administered per one hundred. And there's not an obvious pattern so again sort of make sense that you can. Denmark are doing very well but then you have italy. You have spain. You have slovenia and lithuania in the top ten whereas you have big wealthy countries like germany and france and the netherlands as you mentioned doing quite poorly and each country is a precious snowflake with a health system and the value said that really drive this so one of the factors in the netherlands. The case in many countries is at one point. It looked like the astra zeneca vaccine was the front runner that was both the cheapest and the most logistically simple. It doesn't need kind of special freezing transportation so i think the netherlands was a country where they were more banking on that particular shot being the one that was available so they didn't think as much about how they were going to be doing the logistics for a more complicated marnie vaccine in germany. They say actually part of the issue is that germany has many different health insurance systems. And so the data about who actually qualifies for this vaccine is not consistently available whereas in countries like spain and italy. You may be due in certainly in the united kingdom where you have the national health service you have various centralized data system author another thing that countries have had a long time to think about is the order in which they roll the vaccines out. Obviously who gets it i. You can't vaccinate everybody the same week. Does it strike you that. There's much in the way of interesting or indicative divergence in in who is prioritizing. What here in the uk of call us where credit where it's due to the government as we were saying they're doing quite well. They started out with old people. Care homes people with chronic illnesses which might make them more vulnerable. Is that the smart thing to do. I wonder myself with a more thought. Should be given to vaccinating. People like retail workers bus drivers refuse collectors. Delivery people the ones who have to interact with the public and the ones without whom society really would grind to a halt. Yes well we spent an announcement of time in the us arguing over who should go first. Who should go second new should go third lots of categories federal advice flying around about prioritization. But we learned a couple of things once. The vaccine went to the states. They all decided their own priorities. So in some parts of the us prisons and prison staff are being vaccinated in other states. The governors have said no. We're not doing that because they don't like prisoners basically even though that's a high risk population and could be a place where the virus easily spreads back to the community. I've talked to a lot of people who run group homes for intellectually disabled people in nursing homes or care homes but out in the community. They're getting no supply they got forgotten. So i'm lis- despite lots and lots of arguing if you had a clientele of down syndrome individuals. Their death rates are six seven eight times as high as everybody else but somehow the prioritization list so we did spend a lot of time arguing but now we have fifty states with fifty different policies. We've seen a little cheating as a result because when you don't have consistency people start to say that. I'm not gonna follow the rules. So we have people who are rich. Flying to florida to get in line to get vaccinated. Florida per usual doesn't seem to care exactly who's supposed to be a priority. The lord help us to even vaccinating canadians. Their her down there snowbirds so that's causing tension among the locals. But here's the take on less than than i learned. It's great to have these arguments. About who goes i. If your logistics don't work it doesn't matter what your list is if you can't get supply out to the meat packers of the delivery. People are wherever if what we do. Is we send the supply to hospitals and nursing homes or care homes as we've done here that's where the vaccinations occur and those institutions will just vaccinate their employees high risk. Or not is. That's where the refrigerator is. As sarah said it's hard to handle stuff. They're not gonna go running down the street looking for the next category person to give it to so logistics as much as ethics or laying out priority groups drives distribution

Sarah Wheaton The Netherlands UK Andrew Mullah Dr Arthur Caplan Autho Kaplan Germany Brussels European Union School Of Medicine Spain Italy Polaroid Connecticut Sarah Slovenia Astra Lithuania Europe
Vaccine Rollout Strategies Vary Between Nations

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:42 min | Last month

Vaccine Rollout Strategies Vary Between Nations

"Welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew mullah my guests today sarah wheaton and dr arthur caplan sarah wheaton chief policy correspondent for politico europe. She joins us from brussels. And autho kaplan is professor of bioethics at new york. University's school of medicine. He joins us from the woods of connecticut. This first part of the show. I want to talk more domestically about what. The responsibilities and duties and possibilities are in terms of vaccinations and how domestic governments go about organizing them the second part of the show. We'll talk more about the global picture. But sarah i'll start with you not withstanding the united kingdom which is actually proceeding with the vaccinations at a reasonably impressive clip. The non uk european countries. Actually being too slow by half they'd seemed to have got off to a very sluggish. Start indeed and it's causing quite a bit of domestic problems around the block and as well it's also calling into question european union's unity in fact. There's a huge blame. Brussels faction basically saying that the eu was too slow to buy doses compared to the united states and the united kingdom on the other hand. You also see that many countries including germany. Which has been one of the most vocal in criticizing. Brussels is not doing a very good job of getting the doses out that they have. is it. just a question of polaroid if you will if we focus on one specific example you look at a country like the netherlands which would appear to have every imaginable advantage. Where doing something like. This is concerned. It is geographically tiny eddies rich. It is well organized you would think vaccinating. The netherlands would be relatively straightforward. Is these things go and yet one. They have barely started and to the government has picked this moment to resign on mass over. Something else entirely right. I think it's really fascinating if you look at the databases that lay out. How countries have been doing with their vaccination. There are some things that show number of doses administered per one hundred. And there's not an obvious pattern so again sort of make sense that you can. Denmark are doing very well but then you have italy. You have spain. You have slovenia and lithuania in the top ten whereas you have big wealthy countries like germany and france and the netherlands as you mentioned doing quite poorly and each country is a precious snowflake with a health system and the value said that really drive this so one of the factors in the netherlands. The case in many countries is at one point. It looked like the astra zeneca vaccine was the front runner that was both the cheapest and the most logistically simple. It doesn't need kind of special freezing transportation so i think the netherlands was a country where they were more banking on that particular shot being the one that was available so they didn't think as much about how they were going to be doing the logistics for a more complicated marnie vaccine in germany. They say actually part of the issue is that germany has many different health insurance systems. And so the data about who actually qualifies for this vaccine is not consistently available whereas in countries like spain and italy. You may be due in certainly in the united kingdom where you have the national health service you have various centralized data system author another thing that countries have had a long time to think about is the order in which they roll the vaccines out. Obviously who gets it i. You can't vaccinate everybody the same week. Does it strike you that. There's much in the way of interesting or indicative divergence in in who is prioritizing. What here in the uk of call us where credit where it's due to the government as we were saying they're doing quite well. They started out with old people. Care homes people with chronic illnesses which might make them more vulnerable. Is that the smart thing to do. I wonder myself with a more thought. Should be given to vaccinating. People like retail workers bus drivers refuse collectors. Delivery people the ones who have to interact with the public and the ones without whom society really would grind to a halt. Yes well we spent an announcement of time in the us arguing over who should go first. Who should go second new should go third lots of categories federal advice flying around about prioritization. But we learned a couple of things once. The vaccine went to the states. They all decided their own priorities. So in some parts of the us prisons and prison staff are being vaccinated in other states. The governors have said no. We're not doing that because they don't like prisoners basically even though that's a high risk population and could be a place where the virus easily spreads back to the community. I've talked to a lot of people who run group homes for intellectually disabled people in nursing homes or care homes but out in the community. They're getting no supply they got forgotten. So i'm lis- despite lots and lots of arguing if you had a clientele of down syndrome individuals. Their death rates are six seven eight times as high as everybody else but somehow the prioritization list so we did spend a lot of time arguing but now we have fifty states with fifty different policies. We've seen a little cheating as a result because when you don't have consistency people start to say that. I'm not gonna follow the rules. So we have people who are rich. Flying to florida to get in line to get vaccinated. Florida per usual doesn't seem to care exactly who's supposed to be a priority. The lord help us to even vaccinating canadians. Their her down there snowbirds so that's causing tension among the locals. But here's the take on less than than i learned. It's great to have these arguments. About who goes i. If your logistics don't work it doesn't matter what your list is if you can't get supply out to the meat packers of the delivery. People are wherever if what we do. Is we send the supply to hospitals and nursing homes or care homes as we've done here that's where the vaccinations occur and those institutions will just vaccinate their employees high risk. Or not is. That's where the refrigerator is. As sarah said it's hard to handle stuff. They're not gonna go running down the street looking for the next category person to give it to so logistics as much as ethics or laying out priority groups drives distribution

Sarah Wheaton The Netherlands UK Andrew Mullah Dr Arthur Caplan Autho Kaplan Germany Brussels European Union School Of Medicine Spain Italy Polaroid Connecticut Sarah Slovenia Astra Lithuania Europe
REMAP CAP | COVID-19 Clinical Research

