37 Burst results for "National Geographic"

Rising Tides with Dr. Victoria Herrmann

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Rising Tides with Dr. Victoria Herrmann

"I am talking with. Dr victoria is the managing director of the arctic institute. A gates scholar at cambridge university and the national geographic explorer. Hi victoria welcome to the podcast. I agree to be here looking forward to this. Conversation has been real. Treat to do some background research on you. But let's just start off because you wasn't even quite sure how to introduce you. Let's start off. What is the arctic institute. The arctic institute is a nonprofit organization. That space here in washington. Dc but we have a team of about forty five researchers across north america and europe working towards a justice. Dana ball end secure. Are we do research across the many dimensions of arctic security so thank climate security. Which is what. I do cultural security. But also maritime security hard security food security making sure everyone is safe healthy and their wellbeing is up across the arctic region. now what is a gates scholar. A gates scholar is a scholarship. That i was very fortunate to have to complete my phd at university in the uk. It's a scholarship that is afforded to anyone who is a resident outside of the uk and is dedicated to improving the lives of others. So that includes me a geographer but also biologists and chemists anthropologist lawyers all working hopefully towards a better world okay so this is not associated with bill gates at all it was established by bill gates established alongside his father bill gates senior. So it is his money and his vision started at twenty years ago this year. Actually so we are celebrating our twentieth anniversary in twenty twenty one. Okay so named gates usually typically think of bill

Arctic Institute Dr Victoria Dana Ball Cambridge University Arctic Victoria North America Bill Gates Washington Europe UK Gates
Fresh update on "national geographic" discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

00:15 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "national geographic" discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"The podcast. Seizing freedom tells. The story of how black americans liberated themselves during the civil war and fought for justice during reconstruction. You ask what i am. Grumbling about has not. The president issued his emancipation proclamation. The president has but the country has not and it must be done else. God will blow out the sun. Burn up the sea and thunder his wrath abroad. You can listen to the complete for season of seizing freedom now. So i was lucky enough to get to work with you on a on a feature for history magazine that you wrote for us on the on the tulsa massacre so and i learned after the fact. Because you didn't tell me with a family connection to say. Can you tell me what your family's connection is so i'm related to jbc stratford. Who was touted in in research. That i've found when i was writing the story. As you know one of the most wealthy men on black wall street or greenwood in tulsa oklahoma at that time in the country and he is my third great grandfather. That is tucker tool who works with me. A history resident on the history and culture desk for national geographic tucker's at talented young writer. And i reached out to him to do a story on the hundredth anniversary of the tulsa race riot. So when i found out about his relationship to j. stratford after he turned into the story. I was floored tucker grew up hearing stories about his formidable ancestor. Our new of j. b. end the name. I'd seen his face on when i was younger. I remember my grandfather having conversations with me about how important legacy is in doing research for his article. Tekere sat down with his grandfather. They're unsee tool to learn more about j. b. stratford. And what happened to him after he left. Also all these years trying to blame the right point to him being a major instigator but thanks to the efforts of stratford descendants. Many who have also become lawyers and judges the state of oklahoma stratford and honorary executive. Pardon in nineteen ninety-six. We have plaque. That was issue is issued in the name of state and government had absolve him and talk about the what the family wouldn't get back however is the fortune that jd. Stratford lost when the white mob destroyed his home business properties and forced him out of town. The loss of data generational wealth is something that descendants greenwood's entrepreneurs continue to grapple with my grandfather's words. He said you. You would have been born with a silver spoon in your mouth if if this didn't happen to sort of in in an ally hardaway but you know it's it's really hard to think about because we know this isn't the only event or massacre that black people have faced in in the united states. But we know that these type of events have generational impac. Some economists estimate the financial losses from the tulsa race riots at more than twenty five million dollars today but in terms of loss generational wealth. The number tops. Six hundred million human rights watch issued a report in two thousand twenty making a case for reparations for descendants they and others are calling on federal state and local governments to come up with adequate ways to repair the harm. What's harder to calculate are the effects of decades of erasing the history of what actually happened in tulsa but organizations like the tulsa race massacre sentinel commission historians and scientists like phoebe. Stubblefield are committed to reclaiming the story. I'm here for the seeds. And i hope that that will turn into a connection with their descendants. I thank god. And i both had this mission of tells me people's possibles there won't be around to of hiding the history is i. Don't want this story to be hidden again. More after the break for more on the tulsa race massacre check out the cover story on the anniversary from writer. Deneen brown in the upcoming june issue of national geographic. You can also find the race card a project from journalists michelle norris who challenged people to capture their thoughts on race and just six words and poet. Elizabeth alexander will reflect on what it means to be black and free in a country that undermines black freedom that yo subscribers can check out tucker tools piece on how greenwood was destroyed by the tulsa race massacre in the may june issue of national geographic. History magazine. and soon you'll also be able to read a personal essay tucker road about his ancestor j. stratford on our website. And checkout scott. Ellsworth's new book on the tulsa race massacre called the groundbreaking an american city search for justice. Finally stay tuned this summer for national geographic documentary red summer which chronicles white supremacist terrorism and race. Riots that took place across the country in nineteen nineteen shortly before the tulsa race massacre. That's all in your show notes. Right there in your podcast. App overheard. National geographic is produced by brian. Good jacob pinter. Laura sim and alana strauss. Our senior producer. Carla wills who produced this episode. Our senior editor is eli chen. Our executive producer of audio is to our lawn. Our fact checkers are julie. Beer and robin palmer on sale. Su sound designed engineered this episode. He also composed our theme music. The music in this episode was composed by thomas. Brian of push audio joshua. Thomas was the voice of bucks franklin. This podcast production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson is the director officials and immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national geographic's director and i'm your host amy briggs. Thanks for listening and see you next time..

Susan Goldberg Michelle Norris Whitney Johnson Brian J. Stratford Alana Strauss Elizabeth Alexander Thomas J. B. Stratford Eli Chen Oklahoma Laura Sim Six Hundred Million Stubblefield Julie Stratford Two Thousand Jacob Pinter
Roth Smith: When the NY Times publish your photostory

Photography Daily

02:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Roth Smith: When the NY Times publish your photostory

"Rough smith. He is a photographer of writer. A contributed for national geographic and its many guises and has been that for a number of years. So i'm fascinated to find out more about how that came about how you go about approach shooting writing for this powerhouse publication. But you know. I was made aware off his work very recently following the new york times publishing a piece about a photo project. That is proof that you really don't need to go too far from new frontal to make stories that the world's most important titles akin to talk about. I think it's too easy to think that you need something exceptionally complex difficult to pull off for it to be worthy of shooting or attract attention. Sometimes the simplest stores of just the best. This is a story about a photographer who takes a real pleasure in following his instincts to make photo stories and create intriguing assignments for himself. This is a story about ralph smith. Every morning i set off on a journey up at sparrows down the street on my bicycle. Exercising my modulation as much as my legs by the time. It's end of the house an hour or two later having witnessed to summarize and put however many miles of town and country beneath my wheels. I feel as though i've been places. Seeing things traveled in the grand old sense of the word. This rough sounds like the perfect breakfast. But an and it's not just fairweather. Never the weather done you. i do i. I've been out in some very cold bitter temperatures the couple of things that keep me home here on the coast. We get some really savage wins and wins it going fifty miles an hour coming off. The there's no point in writing you. Just get blown off the bike but otherwise yet temperature makes very little difference to me and now there's no such thing as bad weather just inappropriate clothing

Rough Smith Ralph Smith The New York Times Fairweather
Fresh update on "national geographic" discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

00:33 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "national geographic" discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"So i want you to close your eyes and imagine it's a sunny morning in early. May nineteen twenty one. you're in tulsa oklahoma in the bustling all black green. With section of town dapper moustachioed man pulls up in front of the stratford hotel in a shiny model. T ford. he's a lawyer and real estate. Developer named b. stratford. Hotel is just one of his properties. He is not only one of the richest men in town but one of the most prosperous african americans in the country at the time he steps into the lobby stops for quick shoeshine. Maybe from someone like a young robert fairchild who recalled in a nineteen seventy-eight interview that he used to earn good money shining shoes in greenwood. I made semi notch. Twenty nine hundred jobs. And i make were over eighteen hundred dollars that's fairchild being interviewed by scott ellsworth a writer historian and tulsa native scott has spent decades studying and writing about tulsa greenwood district and though we imagined that scenario j. stratford. The man himself was very real. One of hundreds of african american entrepreneurs who helped make greenwood one of the wealthiest black communities in the united states in the early twentieth century. In greenwood. there were two movie theatres. The dixie is wells dreamland. There were more than thirty restaurants. There were thirty five grocery stores and meat markets. There were a dozen physicians and surgeons there. Were lawyers real estate agents. You know all sorts of shops. You know you name. It in short community was thriving. Well not all of these business. Owners and professionals whereas wealthiest j. b. stratford was good company. There was a minority of people who did quite well. We lived in nice modern two story homes with pianos and crystal chandeliers automobiles and all that but also was a place where people shared ideas book clubs lecture groups societies like that so it was an african american version of the american dream made real in the middle of the country and nineteen twenty and nineteen twenty one on may thirty first. Nineteen twenty one. That dream turned into a nightmare. A white mob spurred by rumor that a black man had assaulted a white girl rioted by the end of the next day the group had murdered anywhere from seventy five to as many as three hundred black residents destroying their family homes and businesses. What happened after that was an elaborate. Cover up a systematic attempt to raise the massacre from news accounts and history books. The story of the massacre was actively suppressed for fifty years tulsa white daily newspapers went out of their way not to mention you know the master official records disappeared. I'm amy briggs. Executive editor of national geographic his magazine. And you're listening to overheard share where we eavesdrop on the wild conversations. We have it out and follow them to the edges ever big weird beautiful world this week. We explore one of the worst incidents of racial violence. In american history people's attempts to erase it and the historians scientists determined to recover the full story of the tulsa race massacre more after the break geico and national geographic are working together to make your life a lot easier get a quote with geico mentioned your nat geo affiliation and you could get a special discount on geico's already low rates visit geico dot com slash nat geo to see how much you could save. That's geico dot com slash nat geo great rates great service and a whole lot more geico dot com slash nat geo a little more than one hundred years ago tulsa. Oklahoma was booming. Thanks to the discovery of the richest small oilfield in the world at the time. Just across the arkansas. Remember the attracted. Both white and black residents and money was flowing as historian. Scott elsworth explains blacks. Were not allowed to work in the oilfields in the oil industry. But again there was so much money. There were lots of jobs for african american women in particularly some men as well working as maids as domestic servants cooks in well-to-do oil manson's of these oil barons. There were jobs for black men as janitors. Cooks dishwashers as day. laborers whatnot. And the pay was good. And it was steady. Because of oklahoma's. Jim crow and residential segregation laws nearly all of tulsa african american residents settled in thirty five square block area of the city known as the greenwood district. So you have black men and women going off during the working week working in the white community getting a good solid paycheck and then coming back to greenwood. But they didn't spend their paychecks in the white neighbors. They didn't go downtown to shop where they were being treated as second-class citizens were there are other fears as well to instead. They shopped with black merchants. And so greenwood and its businesses. Take off so much so that years later at earns the nickname black wall street but among the most successful is j. b. stratford the son of a freed slave. Who went onto graduate from overland and then indiana law school. The stratford hotel was one of the largest black owned hotels in the country. A massive structure with fifty four suites a dining room pool. Hall a saloon and a barbershop. The property was valued at seventy five thousand dollars adjusting for inflation. It would be worth about million dollars today. The wealth in greenwood was significant. There's no question about and it was stable. People were coming in all the time. Let's come to tulsa. Let's come to greenwood and let's have our chance in this brand new town. While researching his book death in a promised. Land one of the first on the massacre scott ellsworth had to dig into what race relations were like before the violence of may nineteen twenty one. So in the late nineteen teens. What's the relationship between the black tulsa community and the white community is there. tension is their stability. What's that like the well sure there. There's tension but it's important to remember that that's true nationwide. I mean the years right around and after world war one are some of the darkest times of race relations in the united states this period beginning in nineteen seventeen and lasting to about nineteen twenty-three included red summer when white bob's around the country launched a reign of terror to destroy prosperous black communities. This is the era of race riots and understood a race right to mean in those days. Is there some sort of a spark of incident between white that then turns into something much larger where african americans are attacked in downtown neighborhoods. Mobs and gangs of whites will invade african american neighborhoods intent on burning looting killing There was a major riot chicago. They're also writes e saint louis and washington dc. So this is a very tense time. And it's still a tense time in oklahoma as well in one thousand twenty one. Lack tolson's worst fears were realised. It started with an alleged incident in an elevator in the drexel building. Downtown dick rowland a nineteen year old shoeshiner from the parlor down. The street entered the building on the afternoon of may thirtieth memorial day in order to use the restroom on the top floor as an african american. He was barred from using the facilities where he worked in those days. Elevators weren't automatic but instead you had an elevator operator who would turn this wheel to move the elevator up and down the floors and they were typically young white women and the elevator operator and the drexel building was a seventeen year old white girl by the name of sarah page. It's not entirely clear what happened monday.

