35 Burst results for "National Geographic"

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

07:06 min | 8 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"I was born and raise in the coury streets of mexico city. This is for hey kindness and activist. He's standing at an intersection in mexico. City wearing a black mask and a cape. I was an ordinary citizen. Until one day i went to a new delhi rematch. You know the mexican wrestling. And i decided to get a mass cookie to be the pedestrian vigilante of mexico city. He looks out onto a busy street filled with traffic. Lots of honking and swerving people walk cautiously trying to get out of the way of cars. The cars are very fast. There's people with disabilities other people. Even mothers and fathers with strollers. There are also cars parked on the sidewalk so pedestrians have to venture out into the dangerous streets. And that's when it emerges out of the shadows. My mother tells me not to do this. Because i can getting traveled but once i put my mask and i keep and they watch myself in the mirror. You know like tending to yourself. Like i'm here to justice and that's my goal and they'd go out to the streets and i'm watching this video. That for friend took him or he takes a breath and then he jumps onto the front one of the illegally parked cars and then he walks over it we've been walking for thousands and thousands of founders of years and just one hundred years ago we started to drive these keillor machines. You know so. Something wrong happened with with history so now we have to take back our streets and send these message that the pedestrian is on the top of the cars or hey has actually become kind of a local superhero for his activities. He goes by the name. Peyton neto which means little pedestrian. He wears a black and neon green costume and patrols the streets helping people on foot and on bikes and then i have the cape but my grandmother maeve these cave that has white and black stripes just like a pedestrian crosswalks. He paints bike lanes on busy streets and he circles potholes and broken sidewalks. People don't trip on them when he's done. He has a little p like a signature. Then he leaves to his next mission. It's like having two different personalities force because yeah you feel differently. Feel like an authority. You feel like somebody that has a mission in life and it's going to spread a message to the people in the streets. You know and then i go back home and they go off the mask on the cave and what might normally work. You know. i'm alanna strauss. And this is overheard at national geographic. A show where we eavesdrop on the wild conversations we have here in that show and follow them to the edges of our big weird beautiful world. This week we try and answer. A question is a bike friendly world and impossible fantasy or reality just around the corner. we'll meet an urban planner. Who tells us how to accomplish that. And it's not just painting more bike lanes and we'll cure why activists in mexico and the netherlands are so passionate about cycling that they'll go to great lengths to capture the attention of people in power. We kidnapped the chief government. What more after this geico and national geographic are working together to make your life a lot easier getting quote with geico mentioned your net ju- affiliation and you could get a special discount on geico's already low rates visit geico dot com slash nat. Go to see how much you could save. That's geico dot com slash nat. Go great rates. Great service and a whole lot more geico dot com slash nat. Go all right. Let's get something straight here when we talk about biking in this episode. We're not talking about recreation. We're talking about bikes as an alternative to cars away for people to get from point a to point b. There's good reason to make that switch. Transportation is the leading cause of greenhouse gas emissions in the us and cars. Make up the biggest chunk of that bikes on the other hand. There's virtually no pollution almost no energy use the energy that you actually good for you by energy. That's good for you. John poker means exercise. John is an urban planning professor maradas at rutgers university. He specializes in bikes. And it's not always so easy to get along without a car but for for all the time. It was a rutgers. I ahead before. Actually don't have a car myself. So oh i love you i love you i love you. We're going to get along very well alone. All right so if bikes are so great. Why don't more people in north america by it comes down to safety when surveyed more than half of americans actually say they're interested in biking but they think it's too dangerous because of you know cars from nineteen eighty one to twenty ten motor vehicle. Traffic was the leading cause of death for people under forty four in the us. John says there's an easy fix for this and it's not just creating bike lanes everywhere. It's creating with cold bike network. That's a web of connected pass that can take a traveler from any one point in the city to another. It's maybe things like green ways which are off-road paths so cyclists. Never have to worry about cars. They combined those with protected bike lanes with these physically separated lanes of the concrete barriers bollards or shrubbery of some sort dividing the cyclist from the motor. So it sounds like what you're saying is for city to be bike friendly. You don't need every streets have bike lanes you kind of just need enough of a network that you can get pretty much from anywhere to anywhere on a bike safely. That's exactly correct. The keywords connection so you don't wanna have a really state-of-the-art protected bike lane here and a wonderful greenway over there but nothing in between bike. Networks are actually part of this larger transportation network buses trains sidewalks. The let people get around without cars. You back to the train station. Take a train to another city. Then take the bus to your house. That kind of thing activists like hor. Hey often push for all these things at.

mexico city geico Peyton neto alanna strauss mexico new delhi wrestling John poker national geographic the netherlands rutgers university rutgers John us north america
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

01:37 min | 8 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Overheard at national geographic is produced by. Laura sim braga has a lotta strauss archie thompson. In jacob pinter our senior editor is eli chin. This episode was also edited by bob. Maleski our executive producer of audio's davar arlen to also produce this episode. Michelle harris fact check has episode on steel. Sue composed theme music and engineers are episodes. The national geographic society committed to eliminating in protecting the wonder of our world funds the work of national geographic explorer and morales. This podcast is a production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson is the director visuals immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national geographic's editorial director. And i'm your host peter gwen. Thanks for listening. See next on. We've all been dreaming of traveling and have long lists of places to visit an with the city advantage. Platinum select card adventure is always within reach. You'll earn american airlines advantage miles on every purchase and two times miles at restaurants including takeout in two times miles at gas stations. Plus here's a bonus offer that will really get you moving for a limited time apply for the city advantage platinum select card and you can earn fifty thousand advantage bonus miles after qualifying purchases had to city dot com slash adventure to learn more..

Laura sim braga archie thompson jacob pinter eli chin Maleski davar arlen Michelle harris Whitney johnson Susan goldberg peter gwen national geographic society morales Sue bob
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

06:38 min | 8 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"The sprawling capital of the philippines and the center of a violent government. Crackdown on the drug. Trade city is awash with crime scenes. Neighbors come out of their homes to look at the victims and watch the authorities. Take them away. Hannah reyes morales was among the reporters who cover these crime scenes between twenty sixteen in two thousand eighteen and she saw how people tried to go on about their daily lives amid such violence. I had seen this family where you know. Of course the baby was crying. someone was shot And the baby was having trouble going to sleep. And i just saw a mom. Trying to sue the child. And i thought hm super interesting you know like lullabies are actively being used as a way to create safety in this very very violent and firemen also thought about winter. Her four year old stepson moved into an apartment with her not too long ago and how she tried to soothe him with a lullaby then the sounds of the place of the city was new to him. The environment the bed he was sleeping on everything was new so he was just getting really apprehensive. I had a moment of panic. And i picked him up and then i started singing and i realized when i was doing that I started to ask myself. who's fears. Was i really assuaging. Was it his or was it also mine. Ns curiosity led her around the world. Documenting songs nighttime rituals for a project called living loa buys is they do love is e no learn by have been. He loves have buso. Mona is is one of those grandmother. Very involved in her grandchildren's lives. Mona idrees is a syrian refugee and a met in thai turkey. Mona's neighbors would threaten to call the police and report her grandsons crying so in the middle of the night she would get up and in fear you know. She would hold the baby and start singing and for her. The lullaby is a prayer to god showing how people comfort each other when things are tough strong theme in hannah's work then i think between the story and all my other stories where i've always been asking the question of what constitutes how we make safety for ourselves. One of the things that i learned from what low bias is. How how much the song. Which is so old and so universal really connects us not just across geographical locations but also through time and i think that gave me a lot of comfort you know that as human beings. We have this instinct. We have this instinct to to comfort to suv in the face of all these sort of difficult things that i've been photographing that has been truly one of the greatest gifts of working on this story. I'm peter gwen. And you're listening to overheard at national geographic. A show where we eavesdrop on the wild conversations. We have here at nat. Go and follow them to the edges of our big weird beautiful world this week. I talked to photographer hannah. Race morales. who's covered. The war on drugs in the philippines enforced marriages in cambodia. She'll share what it was like growing up in manila. It how she got her start in photojournalism. Inner journey to document ways. People find refuge in mr turmoil. More after this guy. Kyle and national geographic are working together to make your life a lot easier getting quote with gyco mentioned your nat ju affiliation and you could get a special discount on geico's already low rates visit geico dot com slash nat. Go to see how much you could save. That's geico dot com slash nat. Go great rates great service and a whole lot more geico dot com slash nat go. I grew up in a very messy manila. I always say. I'm from the messy parts of an alarm for manila manila What does that mean. The messy parts had an insular childhood. In that i wasn't really allowed to go out into the streets My mom didn't feel safe for me to go outside the streets but my house was very much a bustling home. It was you know we had about a dozen to to fourteen. Sixteen people at a time depending on which relatives were visiting. Who is coming in and out of the diaspora. It was a very bustling house. I grew up. I never had my own bed Really you can have your own bed now. I never had my own bed sharing or your bed sharing. We had a room that i shared with my mom and whoever relative needed space at the time And yet it was just very much a busy busy home in so said people were sort of going and coming a lot with his traveling abroad was that were they part of this diaspora that you were talking about. I think at the time. I didn't really understand the meaning of diaspora. You know as a kid from your point of view people were just leaving all the time you had your some of your best friends suddenly going into places where you can only imagine and then they would sometimes come to visit and there would be completely different people and suddenly they had an american accent. They had gone to camp things that you would watch on television You know they were going to high schools where they didn't have to wear a uniform as like what you know like in cousins really Most of my cousins now live abroad and most of my relatives and my aunties live abroad. And also the experience of just being the one left behind As everybody started leaving was an interesting experience. Because you then have these cousins. Were younger than us. Sending you hand-me-downs from the us you would get in the philippines. We have this thing called bullock by and boxes and these are the boxes that The diaspora will then send home. So you know. Every time we'd have one of those boxes at i'd be back home. And i would be looking through the objects there. And you know exclaiming how it smells like america. even. If i hadn't been there he had been to america Like what would be in the box like what kind of things it would be old clothes. It'd be toiletries. it.

Hannah reyes morales buso Mona idrees thai turkey Mona Trade city philippines peter gwen hannah stepson geico manila manila manila morales cambodia Kyle bullock america
Does Time Really Heal All Wounds?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:44 min | 8 months ago

Does Time Really Heal All Wounds?

"Channel Discovery Channel stuff about 9 11. Some of it was new. Some footage I hadn't seen before. And, Yeah, I wasn't really feeling optimistic. So, like three hours before the show, I said, um, how about you Just throw all that out? And the producers were great. They were like, Sure. No problem Do you want to do? I'm like I don't know other side on the air. I got on the air and said, You know, you hear these old cliches and adages, You know time heals all wounds and stuff when 9 11 and I said, does it Does it really This doesn't heal mind. I don't mind, you know. I don't feel healed The matter of fact, I feel more pissed off now than I did then. Sense of rage and I learned something I hadn't learned before that. On one of the flights. That hit the Pentagon. There was a young lady who had won a National Geographic Contests. He was going to some whatever island to look at sea turtles or something like that. She was on that plane with her teacher, and I thought I just want to kick someone's ass right now. I have to hear that. You know? I don't feel peeled much at all. I don't know about you. Maybe it's just me, but I just felt anger. I know it's not right. I get it, folks. I know it. I mean, I I believe in Jesus Christ. I don't run from that. I've said it on this radio. I'll say it again. I'm proud of that. And I know the message is always redemption and You know, love your enemies and stuff, but I'd be lying if I said that work this weekend. You know, it really

Channel Discovery Channel Pentagon
Remembering 9/11, 20 Years Later

Pantsuit Politics

01:39 min | 8 months ago

Remembering 9/11, 20 Years Later

"At each american airlines flight seventy seven took off from dulles international airport outside of washington. Dc the boeing. Seven fifty seven was headed to los angeles like the other two flights. Sarah just talked about with sixty four people on board to pilots four flight attendants fifty eight passengers including three elementary school. Children selected for a trip hosted by national geographic. All five of these hijackers were flagged by security for extra scrutiny for one reason or another including that one of them didn't have a photo. Id and agents found them to be suspicious. The only consequence of being flagged for this extra scrutiny ended up being that they're checked bags were held off the plane until it was confirmed that they had boarded three of the hijackers set off metal detectors and had extra screening before boarding the plane. The screeners didn't resolve. What set off the alarms and allowed the hijackers to board the plane anyway and this seems unthinkable today and the reason that it seems unthinkable today is because we have all been flying in recent years in a post nine eleven world and i think this is one moment to kind of flag as a way in which our our everyday lives substantially changed after nine eleven when you read about the way security was conducted. Then it's just unimaginable compared to what we do now. The five hijackers boarded the plane at seven. Fifty a m two of them set in coach in three and first class. The plane was scheduled to depart at eight ten took off at eight twenty and reached its cruising altitude at eight forty six.