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:21 min | Last month

REMAP CAP | COVID-19 Clinical Research

"In california's los angeles county. The hardest hit area of the country. Many hospitals have no more room in their intensive care units so even as vaccines are developed and deployed to prevent covid nineteen cases. The remains an urgent need for drugs to help treat those. Who have it on seventh. A study called re map cap which is conducted in england and other countries report results from clinical trials of hugh drax which are currently used to treat. A chunk of is our healthcare correspondent. Do you results which have not yet been period but will be soon are very promising. They show that these drugs can reduce the death rate among styles to barely. Ill covid nineteen patients by around a quarter. And why is it. That drugs normally administered for arthritis would be a help in covid. Nineteen so these tracks tau cillizza mab and surreal. Ma'am there normally used to reduce inflammation in patients with arthritis and inflammation is a big problem with covid nineteen. It's actually one of the ways that actually kills severely. Ill patients and what happens. Is that the body's immune system calls information. It's usually helpful. That's how it fights off an infection but with covid nineteen in some patients. Information just goes overboard so it has been surge going on for over year for drugs that can prevent a hyper inflammation and so far we've had on the one drug. A steroid called exa medicine which was proven to reduce dramatically death rates. And how did these two drugs emerge as good candidates them. So dixon mechanism dampens the immune system across the bharat was and surreal. Map are a little bit more targeted. They are both made the antibodies that block they affect of a specific protein called interleukin. Six that is known to stock. They mean response and has been particularly prominent in patients with covid nineteen so they're really targeting proteins. Which is a big problem material patients. And so how did we come to know that these two drugs are so good. At reducing inflammation the clinical trial enrolled eight hundred patients. Who are customized for covid nineteen. Who are all ill enough to require. Transfer this carry units in. The results are really striking in the group of patients who received the standard treatment. Which already includes dixon on a standard of care. Nearly three six percent died in the group that receives the standard treatment and then on top of it one of these two and inflammatory drags only twenty seven percent of patients died. So that's a mass effect and another very important. Finding from the trial was the patients who received these tracks recover faster. They were discharged from hospitals seven to ten days earlier which also is a mass effect because normally covid nineteen patients in hospitals for a very long time and so with that knowledge in hand. Then how soon might we see it. Sort of put to use and wear. So does eliza map. One of the tracks is already being used here in the uk. There already suffice. In hospitals guidelines for treating covid nineteen patients already been changed and it will be attracted will be used in other countries soon. I'm sure but unlike some medicine which is a very cheap drag. It costs a couple of dollars for a course of treatment. The cost of these hugh anti inflammatory drugs is an issue in britain of course of treatment. Which is intravenous. Infusion costs around one thousand pounds. So that's really expensive for developing countries and although in britain it's probably very cost effective because a day intensive care in hospital costs the national health service here around thousand pounds per patients so compared to one thousand pounds for the drag. It's a good deal to say nothing of the lives. say so. It seems that we are finding more more treatments. more drugs. more things that are already clinically approved. Is there more in the pipeline like this that can give us a bit more hope about treating covid nineteen yes absolutely many more drags which are being tested around the world sam in very large clinical trials here in the uk where probably around the corner of covid nineteen patients in hospitals are enrolled in one trial another. Some of these trials have shown that some drugs are not effective which is also useful knowledge because they are rigorously. Conducted randomized trials with very large patient samples. So you can be very confident in the results but there are several other drugs. That are still being tested than we may. Well find more drugs. We can add to the treatment protocols. Thanks very much for joining us

Hugh Drax Arthritis Dixon Los Angeles County Inflammation England California Britain Eliza UK Hugh National Health Service
1 in 30 Londoners has Covid as city mayor declares a major incident

WBZ Morning News

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

1 in 30 Londoners has Covid as city mayor declares a major incident

"Calls this a major incident in the UK capital, saying the state run National Health Service is at risk of being overwhelmed by Corona virus. Now one in 30 Londoners has Cove it earlier this week. That number was one in 50 the mayor ads. If we do not take immediate action. Now, more people will die. Regulators in the United Kingdom have approved Cambridge drugmaker Moder NAS vaccine for emergency authorization effective Immediately. It is 8

State Run National Health Serv UK Moder Nas Cambridge
UK in 'eye of the storm' amid surging new coronavirus cases

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

UK in 'eye of the storm' amid surging new coronavirus cases

"British medical workers say hospitals around the country are facing a perilous situation due to the new coronavirus variant concerns are mounting about the ability of the National Health Service to cope with the anticipated increase in people seeking treatment for COPD at nineteen the could be fueled further by holiday gatherings the spike in new cases is said to be due to a new more contagious variant of the virus first identified around London and the south east of England person already has Europe's second highest buyers death toll of more than seventy four thousand currently two vaccines have been approved for use in the U. K. around one million people have received the first dose Sarah Bassett London

National Health Service Copd South East London England Europe U. Sarah Bassett
"national health service" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 2 months ago

"national health service" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pandemic. Special correspondent Malcolm Brevin has traveled to some of Europe's virus hot spots during the pandemic. He's covered northern Italy and demonstrations in Britain, Germany and Poland. He has not been affected personally until now, as he explains from his home in Brighton in the south of England. He is in self isolation with his wife, Trina and son, Lucas. This is day one of self isolation. I got an email from the National Health Service track and Trace service a few hours ago to say that I had to isolate myself. Until December, the 23rd and that's because my son has tested positive. He's upstairs at the top of the house right now on my wife is also showing symptoms. We've got a small house, but hopefully we can compartmentalize it in such a way. But both my wife and my son can stay out of my way. So I think I contracted covert last week at a studio that I was filming at. For two days straight to six hour shoots on but the amount of people there there were at least 30 people in the room. And once we got to yourself this morning Lucas sister positive I tested negative. I'm sure of it now and had to test it would be prostitutes. Well, I'm just feeling Too sick to go out. I mean, the whole idea of having to get into a car. Go to test and I I just cannot do it. I'm so weak. I'm in the kitchen right now. Everything is a bit of a mess. I have to say I've just come back from a trip to Poland. And I'm making chicken soup, which hopefully will ease their sore throats have seemed quite I see the finish. It was more like a flu. At this point. I don't have trouble breathing. I could breathe without any problems. Lucas Which in Moscow Focuses on the stairs. It's been absolutely horrible. So when I wear I could be helping my lungs up the next just be sitting there in the hot and cold flashes. Um It's It's really annoying. There's so many things I had planned to do. My biggest concern has been asked Sandu kiss because there was spoken with Julie..

Lucas Malcolm Brevin Poland Europe Trina National Health Service Sandu Brighton Italy England Julie Britain Germany Moscow
U.K. warns against Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for those with severe allergies

Ben Shapiro

00:27 sec | 3 months ago

U.K. warns against Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for those with severe allergies

"Snow. The covert 19 vaccine has been out for just one day in England, and already some people are clicking. The concerned face Some words of caution out of the UK National Health Service in England has issued an urgent warning. People with a history of severe allergies should not get the Pfizer vaccine for Corona virus. To health care workers in the U. K suffered from severe allergic reactions after getting the shot, But both of those workers do have a history

Uk National Health Service England Severe Allergic Reactions Pfizer U.
Britain hospitals prepare for coronavirus vaccine distribution

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Britain hospitals prepare for coronavirus vaccine distribution

"Medical regulator says people with a significant history of allergies should not take the newly approved cove in 19 vaccine from Fizer, NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from London to health care workers in the UK have allergic reactions. Regulatory agency said people have allergic reactions to medicines, Food or vaccines in general should steer clear of this one, which the UK began rolling out to thousands of people on Tuesday. Officials said the national health Service workers who carried adrenalin pens with them or both recovering well. Britain's regulator approved emergency use of the Fizer vaccine, which, like other covert vaccines, has been developed in record time because of the urgency of the pandemic. Given the speed vaccine, experts say the government must take even more care to monitor any bad reactions to the vaccine. You can launch the vaccine in 70 hospitals on Tuesday and plans to expand distribution to 200 family practices next week.