Scott Elsworth J. Stratford Scott Ellsworth J. B. Stratford Arkansas Monday May Thirty First Twenty Nine Hundred Jobs May Nineteen Twenty One Early Twentieth Century Fifty Years Three Hundred One Thousand Seventy Five Thousand Dollars Tulsa Oklahoma Saint Louis Over Eighteen Hundred Dollars Greenwood District Robert
New Study Shows Ancient Primates May Have Lived Alongside Dinosaurs

Kottke Ride Home

01:45 min | Last month

New Study Shows Ancient Primates May Have Lived Alongside Dinosaurs

"Did a primates the precursor to all modern primates including humans live alongside dinosaurs. The theory has been batted around over the years but a new study published this year and the journal royal society opens science provides further evidence that that may have been the case. The study is based on new analysis of fossil teeth from the collection of the university of california museum of paleontology in berkeley. Those teeth were just laying undisturbed and uncategorized in her drawer. Ziam until then grad student. Gregory wilson mental. A happened upon them in two thousand three. The teeth are credited with originally having been found by the late. William clemens prolific fossil hunter an expert on the mammals of the mesozoic era who spent most of his time working in the hell creek formation in montana and who unfortunately passed away from cancer in november and the badlands of montana. As you may know from duress park is one of the best places to find evidence about the last dinosaurs and their extinction. Hell creek formation specifically quoting national geographic is critical to understanding what killed off non. Avian dinosaurs and how life evolved afterwards. It's rocks preserve a timeline of life on earth stretching from two million years before the mass extinction to about a million years after one of the few places in the world where fossils can be found on both sides of that boundary and quotes a skeptical that it was the asteroid alone and not other at the time ongoing factors that led to the dinosaurs extinction. Clemens focused on studying other animals that lived alongside the dinosaurs and potentially lived through the extinction. Events other animals potentially including ancient primates.

Journal Royal Society University Of California Museu Gregory Wilson William Clemens Hell Creek Montana Berkeley Cancer Clemens
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

01:52 min | 2 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Him all right. Jc if you're listening national geographic is offering up its studios for you and qi drawn to do a collab- so if he wants to reach genius he's gonna need that perfect storm with nature. Nurture in luck tizzy..

Disney Plus Launches Star, A Streaming Outlet With More Grown-Up Fare

Android Central Podcast

07:36 min | 2 months ago

Disney Plus Launches Star, A Streaming Outlet With More Grown-Up Fare

"Knew that star was launching february twenty third which recording this yesterday. I am in canada. So i have access to it along with australia. New zealand parts of europe in singapore. So a few countries have this new section on their disney plus app. And it's a big deal. It's a big deal for me. Because we get all the wes anderson movies. It's a big deal for some other people because they get like twenty four and richard devine from window. Central is tweeting about how much she loves. Twenty four and jack bowers back baby and all that so. I just wanted to talk about where we are in terms of streaming. I know disney or marvel disney made a big bunch of big announcement this morning On when the next set of mcu in star wars shows will be released on disney plus. And then there's all the other services right. There's hbo max there's peacock there's discovery plus there's Paramount plus. I guess if you want to call that new and all this leads to confusion for people who just want to find the show to watch. So let's start with disney. They now have ninety five million subscribers. They are doing really really well. In terms of expansion into new countries. This new star lodge is a big deal so give us the t. l. Dr if you will of why star launched now and why. It's a big deal for people outside the us lawyers. It's always the lawyers. Yeah i say why did it launch now because this is when they could finally agree on. Okay here's where the contracts in so we can pick things up. Yeah the the. The really oversimplified version is this in the united states. We have hulu and hulu has basically everything. That's not under the five pillars of disney plus in those disney star. Wars marvel pixar in national geographic. Anything outside of that. you what. You're forgetting well. I was gonna say you're forgetting the pillar of twentieth century fox and twentieth century fox which is on hulu so so virtually anything outside of those five pillars in the. Us will find on hulu yes. They're exceptions the problem is hulu is not anywhere in the rest of the world. It's a decidedly american phenomenon and so disney needed a way to get all this content to everybody else in pay by the way they get to charge a little more for it too and that became star the way they first announced it they do it. What other earnings calls last year It was a little like just weird. I didn't even fully understand it at the time and it took a little while to sink in and then the developer not developer days there investor days into simmer november december whenever that was explained. It a little better really. It's just that simple if it's if it's content you can probably find on hulu here in the us it's going to be on star everywhere else. So given that disney twentieth century fox. They bought a. They bought that from fox which was previously a shareholder in hulu disney is now the majority shareholder of hulu. Why can't they just bring hulu to the rest of the world. What is that. I mean i don't know the brand well who owns. Who is the issue there although disney now entirely owns who if i correct right they finish tying their last pieces of hulu like two years ago for for all intents and purposes and there might be somebody with a little sliver but it it's a disney joint partially owned by comcast but they're buying it slowly over the next few years right. Yeah that was an agreement that was made a couple of years ago but But that's why comcast is okay. All of our stuff is leaving hulu at this date because we will no longer have a share in it and it's all going to peacock But yeah the reason that who didn't exist in all these other countries was media streaming lauzon like entertainment and streaming laws vary by country by country. It takes a lot of money to get the rights to a decent amount of shows in places other than the us so it was a matter of hulu. Didn't really have the time or the or the money to spend on investing in trying to build up a catalog and other countries the only other country that hulu is in outside of the united states is japan. And i'm not sure how much longer is going to be there since they're probably going to roll it into star but it's disney had the clout to roll around the disney also already had rights to a lot of these things or the released they in contracts and have the rights back right so it's just easier to bring a new sub domain umbrella underneath disney plus put all the twentieth century fox content in there called star and make it a separate kind of expansion for everybody who already has disney plus. All star is disney. Plus for grownups. It's harder to always you know proper phones not anymore. But that's a. That's a good analogy. Yeah all right. So we we have star. It's got all the twentieth century fox stuff. I think it's got more than that. That's also where a lot of like. Abc television stuff ended up. It's also where a bunch of other like indie stuff that disney and fox had bought up over the years. Anything fox searchlight his ended up in there. That's why it's it's a huge a collection of content. I'm amazed that they were able to get the international rights for those together quickly. Enough for star for the international launches. So the question. I have is is disney. Plus going to host new content in star is that is this where they're going to compete with netflix and hbo for adult viewership or are they still kind of not really aiming at that audience. No actually. I think you've got that right in. It's going to get a little weird because contents can vary by country but you can see that a little bit in the in the Release lists you get you get stuff that is decidedly more adult in there and and part of that is just from the content. That's coming out of those houses in the first place. If you look at specifically fx stuff here it's called fx. Hulu it is it is. I don't know that. I'd go so far as to say it's r rated but it's pretty damn close. Fx is yeah fx is definitely not child-friendly content like ninety percent of it like isn't fx. Were archer lives yeah. Fx is is archer archer archers ethics original sort of But yeah we look at the. The new exclusive stuff like fx on hulu like depths. Was one. I loved last year. I thought it was excellent right up until the end and it went. A little off the rails. Mrs america was on there as well. I mean there's stuff that the you wouldn't even otherwise necessarily see on cable but that they're streaming in that fashion. lets them. do you know just a little more than they. otherwise would have And it's not something that you would see on disney plus so this gives them another conduit for that stuff as well. Yeah and the brand new original content is also going. It's going to vary by the audience category. 'cause like anything that's marvel or star wars is not going to be listed under the star brand period. If it belongs to one of those temples it's still going to be disney plus branded and everything starts going to have the both labels at the bottom whenever they're advertising it but it's a matter of if we're going to do original series if it's pg or if it's pg thirteen below it'll probably be disney plus branded and if it's not pg thirteen disney and pg thirteen and up will probably be star

Hulu Disney Richard Devine Jack Bowers Marvel Disney Wars Marvel Pixar United States Disney Twentieth Century Fox Wes Anderson HBO Comcast Paramount Singapore New Zealand Confusion FOX Australia Europe Canada Abc Television
Riley Arthur shares journalism and publishing tips

Photofocus Podcast

05:23 min | 3 months ago

Riley Arthur shares journalism and publishing tips

"This schmear young. And i'm joined by my co host. Who's dealing with the frigid. Fifty degree weather in florida right now. Skip cohen own. Showing you get not. I mean it's hysterical. Because it's the way we dress down here like today. I've got on shorts flip flops and a flannel shirt that makes no sense and if the fashion police came by most of us would be arrested. So that is. Let's get into today's program because you end. Our guest are both hanging out in a very cold place in the country right now when it's perfectly appropriate to do a hot podcast. How's that that sounds great because it is twelve degrees right now. Right things that. I'll i'll do my best not complain about having to put the top up. Okay hey seriously. Riley joins us today and she is a testimonial to a combination of the grapevine and social media. And here's the fun aspect of how i got to know riley. A good buddy of mine in boston sent me an. I am and a link to her work and said hey you need to go talk to her so a phone call later. That opened the door to this michigan based documentary photographer. She's an art director. She's an accomplished author. She's a big believer especially in themed projects like her diners of new york. Which is a a personal favourite of hers. And i happen to love the just to if you've lived in the new jersey new york area. Then you know that diners are just an incredible Concept she's a national geographic explorer. She's a fulbright fellow and her work has been published in numerous magazines and is in the permanent collections of seven. Different museums nine. Oh there's probably nothing. Riley can't photograph but as a journalist. What i love most about her work is. it's just about the simplicity of life And sometimes obviously more complex than a complex and less simple in any event riley. If i haven't screwed up something in technology here welcome to the mind. Your own business podcast. Thanks for having me well. It's good to have you here and i really am. I'm outnumbered today. Because i'm always complaining about the weather or or making shamir aware that she's in the coldest place in the country right now and now. The two of you can share that misery law like complaint. It's nice to have some company. Let me tell you and and riley. I'm so excited to chat with you because it sounds like you've had a very interesting journey. And we were kind of chatting in the pre interview chat and it was interesting to learn that you are not originally from michigan. But from the lemme say this right. American samoa correct yes. Correct soren and raised. That's somehow you ended up here in michigan. Where we're just happy to be in the double digits today and so kind of. Let's kick things off by having you kind of tell us about your background. how you ended up doing what you're doing today and just how you got here well since you mentioned where i was Warren raised american saw. I think that would be a great place to start off so you guys might know. American simul from a number of things like you know american football players to you know a variety of other cultural touch points. But you know the first person to make american samoa on the mainstream was the anthropologist margaret mead and some of her photographs and writings about american samoa. so you know and Independent som- so you know. When i was young american sama as i told you earlier is the third wettest is place in the world gets a tremendous amount of rain and one of the things that happens is that mold grows on just about anything including photographs and vhs tapes. You know back when there while people are using those so we had a you know a a system where we would take photographs When our film was ready would send it off to get you know in the mail to get back in the day and we get our photographs back. My mom would fill a photo album and then she sent it off to our grandparents the store because if we kept them on island they would mold in a number of years. We'd have no relics of our family. History so i became kind of fascinated by sort of documenting a place in time and the fact that where we were from. We couldn't really keep our photographs if we wanted them to actually survive more than say three years so that sort of drive to document is really becoming a leading charge in fascination with documenting things and being sort of for that picks niche interests. That might be sort of going away. So that's sort of a long answer to your question How i got started in my career was. I had my senior thesis in my undergraduate degree. I interned at the oregon shakespeare festival as a theatre photographer

Skip Cohen Riley American Samoa Michigan New York Shamir Florida Boston New Jersey Soren Margaret Mead Warren Football Oregon
Interview With Dan Westergren

PhotoBiz Xposed

05:07 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Dan Westergren

"I was recently exchanging emails with today's guest. A bad he's premium membership and it turns out he has a love of sauk cling lock. Do he used to rice and he even spent time in south australia from the us. I while on assignment for white for national geographic now is picked up and i poked a few more questions by any told me on the nat geo and commercial travel photographer stock at home trying to decide how to make money with that getting on an airplane right now putting my towards commercial real estate architectural things but honestly don't know what's going to work out a cape listening to the podcast about facebook marketing for portraits etc thinking. Maybe that's the way to go. We exchange and other email to and i post a few questions and he said for more than twenty years. I was director of photography for national geographic. Travel up magazine. I had an editor who let me find the graph. A couple of stories a year usually adventure top stories and i was lucky enough to photograph stories to the magazine. Such as climbing mont blanc the matterhorn and skiing to the north pole now following that exchange. I invited him on for this recording. I'm talking about dan west to grin and i'm wrapped to having this now. Dan welcome andrew so good to talk to you. Do you still pinch yourself when you hear an intra liked about the things that you've done in the past. I do i do. It's it's kind of funny. It's a hard act. Live up to for many many years. I would tell my photographer friends who seemed to have up and down lives. You know the freelance yoyo. And i would joke to them. Well you know. I'm addicted to my paycheck. And i have the chance to send you guys out into the field my editor lets me go out every now and then you know. This is working pretty well. Well you know the media marketplace changes and so now here. I am not working on the staff at national geographic anymore doing some projects for them but just trying to figure out how to make this thing happen as a photographer. Yeah the tables have really turned. I think not only for youtha for all of us. Haven't i this year. Oh yeah yeah. I mean and it's a double whammy with a travel photographer because i don't even of course you can imagine after all those years. I have this huge rolodex of all these photo editors of magazines and things like this but nobody even pays money for magazines to take pictures anymore. It's like the rug was pulled out from under my profession. The one savior for me. The last few years has been you could either call it native advertising or content marketing or partnership projects. That's the kind of things like last year. I got to go to canada. Three times for national geographic. To do ten day long stories about places and so i did prince edward island nova scotia new brunswick last year and british columbia and those were my favorite Trips to take. Because i will talk to my producer at national geographic since i had a background in doing the photo editing. At national geographic. The photo editors really acted like a regular editor at most magazines. If we thought that a story was not sufficiently visual we would tell people. We didn't think we should do the story. And a lot of magazines. The phone will editors are just kind of in their corner in somebody throws them a manuscript is air pictures to go with this so when they tell me okay we wanna to do an online piece about adventures in new brunswick ten adventures in new brunswick will then i get to study new brunswick i pull out a map i get defined tended ventures. I contact all the people that i think might lead me to those adventures and then make pictures that i hope people find interesting and then when we get back in my case usually i sit down and they know that i've chosen the photo subjects with story line and so they don't even send a writer. They have a friend of mine. Who i get on the phone marielle. And is her name. And she sorta ghosts rights for me. And i just tell her what my experience was like and why i went to particular plex. And that's just that's what i love about. It all is to do the research into a place and then actually go take those pictures myself in sounds amazing and said the way you described this right now the role you had. Oh have you familiar with the movie. The secret life of walter. Mitty of course. Yes you the walter. Meeting is at your role in national geographic traveler. It was a little bit different because he was more had a role that we would call film review which were the people that actually got to look at the pictures. I didn't have a big role in putting the magazine together. So you know that was kind of funny. It was interesting that i love that movie. You know he got to go out into the field. And i've just i've seen that movie so many times i was watching it and my kids. My son is twenty two. My daughter's twenty five and they're really into music and david bowie died. We had to listen to all the versions of space. Oddity that we could find.