Dulles International Airport American Airlines Boeing Sarah Los Angeles Washington
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

06:25 min | 9 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"For their existence. Maggie says that david's respect for these creatures is obvious. It's clear that he is not someone who is trying to eradicate all pests from the earth. He gets the life cycle. Just hearing you say that makes me think of silk comes from silk worms and you know we live without them I do think he probably had peers. At the time who might have had a very different view and people didn't know at that point. You know what was happening with pesticides. I'm sure as part of usda he was inundated with you know the concept of we have to make it work for the farmers but marian and david wanted to show the world. These bugs are necessary to so. Why would you think this book still matters today. Well i think it's these pictures are still what these creatures look like. you know. they haven't evolved since then and so it kind of serves its purpose to a you know a maze inspire and awe us about the natural kingdom. It's also a good reminder. That looking at things from a different perspective can really kind of change your view of them. Sometimes you need to consider it from the other perspective. I guess and that's because we humans depend on animals even insects to survive. Appoint that you'll sartori is still working to make when we save nature. We're actually saving ourselves. These species need the same intact. Life support systems that we do clean air clean water clean soil good food stable climate. They need the same things as us. So my job is to just build this thing build the ark and hopefully people will gravitate to it but time is not on our side. Joel says that an eighty years. We're on track to lose half of all species and that's including plants a really have this. Stop watch mentality. I can just hear ticking like the sixty minutes. Stop watch you know. I just hear it. Ticking i mean both on my life. I'll be fifty nine this summer and on the time we have left to try to save big tracks of habitat. This is really key. This idea can feel daunting but joel says there are things that we can do. Watch what you buy you know reduce reuse and recycle in that order. You know recycling's the last resort watch the kind of car you drive to use public transportation. How much meat do you eat. Either just in your lifestyle your consumer choices. That's really the power to change the world. Every time you break out your purser your wallet you're saying to a retailer. I like the so much. I want you to do it again. And again well you can tear the world up or maybe it can help save it. Joel still has another ten years to go about ten thousand animals. Each one of these animals whether it's a spider or verte paradise. They're all magnificent away. They're all works of art into me. The ultimate sin is to to allow anything to go to extinction even one species. And we're on the cusp to lose thousands and thousands. And i'm glad people are finally starting to notice but it's it's just that's the mission is to really get people to pay attention through repeated advertising. That's what we do. Repeated advertising on behalf of nature joel's cova dear. Put his attention on bugs and as he turns towards the next phase i asked him. What the photo arc's last portrait could be. I think that the last portrait will probably be a family naked tastefully done a man a man with a full beard to show the difference between male and female there you know and you know kinda sideways portrait of a man and woman holding a baby and with a half grandchild probably the last thing i do. Maybe by photographing a family of humans he saying. Hey we're gonna save ourselves to more after this if you'd like to see joel's photos more than eleven thousand now so be prepared to spend a little time there you can do that at joel. Sartori dot com or you can go to our website. Michio dot com. We also have a magazine feature on joel and the photo arc which you can find in our show notes and thanks to the power of the internet you can also view the entire book of monsters online too. There's a link for that in our show notes as well. Joel's also coming out with two new books next month. The first is called wonders and it features the most eye-catching animals he's photographed. The other one is book for kids and it goes through the abc's with poetry by debbie. Levy you can check out those books on chills web site. Most booksellers were national geographic books. So that's all in the show notes right there in your podcast app and if you like overheard please take a minute to rate and review us. It's a big help. Overheard at national geographic is produced by. Laura stem brian. Gutierrez jacob pinter and a lotta strauss. Our senior editor is eli chen. Our senior producer is carla wills. Who edited this episode. Our executive producer of audio is davar. Art along our fact checkers robin palmer and julie beer per copy editor is amy kozak and hans. Stale soup composed our theme music and also sound designed and engineered this episode. The national geographic society committed to illuminating and protecting the wonder of our world funds the work of national geographic explorer. Joel sartori this. Podcast is a production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson is the director of visuals and immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national. Geographic's editorial director and i'm your host. Amy breaks. thanks for listening and see all next time. We've all been dreaming of traveling and have long lists of places to visit and explore with the city advantage. Platinum select card adventure is always within reach. You'll earn american airlines advantage miles on every purchase and two times miles at restaurants including takeout in two times miles at gas stations. Plus here's a bonus offer that will really get you moving for a limited time apply for the city advantage platinum select card and you can earn fifty thousand advantage bonus miles after qualifying purchases had to city dot com slash adventure to learn more..

joel sartori Joel david marian Maggie usda Laura stem brian Michio Gutierrez jacob pinter lotta strauss eli chen carla wills davar robin palmer julie beer amy kozak Joel sartori Whitney johnson debbie
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

06:56 min | 9 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"At them and the fact is have human beings ever built a machine as complicated as spider or a fly just in terms of their ability to find food to get out of bad weather to avoid predators to you know to just have a sense of the world around them and make it through time millions of years. I don't think so. So i have a lot of respect for him. And that's how. I spent the pandemic and it went on until late october And i'm glad i did. And whether joel knew it or not. He was following in the footsteps of a husband and wife team who also photographed bugs in their backyard. A hundred years earlier. This online library smell the glove library. Smell it's good to see you guys good to see you too. After covert nineteen kept me at home for a year as part of this story. I got to go back to one of my favorite places at national geographic headquarters the library. I was searching for a one hundred year old book kind of an ancestor to the photo. Arc and what is the library without. Its librarian maggie. Turkmen and i'm the library director here at the national geographic library and archives. Okay so what are you gonna show us today. We are going to look at the book of monsters. You heard correctly the book of monsters a longtime ago. When i first started working at michio. I came across a copy of this book. It was an old book. Red cloth hardcover with book of monsters in big old letters on the spine on the cover and extremely close up black and white photograph of caterpillars face. The publisher national geographic books. I mean how do you not pick that up. So what do we know about this book of fosters so we know that it was published in nineteen fourteen and it has over one hundred super super close up photographs of insects and these pictures were all taken by the author david fairchild and With the help of his wife marian in their backyard in suburban maryland this catalogue of backyard bucks monsters is the fairchild called them featured groundbreaking photography of all kinds of critters beetles cockroaches spiders wasps caterpillars and dragonflies. It was sort of a passion project for the couple. David was a botanist. Who was hired by the us government to travel the world in search of new crops. In short he was a food explorer and so he went out and traveled around the world To try to find different variations of species to bring them back to the us to provide us farmers to try to help diversify crops and find better versions of the different things that People were eating. Both david in marian had strong national geographic ties. Marianne was the daughter of alexander. Graham bell who in addition to inventing the telephone also served as president of the national geographic society. David wrote articles for the magazine and even became a member of the society's board of trustees david. Mary work together on the monsters project. They set up a giant camera in their backyard in maryland. It was a largely homemade affair that the book explains in its introduction. The whole art of these large photographs of insects is so simple that thousands of amateurs ought to be able to take them. The outfit consists of the camera which is just long box along. Focus lens a piece of ground. Glass in a focusing glass a flashlight. A pair of pincers. Some needles mounted in handles or else some small dental tools a few little blocks of wood. A candle a piece of glass covered with tissue paper and a long hollow cylinder made a stiff black paper or cardboard. Add to these a great deal of patience and you have all that is needed. They photograph the bugs in their backyard. Not too different from what jolted more than one hundred years later. They publish their first monster photographs in national geographic magazine in nineteen thirteen and then they put out their book a year later. Each page shows a large black and white photo of different monster accompanied by a caption colorfully written by david. And marian check out the entry on the bald-faced hornet. Oh here it is. The bald face worn it. I wish i could convey to you my sensation when in hunting for the focus on my ground glass this creature burst upon my sight. It was as though exploring in some strange land. I suddenly stood face to face with a beast about which no school book had ever taught me anything it appeared at me out of the gloom of imperfect focus and it took me some time to realize that i was looking into the eyes of bald faced. Hornet there is no wild creature in the northern united states that a man will run away from so fast as from a bald-faced hornet than the end. The does this picture represent. I wonder one of the nightmare visions which haunt the dreams of baby flies so romantic to flies during each bug is photographed in a lifelike way that similar to how joe photographs his animals for the photo work. The bugs are looking right at you. With all the details on display from the hairy legs of a wolf spider to the lacy wings of a damsel fly. Maggie says that this was really unique for that time a lot of times. If you were looking at something in a scientific book you would basically just see the straight down. Overhead view of things and this is very three dimensional. I would think especially for the time you know people did not. I would imagine get up close and personal the way. These photographs are where you can see ito. The flies in the fly's is or you're right up with the you can see the hairs on the spider's legs. I mean that must have been an unprecedented view for a lot of the readers. Readers were able to view these bugs in a way that they likely never had before from an eye level view and perhaps this perspective could help. Readers see these creatures for the very first time even if they were a little scary close up and the book lays out the reasons for the book of monsters which are surprisingly similar to joel's so the pictures in this book are portrait's of creatures which are as much the real inhabitants of the world as we are and have all the rights of ownership that we have but because their own struggle for existence so often crosses hours. Many of them are our enemies. Indeed man's own real struggle for the supremacy of the world is his struggle to control these tiny monsters. But all these fascinating little creatures are not our enemies we must not forget. The man has domesticated certain of the insects and that gigantic industries depend.

national geographic headquarte national geographic library marian david fairchild society's board of trustees maryland david national geographic magazine joel maggie David Graham bell national geographic society us government Marianne alexander united states Mary Maggie joe
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

03:41 min | 9 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"We've all been dreaming of traveling and have long lists of places to visit an explorer with the city advantage. Platinum select card adventure is always within reach go earn american airlines advantage miles on every purchase and two times miles at restaurants including takeout in two times miles at gas stations. Plus here's a bonus offer that will really get you moving for a limited time apply for the city advantage platinum select card and you can earn fifty thousand advantage bonus miles after qualifying purchases had to city dot com slash adventure to learn more. I'd like to take you back. Just a few months to a modern gated community a residential and shopping complex near the outskirts of kandahar afghanistan. Second biggest city. It's late at night. At cafe delight. the music is loud and spirits are high. Young professionals are gurgling tobacco. Smoke through lucas. This is a cafe so it's not you only get a coffee and juices and cakes surf to you. The lighting definitely really stood out because it's very colorful. It looks like a disco club to me national geographic photographer. Kiana harry who has lived in afghanistan for six years described the purple mood lighting the upscale lounge five and something else a bit more surprising. The most interesting part was there was a tv installed in the cafe that was playing video music. The ones that involve dancing and bearskin. So why would music. Videos at nightclub be shocking. Context is everything. Kandahar in the socially conservative south of the country was the birthplace of the taliban in nineties during taliban ruling tv was banned music was banned capturing in any form film or photography was bad. And here we are in canada heart. Were used to be the capital of taliban back in ninety s. There's a music video on. Tv in cafe playing india music even all these years later under a more liberal government. Not everything goes. The bare midriffs of the bollywood dancers were blurred by channel sensors and while female patrons weren't banned only a few women have ever come to the cafe but the contrast with the past is still astonishing when the taliban were in power twenty years ago a place like this would have been unimaginable..