Frank Langfitt Allergic Reactions NPR UK National Health Service London Britain
"national health service" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"national health service" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Is emergency use authorization for fighters. Covert vaccine could come as soon as tomorrow. And once that happens, officials with the government's operation Warp speed program say they've got the medical supplies needed to distribute the shots nationwide. We bought all those particular things, the syringes and needles, the alcohol wipes the PPE necessary in order to do the administration and we marry those particular kids up with the vaccines when we ship him out. The jurisdiction, retired General Paul Ostrowski in charge of supply and distribution. The vaccines in Britain, where they started administering Fizer shots yesterday. Doctors air warning that people who have serious allergies Shouldn't be vaccinated, maybe See chief National Affairs correspondent Tom Llamas, They put the vaccine to thousands of NHS workers. This is the National Health Service is basically the people that run the government health care. They're in the UK are rolling out the vaccine in two of those thousands. They had an allergic reaction. But these people suffer from severe allergies. They carry a device like an EpiPen. So you know, these people have problems with allergies. They took the EpiPen device, and they were fine. And they're now recovering covert cases surging nationwide, including in the state of Arizona, where Phoenix Dr Andrew Carroll says hospitals, air filling and certain shifts taking up because there's been such high demand. The teams are working hard. They're working as hard as they can. We're trying to get in as many specialized personnel from out of state to help us out where we're just We're running on empty. Your states are going after Facebook. Maybe she's here in Qatar Ski with more on why, When Facebook bought Instagram and WhatsApp, it raised alarms among state and federal regulators concerned about anti competitive practices. The New York Attorney general's Office open an investigation more than a year ago into whether Facebook has stifled competition and put users at risk. The Washington Post reports more than three dozen attorneys general and the Federal Trade Commission will file antitrust lawsuits against Facebook. Trump legal team losing a Supreme Court attempt to get Pennsylvania's mail in ballots thrown out. You're listening to ABC news. There is word that Ah reservation in Northern California shutting down. It's news from the neighborhood and a little bit, But let's get off with Rose right now on chicken traffic.

Facebook Dr Andrew Carroll General Paul Ostrowski allergic Tom Llamas NHS National Health Service Supreme Court Federal Trade Commission UK ABC Fizer Washington Post Northern California Arizona Trump Britain New York Rose Qatar Ski
UK investigates possible allergic reactions to COVID-19 shot

Kentuckiana's Morning News

01:34 min | 3 months ago

UK investigates possible allergic reactions to COVID-19 shot

"Associated Press reporting now, but UK United Kingdom That's England. Regulators, saying this morning that people who have a significant history of allergic reactions should not receive the said new visor bio in tech vaccine While they investigate to adverse reactions that occurred on the first day of the country's mass vaccination program. Pressure. Stephen Paulus, national medical director for the National Health Service in England, said health authorities were acting on a recommendation from the medical and Health Care Products Regulatory Agency. I guess I'd be like our what FDA Or what have you, according Todos professor Stephen Palace. He's quoted saying, as is common with new vaccines. The M H R a have advised on a precautionary basis that people with a significant history of allergic reactions do not receive this vaccination after two people with a history of significant allergic reactions, responded adversely. Yesterday. So here we go. Scott here he's you know where we're dealing with the science. We know that not ever. It's not gonna help. Maybe that's what we said This was gonna happen, and we also admitted that the national media would run with it and make it a big deal and And then it is a big deal, not trying to diminish that it's but this is not unexpected. Yeah, And what's funny, though, is people are saying No, I will not. Get the vaccine because I may have an adverse reaction. Meanwhile, I'll go driving my car every single day of my life and not think twice that that's more dangerous than ever. Getting the shot.

Allergic Reactions Stephen Paulus Medical And Health Care Produc UK Stephen Palace England Associated Press National Health Service FDA Scott
'V-Day': UK rolls out vaccine, 90-year-old woman first in line

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

'V-Day': UK rolls out vaccine, 90-year-old woman first in line

"Has just become the first Western country to begin a mass vaccination campaign against Cove in 19. The first patients to receive the jab produced by Fizer and buy on Tick was a 90 year old woman. Thousands of care, home staff and residents will be in the first cohorts to get the vaccine, which was given emergency approval by UK regulators last week, So Simon Stevens is chief executive of the National Health Service in England. It will take some weeks and months of vaccine supply becomes available for GPS and hospitals and pharmacists to reach all of the most vulnerable. We think there's every prospect that by next spring The high risk vulnerable groups identified by the medical experts will all have been vaccinated,

Fizer Simon Stevens Cove National Health Service UK England
World wide web inventor launches privacy platform for enterprises; NHS and BBC sign up

Latest In Tech News

01:37 min | 4 months ago

World wide web inventor launches privacy platform for enterprises; NHS and BBC sign up

"Tim burners lee known as the inventor of the world wide web has revealed that interrupt company works at launch a privacy platform for enterprises. Now the uk's national health service to bbc natwest bank a flanders government are among its early adopters main reason. He's concerned that today's digital giants are exploiting citizens around the world and he kind of wants to take the whole apple Vision of privacy for everybody and by everybody everybody In kind of brain out more to the forefront tim burners lee. The article begins the english computer scientist best known as the inventor of the world wide web has revealed that his latest startup has launched a privacy platform for enterprises interrupt founded by burners lee and ceo. Don bruce in two thousand eighteen is aiming to develop technology that gives people control of their data allowing them to choose where their data is stored. And who has access to it. The startup announced monday that it had launched an enterprise version of its solid platform built with scientists at massachusetts institute of technology at mit solid allows users to create personal online data stores or pods. Get it that they can then share with third party apps if they wish bruce wrote in a blog post at the nhl for example was using the platform to allow patients distorted personal medical data on pods as well as data from health apps on our phones or other devices going to drive groundbreaking new opportunities at not only restored trust and data but also enhance our lives

Tim Burners Lee Natwest Bank Burners Lee Don Bruce National Health Service BBC UK Apple Massachusetts Institute Of Tec MIT NHL Bruce
Will European lockdowns work or are they too weak?

Coronacast

09:31 min | 4 months ago

Will European lockdowns work or are they too weak?