Travel Up Magazine Dan West New Brunswick South Australia Skiing Andrew Facebook DAN Prince Edward Island Marielle Nova Scotia British Columbia United States Canada Mitty Walter David Bowie
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

02:09 min | 5 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"If you'd like to read the nat geo article that inspired this episode. You can find that an inter show notes the right there on your podcast app and there. You'll also find another story from tomasa you so it's about. The impact corona viruses had a migrant families applying for asylum in the united states. And if you'd like to read more circus coverage from national geographic check out our story about traditional tight rope walking and remote russian villages and for subscribers check out a recent national geographic magazine feature on covid nineteen. It takes the work of photographers. Five countries in composite into one photo essay about how the pandemic has become a painful shared experience around the globe. It's the right there in your podcast. App overheard it. National geographic is produced by. Laura sim pincer brian. gutierrez our senior editor is eli. Chen executive producer of audio Arnold who also edited this episode. Our fact checkers. Michelle harris hans deal. Sue composed our theme music and engineers are episodes special thanks to daniel jacobson and garett bradford to this with the spanish for the story this podcast production of national geographic partners when he johnson is the director of visuals and immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national. Geographic's editorial director and i'm your host peter gwen. That's all for the season. But amy now we'll be back soon with more new episodes. Thanks for listening seal. Soon geico and national geographic are working together to make your life a lot easier. Get a quote with geico mentioned your nat geo affiliation and you could get a special discount on geico's already low rates visit geico dot com slash nat geo to see how much you could save. That's geico dot com slash nat geo great rates great service and a whole lot more geico dot com slash nat geo..

tomasa Laura sim Michelle harris daniel jacobson garett bradford Susan goldberg geico gutierrez peter gwen Chen united states eli Arnold brian Sue johnson amy
Arno Hazekamp PhD on Confronting the Unknown in Holland's Medical Cannabis Program

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

03:22 min | 5 months ago

Arno Hazekamp PhD on Confronting the Unknown in Holland's Medical Cannabis Program

"So of course in the medical system you'll never promote smoking but then what while make tea or vaporize. It's what do we know about t. What do we know about pricing. Nothing but it's better than smoking. Right so i said no. Not if you're drinking disgusting green water with no active ingredients. Just wasting your expensive medicine. Yeah that's true too. So i had to go completely to the basis so that means isolate my own standards because i couldn't order them. Quantify my own standards purifying one thing chromatography. The second thing is to quantify them and you cannot easily do that by weighing because they're sticky and syrupy so i had to develop an methods to quantify it with an internal standard. There was not a cannabinoid that we had our cannabinoid than i had to learn. How do they behave. What what kind of spectroscopic and chromatographic behavior do they have. So i had to summarize that. And then i had to move on to. What's actually different between the varieties that we're growing here in holland. Are they really that different or should be more different. Cbd wasn't even the question back then that came even later but then you move onto administration forms. How do you make optimal cannabis t in a reproducible. Way where it's not suddenly way too strong when you forget about the boiling water for five minutes because the phone rings. What if in those five minutes your tickets and times stronger than there's all kinds of patients around holland are suddenly fainting and falling off the stairs because they're super high right so and we knew none of those things vaporisers. What's a good vaporizer. What's not so good vaporize and how what you know no standards for anything. No quality checks for anything. If you could make a vaporizer bring it to the market. You just sold it right. It's not really that much difference now. But then those things renew and then we had no idea what kind of toxins or or crap. They were spitting out to candidates so my question was always. Keep it simple Stick to the things that real people need to know now. No no large studies just for your signs buddies but focus on what patients need to know today and try to set up the study and also writes the results down in in an article in situation. Everybody can understand including the patient. You're doing it for so i. I called a national geographic style. You can't you can't watered down to science so much that it's not actually true anymore. It just sounds easy at nice but it's not actually true because then you're misleading people and i think you know if you get data from people you have to give it back to them so I i was interacting with users and prescribers and patient organizations. Like what are you dealing with. What is your life. Look like once you get that jar with cannabis and you go home then what you know. Where do you get stuck. What do you want to know. And that's been a very fruitful approach to my To my phd thesis. Because then not only a bunch of scientists around the world but basically everybody in my sphere of influence from from physicians to to patients to politicians to to family members. They wanted to know out his his work. Because i can actually read this teases and know what it means so with that i reached my goal of not just as a molecular biology. Just doing very fun stuff in the lab but also have one leg in in the real world and be

Holland CBD
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

03:36 min | 6 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Part of her reporting for traffic. Mariana traveled to a forest in thailand to join a team of rangers. they're patrolling the area for poachers. They asked her not to disclose the name of the forest to protect the wild tigers. Living there and it was a wild experience. I mean walking deep into this forest and beautiful and lush and there's all sorts of animals. She and her crew ended up camping in the forest with the rangers and slept outside and it was one of the most frightening experiences of my life we were set up in hammocks with all these park rangers and i started hearing all these noises snakes. I'm thinking they're snakes coming into my hammock. And then i started thinking of the worst which is obviously there has to be saigo right next to me and i sort of imagine that it was breathing right next to the following morning. She told the rangers about her fears but they laughed because a while tiger citing even here in the heart of tiger country is extremely rare. Some of the rangers who'd worked in the forest for years had never even seen one themselves. It sort of gave me that respect that i believe we should have for tigers. Which is if. I was lucky enough to see it. It should be seen in the wild and it should we. Should we should see if far away and we should respect it as the wild and beautiful predator that it is well said indeed more after this. Hey i'm eli chance. Senior editor of overheard national geographic with more programming notes for marian events sellers reporting on tiger trade and other black markets around the world tune into national geographic series traffic. If you're interested in learning more about captive tigers in the us make sure you also check out national geographic's coverage of this issue in our show notes link to articles at writer. Natasha daily has reported. I'm big cats and wildlife. Tourism and subscribers can read a magazine article called captive tigers in the us outnumber those in the wild. It's a problem it comes with a fascinating map that tracks. How tigers get traded across the country. That's on the show right there and your podcast app. National geographic is produced by brian. Gutierrez jacob pinter and laura sue. Our senior editor is eli chin. Who also produced this episode. Executive producer of is d'ivoire arnold. Who also edited this episode. Our fact checker. Michelle harris with special thanks to vilma. Norris natasha daily. Rachel bail hans deal sue composed. Our theme music and engineers are episodes. This podcast is a production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson is the director of visuals and immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national. Geographic's editorial director and i'm your host peter glen. Thanks for listening and seal next time. Gyco and national geographic are working together to make your life a lot easier. Get a quote with geico mentioned. You're nat geo affiliation and you get a special discount on geico's already low rates visit dot com slash nat geo to see how much you could save. That's geico dot com slash naci. Oh great rates great service and a whole lot more geico dot com slash nat geo..

Mariana Natasha daily thailand jacob pinter laura sue eli chin rangers d'ivoire arnold Michelle harris Norris natasha Rachel bail Whitney johnson Gutierrez Susan goldberg National geographic us vilma peter glen Gyco brian
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

03:48 min | 6 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"But nizara thought he knew it was four and sure enough when he put everything together. We realized that this was a structure that looked like a giant finn right at a tail fin tailed paddle. We had found our propulsive structure. This long flat tail seems built for pushing through the water. Like a crocodile in other words a powerful aquatic motor. When i started piecing the skeleton together and i realized that this was a dinosaur like no other. Of course i couldn't help thinking you know. Wouldn't it be great if toma could see this. Cincinnati storage both german and moroccan. In some ways. It feels like he was the perfect person to find this fossil. An answer a century's worth of questions that has surrounded this iconic dinosaur so for me it was not just a scientific adventure. He was a personal one in many ways because also as a german had a different way to look at this right i i could read all the original expedition diaries. I visited the site where the original museum was standing right in munich so it was a journey back in time in my own country And it was a personal journey. That started when i was four or five years old now as an adult is our plans to return to germany and unveil a life sized model of spinosaurus. It looks pretty different from what strimmer and other paleontologists might have expected in his our hopes. The bones will remain where they were found in morocco and eventually become part of a museum where they can inspire young paleontologists in the same way. Nizara had been inspired by stromer working very closely with african scientists. And we're trying to do this in a way that really result in a kind of win win scenario right. Even though dinosaurs or ancient paleontology is relatively new up until the seventeen. Hundreds western science didn't even understand. Entire species could go extinct nowadays about fifty. previously unknown. Dinosaurs are identified every year. So there's still a whole lot left to learn. There's so much we don't know really just skimming the surface right and if a river monster. Dinosaurs spinosaurus eluded us for so long. I mean what else have. We not found more after this. If you'd like to see these fossil for yourself take a look at michael gresh story. It's full of photos of the updated skeleton animations what spinosaurus might have looked like in the water. There's lincoln the show nuts. Spinosaurus is just one of the incredible. Dinosaur discoveries made over the past few years paid subscribers can read our cover story reimagining dinosaurs. About how paleontologist are learning more than never by using the dance techniques like cat. Scans to examine frozen crocodiles. Figure out what color velociraptor that's shown it's right there on your podcast. App overheard it. National geographic is produced by brian. Gutierrez jacob pinter and morrison. Our senior editor is eli chin. Executive producer of audio's davar on our fact checkers. Michelle harris hunstville soup composed. Our theme music and engineers are episodes and special. Thanks goes to our guests for recording themselves at home. This podcast is a production of national geographic partners. Woody johnson is the director of visuals and immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national geographic editorial director. I'm your host peter gwen..

nizara Spinosaurus toma finn Woody johnson Cincinnati munich morocco germany Michelle harris michael gresh peter gwen Susan goldberg Gutierrez jacob pinter editorial director director eli chin lincoln Executive producer senior editor
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

04:25 min | 6 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Even help protect people in the future. You know i do anything. In my power to get my friends back But given all that has transpired. I feel like we've derived great meaning a great value from the wolf of experienced And all these subsequent efforts to understand the storm into the story to be told as accurately as possible Teaching many things in town thinks video data could solve even more tornado. Mysteries and his team has become more sophisticated. Now they strategically fan out around the tornado in record videos from several angles plus new video technology means their data is getting better and better all the time. Video is treasure trove for us because it is so it's a sufficiently high resolution that we can really see a lot of the fine scale detail. The smaller particles in motion little patches of dust around the tornado leaves emotion. Things like that that really we couldn't see and what we used to consider behind f emissions video. So that's been quite a breakthrough is anton closes. In on thirty years of tornado research. he's still sees a lot of storm chasing in his future. Even during the covid nineteen pandemic anton team found a way to chase safely. We did some unusual things We bought ten days of food with us and so we never actually had to sit down in a restaurant anywhere. You know actions like that are already helped. The key was always being vigilant. Never forgetting that. This is an unusual situation. Would is it pulls you out every spring mean like you said it. Sounds like you've seen it kind of all from el reno on down one of the most compelling things is that you said you must have seen the goal. Is we absolutely no. We haven't seen it all and that's troy us back every year because there's always something yeah every year brings some your experience and if i didn't have a research interest in the world still be out there. Every day could win big storms start thundering across the great plains in the spring anton will be there in his video. Camera will be rolling more after the break. There's something about tornadoes that's completely mesmerizing. Just can't look away and you can see that for yourself in our show notes. We have links to some of anton to videos. You can also find out more about tornadoes. Science we have cool graphics and videos that explain how tornadoes form and some helpful tips to stay safe. There's even a list of emergency supplies to stock up on just in case in for subscribers you can read or national geographic magazine article called the last chase details. Why trump samir's pushed himself to become one of the world's most successful tornado researchers and how the el reno tornado became the first kill storm chasers. That's shuts right there in your podcast. App overheard it. National geographic is produced by jacob. Pinter ryan gutierrez. Laura sim our senior editor is eli chen. Executive producer of audio is dr arnold who also edited this episode. Our fact checkers. Michelle harris hans stale sue composed our theme music and engineers are episodes. This podcast is a production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson is the director of visuals and immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national. Geographic's editorial director and i'm your host. Peter gwen you'll next on geico and national geographic working together to make your life a lot easier get a quote with geico junior nat geo affiliation. And you could get a special discount. On geico's low rates visit geico dot com slash nicio to see how much you could save. That's geico dot com slash. Nah you great rates. Great service and a whole lot more. Geico dot com slash nat geo..