Kiana harry afghanistan kandahar taliban lucas Kandahar canada india
Rattlesnake Rattles Use Auditory Illusion to Trick Human Brains

The KFBK Morning News

00:51 sec | 9 months ago

Rattlesnake Rattles Use Auditory Illusion to Trick Human Brains

"That rattlesnakes? Yes. What about them? We see a lot of them this time of year. They had figured out that the rattle of a rattlesnake is a whole another language on its own. Okay? Yeah. This is out of National Geographic this morning and that rattlesnakes have evolved to try to trick humans into thinking they're closer than they are. So we think they're closer than they are because they change the frequency of their rattles. You know? I'm not so I'm not sure that I really care how close they are. If I hear that rattle, I'm I'm out. Yeah, I know. I appreciate you don't have to trick me. I appreciate this trying to warn me, but I mean things like they're finding out things that ground squirrels can use a rattlesnakes rattling frequency to tell how dangerous the snake is, and they know that snakes that have just given birth. Are more aggressive with their rattles. Oh, I would imagine. So it's very interesting

How Money Really Got Invented

Flash Forward

02:49 min | 9 months ago

How Money Really Got Invented

"How did money got invented so the story. Is you know before we had money. We were just sort of stuck in this unfortunate situation where we had to trade with each other all the time. This is alana. Strauss a producer at national geographic's podcast overheard so person number. One would be a butcher and they'd have meat person number two knew how to make furniture. And you know if if you were someone who had meat and you wanted a chair. But the chair maker didn't need meet at the moment. You just couldn't get a chair and who super inconvenient everyone was just like sitting around unable to get things but of course. Humans are quite inventive. We've talked about that on the show a lot so we figured out solution money so money. Is this amazing invention that comes around where you can ever has money and you can use that as a go-between. Hey i wanna chair right now. I don't have anything you want but here you go. Here's some money you can use that to eggs or whatever else you want and it'll all come around in the future great story. The problem is that it is just that a story it's not true for decades anthropologists have been studying the economic systems of different cultures through history and in nineteen eighty five dr caroline humphrey pointed out that. No one had ever actually documented an example of a pure barter economy. Nobody operates on this barter system. Like it's just not a real thing that anyone uses because leg. He said he would be so inconvenient. Like why would any like people were just like walking around like walking into walls before we came up with like modern ideas you know instead. One system that we know people operated under was a gift economy. These things might sound like the same thing right. Bartering gifting what's the difference so it gift economy is much more flexible right. First of all people aren't just like atomic thomas in a vacuum right like it's probably a friend or a family member someone in your community so when you have a relationship with besides just like this purely kind of economic ebay style thing and if if someone around you need something you're gonna wanna help them out. You know if the butcher needs a chair and you make chairs like the is probably your neighbor and like you have a bunch of chairs because you make chairs and you give them a chair and you know that your community in general is always helping you right like the woman down. The street gave eggs last week and got meat from the butcher a month ago. You probably already do this with your friends and family and community right. If somebody that you know needs something you help them out and you know that if you need something in the future. They're going to help you out.

Dr Caroline Humphrey Alana Strauss National Geographic Ebay
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

03:04 min | 9 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"We have to finish glass somaliland use to have lots of cheetahs leopards elephants giraffes animals that are nowhere near the area anymore. And even right now Nobody has any idea how many cheetahs are in somaliland and being able to protect it and even help bring them back would be such a win. Both i think for somaliland's pride and for recognition on the international stage. And because all this. There's a chance that when these kids grow up their kids we'll have a chance to see while cheetah to see nicole's pictures in read rachel's reporting check out their article cheetahs for sale. We've included a link to their story in our show notes r- also including links to a few other resources including a short video about the basics of cheetah biology and conservation as well as an article. About how drought is affecting somaliland. Meanwhile on the other end of the continent like to share another podcast in the national geographic family.

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

08:17 min | 9 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Recognized by the international community does that play any role in the cheetah trafficking. Story it's made it a lot harder for somaliland to get the international aid it needs and wants to fight cheetah trafficking because somaliland isn't recognized as independent on the international stage somaliland doesn't have access to most of the funding it needs to be able to fight the cheetah trade while this lack of recognition makes things more difficult. Rachel thinks that it's also helping to motivate their efforts to stop trafficking and it seems to me that one of the ways. They're trying to demonstrate that they have a functional government subject to the rule of law is by really cracking down on trafficking of all kinds and by focusing on wildlife is just another way for somaliland to say like. Hey look worlds. Were paying attention. Not only to economic development and our citizens and good governance but also to the environment. It also helps that the minister of the environment Minister shukri is personally extremely passionate about about stopping cheetah trafficking. She's the one who really made it a national issue because she cares so much about it so so yes and a half now When rachel was covering the trial in the capital she recorded this interview with minister. Shukri haji smell. Muhammed and the minister told rachel that in her first week on the job. Five confiscated cheetah cubs actually died of malnutrition in her office building. Five died in here. Yes that was my last week and said what. Why are we let people taking the cheapest from the one. And they said they're selling selling that goat's shit comes. Why do some the cheetah's minister shukri says that many of the somali landers who come across while cheetahs see selling the cubs as a way to make additional money especially if the cheetah mother had killed one of their votes which is what happened to mati. Farah duxian i said. Marty is a nomadic pastoralists. Living in western smalley land and you pastoralism is the dominant way of life for most people across the region. This is nicole so becky the photographer who went with rachel to interview. Mati a series of recent droughts in somaliland has made keeping large herds of animals. Much more difficult for the people living there so his father had five hundred sheep and goats matias forty and that's really not enough to sustain his family of one wife and seven kids and so he's really struggling. They're living on the razor's edge of survival and so for his father when a cheetah took one of his goats. It wasn't a big deal. He was able to just brush it off and move on with mock. That's you know that could mean the difference between being able to feed his family or not multi. Father might have been able to brush off the occasional cheetah attack but when he caught a cheetah eating goat and not just any go but one that his own son was relying on for milk. You felt he had to do something so bitten nearly cried. But then i decided to to revenge on definitely shoot rushed for my gun. He talked about kissing his gun after that. And you know feeling vindicated feeling revenge that he had been able to kill the cheetah that had killed the goat that his young son had been relying on and that was in his. Mind's not only justified but the right thing to do but the cheetah carcass was discovered in my d. Was arrested of that. The body was food to the that. I was arrested on despite me not knowing that. There was an organizational initiatives product getting the word out to nomadic farmers as part of the challenge of cheetah conservation in this area. Monte didn't know that cheetahs were endangered or that it was illegal to hunt them so he was let off with a warning and he promised not to harm cheetahs in the future fence. Mufti promise not to kill anymore that he has actually suffered several losses of goats but he has stayed firm to his promise and he has convinced other friends of his to call in and she worked to release cheetah that they have taken from the wilds but the choice between conservation in illegal. Commerce isn't always easy in a reporting rachel film that powerful incentives to sell cheetah cubs remain when a cheetah kills a goat and you only have fifty goats. That is a huge blow to your income. And you need to try to recoup that loss all pastoralists no. There's a market for cheetah cubs. They know there's somebody who's gonna pay money for those cheetah cups. Who's buying the cheetah's so it's people who own private menagerie of all kinds of animals Think about like a wealthy saudi prince or somebody in dubai who has a cheetah some lions Some awesome lots maybe a monkey. It becomes part of a collection interesting. So what are they doing with the cheetah. That's a really good question. So cheetahs are in between big cats and small cats because they're not so big and they're not particularly aggressive at least in comparison to alliance tiger. You know people will bring them into their house. You have their pictures on instagram of people lounging in their living. Rooms watching tv with their cheetahs. Cheetahs have a long history as exotic pets. They've been kept by egyptian pharaohs. Renaissance nobles and more recently instagram influencers. Social media definitely drives the trade particularly instagram. You get people who have public accounts you know. Tens of thousands of followers who post pictures of them in their pet cheetahs and it's in many ways a sign of not just wealth but of privilege and influence because in most places In the gulf countries it is illegal to own a pet cheetah Or any big cat so by posting openly that you have one sort of like saying look how important i am. This is illegal. But i still have it so since instagram. You mentioned specifically instagram. But since instagram's such a driver for this illegal market have they you. What's their been their response to this. Instagram has not responded to my questions or requests for comment in theory. You know illegal. Activity isn't supposed to happen on the platform and instagram interest. A place where people show off their pet cheetahs. It's also a place where people sell and buy cheetahs so those ads are against their policy. But as we've seen with social media platforms not just instagram. All social media platforms. You know you get a little creative in. It's easy enough to get around those restrictions but someone needs to connect the farmers who might happen across well cheetah cubs to the people who might want to buy them as pets and that brings us back to ati high one and the trial in the somaliland courtroom. We spent ten days traveling throughout western somaliland. Every single person. I talked to whether they were a fisherman and a beach community or like a driver. Local cut seller or.

somaliland rachel Minister shukri Shukri haji shukri Farah duxian cubs Muhammed Mati landers Rachel Marty becky nicole Mufti Instagram Monte dubai
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

02:41 min | 10 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"If you wanna know. More about what the aztecs like before fifteen twenty one. Check out our history magazine piece and learn how. This anniversary is playing out in mexico especially during cova. We only spent a few minutes with communities to spend more time with them. Take a look at allen's book corns our blood culture and ethnic identity in contemporary as tech village. He and pamela also have a new book coming out in two thousand twenty two call pilgrimage to broken mountain. it's a look now sacred journeys in mexico plus if the rain gods intrigued you take. Jim's book the rain gods rebellion to learn more about raphael's michika. Ai program checkout www dot rafael perez e perez dot com. That's all in the show notes and while you're there be sure rates and review us because that really helps other listeners. Find us if you like what you hear and want to support more content like this. Please consider a national geographic subscription. Go to nat. Go dot com slash explore to subscribe. Today overheard at national geographic is produced by alana strauss. Brian gutierrez jacob pinter and laura sam. Our senior producer is carl wells. Our senior editor is eli chen. Our executive producer of audio is our lawn. Perfect checkers robin paul. Merkin julie. beer or copy editor. Is amy kozak. This episode was sound designed and engineered by hans. Stale sue special. Thanks to jeff kaufman who fell manawatu ceremony. This podcast production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson is the director of visuals and immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national. Geographic's editorial director and i'm your host. Amy breaks thanks for listening. We've all been dreaming of traveling and have long lists of places to visit and explore with the city of vantage platinum. Select card adventure is always within reach. You'll earn american airlines advantage miles on every purchase and two times miles at restaurants including takeout in two times at gas stations. Plus here's a bonus offer that will really get you moving for a limited time apply for the city advantage platinum select card and you can earn fifty thousand advantage bonus miles after qualifying purchases had to city dot com slash adventure to learn more..

rafael perez mexico cova alana strauss Brian gutierrez jacob pinter laura sam carl wells eli chen robin paul Merkin julie amy kozak jeff kaufman pamela raphael national geographic partners Whitney johnson allen Susan goldberg national geographic
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

