29 Burst results for "National Gallery"

"national gallery" Discussed on The Two Of Us

The Two Of Us

05:42 min | Last month

"national gallery" Discussed on The Two Of Us

"I I'm going to go for it and a big benefit. Their partners else is. GonNa have a point. That's a worry. There is something about that. Though isn't that if you're not the headline not to no way in the whole evening. To do your thing so that one of the reasons you like it or is it the fact that there's a new audience they weren't expecting you and you just might blow their minds. Are caught doing nude. She's well share that with Tim rose by says if he's done a GIG and he's not pissed somebody off threes now. He's not done it right A and not as somebody whose opinion treasure. My he doesn't miss a trick that does eaten. so We're we've resigned generation ALGORITHM SO. I was getting in above right before able to. And Yeah. Something I. OUGHTA partner. Pouch WanNA, pick it long kroger and there's A. There's everybody's welcome but some simply really steps up to play on that real quick paper. In that will chip but at the end of the entity so I want you to read a poem before you got is interested in called book. Tim. Says that. Leads from the page when he's doing a geek. Because got regional accent. Raping a Pie. Cancel. Now it's all. but. Legendary really in adult rate from the Pike. So a now mccombs. Of what I think I'm going to thirty. One. I'm just flicking through the book which is exactly what I said you should never ever do. So a this as is the upon the the the I I'm already. When I apply on a picket on. during the June that he spirit the National Gallery and it was a out the coalition government but the source tape Tapelu. Government Dunk change that assigned label and went to the sign school. and whatever you say about them by all ACC, lost act. It's the fin veneer that sewing salting. Nate's ally so Decisions Deeply Still, there are consulting their case stakeholders the full between the KOI unloved unlucky, unfortunate undeserving poor. They'll play no real part the big debate. Do the hands sleet so much more to motivate them whilst the have nots apparently need saw much less. Headed we get ourselves into this sorry state and can we trust the ones you say that they'll extract from this mess? Seems to be one fundamental fight will flow a massive fault line in their master plan. They want it. Both ways wants to get well in the good times and the bad. By want you with your head down working for the man. They want to stop you sparring you've been had. Whilst those want for nothing. More. So now, we've government clever not. Go saw a melody very nicely. Thank you out of boom and bust. So ask yourself what does it signify? Is the, a nasty accident orbit trial of trust. The fact is, this is something that we've seen before. This is a class act as what this is. This Is Wall fantastic and care. And You perform perform because it's not. Perform because before me makes sound like it's not real. And Israel. You know I made that when on the picket line it's like. Another. Is Lack of funding analogy but so much rallying the troops and you know you say this is war. So it is like that it's not just about the will hopeful. Smart Yeah. You know we're not giving up the fine. So I have to say thank you so much for sharing that. With us. More. Pleasure. I would say that the thing that to take away from that is. Solidarity is the thing. Standing we people you might not necessarily be the Siamese, but you're part of the sign saying. That we need to look across and understand what's the might. Be Different, there's a common interest. And if you find that class then okay. Fair. Enough You know I'm not a Marxist. Do believe in class politics potent that we stand together irrespective of differences solidarity that work. Thank you thank you so much for saying that? I think he's so much. Show the wonderful music you can have as by Gavin Brian. If you like the show, please subscribe this plenty of emphasis listen to the good news stable..