geico anton el reno tornado national geographic magazine el reno ryan gutierrez Michelle harris jacob samir editorial director Susan goldberg Whitney johnson Laura sim Executive producer Peter gwen eli chen dr arnold director senior editor
NASA Says It Found Water Molecules On The Moon's Surface

Arizona's Morning News

00:23 sec | 7 months ago

NASA Says It Found Water Molecules On The Moon's Surface

"The moon's surface. For the first time. Water has been confirmed by scientists on the sunlit side of the moon, and we're not talking rivers or lakes here. This would be water stuck to the surface, like molecules of water, stuck to the surface of tiny grains, or sort of encapsulated in beads of glass. That's National Geographic science writer Dr Maya Way. Haas at 6

Dr Maya Haas Writer
Scientists hail first unambiguous detection of water on Mars

Arizona's Morning News

00:23 sec | 7 months ago

Scientists hail first unambiguous detection of water on Mars

"Has been confirmed by scientists on the Sunlit side of the moon, and we're not talking rivers or lakes here. This would be water stuck to the surface like molecules of water stuck to the surface of tiny grains, or sort of encapsulated in beads of glass. That's National Geographic science writer Dr Maya Way. Haas 5 25 traffic now from Danny Sullivan in

Danny Sullivan Dr Maya Haas Writer
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

08:08 min | 7 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"My mom always said that it's always best to give. Bitter News with honey. and. So if you know anything about Bob and the science behind his music, every song has a one job ridden. And one drop rhythm is a simulation of heartbeat. So Dum Dum dum. Dum Dum dum. That's photographer, Ruddy Roy talking about reggae icon Bob Marley. So he wants to find your vibration and evaluation that everybody lives with. Is the vibration of a heartbeat. And he uses that. To push the needle in. That needle is the sort of your arm. And he gets you to the music and once you're there, he can give you the medicine those other words. I mean, he never left that methodology. So. Why is it documentary photographer amusing about REGGAE MUSIC I'm Peter Gwynne editor at large at National Geographic magazine, and you're listening to overheard at National Geographic. A show where we eavesdrop on the wild conversations, we have here at nat go and follow them to the edges of our big weird beautiful world. This. Week we sit down with photographer Ruddy Roy's he talks about growing up in. Jamaica. and. How the songs of reggae musician. Bob Marley prepared him for a journalism career. Ultimately led him to the frontlines of the covid nineteen pandemic and the civil rights protests. If you love the science and history stories, you hear on overheard try audible. Audible makes it easy to find audiobooks that can take you to another place or time without leaving. Your House. Right now audible is giving members even more with the new plus catalog, which has thousands of select audiobooks, podcasts, audible originals, and more. VISIT AUDIBLE DOT com slash overheard or text overheard to five hundred, five, hundred. That's audible. Dot Com slash overheard for text the number overheard to five, hundred, five, hundred. Can you take me back to Jamaica and your childhood like what? What's your earliest memory of Jamaica? You know in. In the seventies Jamaica were tumultuous, it was. It a country went through. This idea of. Mike unmanly verses, sir. Edward Siada. Any was really the People's National Party versus the Jamaica Labour Party and I remember as a kid going to school watching people run chase each other with boom sticks with St-, with two by fours. You'd hear on the news people shooting at each other different parties who not each other. And ULTA. Tyranny came. Musy Leroy smart with seeing ballistic fear and it's these are the group one. I need a roof over my head. Yeah. The mighty dime by might. And then read the molly brought to the floor the idea of the the woman's voice. She Sang. Again piece this idea of oneness. and. I think in Jamaica. Either the church songs. Other. Songs from these. Entertainers that really lifted us. Open that tumultuous time. Tell me about your we've got your parents. were. They like both from the country like rural so It would be compatible to there from down south. They. Both both parents were farmers, but my mom. Grew up on a five year we went to the farm. It was one of the sweetest part of the vacation. Because we we didn't work land because I mean, they thought they were had. But we were allowed to go sit in the cage feel like they could never find me. Yeah but my mom's it also would do is to look over the cane field and wherever she saw the Bush do this. She knew it was me. I was in there doing this. And tearing the kid my deep. and. It would shake the bushes so she would know exactly with the find me. My Mom. My Mom got hurt her discipline from being. A girl who grew up on a farm. She's one of the most hardworking. People. I know. Beautiful Witty why's she was one of the first woman in Jamaica, to run ten seconds in nineteen sixty eight. Shared what she couldn't get to go to the work because she got pregnant I`Ma Gosh. Women. She ran ten seconds in, but I made one hundred and one hundred yard dash hundred. Yes. That is a phenomenal. Jamaica's known for sprinters I. Mean That's I. Guess that's a long tradition. I didn't realize that it's in the food and it's it's it's whole retrain it's. So my father was. My father was quite eight. He was he was the first person. That I, thought about. would. I would I when I started studying philosophy? He was the first person I thought -able and he always had stories. Every lesson that he had to teach it was done through a story and I think. More than anything else that's where got that from. But my love for art I know definitely came from my mom she gave me books very early. She gives me poetry very early. She gives me music around age nine or ten. At what point did you start to pick the idea that you know you wanted to get into photography? When did you pick up a camera? I got an assignment to photograph people were living on the defunct trail line in Montego Bay. So the trade the train that used to run from Kingston to Montego Bay had stopped running. And he had stopped running for such a long time that people were no. Living on the train, they took over the train houses. They were living close to the train because it was good property. And the newspaper said, why don't you do a story on a family that's living? So because if the train comes back, these families would have to move. So. I went and I did it and I, walked one hundred and twenty one miles. From. Kingston finish the project while wile and use those images. To get a Job Associated Press. In New York Oh my goodness. And that was the best the beginning of that this journey. So walking from your hometown to the capital in Jamaica pictures all the way. Is What led you to your professional career really in a way? Yes. GEICO and National Geographic are working together to make life a lot easier. Get a quote with gyco mentioned your nat go affiliation and you could get a special discount on GEICO's already low rates. Visit GEICO DOT com slash nat go to see how much you could save. That's GEICO DOT com slash nat. Go. Great rates great service and a whole lot more GEICO dot com slash nat go..

Jamaica GEICO Bob Marley Ruddy Roy GEICO DOT Jamaica Labour Party Audible Kingston National Geographic magazine Montego Bay honey. ULTA National Geographic People's National Party Musy Leroy Edward Siada Mike unmanly Peter Gwynne
Interview With Amy Toensing

The Candid Frame

04:47 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Amy Toensing

"So. How are here so you? Holding up in the midst of all this madness. I, you know in the grand scheme of things. I feel very lucky but that doesn't mean that on a daily basis I'm not like pulling my hair and. Try to remember Hala game but definitely, it's been a little crazy I. don't know if you feel this I was thinking about this recently like it just it's weird that it's Gotten Kind. Of normalized on. So many levels with what's going on. It's like we've just adjusted. You know how you need. I think it also involves a certain degree of denial. Yeah. There's a lot of. Yeah. Because I think he caught up to me emotionally about two three weeks ago. I'm constantly busy with things. So and then one day, I couldn't be busy enough. Credibly fatigued. And there was nothing happening in terms of my health, my life to sort of explain it that I think he just like. It was just so much constant noise. Yeah. That I felt like I couldn't escape. It was just like Oh my God I just need to. decompress I spent a couple of days disconnected reading Brooke, taking long naps. Like I didn't realize how much I needed it until I needed it. It's just insane what's happening it's just it's so crazy the politics right now are just it's so upside down and then at the same time, there's this undercurrent of trying to. Just live logic just the logistics of it you know. With life staff and then your lake in the new the noise and what's happening to is just so the upheaval is insanity. So I'm with. But I haven't had that moment. Me We. Finally, we went camping on our land couple of weekends ago we bought land up Nevada on duck sweep made husband myself three-year-old. We all moved to Syracuse New York mayor for new job that I got as a tenure track professor at Syracuse University. So that's like a massive change but. With living in Syracuse it was like, okay. We're going to get at least get landed on exit. WE'RE GONNA move out stay he'd. Have some sort. It's to have rumors, but they going out and camping was the I. Guess that resonates with what you're talking about like just kind of shutting down a little bit was very helpful. The quiet that's for sure I find these conversations give me at least an hour respite. I can. I get to talk shop with interesting people and. Usually am left with. Not usually almost every time. Left with A feeling of positivity positivity in hope. So I hope that that's what listeners to take away from it when they when they listen to the show. Oh, yeah and I think just like a segue from the evening with the masters I think that that was an I'm making my way through the talks right now video. Again we three year olds I just I didn't make to a lot of them over the summer as the timing of it for the East Coast. It was bedtime every time it was happening. So you didn't go over very well with timing, but now it's amazing to listen to it so. It. It gave me an excuse to find out more about you because I knew of your work. But that was the first time. I've ever really had a chance a good chance to sort of take it in. And I really enjoyed your presentation thought it was wonderful but. Look even more look forward to having an hour with you today. So thank you again for for doing this. In in doing my research, I saw presentation that you did in which you and several other photographers were working with. Like Somali the offers African photographers sort of a project with the. National Geographic or. At. Least National Geographic distributed the video for it was it. Was it. National. Right I mean I've done a lot of camps. So was it in Kenya or was it in the United States with similar because we are to Somalia there was photographer called Chill Mel mayank yeah. Amazing photographer. You're sitting down with Catherine Simone. Krona. Yes. Oh. That's okay. I know what you're talking about now we did. So it was really cool. They came to. DC. Yeah. That's what you're talking about. There are south Sudanese

Syracuse Somalia Syracuse University Brooke Nevada East Coast Catherine Simone Kenya DC Professor United States New York
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

02:33 min | 7 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Like, many of you I've been working from home for the past few months. But one day a producer and I put on our masks fired up our quarters and went back inside National Geographic headquarters. There's this really cool wall like all the national, geographic photographs like the iconic ones. It's beautiful. It's colorful everybody. There's something that just draws. By. This iconic wall of pictures. Sort of hides this secret ran. Down the hall. Through feels almost like you're going into a labyrinth. and. They're found one of our photographers. He was shooting portraits of a color that a scientist accidentally invented in the lab. Little movie. Star. Howdy for its close up. I'm Amy Briggs executive editor of national. Geographic History magazine and I'm Peter Gwen editor at large at National Geographic. Magazine. We host overheard at National Geographic a podcast where we eavesdrop on the wild conversations we have here at Naji you. Okay. A lot of those runs zoom these days, but we're still following them to the edges of our big weird beautiful world. Okay. So what do we have on tap next season amy. So Peter, we're going to hear from experts go inside tornadoes. Yeah. On one hand every incentive body's telling you to panic and get the heck of that. The other hand the scientists me is just so fascinated by what I'm wondering saying. Also, meet explores looking for rex of law sleep. Ships. I. Just think that there's something extraordinary about black people saying I am going to go out and find my own history and we'll bring you the strange odyssey of a traveling circus in Central America. SCUMBAG. EAT MEAT MEALS CNN. bienvenidos see the Gordon model sick VR. I love it. I feel like I'm at the circus right there. And you'll hear moments of discovery. Like the excalibur moment in this was like you know I've done it and passionate people who want to change the world. So these stories have been more that your stories from. There have been paid pages in a history has not been reading here because this. Curriculum, and is not you know his triple? New episodes of overheard coming soon wherever you get your podcast. That's magic..