07:32 min | 10 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Water. Cold's out to call out in the. The rains begin guessing. That's not talking. Jim montague shoot up. But it's hurting bidding a drawn marking pack. We do not know how is going. And according to what they say they killed the ring. God's killed him because he does not pull out now. Though at the rain gardens are what they sound like gods that bring rain tell you the story about it. They say it's a story about a boy who goes to the river together crayfish near nachos Ideas daily porch. Not a glum. Like the ones they could send dancers use. Take the castle. Dancers are a downsized community who knows actually nachos middle brother plays drums for that group so gathering crayfish boy came to a waterfall and this girl appeared out of the water and started talking to him and basically falling in love and the girl she was mythological while culture called an chahe which means water dweller and they can take the form of a lizard or serpent view chani argue one who kind of bring the terrestrial waters it bobble out of the ground so the china have a lot of downtime. Just sit in water with their mouths open and eat everything that falls into the water. Ordinarily the chani a earlier stories is a dangerous being and often associated with the with the devil. China and this story was friendly. She didn't want to leave the boy. I'm gonna embraced. Embracing took him into the water and he doesn't drowned. He doesn't die keeps playing his drum for these. They say that is of that born when they make yes talking. You know for sure myself. According to what they say the boy pass strums before the boy plays the drum with the girl and and marks The path to of siestas that occur in different times of the year. But now we know number one younger. Here's jim doesn't know why the now i hear the drumming anymore. One of the theories is the rain. Gods killed it. And the other possibility is that he was explaining really his his sense of loss having no longer cultivated a common core and being plot with his brothers and because his life has changed. And it's changed in the community as well so they've lost contact with the chani this story and others made jim realize something. New took me a long time to see it. They are the way people talk about discourse about political discourse political events in their community. The stories aren't just old folktales there about the present the now associate the itani with the mysterious mexican people whose ancestry is both indigenous and european. They are the largest ethnic group in mexico in some stories. Jim collected the ashani where the animal companion spirits of local political figures. Who did the misdeeds. And jim found that the roles of the gods with change over time based on what was going on for instance before the fall of the aztec rain. Gods were kind of above human affairs so this idea of of rain gods coming to the aid of people because they empathize with their circumstances which is definitely something that developed after the conquest. This idea that god's can be emphasis empathetic. that's in part. Because the brain gods became kind of a standard for the nawab muring the way the ivana represented missiles the rain. Gods and china would frequently get into fights the tension between the rain gods in the itani mirrors the tension between the nawa. And the. because there's a lot of antagonism between the johnny and the rain gods explained too often end the this concept of envy and now culture is something that really struck jim. They don't even admit that they feel envious defined blame everything frenzy. It's considered to be a major character. Flaw nbn lover opposites. Love is about working with others. If you cooperate in the family you're going to love your family members. The opposite of this is envy which is out for yourself. You want something so badly you'll do take it from another person. It's described as like hunger. We've all been traveling and have long lists of places to visit an explorer with the city advantage. Platinum select card adventure is always within reach. You'll earn american airlines advantage miles on every purchase and two times miles at restaurants including takeout into smiles at gas stations. Plus here's a bonus offer that will get you moving for a limited time apply for the city advange platinum select card and you can earn fifty thousand advantage bonus miles after qualifying purchases had to city dot com slash adventure to learn more. There's a new podcast. You might enjoy ted climate from the ted audio collective. They don't pack the problems and solutions of climate. Change without burning you out too much host. Dan quarter walks you through big systemic issues in bite sized episodes with questions lake. Will the ocean ever run a fish or can we transition to only renewable energy coming up extreme weather the best grocery bag to us and the international journey of the very shirt on your back find and follow ted climate wherever you're listening so after the aztec fell from power and now people in their culture survived even after a disastrous population decline and they continue to survive today an international interest in the no other language in this being taught all the united states. Right now are we have colleagues teaching in university of utah. What are the world's centers for the study of this. Language is now warsaw poland. And after all there aren't a whole lot of indigenous american languages that have one point five million speakers. If you're going to learn this is a pretty useful. One two now and now now is making its way into the cage. Some years ago. The princes were born under the protection of the greek.

Jim montague jim china China mexico Jim johnny ted Dan university of utah warsaw united states poland
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

06:37 min | 10 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"City. He took a special interest in the catis. When you think that they've destroyed all these books eight just hurts. Amazingly some caucases are still around today held in museum collections. All over the world. And when i say amazingly i mean it one codex was in dresden during world war two and survived the firebombing there the room where the codex was in florida and he's miraculously survive in because it was sort of encapsulated in between two other books or nesta says you can learn a lot about aztec culture from these cottage cheese like the rituals beliefs and even their beverages. After certain age they were allowed to drink bull k. These furman drink coming from the gaby from where you get a scholarship and tequila also and only the the others were allowed to use these drinks in the non ritual context as well as what we call in western traditionist. Magic mushrooms psychedelic mushrooms. That were also very common for ritual practices but these goddesses aren't just artifacts they're living documents communities every year. Go to the national anthropology museum. They take out the from the bolt and they do small retail some reps from the community with meskel and some other elements from the culture and then they take it back in fact. These old documents are even occasionally used in current legal disputes. They might go back to that. Say okay. I see that this territory belong to the family of one parents so any. It's good proof to make a legal case in mexico so we have these documents which are valuable records of how the aztec live back. Then but how are. They living now deluged pretty much as they had lived particularly in the areas outside of the very center of mexico city. That's jim taggart. A professor of history archaeology franklin and marshall college up north the. Us and canada tried to wipe out native american culture. In some cases native american children were sent to schools far from their family and forbidden from speaking their languages which drastically decrease the number of speakers in mexico. The government did encourage simulation but many indigenous people were still able to keep their languages. No there were all kinds of problems but the now i was in certain regions. Speak very good now. What their vocabularies large they. The grammar is in good shape. They're very articulate and they can tell beautiful oral narratives. that's right. There are still now uh speakers in mexico about one point five million of them they still live in their communities speak their language tell their stories and practice their religion and in nineteen sixty eight. Jim went on a quest to find them and learn about their culture. He traveled to mexico and came upon a valley five hours from mexico city that he knew had community was live in houses that are hidden. You can't really see them. The valley is so covered in trees. That you can't actually see the houses. Call them challah. Weekday trees a big leaves the provide a lot of shade and are also tropical fruit trees growing bananas. Oranges papaya mangoes every morning. A person could hear the mule trains with their their horseshoes hitting stones. They'd be walking through the community. Up to the commercial center of doc apostle which was the most important town for the merchants in the area the now up and dressed in white cotton trousers and shirts and the women wore these blouses embroidered with logical figures when they worked in the cornfields and they turn back corn tortillas. The idea was to get the corn very finely so that the tortillas tasted like cakes there would just melt in your mouth but they're very hard to make at the village. Jim was looking to gather stories but he had to win. Over people's trust. I and that was tricky. At one point he attended awake for a young man when another man approached him. Who said de-deputy took you quality. Are you working with the devil. And at that time. I was a i would answer everyone what i didn't know what else to say i said came on. Yes i am. But i didn't know what he said and people look at me like they thought. I just been aware that this guy come prom. But then nacho showed up. Nacho wasn't now a man who explained what happened at the week. He would go on to be gym teacher and friend and he just turned out to be a splendid fellow. he's very honest and very decent man and he was four years younger than me and so we were close enough in age so we share a lot of interest. Jim would end up going back and forth between now villages in the us for the next forty four years over. The decades nacho taught him to speak a dialect of nah he could also explain to me things that people said that. I didn't understand because you were alluding to things that i didn't know abou- so over time. Jim got something really valuable stories. Jim would come to nachos house. Nacho hannah piece of sweet bread and a cup of coffee. They used to make delicious coffee because they used sugarman real sugar. Cane and nacho would tell him stories on one occasion he told him a story that finally made him understand why these stories were so important to the nawa. It started when nacho told him about a mysterious sound in a nearby river but say not.

national anthropology museum mexico jim taggart marshall college mexico city nesta dresden commercial center of doc apost Jim florida franklin nacho canada us Nacho Nacho hannah sugarman Cane
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

04:52 min | 10 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"So how does someone end up as a tree. Person for eileen garcia. It started when she was a little kid. She grew up with her grandparents in a neighborhood in la all the pointing their from mexico and they brought with them a lot of their. You know planting trees. We had a lot of fruit trees growing up and i grew up climbing then. Eileen says lafuente didn't have many trees but her grandmother would tell her stories about growing up in adobe house along canal where her family grew their own food. My grandparents were agricultural migrant workers. And i think it was very natural for them to exercise their skill sets in their home. The house where i would eventually be raised in so eileen yard was lush with avocado trees in peach trees there are also orchid tris with bright pink flowers and she says she treated them like her own private monkey bars. Eileen thought. that was just normal. I don't think it really dawned on me that my house was so special until i started kindergarten and when we were walking home from school the one of the little kids like all you live in the jungle house. Many people think of l. a. As a desert not a jungle but trees have a long history in los angeles. Oak wetlands grow naturally in la and before europeans arrived the indigenous tonga. People manage the wetlands and lived off the acorns but these days when most people picture. La they don't think of shade. La has a city is based around and built around sunshine. This is alejandro bruneta. She's a writer at natsios environment desk and she wrote a cover story about the lack of shade in la. That's why people came here. That's why hollywood loves this place. The quality of the light is exceptional. The sunshine is exceptional. It's a beautiful place if you love son but even for people who love sunshine. There's a darker side to the sun and it's a problem all over the us not just los angeles..

eileen garcia lafuente Eileen adobe house la Oak wetlands eileen mexico alejandro bruneta natsios environment desk tonga La los angeles hollywood us
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

06:47 min | 10 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Jackie cochran died in nineteen eighty in at that time. According to the national aviation hall of fame he held more speed altitude and distance records than anyone in the world male or female but she never saw an american woman. Make it into space. She also never explained. What made her testify against the loveless program. We figured it might be because she was not going to be allowed in it. I have heard from others that they heard. Jackie had made the statement in later years that she regretted what she had done at the congressional hearings but we felt like she sabotaged just after the hearings. Congress sided with nasa nasa said astronauts had to be military jet test. Pilots in only men could be jet pilots. Well that's just the way things were in that man. There was no need for the levels program. Nasa ultimately decided they were not going to make the access and the funding available to continue the project. And that pretty much. Shut the door and women being able to pursue any hopes of being in the astronaut corps. I was greatly disappointed that we did not go on. I had already quit my job. I kept hoping for the best that the program would be reinstated. I just you know for every door that closes two more will open. So i just went on with my life and another door did open just not for the americans. Unfortunately for the us what happened next is soviet speed us to the punch of anti nanterre cova in nineteen sixty three which was not long after the program had died became the first woman to space. Unlike the women love was tested. Valentina tereshkova hadn't spent thousands of hours in a cockpit the soviets had heard about the lowest program and they wanted to be the first to send a woman into space so they trained her to fly and mater cosmonaut. We were very happy for her. We were sorry that it was not an american woman but we were happy that a woman finally made it into space but nasa hardly noticed the. Us was headed for the moon. Nasa spent all of its money and resources to reach that goal in. There wasn't room for anything else. It was decades before an american woman blasted off into space. So nineteen seventy eight now so recruited its first new set of astronauts since nineteen sixty nine first african americans to be recruited to the program first asian americans to be recruited to the program and notably six women including sally ride who then became the first american woman in space in nineteen ninety-three by then nasa had changed the requirements. The astronauts didn't all have to be military pilots. Sally ride she was a scientist. We were happy for sally. Ride to who went up as a mission specialist. The we were pilots. We wanted to sit up front and we want to sit in the left seat. The pilots it would take another decade for an american woman to sit there in nineteen ninety five. Eileen collins became the first woman to pilot the space shuttle and a few years later she was the first female commander of a shuttle mission. Wally phone sir. Rally both went to her launches when the rockets lifting off i was yelling out into the crowd go go for all of us and so when i lean collins went up we felt that we had been redeemed. What we had done had not been in vain that maybe we put the bug in. Someone's ear that we can crack this glass ceiling in crack it. They did but it still hasn't been shattered. Nasa has sent of men into space but only about fifty women and a woman never walked on the moon not yet anyway today nasa embraces the lowest testing program as part of its history photos of some of the women pilots can be found on the nasa website and nasa has acknowledged that these women pave the way for future astronauts. But that's far from the message. Nasa was sent into women at the time. I like to think you know this. It didn't work out and that's a shame but this was a moment of them being able to say. Hey look. there's somebody who is going to advocate for us. They're women who were going to advocate for each other and there is now scientific proof that were just as capable and i think that's very inspirational and continues to be very inspirational. Even now after nasa. Shut down the loveless program sir. Radley became an accountant that pay the bills so she could keep flying for fun at eighty five years young. Sarah still flies and she still gets questions about the lowest program recently interest. She met some college aged pilots. Several the girls had to me. You were my role model. Thought me a role model. I think it's the idea of being a pioneer of trying to do something different to bring a better life and a bit more hopes two more women. I think that's why they still onto the story because women weren't doing things like that in those days in someone had to lead the way because for sarah radley and the other women. There's only ever been one way to go up more space stories. You can read victoria. Jags essay about the future of space tourism. Also check out why some scientists think the future of spaceflight should be female. You can also see a brief history of human space in photos if you like what you hear and want to support more content like this. Please consider a national geographic subscription. Go to nat. Go dot com slash explore to subscribe. Today overheard at national geographic is produced by jacob. Pinter emily oxen schlager christian clark. Brian gutierrez and robin miniature. Our editors are ibi caputo. Casey minor hunstville sue composed our theme music and engineers are episodes with additional. Help from nick. Anderson jerry buscher early seaver and interface media group special. Thanks to pineapple street media and marker wider camp. This podcast is a production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson manages our podcast team and susan. Goldberg is our editorial director. I'm your host peter gwen. Thanks for listening and see all next week..