"So we have come out of a really long slog here in Australia especially in Victoria where we've had a very long lockdown and the payoff has been really low numbers of community transmission. Now here in Australia and in contrast Europe is heading into winter and the case numbers they are ratcheting up really quickly to the point where the UK and many countries in Europe are announcing really tough lockdown measures and so let's talk about that a bit Norman what are we? What are they looking at doing in England and some of those European countries. Varies a bit and it seems to be driven by a fear that their hospitals in ICU's will be overwhelmed. You've already got a significant number of beds taken up in France and Spain Britain is worried that the NHS the National Health Service, will be overwhelmed and I think the hand has been forced. But they're all coming into this late. So they're doing curfews. Don't think there's any country in Europe that's locking down schools showing who so school's Continue And I think that universities do in some places as well. So the education system stays open bars, restaurants that sort of thing close or our time restricted. So I'm not sure that anybody is really going for the hard. Stage four type lockdown that we saw in Victoria. And, it has to be said that's really the only thing that works. So the problem that you're is God and most European countries and are two problems. One is the borders are not properly closed. So the borders are not closed. You can go to lockdown, but new cases can come in all the time even though you might have border checks and people are not supposed to communicate got symptoms and so on. They do have open borders to some countries in the world, but it's a pre Philip. Britain, it's a pretty long list includes strata. Most of them seem quite sensible in terms of having quarantine free travel. But it's moving around a bit. But where else you might have trouble coming in from and in Europe itself, the borders seem to be largely open although it's up to each European country to say its own rules and by the time you're listening to this podcast this chronic. The rules could could possibly have changed. That's why I'm not really being very specific. Point being is that you need a lockdown of your country and your lockdown of people's movements. That the virus. Stays with the stews infected and you don't get new clusters emerging and there aren't very many countries in Europe that have got the testing and contact tracing regime that we're lucky to have in. Australia. and. The question is, are they going to put that in place? So you were saying before that the only thing that really does the job is really hard lockdowns luck we had in Victoria, but doesn't it depend on what approach that country is trying to take like we were hearing in the beginning this idea flattening the curves that we wouldn't overwhelm the hospital system is that what they're trying to do their just push just smooth out the number of cases a bit more without having to have really tough lockdowns just so that they're not having. Intensive care units different approach to Australia will certainly is a different approach to Australia. It's been all along they went the lifted, whatever they had to. Early they had some some period where people particularly Spain were just letting their hair down and we're paying the price for that now, and so that's all these European countries will achieve is a bit of the flattening of the curve if they're lucky and therefore a bit of. Heat of their hospitals in ICU's. But you're still going to have a lot of people who are very sick and they may not succeed as well as they should. Israel's done quite a good job. It was doing really badly with hundreds of thousands of cases and its case rate seems to have come down with a fairly significant lockdown. It has to be said in Israel. So Israel's a success story now having been a failure. And so it's been quite impressive how it's how it's brought it down. But the question is, will that happen in Europe and will it be enough or will it be too late and it's just out of control what other projections maybe not every European country but I know that the UK has daughter about the different scenarios. What kind of numbers are we talking about the sky's the limit? Really I mean Israel's an interesting example because you've got a small population of nine million or so people with several hundred, thousand cases. And that's what could have happened to Tori as well. You when you've got a non immune population, you can have very very large numbers and so at the moment, for example, in Britain as we saw that prevalence study that we talked about last week on Krona cast. In June after thirty thousand deaths, they had six percent prevalence of antibodies. So that suggests that six percent. Of the British public were infected with covid nineteen. Your albeit the antibody levels dropped over a period of time. So, there's ninety four percent of the population left infected. So that's a lot of people to go. So the sky is the limit unfortunately, and so the question then on the modeling and there was interesting modeling out of Washington State about media months six weeks ago, which suggested that once you got to about twenty percent. Prevalence of people who've been infected. So in other words that level of population immunity, I won't use. Herod. Amenity, here really misplaced tarum. With social distancing, you might be able to control the virus. But that's a long way to go twenty percent of the British populations millions twenty percent of the German and French, population is millions to get to that point and then you start to control it. So. There's a long way to go. Yeah. Really high price to pay for perhaps not the payoff that you need to actually stop the spread and remember that it was going size. The mortality rates come down as indeed it has because we're better treating. People were a and there are drugs now particularly zone which reduces the death rate and the other new drugs antibody drugs that will start to come on stream, but even so people are still getting the disease. there. Tonight on seven thirty avacado story of. radiographer WHO's worked in Melbourne and weeks after his. Infection which he caught in hospital he's still very unwell not able to exercise and really feeling lousy. So the burden on the community is enormous beyond people dying. So we're getting questions for me. It's not just about what's happening Estrella but also it's happening overseas and how it's asking, what do you make of the curfew measures in Europe where you got? Pubs closing at ten pm and that sort of thing why or how are those sorts of issues effective. So a curfew, a curfew by itself is not really going to do very much of anything. You've got to stop people moving around during the day as well as at night, and you do that by shutting POB shutting restaurants, shunning public areas that are. That are high risk Gymnasia and so on. And then a curfew on top of that in your say starting at nine o'clock through to the early morning. Restricts People's movements even more, but it's it's on the it's on the margins. It's not going to be the core thing that you do, and of course, no country in Europe is closing down schools, which means that you've got large numbers of parents circulating in the community each day taking the kids to school and picking them up unless, of course, the letting go by public transport with masks on, and that's the other thing is the extent to which countries are mandating. mask-wearing they should all be mandating mask-wearing to really reduce the spread as much as possible in public areas particularly indoors, and we've got a question from someone in New South, Wales who's having greeting anxiety. So they are asking if we got aerosol spread if I was to be in a room with someone for a long period of time, does it make any difference if I give them a hug when I I see them a does the one point five made a rule. That much. If you with someone in an enclosed space for a prolonged period will you should not get yourself into a situation where you're in a very poorly ventilated area in for an extended period, you should just not be in that situation. So it's fine being indoors particularly wasn't sure these days because the risk is so low, but anyway, your sittings gotta be ventilated possibly to to the discomfort of being to cold. So you've got through drafts and fresh air, and then the the risk is much lower. Now, if you give people a hug when you see them, then you're increasing the risk even further. So you should really maintain social distance touch elbows and not get too close because you're just amplifying the problems because there's no question does spread by droplets and close contact. So you're just making the situation worse. So to avoid greeting anxiety, you just stop hugging people kissing them, etc and you and you maintain a bit of distance. Well, it's time for on Koranic today if you've got a question policing leading new go-to. Dot Net air you slash krona cast click ask a question and mentioned current castle. We can find it still lots of questions coming in and we welcome them

Europe Victoria Britain Australia. Israel UK Spain England ICU France NHS Norman Philip Melbourne Tori Herod Washington National Health Service
Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:36 min | 4 months ago

Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra Cosso. This podcast discussed cybercrime or ransomware attacks against hospitals and other healthcare providers with Collab- Barlow CEO Synergistic Tech this barlow welcome to the program. Hey pleasure to be here. David. Mr Biles vile is, of course, posted on the podcast website. On background computer or cybercrimes against healthcare providers, more of a hospitals, disabled computer networks holding them for ransom. Frequently for Bitcoin fee, the tax have been prevalent since at least two, thousand and ten. This past month however, universal health services with over four hundred locations. Over in the US suffered a cyber attack disabling it's company wide computer network causing some it's hospitals to revert to pen and paper recordkeeping also last month the first known death. Resulted from a ransomware attack in Germany when a patient did not survive transferred to another hospital. Though a twenty nineteen hhs report found between twenty, twelve and sixteen. Hospital deaths increased after ransomware attacks. Earlier this month covid nineteen VACs. A covid nineteen vaccine trial was delayed by more attack or at least one. Likely. The most costly ransomware attack was to the UK's national health service in seventeen that amounted to an estimated one, hundred, twenty, million in it costs and lost productivity. ransomware attacks are on the increase especially amongst small hospitals, particularly vulnerable to phishing attacks, lasting upwards of tumor weeks because of their lean or inadequate security support. As Josephine Wolf noted in October Seventeen New York Times editorial quote Unquote cybersecurity shortcomings in the healthcare sector needs to be addressed now. More than ever when medical care is increasingly being offered via remote online formats. In twenty twenty states introduced more than two hundred and eighty cybersecurity related bills enacting several related to task forces or commissions training. Cybersecurity insurance in criminal. Penalties. The US Senate and House passed seven cybersecurity bills whoever not specifically addressed the healthcare industry and none became law. With me again and discuss healthcare cybersecurity is synergise texts, CEO. COLLAB- Barlow so club with that. As background LET'S START WITH A. Primer Info. I've read these ransomware products. in part are. Titled or named Wannacry Laki Win Plock encrypt locker. Are some these known ransomware product. So my question is, how do these encrypt clinical data and to what effect? So. So basically, what happening if you look at ransomware incident is a you know a narrow will gets access to a network and that could be as simple as grabbing somebody's credentials. You know maybe you were on a retail site, use the same credentials you used at work that retail site was compromised and There are many locations on the dark web that will. Sell compromised credentials or could have been through a phishing attack once the bad guy is into the network then there's two primary things that they're looking to do first is to move laterally. They WANNA get as much access across the networks they can, and there are a variety of tools that they'll deploy. They will actually help them harvest additional credentials once they've got a beachhead. On, the network in addition to harvesting new credentials and kind of moving lateral or what we call lateral movement. The other thing that are going to do is to try to elevate their privilege. So going from maybe an administrator or you know a nurse and triage and maybe getting access to their credentials, they're going to try to work their way up to a network. Administrator or someone that controls access to the whole domain once they've been able to get in and move their tentacles around the organization, then they're going to deploy their payroll, which is one of several of the tools that you mentioned will allow them to then lock things up effectively what these tools, our cryptographic tools, and they basically take the entire hard drive at the device. Scramble it and lock it up with a cryptographic key. What we've seen of late is the bad guys oftentimes insert a new step just before scrambling data, locking it all up in that the exfiltrated lot of it, and they're using that to increase their chances of getting paid by potentially threatening to. The organization by releasing that data if they don't pay ransom. Okay. Thank you so. I in my reading. It's uncertain Saul. Asked you this question? What's your understanding? How frequently? Is this occurring in the healthcare sector? Oh, it's every day I mean literally every single day because you got to remember what you read about in the news is only a very small fraction of what's actually going on even though technically speaking ransomware incident is as far as I'm concerned reportable incident because you gotta remember if the bad guy had enough access to walk up your data, they had the same level of access needed to read the data and they actually in many cases had the same level access needed to change the data. So the problem is you've actually lost control of that system when you've had a ransomware incident. I. So that was that was a question I did have. Other than. Possibly, making this data public and you know healthcare data's is is is confidential proprietary, of course. What do they typically do this data other than hold it hostage? Well remember, this is a organized crime. It is a volume organization you're dealing with a human on the other end and that human is organized right. You're not the only target, their targeting dozens of organizations at the same time in many cases are teams of thirty individuals and you know there's a breakdown on that team there's a project manager of a boss. There's people that are responsible for getting access. There's people that are responsible for moving laterally people responsible for elevating credentials and people are responsible for negotiating. Once walked up system

Mr Biles Josephine Wolf Seventeen New York Times Wannacry Laki Bitcoin Barlow National Health Service HHS Collab Us Senate Tumor Germany David UK United States House Saul
Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

04:28 min | 4 months ago

Caleb Barlow Discusses Healthcare Industry Ransomware Attacks and Measures to Prevent Cybercrimes