National Geographic Peter Gwen Geographic History scientist Amy Briggs producer Naji executive editor Central America editor CNN.
A Conversation With Rob Feakins

The Candid Frame

05:09 min | 9 months ago

A Conversation With Rob Feakins

"First off. Welcome to the show from joining my pleasure. I. WanNa start off with your career before you photographer and filmmaker when you were into marketing and Tell me tell me about what led you into that career. Yeah. So when I was in college there were there were no ED schools or schools for for creative people there probably art center back then but I was on the East Coast and I was in English Major. When I got out of college I thought, I would probably be I wanna be documentary photographers slash journalist because I was interested in photography from high school on. As a member of the Camera Club in college, and there was a dark room back when we were dealing with film and whatnot. and. I was doing a few journalistic pieces for the Dartmouth magazine of different people and I really liked that combination photography and journalism. So I got out of college at what to do. I went down back to New Jersey Right GROWNUP and I slept on my brother's apartment, which was above a garage and I slept on a sleeping bag for close to a year on his floor and I got a job as a as a journalist for more the Morris County daily record, which is a big kind of suburban newspaper in New Jersey and I started to you know because. I was low on the totem pole was going to PTA meeting meetings on a hot July tonight being the only person in the audience. But I got a nice little piece where I used to write about the manufacturing jobs and business jobs, and I kind of tried to turn into like a human feature piece. So I would write about the world's largest ecclesiastical garment designer. Was Morris. County. So I did in article on that and then there was an article on I did on the guys who did the macy's fireworks parade were in Morris County and so back then that. Their entire sales were once a year for the July and that was kind of an interesting business article but it was tough going. You know I was again I was sleeping on my brothers floride a sixty four Volkswagen bug that was breaking down and someone said to me you know you could be a copywriter in advertising. Nice. What's that and so? They told me what it was a copywriter in advertising talk about old school this how I put my portfolio together, there was a huge stack of national geographics in the basement of his or in this garage Saab go down there I would go to the national geographics in I would clip out photographs that I thought were appropriate in right headlines to them. And taped the photographs to the bond paper in Rhode headlining copy beneath the road some campaigns and put a book together and guide offer at Ted Bates as a junior copywriter which doesn't exist anymore to base fun to backer joined back Spielvogel than they went out of business years ago. But they were a big agency back then and I thought Big was good. The United Thought you know whether baked or solid they'll. They'll be good agency and then I was there for about a year or two when I stumbled across a one show book and I saw what worked could be in advertising and I was kind of blown away. I was Kinda like, wow this tremendous work. This is really what good work is. What what did you see in that work that you weren't seeing where you were I thought the thing that struck me even back then was that the best work for me wasn't necessarily the most clever or most clever headline but it was work that made me think differently about a brand or made me think differently about what they're trying to communicate that I actually Kinda learned something from the ad or the commercial and I was totally struck by because I was in a huge package goods agency and there was no attempt on many of those accounts to make you think differently about the product versus tell you how efficacious case it was. From then on I try to do very different kind of work I got into the did get into the one show about a year or two later than I, think some the first time agency have been the one show since they could ever remember in I slowly clawed my way out of that agency to other agencies and then found my way too shy in Los Angeles around Nineteen in the mid eighties, and that was amazing to me because that was the first time I felt like I had been with a company or a group of people that were just. Everybody was everybody was just impressive. I mean the receptionist was impressive and later on became the head of our buying they just hired people regardless of position who were thought differently or incredibly intelligent. and. I loved working there I worked there for. Close to ten years of not more, and I really enjoyed there in that was. Probably, you know I think a lot of guys who go to shy day or worked at shy can look back at those years is maybe their their heyday right in any event. That's how we got into advertising

Morris County New Jersey Morris Dartmouth Magazine Macy Volkswagen East Coast PTA Camera Club Ted Bates Rhode English Major Los Angeles Spielvogel
Diversity in Photography

This Week in Photo

05:51 min | 9 months ago

Diversity in Photography

"Welcome back to another episode I'm your host Frederik van Johnson. Today I'm talking with my friend Karen Sacks. We're GONNA be talking about her new accidents, not even that new, but it's a it's a service that you may not have heard about its. Services a good name for Karen can explain what what the loop is all about, but it is a, it's something. Like this carrying you can tell me if I'm wrong, it is something that is serving a niche that is severely under served right now, and she's at the right place at the right time with the right product cares acts welcome to the show how's it going and it's going great. Thank you so much for having me and great description of of what we're building at the loop. WAS THAT AMORPHOUS? You it was. It was why don't I? Can. Go a little bit deeper and. What we like to say is that we're building a platform that is connecting the world's best diverse photographers, commercial professional photographers with brands around the world to make great work we want to help brands get content. Simply we WANNA simplify that process and we want to help photographers especially underrepresented diverse photographers get work. So we're bringing those two together our platform, the loop. Wonderful. That sounds like you you practice for. Maybe once or twice. Saying that a lot lately. To, the elevator with with. Man. Musk at your kitchen, you know. Right, exactly that's my elevator patch. Has Perfect Elevator pitch. Okay. So let's let's rewind I wanNA dive into the loop and kind of understand you know at a at a DNA level what it is you built and are building. But let's let's understand who cares. Sachs's I swear what's your? What's your pedigree that brought you from A to B. Sarah? No problem. So I have been in the industry for close. To twenty years, it sounds a little crazy to say that twenty years But that's how long it's been. I started my career at National Geographic I actually backing up a little bit started taking photography classes in high school like many photographers they always put in there about me section on their website that somebody gave them a camera when they're fifteen or sixteen years old. Similar similar for me I started taking classes. Photography classes in high school fell in love with it decided I wanted to major in photography. I went to the University of Michigan where I studied photography. I have a BFA photography I also have. A degree in American culture. So I did it be in American culture I felt like I needed both of those to take me where I wanted to go in my career yet I didn't know where I wanted to go in my career. I had this idea that I wanted to be at national geographic like many photographers many young aspiring photographers who wanted to go to national. Geographic I had my heart set on it. I. Didn't know what that would look like for me. I didn't know how I would get there. I didn't know what I would do there but I. Knew I. needed a career in photography and I wanted to start there and that's what I did when I graduated from the University of Michigan in August the following summer at the end of the summer I, moved to Washington DC and I started a job at National Geographic Kids magazine as a photo assistant and worked my way up to a photo editor. I. Was there for four years. It was an unbelievable experience I would ride in the elevator speaking of elevators I would ride in elevators with photographers whose work had been studying in school and I would be so nervous. I often wouldn't know what to say to them. That it was they were my heroes, my superstars they were who I wanted to be around into study their work and to know their images and I loved taking my film to get dropped off at the at the film lab at National Geographic. How cool that there was a film lab there and yes, we are still shooting film in those days. And I would be you know right next to Steve McCurry are Jodi COBB and that to me was the coolest thing. So I was there for four years and over that time I, realized that my place was not behind the camera was not being a photographer it was working with photographers. So I started to get a glimpse of really what I wanted to be doing and with each move I made in long career I got closer and closer to what it is that I wanted to be doing. So after I left geographic, I moved up to New York and I started freelancing for the Wall Street Journal. Started meeting a lot of photographers being in studios with them kind of understanding how they operated, how they worked, how they got jobs, and from there where did I go Martha Stewart Martha Stewart living in I was a director photographer on the merchandise side at Martha unbelievable experience I felt like I was working with the best of the best actually where I met my husband and I worked on all of her different product lines overseeing the photography for the product lines working with Martha on a couple of. Shoots, which was an incredible experience and I also after I left there. I went to a place called Archive. I skipped one I was at Corbis for a little bit Corbis, which is now part of getty images in the stock photography world. So I was getting glimpses of different aspects of the photo industry starting with editorial moving into commercial with Martha's products moving into stock photography. At Trunk Archive, I worked with high end photographers, Boutique photo, agency So so I kept kind of building I. Think these are all building blocks. And then more recently, I was at shutter sock for five years. So that's when I really understood what it meant to build products and to work for a company in the photo space. And then that has led me to the loop,

Martha Stewart Martha Stewart University Of Michigan Karen Sacks Frederik Van Johnson National Geographic Corbis National Geographic Kids Trunk Archive Sachs Steve Mccurry Sarah New York Wall Street Journal Washington Editor Jodi Cobb Director
The First Dog With COVID-19 Has Died, And There's A Lot We Still Don't Know

Short Wave

06:53 min | 9 months ago

The First Dog With COVID-19 Has Died, And There's A Lot We Still Don't Know

"April when buddies family I started to notice that something was a bright buddy started breathing really heavily, any hadn't mucus knows, and this was the first thing is family notice that you know the first sign that he was not himself. That's Natasha daily a wildlife reporter with National Geographic. Buddy was a German shepherd who Natasha says by his family's account was a very, very good boy. He loved running through sprinklers, Keitel's love like running and diving right into the lake. His family loved address them up for Halloween, is also photos of him in a bunny costume and you know he's just it looks like he's just grinning at the camera and so when buddies started getting sick this spring, just before his seventh birthday, his family, Robert Allison Mahoney and their daughter Juliana. While, they were worried I mean he'd be completely healthy, and then all of a sudden in the sprain he. started. Struggling to breathe and the first thing. I thought was he has the virus. Meaning the corona virus in the reason they thought that. They had also been sick. So specifically, Robert Mahoney, the husband had tested positive Alison Mahoney. Robert's wife had not been tested, but she was showing symptoms. So she had it to. The daughter Juliana who's thirteen tested negative. But when it came to getting buddy attest, that was a lot harder. But he's regular vet wasn't seeing patients. The Vet significantly said, there's no, he has like just you know there's no way and he prescribed the antibiotics over the phone. Another vets gave buddy ultrasound and x rays. But also didn't think he could have the krona virus remember no dog had yet tested positive in the US. And many vets didn't have the tests for animals anyway. But one day. Robert, Mahoney sister saw facebook post about a vet where they lived on. Staten. Island that had just gotten some test kits. Robert. was like great like let me call right now. Get down there, make an appointment, and so he was able to make an appointment for ten PM on a Friday. So it was a very strange time, but it was the clinic was really busy, and so it was the the first law they had available. That was Friday. May Fifteenth a full month after he started showing symptoms a few days later, but he finally got test that revealed. He was positive. This was a huge deal. Buddy was the first dog in the US known to have the virus and the USDA announced the news in a press release on June second. Buddy wasn't named in that press release. The government only identified his breed. In fact, we only know the details of his story because of Natasha's reporting. The USDA said in. June, that quote the dog is expected to make a full recovery. But Buddy didn't get better. He got more and more sick in June. It. All came to a head one weekend in July. And a warning that the details coming up are pretty tough to hear. So Allison. Came downstairs the morning of July eleventh and found buddy in the kitchen in a pool of modeled flood He was throwing up blood. It was coming from his nose. It was just horrific and devastating for the family, and at that point, they brought him into the vet and the decision was made to euthanize him which was obviously really really difficult on top of two and a half months of stress and confusion that the family had already been through thirteen dogs and eleven cats have tested positive in the US for cove nineteen according to public. Records and while those numbers sound small, they raise big questions about how virus can affect people and their pets. Today's episode. Natasha. Daily on why. Some of those questions are still so hard to answer. Allison Mooney said to me that you tell someone that your dog tested positive for Cova. Did they'd look at you like you had ten heads. You know there's no rubric for navigating covert in your pet. I'm Emily Quang and you're listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. First off the current CDC guidance that there is no evidence that pets can transmit the coronavirus to humans, and that's partially why testing for animals isn't more widespread. We do need to say to that test for animals are different than the test used to detect the virus in humans. All animal tests are processed in different labs are processed in veterinary labs. Not, there's no overlap between human testing and animal testing. So. While some of the mechanics of the tests may be the same. It's not at all taking resources away from humans. But because a covid positive animal isn't seen as a danger to humans, there's been very little scientific study of how the virus can affect those pets or even how it can interact with other diseases are pets may have. That's where we're going to pick up buddy story with an Tasha daily. Yes. So new blood work was taken on July tenth the day before a buddy died, and it was on July eleventh when the Mahoney's brought buddy in. To essentially be euthanized that they found the results of that blood work on and the blood work indicated that he very very likely had lymphoma, which is kind of cancer, right? Yes. Lymphoma is a type of cancer So I I asked a couple of veterinarians who were not involved in buddies case at all to review his full records and they said that, yes, every single one of the symptoms he had could be explained by lymphoma, you know A. A big open question is deity SARS Yovany to present clinically in buddies body, and what that means is did the virus cause any symptoms? For example, the trouble breathing was, and so I think it's it's tough and we'll never have an answer to this was every single. One of his symptoms are the lymph, Oma? Or was some of it, the COVID and the breakdown of fat isn't something that we have an answer to, and you also pose the question. Will. We won't know whether the cancer made them more susceptible to contracting the coronavirus exactly, and that's sort of a big takeaway from his case You know our dogs or cats with underlying conditions like cancer as it turns out. More likely to contract the virus because we know humans are humans It's thought that humans that have suppressed immune systems maybe more likely to contract the virus, but not only that maybe the virus may be more likely to present in ways that are more significant in their bodies if if they're already immuno-compromised. So the same question remains for animals and we just have so little data to investigate it.