Jackie cochran national aviation hall of fame Nasa Sally ride nanterre Valentina tereshkova Eileen collins Jackie Congress Us Wally sally collins sarah radley Radley Sarah Pinter emily oxen schlager chr Brian gutierrez robin miniature ibi caputo
Mercury 13's Sarah Ratley Set out to Break the Glass Stratosphere

Overheard at National Geographic

01:31 min | 10 months ago

Mercury 13's Sarah Ratley Set out to Break the Glass Stratosphere

"Eighty-five years old five years old young correction i maybe five years young. So are you still fly. Or you still piloting plays yes. I fly with a friend of mine very often now. And i'm all used to all the newest equipment when i look at now and see a beautiful blue sky. I want to be up there sir. Bradley has spent a lot of her life pointed in one direction up and at times. She's tried to go even further. I wanted to find out new horizons. What isn't in star trek to go. Where no man has gone before we were leading the way to show that women could be in space to go into space. It's not easy. Astronauts are superhuman. god's basically that's victoria jaggard. She's one of my buddies here at national geographic and a fellow editor. She also writes about space. It is a physically mentally emotionally demanding. Job we are born raised evolved to be comfortable with this level of gravity with this atmospheric pressure. So if we're all meant to be earthbound how do we decide who makes a good astronaut. At the beginning of the space race nasa thought there was a quick answer but sarah radley and a bunch of other women made the country think again.

Victoria Jaggard Bradley National Geographic Sarah Radley Nasa
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

01:52 min | 11 months ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Hemsworth <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Male> the feature documentary <Speech_Male> plane <Speech_Music_Male> with sharks <Speech_Music_Male> in other shark-infested <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> programming all <Speech_Music_Male> summer. Long on national <Speech_Male> geographic in disney. <Speech_Music_Male> Plus <Speech_Music_Male> you can read our stories <Speech_Music_Male> about how <SpeakerChange> sharks navigate <Speech_Music_Male> via the earth's <Speech_Music_Male> magnetic field <Speech_Music_Male> and even band <Speech_Music_Male> together to hunt <Speech_Music_Male> and be <Speech_Male> sure to check out our <Speech_Male> list of the most fascinating <Speech_Male> shark discoveries <Speech_Male> in the last decade <Speech_Male> also. <Speech_Male> Lauren simon <Speech_Male> itis is a member of <Speech_Male> a cool group called <Speech_Music_Male> minorities and shark <Speech_Music_Male> sciences which <Speech_Music_Male> promotes inclusivity <Speech_Music_Male> and diversity. In shark <Speech_Music_Male> sciences <Speech_Male> you can read <Speech_Male> about them at missile <Speech_Music_Male> lasmo dot <Speech_Music_Male> org from <Speech_Music_Male> mis <Speech_Male> s. e. l. <Speech_Male> s. m. o. <Speech_Music_Male> Dot org <Speech_Music_Male> and you <Speech_Music_Male> can read more about shark. <Speech_Music_Male> Repellent research <Speech_Music_Male> in mary roaches <Speech_Music_Male> book grunt. <Speech_Music_Male> The curious science <Speech_Music_Male> of humans at <Speech_Male> war in her latest <Speech_Music_Male> book comes up. September <Speech_Music_Male> fourteenth <Speech_Music_Male> is called us <Speech_Music_Male> when nature breaks <Speech_Music_Male> the law. <Speech_Music_Male> That's all on the show. Nuts <Speech_Music_Male> the right there in your podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> App <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> overheard at national geographic <Speech_Music_Male> is produced by <Speech_Music_Male> monica wilhelm. <Speech_Music_Male> Alana's <Speech_Music_Male> strauss brand <Speech_Music_Male> gutierrez. Loris <Speech_Music_Male> sim and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> jacob pinter. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our senior producer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is carla wills. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our senior editors <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> chin <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our executive <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producer of audio's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> var. Arline <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> fact checkers or julie. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Beer and robin palmer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> to karen circa <Speech_Music_Male> for archival research <Speech_Music_Male> and for <Speech_Music_Male> providing the recording. <Speech_Music_Male> The shark lady. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Eugenie clark <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> heard in this episode <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or copy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> editor. Is amy kovac. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> This <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> episode was sound <Speech_Music_Male> designed and engineered <Speech_Music_Male> by ted woods <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hans. <Speech_Music_Male> They'll soup <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> composed our theme music. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> This podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is a production <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of national. Geographic <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> parker's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> whitney. Johnson is <Speech_Music_Male> the director of visuals <Speech_Music_Male> in immersive experiences. <Speech_Music_Male> Susan <Speech_Music_Male> goldberg is national. <Speech_Male> Geographic's editorial <Speech_Male> director. Now i'm your host <Speech_Male> peter gwen. <Speech_Male> Thanks for listening <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> and seal next on. <Speech_Music_Male>

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Since jane goodall auditor pioneering research and since then new. Generations of conservationists are stepping up to protect africa's most endangered chimps. Today more activists geico and national geographic are together to make your life a lot easier. Get quote with geico mentioned you're ju- affiliation and you could get a special discount on geico's visit geico dot com slash nat geo to see how much you could save. That's geiko dot com slash nat geo great rates great service and a whole lot more geico dot com slash nat geo. I'd like to play you a little clip from a national geographic documentary. Released way back. Well not that way back for some of us in one thousand nine hundred four among wild chimpanzees for centuries there were fearsome tales of a half human months to roaming the african forests even in modern times knowledge of the elusive creature. The wild chimpanzee was largely based on speculation then in one thousand nine hundred sixty a daring young englishwoman. Set out to sought fiction from truth. It's probably not too hard to guess whom this documentary is about her name. Jane goodall was twenty six years old and destined to make scientific history. Jane goodall had been to go on this expedition. In what is now. Tanzania by an anthropologist named louis leakey. He thought observing great apes could help us understand how ancient humans lived especially chimpanzees because they are so similar to humans. They are tied with bonobos as closest living genetic relatives. Jane spent months watching the chimpanzees and slowly introducing them to her presence. I discovered not far from cam that there was a peak overlooking two valleys. And from this vantage point i was able to gradually piece together the daily behavior of chimps. And eventually she was able to watch them close up and pioneered the study of chimpanzees in their natural habitat. The chimps very gradually came to realize that i was not dangerous after all. I shall never forget the day after about eighteen months when into the first time a small group allowed me to approach and be near them. Finally i had been accepted. I think it was one of the proudest most exciting moments of my whole life. Jane goodall made all kinds of incredible discoveries about chimpanzees like they make tools to hunt termites and kind of like birds. They've built complicated nestle high up in the trees and they seem to have their own set of challenges and could be kind or cruel to each other. Jane state that spot now gone bay stream national park in tanzania. She was there for decades and set the groundwork for chimpanzee research to this day but there was still a lot left to learn. Jane goodall research started in central africa. But there are other groups of chimpanzees who live all across the continent. Some have been isolated from each other for hundreds of thousands of years studying those apes would fall to more recent generations of primatology. It's so what was it like for you when you when you first saw a chimpanzee in the wild well so that's a very good story. Actually it's a story. I get made fun of a lot for. But i i'll tell you anyway what happened. This is katie. Ghandour head of the biology department at drexel university. She started studying chimpanzees in the nineties. When i first went to nigeria chimpanzees were believed to be extinct in nigeria. Jane goodall wrote in her nineteen eighty-six book. The chimpanzees have gone that apes. Extinct in nigeria. And that's what most western biologists believed at the time. I didn't even believe that there were still chimpanzees and my phd advisor. John oates was like no no no. They're still they're going look so we track them for three days. And we've we found him and it was such a powerful experience people in nigeria new. The chimps were there and how to find them so i was with this gentleman named salad knew everything about animals and i was in my first year graduate school and i told salom you. I said look salamu. I'm a professional primatology. I will go up to them and get picture. You stay back here. It was a big moment for katie. On the cusp of taking a picture of an animal. That was supposed to be extinct. So i snuck up on these by care patched everything so so he snuck up a second. I don't know forty five minutes or an hour. I finally got right up underneath them like this. It and i took my velcro my camera and all of a sudden chimpanzees like who who they started throwing stuff at me and so all i have. Is this picture of by and blurry. Vegetated as as i thought salbu. He laughed and laughed laughed. But it was. It was such a powerful experience. It really was. I mean there's nothing like seeing wild eighths of but for many years after that every time we go back to go di salom with say Here comes the professional primatology. So i ate a little a little bit of humble pie for forbidden years. After that. despite the humble-pie katie continued to go back. Gathered more evidence pictures for and fecal samples. Katie was able to extract dna to compare these chimpanzees with other known groups of chimps. When we did that what we found was that there were very very different from any other chimpanzees around so in nineteen ninety-seven katie proposed that this group of chimpanzees be considered. Its own subspecies. Now a subspecies is kind of what it sounds like different but not different enough to be. Its own separate. Species take for instance siberian tigers in russia and sumatran tigers and indonesia. They're both still tigers. But evolving in these two different places gives them different traits from visible things like size and coat to differences at the genetic level. Same principles apply for chimps for example the chimpanzee subspecies katie. Observed doesn't seem vulnerable to the simian version of hiv like the chimps of central and east africa before katie rotor paper. The local people already had a sense that there were different kinds of chimpanzee living in the area and they said this all the time you know. There's two different kinds of chimpanzees here for years. I was like oh yeah right but it in fact now we have all this camera trap. Data like literally. We're really done. The truth is but they were saying. Well there's ones that are light brown ones that really dark. And that's what they meant. Subspecies also.