"On background computer or cybercrimes against healthcare providers, more of a hospitals, disabled computer networks holding them for ransom. Frequently for Bitcoin fee, the tax have been prevalent since at least two, thousand and ten. This past month however, universal health services with over four hundred locations. Over in the US suffered a cyber attack disabling it's company wide computer network causing some it's hospitals to revert to pen and paper recordkeeping also last month the first known death. Resulted from a ransomware attack in Germany when a patient did not survive transferred to another hospital. Though a twenty nineteen hhs report found between twenty, twelve and sixteen. Hospital deaths increased after ransomware attacks. Earlier this month covid nineteen VACs. A covid nineteen vaccine trial was delayed by more attack or at least one. Likely. The most costly ransomware attack was to the UK's national health service in seventeen that amounted to an estimated one, hundred, twenty, million in it costs and lost productivity. ransomware attacks are on the increase especially amongst small hospitals, particularly vulnerable to phishing attacks, lasting upwards of tumor weeks because of their lean or inadequate security support. As Josephine Wolf noted in October Seventeen New York Times editorial quote Unquote cybersecurity shortcomings in the healthcare sector needs to be addressed now. More than ever when medical care is increasingly being offered via remote online formats. In twenty twenty states introduced more than two hundred and eighty cybersecurity related bills enacting several related to task forces or commissions training. Cybersecurity insurance in criminal. Penalties. The US Senate and House passed seven cybersecurity bills whoever not specifically addressed the healthcare industry and none became law. With me again and discuss healthcare cybersecurity is synergise texts, CEO. COLLAB- Barlow so club with that. As background LET'S START WITH A. Primer Info. I've read these ransomware products. in part are. Titled or named Wannacry Laki Win Plock encrypt locker. Are some these known ransomware product. So my question is, how do these encrypt clinical data and to what effect? So. So basically, what happening if you look at ransomware incident is a you know a narrow will gets access to a network and that could be as simple as grabbing somebody's credentials. You know maybe you were on a retail site, use the same credentials you used at work that retail site was compromised and There are many locations on the dark web that will. Sell compromised credentials or could have been through a phishing attack once the bad guy is into the network then there's two primary things that they're looking to do first is to move laterally. They WANNA get as much access across the networks they can, and there are a variety of tools that they'll deploy. They will actually help them harvest additional credentials once they've got a beachhead. On, the network in addition to harvesting new credentials and kind of moving lateral or what we call lateral movement. The other thing that are going to do is to try to elevate their privilege. So going from maybe an administrator or you know a nurse and triage and maybe getting access to their credentials, they're going to try to work their way up to a network. Administrator or someone that controls access to the whole domain once they've been able to get in and move their tentacles around the organization, then they're going to deploy their payroll, which is one of several of the tools that you mentioned will allow them to then lock things up effectively what these tools, our cryptographic tools, and they basically take the entire hard drive at the device. Scramble it and lock it up with a cryptographic key. What we've seen of late is the bad guys oftentimes insert a new step just before scrambling data, locking it all up in that the exfiltrated lot of it, and they're using that to increase their chances of getting paid by potentially threatening to. The organization by releasing that data if they don't pay ransom.

Administrator United States Us Senate Wannacry Laki New York Times Josephine Wolf UK Germany CEO House
How To Deal With Depression

The Emma Guns Show

05:24 min | 4 months ago

How To Deal With Depression

"Hello, Hi and welcome to another bullet points episode where I posed the question. Feeling. Sad and I don't mean sad as in all you feeling a bit blue I'm talking about sad that seasonal affective disorder. In the throes of seasonal change and given how odd the year has been overall for all of us wherever it is that you're listening to this episode wherever you are in the world I thought it would be worth liking this up because it's just a useful thing to watch out for and perhaps more importantly just check in with yourself to see how you doing and if. You're feeling what I like to call funky right now because a few tweaks could actually help you navigate away from that down blue low feeling. Now, before we go any further, it's obviously very important that I say very clearly that I am not a medical professional and any concerns about your health, your mood, your mental health are best discussed with your doctor GP MD or family physician. and. I'm sure we can relate to feeling different and by different I. Mean we may notice a drop in energy feeling a bit lackluster, less enthusiastic all of those things during the cold months and especially. So when eve morning might start looking at summary and then quickly and you get to mid morning and it's definitely winter CEO kind of in this hopeful period of its today going to be Nice Oh actually, no today is going to be really wet and cold. So during the colder months when the days are shorter and the evenings all longer, it can just be a little bit harder to get motivated to feel. To feel that get up and go that just seems to come naturally in the summer, and if you feel a drastic change in your in your mood, your disposition or enthusiasm in the autumn, then you may very well be suffering from a form of seasonal affective disorder and obviously there will be a spectrum it'll be mild, and then they'll be more severe instances. So in the UK, it's on the website and it just being the National Health Service as the seasonal affective disorder is a type of depression that comes and goes in a seasonal patterns. So it makes sense right? So in the wind down in the summer summer you up. And the varying degrees of that down and that will be unique team. It goes on side is sometimes known as winter depression because the symptoms are more parent and tend to be more severe during the winter. The symptoms often begin in the autumn is the day start to get shorter and they're typically most severe during. December. January and February and that's not only when it's dark but also usually when the temperatures really do drop Now I personally can relate to this and I feel as though. When it comes to winter I, have to really fight the urge to hibernate especially in this this time October. November. December I really have to fight that urge and but then I mean I have this instinct to get on the blankets or stay in bed longer will. It sounds really dove preserved my energy like a hibernating bear I have honestly at times had to catch myself and say you're not a bear. You don't need to preserve unity and you don't need to eat all of that. So just don't do it and every time I get that urge to have a D.. Day. I have to remind myself how great it is to go for a long walk on the Crisp win today or even I mean even this weekend I went up for a really long walk and it was budgeting with rain but I had to test out my new rain jacket. So I made into I, made it into something exciting and I tried on the walk to notice how fresh everything smells like when it rains and you go for a long walk in the woods, it just smells incredible and I have to remind myself at that. There is nothing wrong with the DVD I hasten to add we. All benefit them from them. They can be absolutely wonderful but it's just making sure for me personally and I don't know about you that I'm not having too many in a row. So seasonal affective disorder is brought on because the brain is exposed to less natural light and vitamin D during the autumn and winter, and this intern disrupts our production of Melatonin Serotonin and Melatonin is the sleepy hormone and Serotonin is the mood hormone. So if those two are taking a bit of a battering or if they're affected anyway and they get out of balance, you're definitely going to feel in how you sleep and your mood. And you're suffering with sad. Then you may feel quite extreme changes in moods across the season's usually a in autumn winter that'll be characterized by depression. With periods of not feeling depressed throughout. Spring. Summer. The lack of light and exposure to vitamin D and the shorter days mean that the actually pretty prevalent in the northern hemisphere and the instances tend to increase further north you go which makes sense when you think about it let's daylight the signs look out for are things like hypothermia. So that's that feeling of extreme lethargy sleepiness just that feeling that you just want to. Curl up which sometimes valid because you're busy and you really do need to rest but other times if it if it's tipping over the edge and it's just getting all the time, remember what I said about me wanting to be a bad. The other thing to look out for is the urge to an you are overeating or you're craving carbohydrates about some part of it. Also part of it is a notable lack of motivation and energy. You might be irritable and your mood might be noticeably depressed or down. You might also just not enjoy the things that you normally like. He might be withdrawing socially and he might be struggling to do the things that you normally do or even think clearly,

Melatonin UK CEO National Health Service Family Physician. Intern
"national health service" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