Robert Allison Mahoney Buddy United States Natasha Alison Mahoney Usda Juliana Lymphoma Keitel Reporter Staten Covid National Geographic Allison Mooney Mahoney Facebook Island
Beirut Digs for Survivors as Death Toll in Explosion Rises

Science Friday

05:48 min | 10 months ago

Beirut Digs for Survivors as Death Toll in Explosion Rises

"Responders in Beirut are still looking for survivors after a massive explosion Tor, the city's port on Tuesday, at least 150 people are dead and another 5000 are injured. Hundreds of thousands are homeless. Indira. What do we know about how this happened? Well, we know that there was an explosion that seems to have been two explosions on dit was really caused by a 2750 ton stockpile of ammonium nitrate. Which is a really explosive chemical that is often used as a fertilizer. To have this amount of ammonium nitrate stored in a port is really kind of stunning and I'm sure we'll get to it, but it's linked to protests that we've now already seen in Beirut among Lebanese who are already upset about government corruption. Government mismanagement, political and economic problems. And this just looks like one thing on top of that. That since 2013 so we're talking seven years this ammonium nitrate has been stored in a warehouse at the port when a Russian owned vessel stopped in Beirut, and then the ship was abandoned. So how is it that for seven years this has been sitting there. And no one has done anything about it. Even though Port officials had apparently written many memos asking, how is this going to be disposed of? I mean, just to give listeners a general sense. This is essentially like fertilizer, which you know, we know is quite explosive. And National Geographic had a really interesting story out yesterday where we talked about Just all the chemistry behind this and why it was so deadly and it's happened before in other places in this country, and by the way listeners may remember the horrible Oklahoma City terrorist attack that was an intentional bombing, but it was made out for the same chemical ammonium nitrate will French President Emmanuel Macron visited Beirut on Thursday to mixed reactions. For the past years. Mick Howard. Lebanon's leaders responding Very defensively. I mean, this is a level of governance, apathy, governance and aptitude that that is simply difficult to comprehend. You know, as Indira was saying, this has been In the port for six or seven years, senior Customs officials are saying claiming that they warned about the danger of having so much Ammonium nitrate at the port, a handful of times the judiciary onto port officials, and they got no response. So many people in Lebanon are talking about a level of criminal negligence. Today, authorities say that they're going to Interview the head of the port, the head of customs on We'll see what comes of that. But at this point, the Lebanese people are so sick. Of a level of corruption and the love of kind of a corrupt core of the entire political class. And that's why this was recently compared to share noble. The idea that this exposes that corrupt core of the government could lead to government and falling again. We saw the government fall again fall last year, replaced by a technocratic successor. This year. Or we could just see increased anger that leads to no reform. But at the very least, this is proving eso awfully so tragically, some of the in confidence at the core of the Lebanese government Nancy talk a little bit more about what comes next with the layer the level of anger so high with the government even before this disaster, What are you going to be watching for in the region? That's a great question. And I should say I have almost bias has spent five holidayed in Lebanon as recently as last year and holds a very special place in my heart and so to see the devastation is just breathtaking. You got it earlier. You know this is a country where people were suffering tremendously before this explosion. This is a country ruled the value of its current had dropped by 80% in the last year. People were hungry. The Lebanese cannot afford. To do the kinds of repairs to their country to their city. In the wake of this bombing, many could not afford to eat before this, And so I think long term, the question becomes, Will we see fundamental changes in the government? In the system in Lebanon because we've heard about port officials being on house arrest or having their assets frozen, but those air sort of on the edges in terms of the issues in Lebanon, the fundamental issues governance. You were asking earlier about the Lebanese reaction on Ly, the Lebanese mayor has walked the streets. There's been no resignations. There's been no sort of out point, even the trash that people are gathering from the debris pile up, and there's no government trash service to pick it up. And so these air Corps problems with the the governance of the country, and so I think for the Lebanese unless there are fundamental changes to that Such that when someone reports thousands of tons of nitrate is near the city center that it's dealt with and not ignored repeatedly over and over again, and so, what we're looking for is whether we're going to see fundamental changes and how the system Operates.

Lebanese Government Lebanon Beirut Port Indira Mick Howard LY Air Corps National Geographic Emmanuel Macron Oklahoma City
First dog in the US to test positive for COVID-19 has died

TIME's Top Stories

01:15 min | 10 months ago

First dog in the US to test positive for COVID-19 has died

"A German shepherd in new. York. That had the first confirmed case of Covid nineteen and a dog in the US has died Robert and allison. Mahoney Staten. Island, told National Geographic that their seven year old shepherd buddy developed breathing problems in mid. April. After Robert had been sick with the corona virus for several weeks, a veterinarian tested buddy in May and found in positive for the virus. The US Department of Agriculture reported in June that a German shepherd in. New. York state was the first dog in the. The country to test positive for covid nineteen, but did not identify the owners buddies health declined steadily after he developed breathing problems and thick nasal mucus in. April. He was euthanized on July eleven after he started vomiting clotted blood, the Mahoney's told National Geographic. It's unknown if the corona virus played a role in his death blood tests indicated buddy likely had lymphoma. A cancer of the immune system veterinarians told the family a spokesman for the New York, City Department of Health. That arrangements were made to take the dog's body for a necropsy. But when the instructions were shared with the veterinarian, the body had already been cremated. A USDA database of confirmed cases of the coronavirus and animals in the united. States includes twelve dogs, ten cats, a tiger and a lion. The agency says there is currently no evidence that animals play a significant role in spreading the corona virus, but it appears the virus can spread from people to animals in some situations.

Us Department Of Agriculture National Geographic York Robert Covid United States Mahoney Staten New York Vomiting City Department Of Health Lymphoma Island Allison
The Horned Helm

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:59 min | 10 months ago

The Horned Helm

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and Joe. McCormick and today. We're doing the horned helm. This is going to be one of our essentially one of our invention themed episodes, but I decided. You know we really need to come back to armor, and the best place to start with armor is really the helmet I think the helmet is one of these wonderful things to consider because on the one hand, there is the more sort of combat, centric and medieval. And even fantasy idea of a Hillman Sifi. Fantastic with the concept, but at a very basic level, I feel like we all have some experience wearing a helmet taking this bit of artificial exoskeleton, slipping it over our own skull, and then enjoying its protection. Do you remember the scene in cone heads? Where it? It is revealed that Dan. Ackroyd Cohen Head Bell Dr Enjoys driving a motorcycle, but he's not a fan of helmet laws. No I. Don't remember this. Does he have a? A weird helmet or he just he can't wear human humans. I would imagine that's the source of his frustration. Because seems seems like bell. Dr Is actually normally pretty much rule follower, but but yeah he doesn't like the helmets, and I think it's probably because he has to get one custom made man. I haven't seen that in forever, but I do remember it had a really fun. Stop Motion Monster towards the end. Yes, yes. Bell Dr Scott to fight one with his Gulf skills. It also has a great line that for some reason is is just used for all occasions around our house, which is your phone is too young. Well, you know I. Don't remember if they wore helmets in that at all the more like space centric cone heads, but I feel like there was some sort of a horned crown that one of the more yeah I think. That's right so one of the we're. We're going to be discussing helmets in general, but but one thing that we're also going to discuss. Here is the idea of the horned helm a helmet with horns on it. It's it's an ancient motif in human civilization, and it ties into some earliest ceremonial practices. Practices and models of imaginative thinking. There's also do something so elegant about the idea thing that may be worn upon the head, and in doing so transforms the individual from a mere human into something, symbolically different a hybrid of human embiid. He's channeling the archaic chaotic gods of the Hunt. Oh Yeah I mean it's very therapy. It's what you see in those ancient cave paintings that so exciting when you start to see the human and the animal forms join together, suggesting fantastical thinking it's clearly there in the horned helmet as well. And and and so when you see these ancient motifs, one example that I was looking at before we came in here today. Was Robert Familiar with the the Sutton? Hoo Helmet? Oh, yes, yes, the sudden new helmet I. Had Papa Picture of it, but I this is one of these that I remember from an early age seeing perhaps on the cover of National Geographic, but it was certainly featured in some sort of Historical Book that I had access to his a kid. Yeah, it's just spectacularly creepy with these hollow is the way the mustaches rendered on the the plate of the face covering. I think it also had leather component when it was actually worn, but it's this decorated Anglo. Saxon helmet from I think it was from the seventh century. was buried in this in this ship burial somewhere in east. Anglia and I've actually seen this up close. And there are replicas of it that are really cool, because they reproduce the artwork that would have been originally visible on the sides, and although it's got all these panels over it, basically, it's a helmet covered with like comic strips, and in all the little panels there are scenes depicted in. In one of them shows these figures will like human shaped figures with horns, apparently wearing some kind of horned helmet. Oh, also evidence of Hornet helmets on a helmet. Yes, wonderful, yes, but it doesn't necessarily show the the characters wearing horned helmets say going into battle it appears to have more kind of a ritual religious significance surrounding the horns. Yes, in in this seems to be basically underlying the earliest versions of of this you know horned helmets go back thousands of years as far back as a twelfth century. See we see this in Cyprus Bronze Age Europe. and. The generally the idea is that yeah, this probably has its origins in in against symbolic tinkling thinking and ritual, and the idea that you're transforming. You're becoming something else. Which of course has a role in combat as well in a row and intimidation sort of role in the basic? behavior of making yourself look larger than you are. But, but then there's also this. Imaginative. Side to it there is this ritual aspect of mill, melting, man, and beast,

Robert Lamb Hillman Sifi Mccormick Ackroyd Cohen Dr Scott Robert Familiar DAN Anglia JOE Cyprus Europe.
Get to Know Cristina Mittermeier

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls

05:04 min | 10 months ago

Get to Know Cristina Mittermeier

"Welcome to good night stories rebel girls. I am Sadie from Nashville I'm eight years old and I'm interviewing Cristina. Mittermeier was the narrator of last week's episode of good night's toys for girls. If you haven't heard last week's episode now is a good time to go back and check it out. Christina, would you like to introduce yourself? My name is Christina Mittermeier I am a national geographic photographer I'm the CO founder of see legacy and like Jane Goodall I also love animals. I am the mother of three children. All of whom Love Tyson and they all love stories about Jayne good. Why did you create see legacy? I created see legacy because I wanted photography an adventure to be an invitation for everybody by publishing my phonograph on my stories on social media, everyday I tried to invite people and share what I. Love about the oceans with everybody. What makes you a rebel thorough? What makes me a rebel girl is that? I grew up in the mountains of central Mexico, but my dream was to swim with dolphins. Everybody told me that I couldn't do it. Because this was not for girls, but like chains mother, my mother champion me, and she said if you WanNa, go swim with dolphins, you have to find a way to get to university and become a marine biologist, and that's exactly what I did. When did you first become interested in photography? And can you tell us what type of photography or most interested in when I finish my studies in University to be a marine biologist I realized that our oceans were in a lot of trouble. Pollution overfishing. All of these things were threatening. The ocean and I wanted to help just like Jane wanted to help Tim Pansies. I thought that science was going to be the tool. I could use to help, but I realized that people are more. In learning from stuff that they understand they can see. Photography became the tool that allow me to communicate with many more people about not just help beautiful the oceanus for all the things we can do to help. When I started my career, photographer I wanted to be a nature photographer. Kasai love animals. I soon realized that I really had a lot more talent to tell stories about people, so my photography became a combination of my love of nature and my interest in people, and then a become an underwater photographer so today I use my camera to tell stories about animals in the ocean and the relationship that humans have with the largest ecosystem on our planet our ocean. Photography allowed people all over the world to see the amazing work. Jane was doing with chimpanzees. What's your favorite thing about photography? My favorite thing about photography is that it's a universal language. It is something that we all understand today. We all have cameras in our telephones, and that makes us all photographers is something. We all know how to do really well and so much like photography National Geographic Allow Jane Goodall to share his stories with a very large audience, so to has my camera on my work with National Geographic, allow me to share the story of our oceans and the importance of protecting the largest. On our planet, our ocean. What is it venture? Mean to you? A venture for me is having the courage to step through the of things that I. Don't know yet sometimes that means getting in the water with a whale, or the shark sometimes means getting on stage with the large number of people and speaking in public. The most important thing about my work is that I wanted to be an. An invitation to adventure for everybody the natural world is there for all of us to enjoy and I. Want my work to be an invitation to you. How do you stay positive in the world? That doesn't always care for the environment. The reason I stay positive in a world that doesn't always care for the environment is that I am the mother of three kids their own much older now, but. I want for them to have the kind of planning that I have come to love and enjoy I want them to be able to go out into nature and spend time with wild animals, and to know that they have a future in a living planet, so I have no choice but stay positive. What's one thing? Young rebel girls can do to protect the oceans are oceans are the largest ecosystem on our planet, and we know so little about how they work. So what we need is more girls to go into. The scientists become marine biologist become underwater photographer filmmakers so that together we can tell the story of how beautiful and important our oceans are thanks Christina.