Jane goodall John oates Jane louis leakey tanzania Tanzania forty five minutes geico indonesia nigeria drexel university africa geiko dot com three days russia nineteen eighty-six book an hour central africa nineteen ninety-seven Today
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"Back in his lab thomas near the finish line with the beaver kale. So it's four thirty three pm. On tuesday march twenty third. Twenty twenty one and i've got a bit of an update for everyone as in all things in life things can change. He's almost writers ship it out and then he gets phone call so going into this morning was all go. Go go full commander mode macgyver. Mode just figured out hard and fast. They could slow trying to get this thing shipped out later this week for projects like this. Have a lot of moving parts in the photographer. Run until. Tom has been delay. He won't make it into the field before the ice melts so the beaver cam won't see action just yet there will be no triumphant. Send up of all the gear at the end. Tom says it was disappointing to get that call but he was also relieved as an engineer. Any real funding through engineer. One wants to. I don't like that. I rushed the half the rush project. So when you get more time all the sudden you're like okay for something. I can go take an app. Okay great secondly. I can take time to work out all the problems okay. There was one upside since the bieber. Cam was delayed. I actually got to see it in person and there's really only one feature that dominate your attention the glass dome of the underwater housing the camera peering out. So this looks to me like a giant robot. I it's big black unblinking scary. This is big brother right. This is close enough. And that's an interest for now that unblinking robot is sits and tom's workshop waiting for its chance to capture beavers like. We've never seen him before. But already thomas. Dreaming up new uses for the beaver can for one he plans to reuse it with other photographers and other projects beyond beavers and he also sees some more possibilities to bring to life so with this. I can now sorry. This is all very exciting. My brain we could make a zoom call or like a video call conference call on his computer and then have the footage be direct from an underwater view of a beaver. That's right either. Lucien livestream straight from the dam. And maybe you would see us beaver swimming by or something like that crazy. I just thought about that. We're going to have to try this. And even though the beaver came as finished there's plenty of day-to-day craziness. He's also a one man. Help hotline for our photographers at anytime. He could get a call in the middle of the night from india or an update from exports stranded on an iceberg. So you know it's always exciting everyday is exciting match. You never know what screwball thing saga refer or visual journalist is going to come up with next black so i got an idea kimball do this. And whenever those ideas come up we have a guy actually our secret weapon and with a sign off for now by all right so if all this talk about photography has you fired up. Check out the show notes. We have plenty of photos. Arctic wolves sage grouse as captured by the funky bird train and a super slow cheetah running at top speed. You got to check this out crazy. Also for world oceans day. Learn more about the legendary jacques cousteau he pioneered scuba. Diving brought the ocean to our living rooms and sparked people to protect the world around us and even though the beaver cam photos haven't published get. We have a really cool story about beavers and how they changed the world around us. It's a previous episode of her called march of the beavers. Some of you may have already heard golsen again. It's awesome check it out and you feed or in the show nuts too right there and your podcast app. And while you're there be sure to rate in reviews and apple podcasts. It really helps other listeners. Find us over. National geographic is produced by jacob. Pinter ranga tears. Morrison alana strauss in manica wilhelm our senior producer. Karl wills our senior editors eli chin our executive producer of audio's arnold on our fact checkers robin palmer and julie beer per copy editors amy klobuchar huntsville sue composed. Our theme music and engineers are episodes. Thanks to karen circa for archival research and for providing the recording though the episode. This podcast is a production of national geographic partners. Whitney johnson is the director of visuals and immersive experiences. Susan goldberg is national geographic editorial director. And i'm your host peter gwen. Thanks for listening in seal next time..

Susan goldberg peter gwen Whitney johnson india tuesday march twenty third Tom jacob Karl Morrison thomas four thirty three pm amy klobuchar march of the beavers apple later this week one feature this morning eli chin tom one
The Stories of the Stars

Greeking Out from National Geographic Kids

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The Stories of the Stars

"In greek mythology. Stars are more than joust stars. A group of stars were constellation is sometimes arranged in a certain shape that makes it look like an image of something kind of like a big connect the dots puzzle the greeks used to believe these shapes represented heroes and warriors that deserve a spot in the sky to be remembered and revered for all eternity. It is a true honor to be placed among the stars but of course stars are only large incandescent celestial bodies that are so far away. They look like tiny points of light. They are not the outlines of long ago. Heroes you gotta make everything less cool. I make everything way more cool with science. scientists use. Exploding stars called super nova's to try to communicate with aliens since super nova's are the brightest things in the sky. They send messages in the opposite direction. Hoping aliens are looking our way okay. That is cool. I admit okay now. We've already mentioned a few of the heroes placed in the sky. Hercules for example era please erica's right heracles. Exactly and today we're going to discuss. Two more characters earned their rightful place in the night sky. Orion and callisto ryan and callisto are rarely talked about together. I do not know if they have ever interacted. That's true. We're not sure if the two ever met each other. But they both were honored by the gods after their deaths and they both share a very important friend in common artists. Artists is the greek goddess of the hunt and wild animals. She is also the goddess of the moon and protector of young girls and women who are not mother's responsibility.

Callisto Ryan Erica Orion
Once Nearly Extinct, the Florida Panther Is Making a Comeback

Environment: NPR

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Once Nearly Extinct, the Florida Panther Is Making a Comeback

"The florida panther once nearly extinct the big cats now number more than two hundred. Steve newborn of member station w. Usf met up with a photographer and a panther biologist who've been documenting their plight and their progress. The path to find the panther begins at a narrow ribbon of preserved land just west of lake okeechobee. Bryan kelly panther biologists for the state of florida opens a creaking gate as trucks rumble along u s highway twenty seven. Just a few steps away is a different world of cowering oaks and cyprus heads for decades this was the edge of panther country fishing creek while management area. This is the current northern frontier of the pather breeding range. So we've gotten female activity here recently. Which is big news for panthers. North of the coosawhatchie river is he walks down a dirt path. Kelly benz down to unlock a camouflaged camera bolted to a cyprus tree rabbit on possum hikers squirrel law enforcement your dear there's no panthers yeah only five days. The last time. I checked it had this particular camera. Usually we'll get a path once a month for the first time in forty three years. A female panther was spotted near this spot. North of the kalisa hetchy river kelly and others the leave. This progress won't matter if they can't find money to preserve a continuous path for the big patch to migrate. So far this year nine have died on the roads. That's where nature photographer. Carleton ward. Junior comes in traffic. Wars overhead is ward climbs under state road eighty just north of the everglades he inspects and infrared camera that produced one of the most striking images used in a recent national geographic article.

Steve Newborn Bryan Kelly Florida Coosawhatchie River Kelly Benz USF Lake Okeechobee Panthers Cyprus Kalisa Hetchy River Kelly Carleton Ward
Rising Tides with Dr. Victoria Herrmann

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Rising Tides with Dr. Victoria Herrmann

"I am talking with. Dr victoria is the managing director of the arctic institute. A gates scholar at cambridge university and the national geographic explorer. Hi victoria welcome to the podcast. I agree to be here looking forward to this. Conversation has been real. Treat to do some background research on you. But let's just start off because you wasn't even quite sure how to introduce you. Let's start off. What is the arctic institute. The arctic institute is a nonprofit organization. That space here in washington. Dc but we have a team of about forty five researchers across north america and europe working towards a justice. Dana ball end secure. Are we do research across the many dimensions of arctic security so thank climate security. Which is what. I do cultural security. But also maritime security hard security food security making sure everyone is safe healthy and their wellbeing is up across the arctic region. now what is a gates scholar. A gates scholar is a scholarship. That i was very fortunate to have to complete my phd at university in the uk. It's a scholarship that is afforded to anyone who is a resident outside of the uk and is dedicated to improving the lives of others. So that includes me a geographer but also biologists and chemists anthropologist lawyers all working hopefully towards a better world okay so this is not associated with bill gates at all it was established by bill gates established alongside his father bill gates senior. So it is his money and his vision started at twenty years ago this year. Actually so we are celebrating our twentieth anniversary in twenty twenty one. Okay so named gates usually typically think of bill

Arctic Institute Dr Victoria Dana Ball Cambridge University Arctic Victoria North America Bill Gates Washington Europe UK Gates
Roth Smith: When the NY Times publish your photostory

Photography Daily

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Roth Smith: When the NY Times publish your photostory

"Rough smith. He is a photographer of writer. A contributed for national geographic and its many guises and has been that for a number of years. So i'm fascinated to find out more about how that came about how you go about approach shooting writing for this powerhouse publication. But you know. I was made aware off his work very recently following the new york times publishing a piece about a photo project. That is proof that you really don't need to go too far from new frontal to make stories that the world's most important titles akin to talk about. I think it's too easy to think that you need something exceptionally complex difficult to pull off for it to be worthy of shooting or attract attention. Sometimes the simplest stores of just the best. This is a story about a photographer who takes a real pleasure in following his instincts to make photo stories and create intriguing assignments for himself. This is a story about ralph smith. Every morning i set off on a journey up at sparrows down the street on my bicycle. Exercising my modulation as much as my legs by the time. It's end of the house an hour or two later having witnessed to summarize and put however many miles of town and country beneath my wheels. I feel as though i've been places. Seeing things traveled in the grand old sense of the word. This rough sounds like the perfect breakfast. But an and it's not just fairweather. Never the weather done you. i do i. I've been out in some very cold bitter temperatures the couple of things that keep me home here on the coast. We get some really savage wins and wins it going fifty miles an hour coming off. The there's no point in writing you. Just get blown off the bike but otherwise yet temperature makes very little difference to me and now there's no such thing as bad weather just inappropriate clothing

Rough Smith Ralph Smith The New York Times Fairweather
New Study Shows Ancient Primates May Have Lived Alongside Dinosaurs

Kottke Ride Home

01:45 min | 1 year ago

New Study Shows Ancient Primates May Have Lived Alongside Dinosaurs

"Did a primates the precursor to all modern primates including humans live alongside dinosaurs. The theory has been batted around over the years but a new study published this year and the journal royal society opens science provides further evidence that that may have been the case. The study is based on new analysis of fossil teeth from the collection of the university of california museum of paleontology in berkeley. Those teeth were just laying undisturbed and uncategorized in her drawer. Ziam until then grad student. Gregory wilson mental. A happened upon them in two thousand three. The teeth are credited with originally having been found by the late. William clemens prolific fossil hunter an expert on the mammals of the mesozoic era who spent most of his time working in the hell creek formation in montana and who unfortunately passed away from cancer in november and the badlands of montana. As you may know from duress park is one of the best places to find evidence about the last dinosaurs and their extinction. Hell creek formation specifically quoting national geographic is critical to understanding what killed off non. Avian dinosaurs and how life evolved afterwards. It's rocks preserve a timeline of life on earth stretching from two million years before the mass extinction to about a million years after one of the few places in the world where fossils can be found on both sides of that boundary and quotes a skeptical that it was the asteroid alone and not other at the time ongoing factors that led to the dinosaurs extinction. Clemens focused on studying other animals that lived alongside the dinosaurs and potentially lived through the extinction. Events other animals potentially including ancient primates.