07:22 min | 5 months ago

"national health service" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"In a number here is a 55 4 53. On the way we're I've been saying it's the National Health Service and the latest debacle out of the UK. As you know, I can't give you an example what it's in regards to, but nobody wanted me to specify that it's in regards to cove it and how they managed to kill more people. With the National Health Service. Yeah, the covert lockdowns are killing people is what it comes down to. In this case, we're talking about the covert lockdowns killing businesses, specifically the newspaper business where that had a co morbidity that has been going on for a long time. Which is there a more efficient way is to deliver tree deliver news than putting them on dead tree. Absolutely true Way more efficient. That that was another cove. It shouldn't even be on the toe tag for that industry Well, but the reality is it definitely sped things of the code. The covert crackdown locked down by the government definitely sped up the demise of some of these papers, and I'll give you the example that our chatter here is calling himself the real Christopher Christopher Camel in the On air now chat over at chat them. As he points out The Tampa Times The Tampa Times had shut down printing from seven days a week. To just too so just Sunday in Wednesday And they cut the paper in half as faras thickness. So even though they're printing twice a week, the paper itself is half his thick as just one of the daily papers would have been just a couple of years. Prior to that. And he points out that they in addition to just doing the two printings per week, he says, This is post Corona. So during the lock down, that's when they finally made the final cut to go down to two days per week, And he said they lost a million dollars in revenue in the first month of the Corona crackdown, just from loss of advertisers. Because fewer people are picking up the paper. The subscription rate, basically the pass around rate the pickup rate went down, you know, into the toilet, and so advertisers are like, Well, why are we advertising here? If no one is actually reading this paper, So we're out, And so now they're literally running on fumes and they come running up against competition. A ce faras advertising goes cheaper, cheaper advertising rates elsewhere like Well, I'm not going to actually advertise anywhere other outlets, but obviously we everybody knows other every other outlet online is going to be cheaper than you know. The newsprint. Hey says they bought their competitors several years ago and immediately closed it because I asked you I used to live in the area. Nobody used to live in Tampa as well. As I remember. There was a there was a newspaper that was a competitors called The ST Petersburg Times. So Tampa in ST Pete are two very large kind of cities on the West Coast of Florida, and apparently, the competitors they bought was the ST Pete Times. So they bought the ST Pete Times, renamed to The Tampa Times or Tampa. 10 times and they shut down The ST Pete Times. So yeah, in Tampa, one of the major cities in the United States right, like one of the big cities in Florida. They only have one newspaper. There's no competition now, and it's only two days a week. It's Krampus is the biggest city in the United States to ever be conquered by pirates. You know, it's crazy to is for a is trying tracks a lot of old people. You would think that they would need to have a readership. You have a huge readership interesting point. Yeah, if they're failing and winter Jeez, that's that's bad. The real bad elsewhere. So yeah, Let's talk about elsewhere were according to the F P report here on International Journalists. International newspaper. This isn't just a U s thing. Right? So it's also in the Philippines. 10 out of the 70 newspapers in their newspaper association have closed. For good Thean Destry is under siege says that one of the folks from the Philippines and we've all taken bruises far from only affecting journalists. The disappearance of print papers deals out paying up the production chain taking in printers, paper makers and delivery people. These air also jobs that are going to go away and people forget about that. Look at what happened with buggy whips. It not only affected the makers of buggy whips, but maybe, but the but the people who killed the cows for the weather for the buggy with rich we need to. We need to pass a law t guarantee the wheel buggy with manufacturers business. Well, what we really need to do. A big nail is finally respond to the candle makers petition because The makers of artificial light have been suffering for centuries known under the onslaught off unfair foreign competition from the sun. The British major British media brands cause of 6.6 million new online readers in the first quarter in what their industry association said was a new records. A lot of people moving to online in this corona crackdown, but most have not seen the same balance in print sales. Corona virus has become quote the greatest threat to the global news industry since the 2008 economic crash. Unquote, wrote industry Publication Press Gazette, which itself moved online only had 2030 that that that that's some writing on the wall for you carry in the coal mine. So to speak. Yeah, I mean, I don't understand why anybody is upset about this. You know what amazes me is that they're not using a combination of pay wall in advertising. You would think that there's Certain articles like a set of articles that they are you would charge for. And then there would be another subset of articles where you know anybody could just what they're doing. They're doing a unified paywall might work because my problem is like I would have paid a little bit to see this article from the telegraph that I'm hoping to read tonight, but But I wasn't going to subscribe to the Telegraph, which is in London on DH normally doesn't doesn't have stuff I want. But what if I could pay one subscription fee and have access to all the major newspapers of the world? That might be something I would think that would be more ah, more of ah, some sort of licensing model where you know outlets with license each other's content, and then you would just subscribe to which you have that's called the A P. Yeah, It's like there's truth. In truth, this Okay. I won't. I won't respond. And they have the newspaper. They have. They have something similar to what you talking about. With a newspaper. You can get a bunch of different papers you could do with magazine, So I bet you there's something like that with newspapers. We had an advertiser here within the last decade, which was an app. I'm sorry. I don't remember what they're called. They didn't You know, they didn't stick around very long and out of the APS even still exist. Maybe it does. But the idea was it was sort of like the Netflix for magazines because, like magazines or dying, right, So they need to get on the digital platforms. And so they, you know, they would. Essentially you paid 10 bucks a month or 12 bucks a month and you get 60. Plus magazine's most of which you probably know interested in like, you know, Cigar aficionado. Yeah, but if you're a cigar aficionado, your rhetoric, you know, that's the thing. But there weren't like 60 Cigar magazines is a bunch of, you know, different topics. You probably aren't.

Tampa Times Tampa Pete Times National Health Service Florida United States UK Christopher Christopher Camel Petersburg Times Netflix Thean Destry Philippines London Press Gazette Tampa.
"national health service" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:35 min | 6 months ago

"national health service" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Has encountered l e X. And there's quite an investigation underway at American Airlines spotted flying this plane in on Sunday and I reported air traffic control. Past a guy wearing a jetpack at 3000 ft. That's right. A guy on a jet back at 3000 ft apart. It's said the man was about 300 yards from the jet tower warned. Other approaching flights be on the lookout. But there were no other fightings. People, especially during the shutdown. When we're all eating more than we should. Ah, there's a study out talking about if you're trying to lose weight. Be careful when you eat. Eating in the evening is associated with higher total calorie intake and a lower quality diet. That's according to a UK study of almost 1200 adults, Researchers found people who ate the least in the evening also consumed less throughout the entire day. The study by researchers in Ireland looked at the eating patterns of about 1000 people every year over a period of more than a decade. So there's some advice for anybody who's trying to move forward in their career. There's a study out by UC Berkeley that says being a jerk it work and really heard somebody's prospects. For future success, They said. That was because the behavior that's manipulative, self interested and across it is harmful to all interpersonal relationships, including those in the workplace. But on the other hand being agreeable building alliances. Well, apparently that helps him move wide up the power ladder. Thousands of diabetics are going on to a low calorie diet in Britain, courtesy of the National Health Service. Starting today. 5000 Type Two diabetics are going.

American Airlines National Health Service UK Britain Ireland
"national health service" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:48 min | 8 months ago

"national health service" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

"People across the UK joined in a round of applause on Sunday to mark the seventy second anniversary of the free to use National Health Service one of the country's most cherished institutions, the reverence with which it is held has been bolstered this year during what is being Europe's deadliest corona virus outbreaks though the UK as a whole has a confirmed virus death toll of forty, four, thousand, two, hundred, twenty, the third highest in the world behind the United States and Brazil the chess and everyone who works within it in whatever capacity have been lauded for their work and care. Created by the Labor government after World War Two, in nineteen, forty, eight by bringing together the nation's disparate health institutions, the NHS's founding principles have never changed funded by everyone through the tax system. It provides free healthcare to any UK resident when needed. Prince Charles said the NHS that been through the most testing time in its history, and it was right for the whole country to come together to pay tribute to everyone who works within it after coming down with corona virus himself and spending three nights in intensive care Prime Minister Boris. Johnson credited NHS workers with saving his life, and his insisted it get whatever resources it needs. The main Labour Party opposition said the NHS has been starved of funding for the past decade during the government's austerity drive. Overnight many of the country's major sites, including the houses of parliament and the arch at Wembley, stadium England's National Soccer Stadium lit up in blue to remember all those who died during the pandemic. And before the weekend, soccer matches, players joined in with a round of applause.

Donald Trump Iran United States NHS America National Health Service UK Britain soccer Anthony Davis Joe Biden National Soccer Stadium England Mount Rushmore White House South Dakota Tehran National Monument
"national health service" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"national health service" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Both the National Health Service which is free and as a private paid breast surgeon he would tell some of his NHS patients they have fast growing breast cancer that the NHS waiting list was weeks long but that he could operate as a private doctor for a fee some later learns they'd never had cancer at all others who did have cancer saw it return because he botched the surgery Patterson's now serving a twenty year sentence and independent tribunal has just found his peers and managers missed multiple opportunities to spot and stop his abuse Vicki Barker CBS news London a new study suggests the inclination to give something to someone in need starts very young university of Washington researchers say more than half of nineteen month old children even when hungry gave a tasty snack to a stranger who they thought was hungry Pam Coulter CBS news CBS news right CBS radio and CBS news radio dot com sure reason for retail from the kitchen table in New York City hi Rachel ray and this is rage on the radio these are with flavor cast iron skillet I've taken one pound of juries per for adult portions just and crumbled person onions char your tortillas then you just build really you take a little bit of potato the providers the onions and the Chinese and then on top of that our people and I don't.