Jane Goodall Christina Mittermeier Love Tyson Tim Pansies Nashville Cristina Mexico Co Founder Jayne
Heaven and Hell with Bart Ehrman

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:44 min | 10 months ago

Heaven and Hell with Bart Ehrman

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and this week. We are going to be featuring a couple of interviews. That I recorded last week because last week Robert, you were out of quote, the office you or at least you off work for a bit and so so I recorded conversations with authors of some books one book. That's already out this year in one book. That's coming up so on Thursday of this week. We're going to be airing a conversation that I had with the author of A. A fascinating upcoming book about the evolutionary biology of cancer, but today we're going to be exploring topic in the realm of ancient history and religion. If you've followed us for a while, I think you probably know this about us that one of our favorite kind of trails to go down his tracing the evolution of religious ideas through ancient history I mean I think I've outed myself on this podcast before. As a the kind of nonreligious person who loves the Bible. Can I love to read ancient religious texts and learn about them and see how the ideas from. From the ancient world of super filtered through to us today and shape to the societies we live in, and that's exactly the kind of thing. We're GONNA be diving into in this episode I'm talking with a secular Biblical historian named Bart Erman about his most recent book, which is called Heaven and hell a history of the afterlife. This book was released in March of this year by Simon. And Schuster, and it's all about the Christian ideas of life after death where they come from ancient history, what influence their development and how they changed over time so? So there was a part that cited in the intro of Bart's book where he talks about a pew research poll that was conducted a few years ago. I think. Maybe it was in two thousand fifteen. Where it found that seventy two percent of Americans believe in a literal heaven and fifty eight percent believe in literal hell, and yet I think most Americans would be deeply surprised, even shock to learn what historians can show about the origins of these beliefs in the strange thing. Is that like the historical conclusions that Bart's GonNa talk about in this episode? Are Not fringe or unusual among secular scholars of the Bible, in historians of the ancient Near East This is utterly mainstream, critical scholarship, and yet I think regular people are especially in the united. States, are going to find it very surprising. Yeah, absolutely, and I want to stress something here for everybody, so I just got back. To work this morning and I plugged into a pre production cut of this interview and it's really it's really excellent, so if you're even slightly scared away by the idea of an interview with a secular biblical scholar don't be because Barda is tremendous. He's he's funny. Very High Energy. I think you're really going to enjoy this chat. Joe Had with Bart here. Yeah, parts full of knowledge, good humor passion for his subject. I think you're really going to enjoy the episode, but before we can do it I'll just give a little bit of background on Bart's here's his biography Bart. D Ehrman is a leading authority on the New Testament and the history of early Christianity, and the author or editor of. Of more than thirty books, including the New York Times bestsellers misquoting Jesus, how Jesus became God, and the triumph of Christianity, and that last one's really interesting. It's about how Christianity took over the Roman Empire and went from a really small religion, too dominant religion of the empire, and just a matter of a few centuries anyway, so he is a distinguished professor of religious studies, the University of North Carolina Chapel, Hill and he. He has created eight popular audio and video courses for the great courses. He has been featured in time. The New Yorker The Washington Post and has appeared on NBC CNN and the daily show with Jon Stewart as well as the history channel National Geographic Channel BBC NPR, all the hits his most recent book is Heaven and Hell just one more thing before we get into it I. WanNa mention obviously we are dealing with. With the audio constraints of of remote recording in the age of Covid, nineteen, so for example around the twelve minute mark in the episode there is briefly some background noise that sounds like a fan was turned on or some rain. It only lasts for about a minute or so, and so please just put up with a little bit of background noise, and it's very brief I promise. It's not the sounds of hell right. Now audio recordings of the underworld leaking up through some sort of mining microphone right? The well to hell was not unleashed office. So yeah, I would say without any further ado. Let's jump right in. Bardem and welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks so much for joining us today. Yes, thanks for having me so your Book Heaven and Hell I just finished reading yesterday, and I I really really enjoyed it. and I want to say that I started reading this book. It very opportune time because though I didn't plan it this way. I'm also currently in the middle of rereading. Rereading the divine comedy, actually my wife and I are reading it together and of course, the divine comedy Dante his wonderful poetry, but it's also psychologically fascinating because when you go through the theology of Dante, you get the sense of somebody who is simultaneously ingenious and thoughtful, and in some ways very intellectually bold and open minded for his historical context, but in other ways. Dante's also very limited and provincial in a word medieval like the way you see him taking so much pleasure in designing horrific tortures for his enemies from these. Petty Thirteenth Century political struggles in Italy. Working with ancient religious texts do you find yourself encountering? This kind of irony embodied within the same author or traditional lot

Bart Erman Dante Robert Lamb Joe Mccormick New York Times Schuster A. A Simon Italy Barda Joe Had Ehrman Jon Stewart Bardem Roman Empire University Of North Carolina C Editor Distinguished Professor Hill
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

08:12 min | 11 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"And he really does mean the plant community. Because that fungi that helped the grass survived the high temperatures in Yellowstone. We threw onto. Tomatoes and watermelons and rice and wheat. Corn you name break seeds. We goodbye easily and. Communicated the same way inside these plants. So when you put them into Mehta's or into rice and corn, they became heat tolerant. which is a really important quality for crops growing in a warming climate? But. COULD FUNGI also make crops drought tolerant? As the climate changes, droughts have already become more common rusty says billions of dollars have been spent over the years trying to create more climate, resistant crops, but not many of those are drought. Resistant crops can vary in their ability deal with stresses, and there are more stress, tolerant crops, the nut, but the the whole idea of breeding. Plants or genetically modifying them for that has not played up for. Rusty in his team went looking for plants and fungi in more dry hot places. They extracted the fungi from some grass in southern California in started using it to make a treatment to spray on seats. His company's seeds are now being used on millions of acres on big forms in the US and small farms in India. So, far rusty says the results are promising. He says the treated seats appear to be helping. Increase Crop Yields. So he and his team are going to keep expire mini in working with farmers. For me, this boils down to. Know the future of food security. and. There always will be droughts. There's always going to be temperature extremes. But if we can, generate climate resilient crops. If we can get them to. Yield at higher level. then. There's a ray of hope there. In writer Joe Born says we need every ray of hope we can get anything we can do to make these crops more resilient. is going to be critical because feeding growing population on a warming planet. In. Joel says we're not going to find a silver bullet. We need every tool in the toolbox to try to nail this thing moving forward to make sure everyone's reasonably said when Joel studying agriculture in school. In the nineteen eighties, he sought genetically modified crops or GMO's could be a potential silver bullet. He says that's what a lot of people thought back then they were going to be the miracle crops right I mean we're? We're GONNA create. Corn that did not need to have noxious for loss, so would never have to apply nitrogen again. You know we're. We're going to create crops that you know had all these new nutrients in them so that we wouldn't have these micronutrient deficiencies in place around the world. We're GONNA. There were all these miracle things that they said these crops were going to do. But forty years later, Joel says those miracles haven't panned out yet. It's proven a lot more challenging to execute miracles. In also, there's been a lot of resistance from consumers who don't want their food to genetically modified. One of the biggest benefits GMO's have provided to commercial farmers are the controversial roundup ready crops crops grown from seeds that are genetically modified to be resistant to herbicides. Roundup did a few nice benefits saved a lot of more toxic pesticides from being sprayed, but because of the overuse in the mismanagement of those traits like. Nature find a workaround, right? It always finds a workout so now we've got. Roundup resistant weeds that you can spray all day long and they'll eat round up like. Like Candy Joel says that for decades, the main thinking agriculture has been that. It doesn't matter how healthy your soil is. As long as you can add water and fertilizer to it, you'll be able to grow crops. What we're now understanding that was very limiting, and that only goes so far. We've pretty much taken that as far as we can. Get now want WanNa have better benefit. We've got to start looking at it more holistically and saying look, it's an and again. This is the with organic guys who've been saying. It's not just the plant. It's the sort healthy, so it was create healthy plants. Create healthy crops create healthy people. Solving this problem is not going to be easy, but Joel says he's optimisitic I'm particularly optimistic about you know people like rusty who are going off to the edges and really trying to help crop survive this new climate in. It's not just rusty WHO's working on this. That's the young kids who are fired up to fix the world food problem. I mean unlike anything I've seen since probably the early nineteen seventies when we really a lot of people were gonNA start so there are a lot of people going into this space whether it's organic whether it's conventional whether it's biotech, whether it's whatever who are really going in to do public good right to do science in the. Public Service and a love that. And Joel says there's something else we can do help. Eat less meat. Out of the forty percent of the dry land on earth that we commit agriculture two thirds of it, we use to feed our animals. So if everybody stopped eating animals, we would have two thirds of the agricultural land to grow vegetables and crops and things like that makes perfect sense, but what I always tell people. It's like John Gate. Kids eat spinach. It's like great idea really good for them. You know they needed. You know they want it. It's very difficult to do. Come on spinach. Who doesn't like spinach? Seriously, though as the grandson of a cattle former I know it'd be difficult to take me out of my diet entirely. But it is something to think about. Joel says there's enough concern over this problem that he thinks it's going to lead to even more investment in finding solutions. Really, there's no other option. We've got to figure out or else we're going to see. A world of pain and hurt. No one wants to see so cautiously cautiously optimistic. We're going to figure it out I. Just hope it happens sooner than later. Because really. twenty-fifty is right around the corner. More after this. Microbes are everywhere, learn about the ones and the depths of the Mariana trench in the Pacific Ocean. And what they could tell us about life on one of Jupiter's moons. And microbes have been around a long time. Check out the world's oldest fungus fossil's. Subscribers can take a look at how the tiny country of the Netherlands is pioneering the future of sustainable agriculture. And learn all about the trillions of microbes that live inside us. All of this and more could be found in our show news. Look for them when your podcast. Overheard IT National Geographic is produced by IMMA. Checkups Franken. Jacob, Pinter and Laura's. Our editor is. Our fact Checker is Michelle Harris. Hans Dale shoot composed our theme, music and engineers are episodes. Special thanks to Jen Shoemaker and inventor scientist. Jerry Glover Ricardo Alita toby cures. This podcast is a production of National Geographic Parker's. Whitney Johnson is the director of visuals and immersive experiences. Susan. Goldberg is national. Geographic editorial director. And I'm your host Peter Quinn. Thanks for listening. Stay safer and we'll see also. GEICO and National Geographic are working together to make your life a lot easier. Get a quote with gyco mentioned your.

Candy Joel Rusty Mehta Yellowstone National Geographic Parker US Jerry Glover Ricardo Alita tob California Public Service Joe Born India GEICO Jen Shoemaker Hans Dale Michelle Harris editorial director Peter Quinn
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"I went right up to the Stupa and. That's when it hit me. It felt almost spiritual. In twenty nineteen RT Kumar row was in the north of India on one of the highest plateaus in the world standing before a massive cone of ice. And I was just thinking my God, you know this is a temple in a very different way, but it is a temple because water is everything what is life for these people? The cone of is was called an Ice Stupa. An artificial glacier made by villagers and named after a type of sacred Buddhist structure. You are you feel it? You know you feel the the gravity of the situation of what's happening and why this needed to be built, and then the the love with which people have built this? It's not something that they've done R, Tutti or out of. You know it was not a ritual or anything this. They did out of now because they wanted to help. Their village, they wanted to survive. Rt says this monstrous kind of ice was a surprising solution to a problem seems insurmountable. I'm Peter. Gwen and this is her at National Geographic. Ashore we eavesdrop on the wild conversations. We have here Gio. And follow them to the edges of our big beautiful world. This week. How villagers in the mountains of northern India are dealing with water shortages caused by shrinking glaciers. More at. GEICO and National Geographic are working together to make your life a lot easier. Get a quote with gyco.

Ice Stupa India Rt Gwen National Geographic GEICO Tutti
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Just because we've been stuck inside. Doesn't mean discovery stops. This whole thing is an emotional roller coaster. You never really can tell whether the next step is going to take you and you're going to be walk like normal, or it's GonNa. Take down to your knees again. There are things that you don't learn about in your sanitize school. You know text books and stuff like that. National Geographic. We're still hearing things that make us go, WHOA! Right Amy, that's right stories that bring the exploration two to you. The F. B. I. Arrested the dinosaur, and took him into custody, and out of the side of this this depression caused by the penguins. They've found ash and bones folly out by the hundreds his bones everywhere. Actually my hair is still going up on the back of my neck because I tell the story, but I was kind of creeped out by. I'm Peter Gwynne the writer and editor for next year. And I may meet breaks. The executive editor of National Geographic History in weird hosts of overheard at National Geographic. A show where we eat straw on the wild conversations, we have at matchy out and follow them to the edges of our big weird beautiful world. Season three is coming soon, so stay tuned. Do we have an hour? Just talk about that..

National Geographic National Geographic History writer and editor Peter Gwynne executive editor depression Amy
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"But in the meantime we have special episode for you about the strange turns living in like everybody in the world. We're trying to figure out as much as possible about novel Corona Virus and. Here's a little bit of what we found out so I didn't want to go to Wuhan because there was the outbreak. I wanted to go to one because as if one institute of our and the people with whom? I have collaborated before. Not many people are interested in traveling these days but even the most adventurous would think twice before buying a ticket to Wuhan China but in January. Roth held was doing just that. I knew that would be dangerous to go to Wuhan but I didn't really know Z. Magnitude of the outbreak there. When I traveled I traveled on January. Twenty Two to China at that time was four hundred cases and nine deaths in. Wuhan so I thought okay It's not very likely that I'm meet an infected person in Wuhan which was an underestimation of situation. Roy Hill filled is a structural biologist at the University of Luebeck in Germany he traveled to China at the start of the cove in nineteen outbreak to further his research on Corona viruses research which could eventually lead to a drug to treat them. I'm Peter Quinn and you're listening to a special episode of overheard at National Geographic Ashore. We eavesdrop on the wild conversations. We have here NAT. Go and follow them to the edges of our big beautiful world this week. We follow researcher as he tries to test compound that could eventually lead to a treatment for corona viruses. Four after this.