Journal Royal Society University Of California Museu Gregory Wilson William Clemens Hell Creek Montana Berkeley Cancer Clemens
Disney Plus Launches Star, A Streaming Outlet With More Grown-Up Fare

Android Central Podcast

07:36 min | 1 year ago

Disney Plus Launches Star, A Streaming Outlet With More Grown-Up Fare

"Knew that star was launching february twenty third which recording this yesterday. I am in canada. So i have access to it along with australia. New zealand parts of europe in singapore. So a few countries have this new section on their disney plus app. And it's a big deal. It's a big deal for me. Because we get all the wes anderson movies. It's a big deal for some other people because they get like twenty four and richard devine from window. Central is tweeting about how much she loves. Twenty four and jack bowers back baby and all that so. I just wanted to talk about where we are in terms of streaming. I know disney or marvel disney made a big bunch of big announcement this morning On when the next set of mcu in star wars shows will be released on disney plus. And then there's all the other services right. There's hbo max there's peacock there's discovery plus there's Paramount plus. I guess if you want to call that new and all this leads to confusion for people who just want to find the show to watch. So let's start with disney. They now have ninety five million subscribers. They are doing really really well. In terms of expansion into new countries. This new star lodge is a big deal so give us the t. l. Dr if you will of why star launched now and why. It's a big deal for people outside the us lawyers. It's always the lawyers. Yeah i say why did it launch now because this is when they could finally agree on. Okay here's where the contracts in so we can pick things up. Yeah the the. The really oversimplified version is this in the united states. We have hulu and hulu has basically everything. That's not under the five pillars of disney plus in those disney star. Wars marvel pixar in national geographic. Anything outside of that. you what. You're forgetting well. I was gonna say you're forgetting the pillar of twentieth century fox and twentieth century fox which is on hulu so so virtually anything outside of those five pillars in the. Us will find on hulu yes. They're exceptions the problem is hulu is not anywhere in the rest of the world. It's a decidedly american phenomenon and so disney needed a way to get all this content to everybody else in pay by the way they get to charge a little more for it too and that became star the way they first announced it they do it. What other earnings calls last year It was a little like just weird. I didn't even fully understand it at the time and it took a little while to sink in and then the developer not developer days there investor days into simmer november december whenever that was explained. It a little better really. It's just that simple if it's if it's content you can probably find on hulu here in the us it's going to be on star everywhere else. So given that disney twentieth century fox. They bought a. They bought that from fox which was previously a shareholder in hulu disney is now the majority shareholder of hulu. Why can't they just bring hulu to the rest of the world. What is that. I mean i don't know the brand well who owns. Who is the issue there although disney now entirely owns who if i correct right they finish tying their last pieces of hulu like two years ago for for all intents and purposes and there might be somebody with a little sliver but it it's a disney joint partially owned by comcast but they're buying it slowly over the next few years right. Yeah that was an agreement that was made a couple of years ago but But that's why comcast is okay. All of our stuff is leaving hulu at this date because we will no longer have a share in it and it's all going to peacock But yeah the reason that who didn't exist in all these other countries was media streaming lauzon like entertainment and streaming laws vary by country by country. It takes a lot of money to get the rights to a decent amount of shows in places other than the us so it was a matter of hulu. Didn't really have the time or the or the money to spend on investing in trying to build up a catalog and other countries the only other country that hulu is in outside of the united states is japan. And i'm not sure how much longer is going to be there since they're probably going to roll it into star but it's disney had the clout to roll around the disney also already had rights to a lot of these things or the released they in contracts and have the rights back right so it's just easier to bring a new sub domain umbrella underneath disney plus put all the twentieth century fox content in there called star and make it a separate kind of expansion for everybody who already has disney plus. All star is disney. Plus for grownups. It's harder to always you know proper phones not anymore. But that's a. That's a good analogy. Yeah all right. So we we have star. It's got all the twentieth century fox stuff. I think it's got more than that. That's also where a lot of like. Abc television stuff ended up. It's also where a bunch of other like indie stuff that disney and fox had bought up over the years. Anything fox searchlight his ended up in there. That's why it's it's a huge a collection of content. I'm amazed that they were able to get the international rights for those together quickly. Enough for star for the international launches. So the question. I have is is disney. Plus going to host new content in star is that is this where they're going to compete with netflix and hbo for adult viewership or are they still kind of not really aiming at that audience. No actually. I think you've got that right in. It's going to get a little weird because contents can vary by country but you can see that a little bit in the in the Release lists you get you get stuff that is decidedly more adult in there and and part of that is just from the content. That's coming out of those houses in the first place. If you look at specifically fx stuff here it's called fx. Hulu it is it is. I don't know that. I'd go so far as to say it's r rated but it's pretty damn close. Fx is yeah fx is definitely not child-friendly content like ninety percent of it like isn't fx. Were archer lives yeah. Fx is is archer archer archers ethics original sort of But yeah we look at the. The new exclusive stuff like fx on hulu like depths. Was one. I loved last year. I thought it was excellent right up until the end and it went. A little off the rails. Mrs america was on there as well. I mean there's stuff that the you wouldn't even otherwise necessarily see on cable but that they're streaming in that fashion. lets them. do you know just a little more than they. otherwise would have And it's not something that you would see on disney plus so this gives them another conduit for that stuff as well. Yeah and the brand new original content is also going. It's going to vary by the audience category. 'cause like anything that's marvel or star wars is not going to be listed under the star brand period. If it belongs to one of those temples it's still going to be disney plus branded and everything starts going to have the both labels at the bottom whenever they're advertising it but it's a matter of if we're going to do original series if it's pg or if it's pg thirteen below it'll probably be disney plus branded and if it's not pg thirteen disney and pg thirteen and up will probably be star

Hulu Disney Richard Devine Jack Bowers Marvel Disney Wars Marvel Pixar United States Disney Twentieth Century Fox Wes Anderson HBO Comcast Paramount Singapore New Zealand Confusion FOX Australia Europe Canada Abc Television
Riley Arthur shares journalism and publishing tips

Photofocus Podcast

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Riley Arthur shares journalism and publishing tips

"This schmear young. And i'm joined by my co host. Who's dealing with the frigid. Fifty degree weather in florida right now. Skip cohen own. Showing you get not. I mean it's hysterical. Because it's the way we dress down here like today. I've got on shorts flip flops and a flannel shirt that makes no sense and if the fashion police came by most of us would be arrested. So that is. Let's get into today's program because you end. Our guest are both hanging out in a very cold place in the country right now when it's perfectly appropriate to do a hot podcast. How's that that sounds great because it is twelve degrees right now. Right things that. I'll i'll do my best not complain about having to put the top up. Okay hey seriously. Riley joins us today and she is a testimonial to a combination of the grapevine and social media. And here's the fun aspect of how i got to know riley. A good buddy of mine in boston sent me an. I am and a link to her work and said hey you need to go talk to her so a phone call later. That opened the door to this michigan based documentary photographer. She's an art director. She's an accomplished author. She's a big believer especially in themed projects like her diners of new york. Which is a a personal favourite of hers. And i happen to love the just to if you've lived in the new jersey new york area. Then you know that diners are just an incredible Concept she's a national geographic explorer. She's a fulbright fellow and her work has been published in numerous magazines and is in the permanent collections of seven. Different museums nine. Oh there's probably nothing. Riley can't photograph but as a journalist. What i love most about her work is. it's just about the simplicity of life And sometimes obviously more complex than a complex and less simple in any event riley. If i haven't screwed up something in technology here welcome to the mind. Your own business podcast. Thanks for having me well. It's good to have you here and i really am. I'm outnumbered today. Because i'm always complaining about the weather or or making shamir aware that she's in the coldest place in the country right now and now. The two of you can share that misery law like complaint. It's nice to have some company. Let me tell you and and riley. I'm so excited to chat with you because it sounds like you've had a very interesting journey. And we were kind of chatting in the pre interview chat and it was interesting to learn that you are not originally from michigan. But from the lemme say this right. American samoa correct yes. Correct soren and raised. That's somehow you ended up here in michigan. Where we're just happy to be in the double digits today and so kind of. Let's kick things off by having you kind of tell us about your background. how you ended up doing what you're doing today and just how you got here well since you mentioned where i was Warren raised american saw. I think that would be a great place to start off so you guys might know. American simul from a number of things like you know american football players to you know a variety of other cultural touch points. But you know the first person to make american samoa on the mainstream was the anthropologist margaret mead and some of her photographs and writings about american samoa. so you know and Independent som- so you know. When i was young american sama as i told you earlier is the third wettest is place in the world gets a tremendous amount of rain and one of the things that happens is that mold grows on just about anything including photographs and vhs tapes. You know back when there while people are using those so we had a you know a a system where we would take photographs When our film was ready would send it off to get you know in the mail to get back in the day and we get our photographs back. My mom would fill a photo album and then she sent it off to our grandparents the store because if we kept them on island they would mold in a number of years. We'd have no relics of our family. History so i became kind of fascinated by sort of documenting a place in time and the fact that where we were from. We couldn't really keep our photographs if we wanted them to actually survive more than say three years so that sort of drive to document is really becoming a leading charge in fascination with documenting things and being sort of for that picks niche interests. That might be sort of going away. So that's sort of a long answer to your question How i got started in my career was. I had my senior thesis in my undergraduate degree. I interned at the oregon shakespeare festival as a theatre photographer

Skip Cohen Riley American Samoa Michigan New York Shamir Florida Boston New Jersey Soren Margaret Mead Warren Football Oregon
Interview With Dan Westergren

PhotoBiz Xposed

05:07 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Dan Westergren

"I was recently exchanging emails with today's guest. A bad he's premium membership and it turns out he has a love of sauk cling lock. Do he used to rice and he even spent time in south australia from the us. I while on assignment for white for national geographic now is picked up and i poked a few more questions by any told me on the nat geo and commercial travel photographer stock at home trying to decide how to make money with that getting on an airplane right now putting my towards commercial real estate architectural things but honestly don't know what's going to work out a cape listening to the podcast about facebook marketing for portraits etc thinking. Maybe that's the way to go. We exchange and other email to and i post a few questions and he said for more than twenty years. I was director of photography for national geographic. Travel up magazine. I had an editor who let me find the graph. A couple of stories a year usually adventure top stories and i was lucky enough to photograph stories to the magazine. Such as climbing mont blanc the matterhorn and skiing to the north pole now following that exchange. I invited him on for this recording. I'm talking about dan west to grin and i'm wrapped to having this now. Dan welcome andrew so good to talk to you. Do you still pinch yourself when you hear an intra liked about the things that you've done in the past. I do i do. It's it's kind of funny. It's a hard act. Live up to for many many years. I would tell my photographer friends who seemed to have up and down lives. You know the freelance yoyo. And i would joke to them. Well you know. I'm addicted to my paycheck. And i have the chance to send you guys out into the field my editor lets me go out every now and then you know. This is working pretty well. Well you know the media marketplace changes and so now here. I am not working on the staff at national geographic anymore doing some projects for them but just trying to figure out how to make this thing happen as a photographer. Yeah the tables have really turned. I think not only for youtha for all of us. Haven't i this year. Oh yeah yeah. I mean and it's a double whammy with a travel photographer because i don't even of course you can imagine after all those years. I have this huge rolodex of all these photo editors of magazines and things like this but nobody even pays money for magazines to take pictures anymore. It's like the rug was pulled out from under my profession. The one savior for me. The last few years has been you could either call it native advertising or content marketing or partnership projects. That's the kind of things like last year. I got to go to canada. Three times for national geographic. To do ten day long stories about places and so i did prince edward island nova scotia new brunswick last year and british columbia and those were my favorite Trips to take. Because i will talk to my producer at national geographic since i had a background in doing the photo editing. At national geographic. The photo editors really acted like a regular editor at most magazines. If we thought that a story was not sufficiently visual we would tell people. We didn't think we should do the story. And a lot of magazines. The phone will editors are just kind of in their corner in somebody throws them a manuscript is air pictures to go with this so when they tell me okay we wanna to do an online piece about adventures in new brunswick ten adventures in new brunswick will then i get to study new brunswick i pull out a map i get defined tended ventures. I contact all the people that i think might lead me to those adventures and then make pictures that i hope people find interesting and then when we get back in my case usually i sit down and they know that i've chosen the photo subjects with story line and so they don't even send a writer. They have a friend of mine. Who i get on the phone marielle. And is her name. And she sorta ghosts rights for me. And i just tell her what my experience was like and why i went to particular plex. And that's just that's what i love about. It all is to do the research into a place and then actually go take those pictures myself in sounds amazing and said the way you described this right now the role you had. Oh have you familiar with the movie. The secret life of walter. Mitty of course. Yes you the walter. Meeting is at your role in national geographic traveler. It was a little bit different because he was more had a role that we would call film review which were the people that actually got to look at the pictures. I didn't have a big role in putting the magazine together. So you know that was kind of funny. It was interesting that i love that movie. You know he got to go out into the field. And i've just i've seen that movie so many times i was watching it and my kids. My son is twenty two. My daughter's twenty five and they're really into music and david bowie died. We had to listen to all the versions of space. Oddity that we could find.