National Health Service NHS cancer Patterson London Rachel ray Vicki Barker university of Washington Pam Coulter CBS New York City
"national health service" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"national health service" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Universality because some people are priced on the market. Medicare for all National Health Service that tends to create universality but I their quality and not affordability or affordability and not quality. so the question is what exactly is the complaint about Medicare for all being made here is the complaint being made that it doesn't cover enough people because obviously that's not true is the complete being made that it is that Medicare is insufficient if so then I'm gonna have to spend an absolute fortune on it especially if you're talking about cancer care for example or the kinds of surgeries that you could theoretically wait for but really hamper quality of life wait times in in Canada for so called elective surgeries are pretty serious yes this is heaven love your work I was having a discussion with somebody on abolishing the second minute missing the point is to prevent against time in government journey his main point is that arming citizens will be effective in combat in the US army how do you respond well the fact is that there are numerous situations in American life in which bands of armed Americans have prevented folks from from committing crimes against them I believe as my lizard kings and that his his father used to be armed at his house in case god forbid people races we arrived violet yeah the the fact is that if you're talking about government tyranny the point of an armed citizenry is not necessarily they're gonna be able to defeat the US military in an all out war the point is that you make the be tiring think twice about actually trending down Tierney. the question is like to be around for example beta says that he wants to take everyone in the country how many American deaths is metalwork willing to preside over in order to achieve that goal. in order to stop. whatever it is three hundred deaths I did not even a hundred deaths a year in school shootings for example which would be a very high an estimate. in order to stop that he wants how many thousands of Americans to die.

Medicare US Tierney. Canada National Health Service
"national health service" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

News Radio WGOW

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"national health service" Discussed on News Radio WGOW

"I'm never surprised secretary of state Mike Pompeii says the president's firing of national security adviser John Bolton sends a message he should have people the trusted values and whose efforts and judgments benefit him and delivering American foreign policy at Pompeii one Bolton were said to have been at odds of late even to the point of hardly speaking with each other South Carolina senator Lindsey Graham spoke with the president last night and had a feeling this was coming I thank the view that there some public discussions about will remain on the other side of me when the the Taliban probably was a bridge too far trump in Bolton reportedly gonna do what major argument at the White House last night over the president's plan to host Taliban peace talks at camp David something Bolton opposed he also opposed the president's offer to meet with the Iranian president without preconditions Charles Kupperman has been named the acting national security adviser a permanent replacement will be the next week hi Mike moss. president trump's firing of national security adviser Bolton has international implications correspondent nic Robertson says an issue raised in the UK was one of the disagreements between the president in bold it was very clear to I think British journalists in particular who follow this issue closely John Bolton had indicated that the United States would like to get access to the British National Health Service in a post brexit scenario hugely politically damaging for the prime minister Boris Johnson so when he met with president trump and the cameras were in front of a pair of them they both both coordinated that on that point saying the National Health Service in the United Kingdom is not open for business with the United States in a price breaks in trade situation a federal judge in Fargo was just walked in North Dakota law that require doctors to tell women they can reverse a medicated abortion on Wall Street the Dow down twelve.

British National Health Servic North Dakota prime minister Mike moss. camp David South Carolina Fargo United Kingdom Boris Johnson Mike Pompeii United States nic Robertson trump Charles Kupperman White House Taliban senator Lindsey Graham
"national health service" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"national health service" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"The national health service. This is the real crown jewels many Brits. And for the president to say that, that would be on the table in any trade negotiation the Brisbane desperately needs a trade deal with the United States. I think many people here that will be the key, takeaway. ABC's Ian panel in London. You're listening to ABC news. Ever wonder why our top local story today. Marks nine years since kyron Horman, vanished from skyline school in northwest, Portland now, eleven ninety Xs, Brad Ford says a book is being published about the case, mother, desert young has been working with New York Times bestselling true primes, the Rebecca Morris write a book about the case. It's titled love you forever. The search for kyron Horman young says detectives are making progress and she believes kyron stepmother Terri Moulton knows what happened. Go put pressure on her that constant pressure is gonna be what gets us kyron Bolton divorce chirons father came shortly after the boy's disappearance. She married Jose, the Hayes, whose fast guys Martinez in the Vana last year. Young says proceeds from the book will go to a missing children's program. The Oregon government ethics commission is launching a preliminary review of Portland state university's former president who resigned under pressure last month this spring, most of PSU's board of trustees wanted remote Tureski to step down over concerns that he lied to. Them used university resources for his own benefit, and that he mistreated co workers and members of his staff Oregon live reports a preliminary review is the first step toward a full investigation. The ethics commission will decide July twelfth whether the evidence supports it a registered sex offender from Ashland is back behind bars after staff at nearby talent middle school found him hiding inside the girls locker room yesterday, talent police track forty one year old Curtis Stevens into a home in Ashland where they found stolen property from the school drugs and Dr paraphernalia, he faces several charges including failure to register as a sex offender. Gas prices are down again this week, the national average for regular drops three pennies to two eighty a gallon in Oregon. The price is also off three cents to three thirty nine prices continue to push lower for most drivers and prices should continue to decline in the short term now that refinery maintenance season has wrapped up and triple as Marie dot says oppressive crew dropped a fifty three bucks a barrel last week. I'm Gail Cunningham, traffic, and weather are next bluecross blueshield believes.

kyron Horman Oregon president Young Rebecca Morris Portland state university Terri Moulton ABC Curtis Stevens Ashland Gail Cunningham United States Brisbane Portland skyline school New York Times Marie dot Brad Ford
"national health service" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"national health service" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The national health service. This is the real crown jewels many Brits. And for the president to say that, that would be on the table in any trade, negotiation the Brisbane desperately needs a trade deal with the United States, I think many people that will be the key. Takeaway, ABC's Ian panel in London. You're listening to ABC news. Sacramento's number one for breaking news, traffic and weather, I heart radio station, news, ninety three point one KFI. I'm John Brennan Z at three oh to with your top local stories sheriff's investigators have released a composite sketch of a man wanted for allegedly assaulting a woman last week. The victim was attacked around five PM on may thirtieth on a pedestrian walkway above highway, fifteen salmon falls park, the woman suffered significant injuries after she was physically and sexually assaulted. The black male suspect is said to be around six foot two within build and unshaven face and two gaps in the top row of his teeth. The sketches posted a KF became dot com facing a surgeon homelessness. Los Angeles County supervisor Hilda Solis wants to see a unified approach is going to require our local elected officials, as well as our public safety officials as well as our healthcare officials to come together in the form of a strike team. We do it for other emergencies. I don't see why we should we can't do that now a new report shows the homeless population grew by twelve percent. Los Angeles County last year. The jump is even bigger on a local level. The city of Los Angeles is dealing with a sixteen percent, increase, and the search is being called off for a Rockland, man who went missing along the south.

Los Angeles County Los Angeles KF ABC Hilda Solis salmon falls John Brennan Z KFI Sacramento Rockland United States Brisbane president London Ian supervisor sixteen percent twelve percent six foot
"national health service" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"national health service" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"For the national health service is the prime minister say taxpayers will have to contribute a bit more in a fair and balanced way to support the nhs that we all use while delivering on our fiscal commitments the prime minister of thailand has said his military government is committed to holding an early election next year an election early next year let me get back to timing rights and that he may clarify his political future in september probably shannon made the comments in an exclusive interview with bloomberg in the past people have asked on win elections in thailand but the important criteria for the election is organic laws right now the factor is quite ready for elections so i'm quite sure we would be able to hold elections in february next year and women in saudi arabia will have the right to get behind the wheel from sunday onwards move that the kingdom has spent months preparing for bloomberg's vivian nazarene reports processes recommended cut point eight that is a nominal figure meaning one sister distributed four tax deliver to the market is going to be a smaller another that was obviously the wrong sound you heard the oil minister from saudi arabia speaking you're just going to have to take my word for that is of sunday women in saudi arabia will have the right to get behind the wheel global news twenty four hours a day on aruna take talk on twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries i'm markus karlsson this is bloomberg guy thank you marcus time joellen marsh and cena facing the prospects of going out in the group stages of the world cup in russia they lost three hills see croatia last night's result that sends their opponents into the last sixteen brazil will look better they're opening drove is switzerland's when they meet costa rica at lunchtime well the swiss take on serbia tonight france will be in the knockout stages after they beat peru one nell england's cricket is just one victory away from sitting a five nil one day international series whitewash australia they won the fourth match by six wickets in durham last night in past the tory score three hundred ten for eight with more than five overs to spare british tennis number one call edmonds has to move on with his wimbledon preparations south being knocked out of the queen's club championships he was beaten by nick curiosity in the last sixteen twelve time grand slam champion novak djokovic critical dmitrov in straight sets to reach the quarterfinals health play frenchman atrean menarini later and the coronation stakes is the big race on the pronouncements this year's royal ascot try me an alpha centurion both been heavily banks to win along with bills them brooke thanks for the sports update coming up on bloomberg daybreak europe brian colton chief economist at fitch ratings joins us next for a few questions about greece into the makes the trade story clearly something needs keep our eyes across as well we will have more here on bloomberg daybreak this guy join bloomberg and top institutional investors in paris.