Wuhan Wuhan China University of Luebeck researcher Roth Peter Quinn Roy Hill National Geographic Germany
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

11:25 min | 1 year ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"To meet animals attache daily is a writer Or at National Geographic. In last year she spent a month in Thailand reporting a cover story for the magazine on Wildlife Tourism Silas at a captive tiger saint him over and over you know go in go in don't be so afraid it's going to be fine it's going to be fine I mean sure it's tiger took age the boy didn't WanNa do it but he eventually did because his mom sort of made him and he stood there the whole time terrified sobbing and what really struck me as that instead of saying okay you don't have to do it that's fine his mom forced him to do it and then said it'll be worth it for the photos and he came out and he wouldn't even liquor in the eye he just stormed off he was really upset the Tasha's says when she saw this something clicked I remember looking I'm thinking like he kinda has a normal natural reaction to this I feel like I'd be really afraid to it so it's it's strange that that was the only time I saw someone reacting in what seems like a really logical way to being in a cage with a massive tiger I mean in this instance it sounds totally crazy but then again for some people could be a bucket list like skydiving not know if I had the opportunity to get up close tiger wood I pass it by it really makes you think step back and look at it like why are we so comfortable with yourselves next to these predators I'm Peter Gwen and this is overheard at national geographic a show where we eavesdrop on the wild conversations we have in that Gio and follow them to the edges of our big weird beautiful world this week how silviculture has helped create an industry that might not be so great for the answer most we admire more on that after the break now there's a new way to meet camel's with AIRBNB experiences paddleboard with a friendly corgi named Mr Beaches who loves being on the water or search for Arctic foxes with a wild Life photographer in the wilderness there are over one thousand experiences with creatures of all shapes and sizes and each one follows animal welfare guidelines created with world animal protection checkout AIRBNB DOT com slash animals to learn more long before Natasha reported on Wildlife tourism she engaged in it you know how when you're remembering something from your pass you're not sure if you're remembering a photo you've seen or you're actually remembering the thing ashes got that and she showed me the photo okay so you definitely you're having a ball here you've got the big kids smile like the wicked me ah on the back of a giant elephant obviously I don't remember this I think I was probably three and a half but I I'm having a great time and we're all were smiling this is that a I'm not sure where but I think probably a zoo in the Toronto area where I'm from it is not just the task on the back of the elephant she sitting up there with her mom and brother they all look really happy and attaches says at the time they probably assumed often was having a good time to there's this idea that I found as I as I talk to tourists over and over again that this experience would you view as special and exhilarating and fun is also fun for the Animal No one wants to think that what they're doing on vacation is helping to hurt an animal that's not even something that I think anyone wants to entertain the possibility of no way we WanNa make memories on vacation do things we can't do it home maybe snap a picture we'll make the best holiday card ever or just experienced nature. Natasha says wildlife tourism ticks all these boxes wow they've toured in itself as a neutral term it can run the gamut from taking but oculus out into you know National Park and looking for birds too going on a boat and whale-watching off Cape Cod to going on safari in South Africa to look at you know wildlife in the Savannah so observing animals in their natural habitats sounds totally cool I mean I love whale-watching but attaches says there's a side to wildlife tours and it goes beyond observing from a distance it also includes getting closer snuggling baby tiger cub posing a large adult male tiger riding elephants Watching bears performing a circus bears elephants and tigers hidden they're wild animals we're not supposed to be close to them so step test to be taken to make it possible for us to interact with them I mean how else would it be possible for a boy to get into a cage with a tiger many tigers have their claws removed some are drugged so make them docile enough to interacts these are predators they are wild animals that can kill you instantly but I mean a recent study by world animal protection found that there was a nearly three hundred percent increase in the number of animals selfish popping up on instagram feeds in the last few years so that showed that it was his explosive shift towards not just wanting to see animals but wanting to show yourself having this exotic once in a lifetime encounter I'm guilty of it a few years ago I was running on a beach in Delaware and there were these people raising money for a kangaroo rescue operation at least that's what they told me the head this baby kangaroo with them in Delaware and I thought okay I gotta go get my kids they have to see this to and it's my girls crowded around these cute little kangaroos my first reaction was of course was to pull out my phone and start taking pictures right I mean that's what we do these days social media encourages it but it turns out there's another side of the story I get concerned that in certain situations people start to see animals more as props than as living beans earn moguls studies how social media affects our daily lives and she says that are online profiles are less like photo albums and more like declarations of identity are opportunity the show off the best versions of ourselves especially when we travel we want to portray ourselves as adventurous spontaneous exciting people in Aaron Says wildlife tourism helps us do that if you go to an exotic place and you get a picture with an exotic animal that most of your friends probably haven't had the opportunity to see and to do then that can make you look a certain way that can be really attractive in social media provides that in an instant we get this immediate social Award so when we post something if we step away just for a few minutes we might come back to a bunch of likes and comments on the posts from other people and that feels like an endorsement not just of what we posted but of who we are as people attaches says those wild sophie's have helped create a major money Acre this is an industry that spans the globe there is no country on earth that I am aware of where it doesn't exist at all and we sided to focus on a few hot spots around the world's where our understanding was that this industry was very deeply embedded in the fabric of the local economy and the tours ministry one of those Hot Spas Thailand there are thirty eight hundred captive elephants in Thailand the vast majority of those elephants are in the tourism and story this isn't necessarily new Thailand has a long history with elephants they're deeply woven into the culture and they've also been an important part of the economy elephants in Thailand defined as domestic livestock so the same as donkeys or cattle they've been tamed for thousands of years in Thailand and used to do logging to do various work with humans for a really long time but in nineteen eighty nine the government banned logging on millions of acres of land which me into facilities and owners were begging and it was I think there's not a single person who would say that that situation was ideal for anyone involved so the Thai government stepped in and that's where to win the tourism industry emerged and the government had sort of initiative called Brenner elephants home and that was the objective to get some of these old consider begging in the streets in Bangkok back to the rural countryside and the way to do that was to establish a new form of enterprise in that new form of enterprise it had a number of things going for it so not only is it an improvement over keeping elephants in Bangkok begging on the streets you now have brought them into a situation that is you know many would say it's it's an improvement for their lifestyle what is a huge moneymaker for the industry and for the hi government ultimately the elephant tourism industry took off and suddenly there was demand for moral it's you do have this very lucrative breeding industry of baby elephants and I think that comes from the fact that tourists increasingly want to interact with babies and so they're willing to pay money for it so the government subsidizes captive elven breeding after all tourism accounts for about a fifth of Thailand's gross domestic product. The TASHA's says you get a sense of just how popular these attractions are the very moment you arrive in an elephant camp the first thing you'll probably notice that there are tons of buses in the parking lot because many of the visitors going to these camps are going there through tour agencies a lot of the camps are located in areas the sound pretty breathtaking like the province of Chiang Mai there's a lot of greenery just the nature of these camps and chain my which is a mountainous leafy beautiful verdant part of the country sounds like a great place for an elephant witnesses the elephants roaming free in this lush landscape at least not the captive audience they're usually kept in stables Paul elephants are pretty much always chains it's easiest way to kind of control and corral healthy with elephants.

Wildlife Tourism Silas Thailand Natasha Chiang Mai writer National Geographic stables Paul three hundred percent
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"In the early two thousands Fellow Cave explorer sent me some images from the Nike Caves and I thought it was a photoshop hoax scientists penny boss is an ancient time capsule a national geographic documentary crew called her deep inside in two thousand eight this passage just Kurds around I don't think that's where she saw them water giant crystals look at slightly pink from Austin I've seen crystals in caves before but never like the ones in nyc to picture it imagine Superman's fortress of solitude there were these massive white crystals lined from floor to ceiling inside of a cut gems excellence I'm gonNA climb down through the most tackler cave is about two stories tall in the size of a football field it's criss crossed with these massive crystal pillars the size of telephone poles you can't put your arms around and they're so big my own thought when I saw this documentary was is this even real it looks other worldly in the midst of these beautiful NASA crystals theory these tiny little people wearing what looks like Orange Has Matt Suits Boston says that's because it's extremely hot parts of the saves up to one hundred and forty some cases one hundred and fifty degrees Fahrenheit so not survivable and so they put together these spacesuit looking things all there in a rather shocking shade of orange and the main features were an ice vest underneath which was heavy as the Dickens because I is is really really heavy and then the suit goes over that and then there is a ice pack in one's caving helmet to keep your brain cool and then a breathing backpack that sent air across very heavy frozen cylinders vice but even with the ice suits Boston says she and her team could only survive in the cave for short periods of time we didn't have arms and legs protected from the heat and so we will get weaker and weaker and you know the heat effects would start to really affect our bodies so we were not supposed to stay on longer than half an hour we once pushed it to fifty minutes in a nearly killed myself very bad idea killer heat sharp crystals no natural light makes you wonder what was she doing in that cave that was worth risking her life and the more important thing than the giant crystals to me although they were spectacular was is that a fellow scientist said I think we're seeing microbial shapes in little pockets within these crystals and I like oh my gosh microbials shapes as in life she was looking for life in the crystals microscopic fossils trapped within small imperfections. she found some and then she took them back to a lab to see if they would grow and did Lo and behold on that first expedition I got a lot of things.

Austin nyc Boston Dickens scientist Lo Nike photoshop football NASA fifty degrees Fahrenheit fifty minutes
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

15:54 min | 1 year ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"I maybe eighty five years old five years old young correction. I maybe five years young so are you still fly. Are you still piloting players. Yes I fly with a friend friend of mine very often now and I'm all used to all the newest equipment when I look at now and see a beautiful blue sky. I WANNA be up there. Sara Radley has spent a lot of her life pointed in one direction action up and at times. She's tried to go even further. I wanted to find out new horizons. What isn't in Star Trek to go where no man has gone before? We were leading the way to show Joe that women could be in space to going to space. It's not easy. Astronauts are superhuman God's basically that's Victoria Jaggard. She's one of my buddies here at National Geographic and a fellow Oh editor she also writes about space. It is a physically mentally emotionally demanding job. We.

Sara Radley Victoria Jaggard National Geographic Joe editor five years eighty five years
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

15:40 min | 2 years ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"She's in the desert in sudan is doomed just four hours you could see the christians and torrance scuba gear okay well this is gonna top it off like let's go diving in a pyramid christian isn't editor writer in one of my colleagues national geographic she's also in underwater archaeologist lynch's she's investigated plenty of periods in terms.

sudan writer lynch torrance editor four hours
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"And if you feel like it gives us a five star rating in apple podcasts. We're a brand new show, and that really helps people find us, which is awesome. Because we're super excited. The share the stories we've got lined up in the season. Make sure to tune in next week. We'll be back with an episode on lying and why it might not be such a bad thing when your kids lie to your face. Overheard? National Geographic is produced by Kristen Clark. Emily oxygen schlager. Brian Gutierrez, Robin miniature and Jacob Pinter our editors Casey minor. Hans, they'll sue composed our theme music and engineers are episodes with the digital help from Nick Anderson. Graham Davis, and Devon compo. Roger Payne recorded a lot of these gorgeous wail songs were hearing back in nineteen seventy naturally. The really cool backstory. We'll link to that in the show notes as well. Special thanks to pineapple street media, Greta Weber, Shane Garo, and Jim, darling. This podcast is the production of National Geographic partners. Susan Goldberg is the editor in chief of National Geographic magazine. I'm your host von Wallace. Thanks for listening. And I'll meet you back here next week. Following baby bear cubs a wolf den stakeout exploring volcano beneath Yellowstone lake. These are just some of the adventures, you'll see when you tune into Yellowstone live on the National Geographic channel, this national parks, extraordinary wildlife, and stunning vistas will be on full display during this four night event. Tune-in at ten nine central starting June twenty third..

National Geographic partners National Geographic magazine Yellowstone lake Yellowstone Roger Payne Kristen Clark apple Graham Davis Greta Weber Brian Gutierrez Devon compo Susan Goldberg Nick Anderson Shane Garo Emily editor in chief Jacob Pinter Hans Wallace Robin miniature
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Humpbacks doing, and it's just humpbacks, remember, photographer Bryan, scary, from earlier, I started to talk to researchers that studied sperm whales, and beluga whales and orca and all these different species, and this sort of theme of culture began to emerge and how it plays a vital role in in these animals. Lives, Brian's next photo project for National Geographic is actually a giant multi-species feature on whale culture, all over the world. When you look at Wales through this lens. A lot of their social behaviors suddenly, come into focus for instance, communication Brian's been talking to researchers in the Caribbean who studied that clicking patterns of sperm whales. These patterns are, so distinct between different sperm whale groups that researchers actually referred to them as individual dialects whales at share the same dialect feed together, take care of each other's Cavs, and they'll even steer clear of other groups of sperm whales nearby who aren't speaking, their same language and really importantly, embedded in these different whale cultures is critical information about how to survive in the local environment things like feeding strategies, you know, dolphins and whales or some of the only animals on the planet. That devise unique feeding strategies depending where in the world they live. Take orcas the scary geniuses of the ocean in Norway. There are groups that flash their white underbellies to herd fish into tight little packs, and then welcome with their tails, but off the coast of Argentina, the menu in the prep. Peration is different orcas. There actually force themselves out of the water deliberately beaching themselves, so that they can snatch baby sea lions right off the sand as far as we know there is no other place in the world where orca do that. That's the only place. And it's this one family this one pod that has been passing that technique down generational. Mom's teaching Cavs photographed a mom, grabbing pup pulling it off the beach. And then, you know tossing it into the air with her tail and in the same frame, you can see the little orca dorsal fin sticking out of the water. So she's teaching her calf. When you think about whale behavior this way, something really striking in urgent.

Cavs Brian Peration Bryan National Geographic Caribbean Norway Argentina Wales