Travel Up Magazine Dan West New Brunswick South Australia Skiing Andrew Facebook DAN Prince Edward Island Marielle Nova Scotia British Columbia United States Canada Mitty Walter David Bowie
Arno Hazekamp PhD on Confronting the Unknown in Holland's Medical Cannabis Program

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Arno Hazekamp PhD on Confronting the Unknown in Holland's Medical Cannabis Program

"So of course in the medical system you'll never promote smoking but then what while make tea or vaporize. It's what do we know about t. What do we know about pricing. Nothing but it's better than smoking. Right so i said no. Not if you're drinking disgusting green water with no active ingredients. Just wasting your expensive medicine. Yeah that's true too. So i had to go completely to the basis so that means isolate my own standards because i couldn't order them. Quantify my own standards purifying one thing chromatography. The second thing is to quantify them and you cannot easily do that by weighing because they're sticky and syrupy so i had to develop an methods to quantify it with an internal standard. There was not a cannabinoid that we had our cannabinoid than i had to learn. How do they behave. What what kind of spectroscopic and chromatographic behavior do they have. So i had to summarize that. And then i had to move on to. What's actually different between the varieties that we're growing here in holland. Are they really that different or should be more different. Cbd wasn't even the question back then that came even later but then you move onto administration forms. How do you make optimal cannabis t in a reproducible. Way where it's not suddenly way too strong when you forget about the boiling water for five minutes because the phone rings. What if in those five minutes your tickets and times stronger than there's all kinds of patients around holland are suddenly fainting and falling off the stairs because they're super high right so and we knew none of those things vaporisers. What's a good vaporizer. What's not so good vaporize and how what you know no standards for anything. No quality checks for anything. If you could make a vaporizer bring it to the market. You just sold it right. It's not really that much difference now. But then those things renew and then we had no idea what kind of toxins or or crap. They were spitting out to candidates so my question was always. Keep it simple Stick to the things that real people need to know now. No no large studies just for your signs buddies but focus on what patients need to know today and try to set up the study and also writes the results down in in an article in situation. Everybody can understand including the patient. You're doing it for so i. I called a national geographic style. You can't you can't watered down to science so much that it's not actually true anymore. It just sounds easy at nice but it's not actually true because then you're misleading people and i think you know if you get data from people you have to give it back to them so I i was interacting with users and prescribers and patient organizations. Like what are you dealing with. What is your life. Look like once you get that jar with cannabis and you go home then what you know. Where do you get stuck. What do you want to know. And that's been a very fruitful approach to my To my phd thesis. Because then not only a bunch of scientists around the world but basically everybody in my sphere of influence from from physicians to to patients to politicians to to family members. They wanted to know out his his work. Because i can actually read this teases and know what it means so with that i reached my goal of not just as a molecular biology. Just doing very fun stuff in the lab but also have one leg in in the real world and be

Holland Cannabis CBD Cannabinoids Arno Hazekamp THC Cannabis Tea Vaporizer Smoking Medical Marijuana Medical Cannabis
NASA Says It Found Water Molecules On The Moon's Surface

Arizona's Morning News

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

NASA Says It Found Water Molecules On The Moon's Surface

"The moon's surface. For the first time. Water has been confirmed by scientists on the sunlit side of the moon, and we're not talking rivers or lakes here. This would be water stuck to the surface, like molecules of water, stuck to the surface of tiny grains, or sort of encapsulated in beads of glass. That's National Geographic science writer Dr Maya Way. Haas at 6

Dr Maya Haas Writer
Scientists hail first unambiguous detection of water on Mars

Arizona's Morning News

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Scientists hail first unambiguous detection of water on Mars

"Has been confirmed by scientists on the Sunlit side of the moon, and we're not talking rivers or lakes here. This would be water stuck to the surface like molecules of water stuck to the surface of tiny grains, or sort of encapsulated in beads of glass. That's National Geographic science writer Dr Maya Way. Haas 5 25 traffic now from Danny Sullivan in

Danny Sullivan Dr Maya Haas Writer
Interview With Amy Toensing

The Candid Frame

04:47 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Amy Toensing

"So. How are here so you? Holding up in the midst of all this madness. I, you know in the grand scheme of things. I feel very lucky but that doesn't mean that on a daily basis I'm not like pulling my hair and. Try to remember Hala game but definitely, it's been a little crazy I. don't know if you feel this I was thinking about this recently like it just it's weird that it's Gotten Kind. Of normalized on. So many levels with what's going on. It's like we've just adjusted. You know how you need. I think it also involves a certain degree of denial. Yeah. There's a lot of. Yeah. Because I think he caught up to me emotionally about two three weeks ago. I'm constantly busy with things. So and then one day, I couldn't be busy enough. Credibly fatigued. And there was nothing happening in terms of my health, my life to sort of explain it that I think he just like. It was just so much constant noise. Yeah. That I felt like I couldn't escape. It was just like Oh my God I just need to. decompress I spent a couple of days disconnected reading Brooke, taking long naps. Like I didn't realize how much I needed it until I needed it. It's just insane what's happening it's just it's so crazy the politics right now are just it's so upside down and then at the same time, there's this undercurrent of trying to. Just live logic just the logistics of it you know. With life staff and then your lake in the new the noise and what's happening to is just so the upheaval is insanity. So I'm with. But I haven't had that moment. Me We. Finally, we went camping on our land couple of weekends ago we bought land up Nevada on duck sweep made husband myself three-year-old. We all moved to Syracuse New York mayor for new job that I got as a tenure track professor at Syracuse University. So that's like a massive change but. With living in Syracuse it was like, okay. We're going to get at least get landed on exit. WE'RE GONNA move out stay he'd. Have some sort. It's to have rumors, but they going out and camping was the I. Guess that resonates with what you're talking about like just kind of shutting down a little bit was very helpful. The quiet that's for sure I find these conversations give me at least an hour respite. I can. I get to talk shop with interesting people and. Usually am left with. Not usually almost every time. Left with A feeling of positivity positivity in hope. So I hope that that's what listeners to take away from it when they when they listen to the show. Oh, yeah and I think just like a segue from the evening with the masters I think that that was an I'm making my way through the talks right now video. Again we three year olds I just I didn't make to a lot of them over the summer as the timing of it for the East Coast. It was bedtime every time it was happening. So you didn't go over very well with timing, but now it's amazing to listen to it so. It. It gave me an excuse to find out more about you because I knew of your work. But that was the first time. I've ever really had a chance a good chance to sort of take it in. And I really enjoyed your presentation thought it was wonderful but. Look even more look forward to having an hour with you today. So thank you again for for doing this. In in doing my research, I saw presentation that you did in which you and several other photographers were working with. Like Somali the offers African photographers sort of a project with the. National Geographic or. At. Least National Geographic distributed the video for it was it. Was it. National. Right I mean I've done a lot of camps. So was it in Kenya or was it in the United States with similar because we are to Somalia there was photographer called Chill Mel mayank yeah. Amazing photographer. You're sitting down with Catherine Simone. Krona. Yes. Oh. That's okay. I know what you're talking about now we did. So it was really cool. They came to. DC. Yeah. That's what you're talking about. There are south Sudanese

Syracuse Somalia Syracuse University Brooke Nevada East Coast Catherine Simone Kenya DC Professor United States New York
A Conversation With Rob Feakins

The Candid Frame

05:09 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Rob Feakins

"First off. Welcome to the show from joining my pleasure. I. WanNa start off with your career before you photographer and filmmaker when you were into marketing and Tell me tell me about what led you into that career. Yeah. So when I was in college there were there were no ED schools or schools for for creative people there probably art center back then but I was on the East Coast and I was in English Major. When I got out of college I thought, I would probably be I wanna be documentary photographers slash journalist because I was interested in photography from high school on. As a member of the Camera Club in college, and there was a dark room back when we were dealing with film and whatnot. and. I was doing a few journalistic pieces for the Dartmouth magazine of different people and I really liked that combination photography and journalism. So I got out of college at what to do. I went down back to New Jersey Right GROWNUP and I slept on my brother's apartment, which was above a garage and I slept on a sleeping bag for close to a year on his floor and I got a job as a as a journalist for more the Morris County daily record, which is a big kind of suburban newspaper in New Jersey and I started to you know because. I was low on the totem pole was going to PTA meeting meetings on a hot July tonight being the only person in the audience. But I got a nice little piece where I used to write about the manufacturing jobs and business jobs, and I kind of tried to turn into like a human feature piece. So I would write about the world's largest ecclesiastical garment designer. Was Morris. County. So I did in article on that and then there was an article on I did on the guys who did the macy's fireworks parade were in Morris County and so back then that. Their entire sales were once a year for the July and that was kind of an interesting business article but it was tough going. You know I was again I was sleeping on my brothers floride a sixty four Volkswagen bug that was breaking down and someone said to me you know you could be a copywriter in advertising. Nice. What's that and so? They told me what it was a copywriter in advertising talk about old school this how I put my portfolio together, there was a huge stack of national geographics in the basement of his or in this garage Saab go down there I would go to the national geographics in I would clip out photographs that I thought were appropriate in right headlines to them. And taped the photographs to the bond paper in Rhode headlining copy beneath the road some campaigns and put a book together and guide offer at Ted Bates as a junior copywriter which doesn't exist anymore to base fun to backer joined back Spielvogel than they went out of business years ago. But they were a big agency back then and I thought Big was good. The United Thought you know whether baked or solid they'll. They'll be good agency and then I was there for about a year or two when I stumbled across a one show book and I saw what worked could be in advertising and I was kind of blown away. I was Kinda like, wow this tremendous work. This is really what good work is. What what did you see in that work that you weren't seeing where you were I thought the thing that struck me even back then was that the best work for me wasn't necessarily the most clever or most clever headline but it was work that made me think differently about a brand or made me think differently about what they're trying to communicate that I actually Kinda learned something from the ad or the commercial and I was totally struck by because I was in a huge package goods agency and there was no attempt on many of those accounts to make you think differently about the product versus tell you how efficacious case it was. From then on I try to do very different kind of work I got into the did get into the one show about a year or two later than I, think some the first time agency have been the one show since they could ever remember in I slowly clawed my way out of that agency to other agencies and then found my way too shy in Los Angeles around Nineteen in the mid eighties, and that was amazing to me because that was the first time I felt like I had been with a company or a group of people that were just. Everybody was everybody was just impressive. I mean the receptionist was impressive and later on became the head of our buying they just hired people regardless of position who were thought differently or incredibly intelligent. and. I loved working there I worked there for. Close to ten years of not more, and I really enjoyed there in that was. Probably, you know I think a lot of guys who go to shy day or worked at shy can look back at those years is maybe their their heyday right in any event. That's how we got into advertising

Morris County New Jersey Morris Dartmouth Magazine Macy Volkswagen East Coast PTA Camera Club Ted Bates Rhode English Major Los Angeles Spielvogel
"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

Overheard at National Geographic

15:40 min | 3 years ago

"national geographic" Discussed on Overheard at National Geographic

"She's in the desert in sudan is doomed just four hours you could see the christians and torrance scuba gear okay well this is gonna top it off like let's go diving in a pyramid christian isn't editor writer in one of my colleagues national geographic she's also in underwater archaeologist lynch's she's investigated plenty of periods in terms.

sudan writer lynch torrance editor four hours