prime minister twenty four hours one day
"national health service" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"national health service" Discussed on AP News

"In the national health service the cap currently restricts tier two visas for non eu workers to twenty thousand seven hundred people per year it's the first easing of immigration rules by conservative government with a long standing goal of cutting net immigration to below one hundred thousand it's currently more than double that britain's 2016 vote to leave the block was followed by an increase in the number of you medical staff leaving the country the royal college of general practitioners said it would be a much needed victory for commonsense and patient care mcdonald's will begin phasing out plastic straws but as ap's meant small reports the move won't be happening at all its restaurants just yeah mcdonald's says it'll switch the paper straws at all it's locations in the uk and ireland and tests an alternative the plastic ones and some of its us restaurants later this year year the golden arches and other fast food companies have been facing increasing pressure from customers and environmental activists to stop using plastic straws because they can end up in the ocean and harm marine and other wildlife the burger chain declined to say what type of straw with test in the us only saying it would be a sustainable solution it is more than fourteen thousand restaurants across the country compared to less than fourteen hundred in the uk and ireland i met small an expanding list of ingredients will count as dietary fiber on new food labels ap correspondent warren levinson says that's leading to a lot of criticism two years ago the food and drug administration told foodmakers if they want to tout added fiber package label they need to show the fiber provides a.

britain mcdonald ap uk ireland us warren levinson eu two years
"national health service" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"national health service" Discussed on AP News

"In the national health service the cap currently restricts tier two visas for non e workers to twenty thousand seven hundred people per year it's the first easing of immigration rules by conservative government with a longstanding goal of cutting net immigration to below one hundred thousand it's currently more than double bats britain's 2016 vote to leave the block was followed by an increase in the number of e medical staff leaving the country the royal college of general practitioners said it would be a much needed victory for commonsense and patient care mcdonald's will begin phasing out plastic straws but as matt small reports the move won't be happy to get old it's its restaurants just yeah mcdonald's says it'll switch the paper straws at all it's locations in the uk in our land and tests an alternative the plastic ones and some of its us restaurants later this year the golden arches and other fast food companies have been facing increasing pressure from customers and environmental activists to stop using plastic straws because they can end up in the ocean in harm marine and other wildlife the burger chain declined to say what type of straw with test in the us only saying it would be a sustainable solution it is more than fourteen thousand restaurants across the country compared to less than fourteen hundred in the uk in ireland i met small an expanding list of ingredients will count as dietary fiber on new food labels ap correspondent warren levinson says that's leading to a lot of criticism two years ago the food and drug administration told foodmakers if they want to tout added fiber on a package label they need to show the fiber provides a health.

mcdonald uk us ireland warren levinson britain matt small ap two years
"national health service" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"national health service" Discussed on AP News

"The national health service the cap currently restricts tier two visas for non e you workers to twenty thousand seven hundred people per year it's the first easing of immigration rules by conservative government with a longstanding goal of cutting net immigration to below one hundred thousand it's currently more than double bats britain's sixteen vote to leave the block was followed by an increase in the number of eu medical staff leaving the country the royal college of general practitioners said it would be a much needed victory for common sense and patient care mcdonald's will begin phasing out plastic straws but as they peas meant small reports the move won't be happy to get all of its restaurants just yeah mcdonald's says it'll switch the paper straws at all it's locations in the uk in ireland and test an alternative the plastic ones and some of its us restaurants later this year the golden arches and other fast food companies have been facing increasing pressure from customers and environmental activists to stop using plastic straws because they can end up in the ocean in harm marine and other wildlife the burger chain declined to say what type of straw with test in the us only saying it would be a sustainable solution it is more than fourteen thousand restaurants across the country compared to less than fourteen hundred in the uk in ireland i met small an expanding list of ingredients will count as dietary fiber on new food labels ap correspondent warren levinson says that's leading to a lot of criticism two years ago the food and drug administration told foodmakers if they want to tout added fiber on a package labeled they need to show the fiber provides health benefit this week the fda greenlighted eight ingredients for approval is.

mcdonald uk ireland us warren levinson britain eu ap two years
"national health service" Discussed on Click

Click

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"national health service" Discussed on Click

"Okay now get end building still here in the studio every can move the discussion a little bit to data and because this is based on some comments that you made last time that we sat opposite each other tho simpson simpson notre hey pronounced name hurt that one of our listeners and says can set something i disagree with in the episode of the tenth of april unusually i know unusual to disagree with then says says well at least i would like to take some exception to her my data belongs to me statement at some point in the discussion you said look i would like to belong to us and also now think if the potential if some of might acer belonged to all of us it is could be a national asset that's how dna if our national health service national health service here in the uk collected that with our lifelong health data we as a nation could find causality with genetic markers correlation of treatment with outcomes and make the u k a potential leader in healthcare we would need farreaching new laws to protect its use in commerce and other areas of life and talk is onto thinking about the medications of insurance companies getting hold of that but it will say some of the regulatory framework that could mitigate potential social homes from that so open to discussion and get data belongs to me so does that mean that we'd have the right to preclude any research based on dna that could be for the greater.

uk acer
"national health service" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"national health service" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"The treasury to this but it is actually pretty significant the most recent permanent secretary recently retards the nick mcpherson his himself come out in favour of of a hypothecated national insurance to fund the national health service and i think the what he recognizes is the the national health service you know all choice to have a taxfunded health system is a particular choice of the british people but is a very important choice it has huge implications for the rest of public expenditure and it actually makes more sense to have a separate discussion about the funding of of the nhs van a evani against cotop in the in the public expenditure round and i don't believe that it would make the nhs vulnerable to shifts in revenue streams because you would say that they would publish that plan for expenditure the fire five years if the the money fell short in one year the fund the national front could borrow enough money to meet its requirements and at the end of the five years if he'd accumulated a bit of debt because revenues had fallen short than the treasury would have to pick up that dead so that would be a stability of funding which currently there isn't nipples you twenty two nine we've been hearing the retail results of a whole series of outlets in recent days of savings reason john lewis and others it's been a good christmas for some much less than mary for others rob you can tell us more yes it's been a tough christmas the retailers that a series of announcements this morning from some of our biggest names on the high street while rene klay trends from consumers from what we've heard this morning they t seemed to show that some retailers are not doing well and other seem to be very much out of favour say marks and spencer all biggest clothes retailer has that reporter yet.

christmas others john lewis reporter nhs national health service permanent secretary treasury british national front people
"national health service" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"national health service" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is bloomberg markets i'm lisa abramowicz along with pimm fox and we are going to delve deeper into the brexit negotiations we're gonna talk about scotland in particular which was not four brexit but ended up getting included in the whole thing anyway i sort of by accident given the fact that part of the united kingdom and go for example that spending in some areas in as scotland for key government programs could fall by about twenty percent who is a new reporter talked about the aging of the population and also the rising health care costs and that means that they're going to need new money more money for the national health service this is a study from the fraser of a lander instituting a calls for a real debate about the sustainability of scotland's budget at it says that the status quo is not an option yeah well and also naturally that that scotland toss have been reaching out itself to other countries to try to cultivate relationships and get new trade agreements wants brexit is completed here to talk a little bit more about that is keith brown cabinet secretary for the economy jobs and fair work for the scottish parliament comes to us from edinburgh edinburgh but is here he in our bloomberg 1130 at studios in new york i ain't a cabinet secretary i would love to get your take on what you think the consequences will be to scotland as these negotiations with respect to brexit go on but all the instruction but to have the phrase it around and should be mentioned in the is to be earned on eight billion perm's loss and up to two thousand jobs being lost but that kind of estimating committed by other economists across the peace so a very fundamental effect on the scottish economy so we're trying to do see what we can do to minimize thoughts on as you say it making sure that we have bilateral relationships which should improved within the eu with and canada which have been tail on this week anti in the us is well minister.

lisa abramowicz pimm fox scotland reporter secretary edinburgh bloomberg new york eu us keith brown canada twenty percent