Tim rose National Gallery partner Gavin Brian Nate Israel
Shenanigans Again

Your Brain on Facts

04:19 min | 2 months ago

Shenanigans Again

"Parents are naturally worried for their children and it doesn't seem to take much to send them into a tizzy. and. It's not just parents. We as people are pretty prone to overreacting to the first piece of information we receive. Modern media makes the spreading of these new urban legends basically effortless. But false panics and hoaxes are far from a new invention. Always. been with us. Most people know the story surrounding Orson Welles radio play the war of the worlds by H. G. Wells. No relation it was presented in the form of a newscast detailing the invasion of earth by beings from another world clearly bent on our destruction. Listeners thought the broadcast was real. There was mayhem in the streets as as many as a million people fled their homes or armed themselves and made ready to fight off the alien hordes. We know all about the panic that this radio play cost it was in all the papers. Therein lies the problem. Newspapers of the day greatly exaggerated the situation. To begin with not that many people were tuned in to the Mercury Theatre on the air that evening only two percent of households with radios even heard the play. which repeatedly identified itself as such during the performance. Some CBS radio affiliates even cut away from the broadcast in favor of local programming further shrinking the potential audience. Most people were listening instead to the ratings, Juggernaut, ventriloquist at Gergen. I still fail to understand how a ventriloquist act really worked on the radio. If it makes you happy. So. Why then if so few people. and. Fewer still were confused by it did newspapers separately and independently make the situation sound much worse than it was. They were motivated by fear not of aliens but of the radio. The wireless radio was the first real threat to the superiority of the newspaper as the public's primary source of information. Reporters and editors saw this as an opportunity to prove to advertisers and regulators that radio was dangerous irresponsible and not to be trusted. A similar thing happened in. England. Twelve years earlier with a fictitious report that an angry mob of unemployed workers were running amok in London looting and destroying everything in sight. The National Gallery had been ransacked the Savoy hotel blown up. The houses of parliament were being attacked with trench mortars and the Big Ben. Clock, tower had been raised to the ground. Like any good radio play? The narration was accompanied by sound effects. Of Fear Few people did take to the streets, even fleeing past the famous buildings that had been reportedly destroyed while others desperately clogged police phone lines. The BBC tried to ease tensions by reminding people that the report was a comedy skit entitled broadcasting in the barricades. anding their message with London is safe Big Ben is still chiming and all his well. You can't trust the BBC at least we can still rely on armed forces, radio. People fought until nineteen, forty seven. When in May W v TR in Tokyo began to issue a series of bulletins about a twenty foot high monster that had risen from the sea to lay waste to the area. Bullets were useless against this dragon like creature listeners could hear terrified shrieks, people shouting orders over bullhorns, heavy weapons and Massu vehicles rolling by. When the beast reached downtown and the intrepid reporter who provided the play by play snuck closer, the monster opened its mouth. And congratulated T.. R. On its fifth anniversary in a high soprano voice. That's right an hour's worth of breaking news to pat themselves on the back. During the broadcast police phone lines were tied up with people trying to get information.

London BBC Orson Welles CBS Gergen H. G. Wells England Reporter Mercury Theatre National Gallery Tokyo
Shenanigans Again

Your Brain on Facts

04:38 min | 2 months ago

Shenanigans Again

"In two, thousand, three Oprah Winfrey used her massive daytime television platform to warn millions of people that teenage girls were attending parties, wearing wild shades of lipstick and performing oral sex on boys. The boy with the most colors of lipstick smudges would win the accolade of his peers. These were called Rainbow Parties. The story was picked up by newspapers television stations across the country parents were panicking. There was one small detail that Oprah missed though. There had not been a single verifiable instance of a Rainbow Party F-. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Parents are naturally worried for their children and it doesn't seem to take much to send them into a tizzy. and. It's not just parents. We as people are pretty prone to overreacting to the first piece of information we receive. Modern media makes the spreading of these new urban legends basically effortless. But false panics and hoaxes are far from a new invention. Always. been with us. Most people know the story surrounding Orson Welles radio play the war of the worlds by H. G. Wells. No relation it was presented in the form of a newscast detailing the invasion of earth by beings from another world clearly bent on our destruction. Listeners thought the broadcast was real. There was mayhem in the streets as as many as a million people fled their homes or armed themselves and made ready to fight off the alien hordes. We know all about the panic that this radio play cost it was in all the papers. Therein lies the problem. Newspapers of the day greatly exaggerated the situation. To begin with not that many people were tuned in to the Mercury Theatre on the air that evening only two percent of households with radios even heard the play. which repeatedly identified itself as such during the performance. Some CBS radio affiliates even cut away from the broadcast in favor of local programming further shrinking the potential audience. Most people were listening instead to the ratings, Juggernaut, ventriloquist at Gergen. I still fail to understand how a ventriloquist act really worked on the radio. If it makes you happy. So. Why then if so few people. and. Fewer still were confused by it did newspapers separately and independently make the situation sound much worse than it was. They were motivated by fear not of aliens but of the radio. The wireless radio was the first real threat to the superiority of the newspaper as the public's primary source of information. Reporters and editors saw this as an opportunity to prove to advertisers and regulators that radio was dangerous irresponsible and not to be trusted. A similar thing happened in. England. Twelve years earlier with a fictitious report that an angry mob of unemployed workers were running amok in London looting and destroying everything in sight. The National Gallery had been ransacked the Savoy hotel blown up. The houses of parliament were being attacked with trench mortars and the Big Ben. Clock, tower had been raised to the ground. Like any good radio play? The narration was accompanied by sound effects. Of Fear Few people did take to the streets, even fleeing past the famous buildings that had been reportedly destroyed while others desperately clogged police phone lines. The BBC tried to ease tensions by reminding people that the report was a comedy skit entitled broadcasting in the barricades. anding their message with London is safe Big Ben is still chiming and all his well. You can't trust the BBC at least we can still rely on armed forces, radio. People fought until nineteen, forty seven. When in May W v TR in Tokyo began to issue a series of bulletins about a twenty foot high monster that had risen from the sea to lay waste to the area. Bullets were useless against this dragon like creature listeners could hear terrified shrieks, people shouting orders over bullhorns, heavy weapons and Massu vehicles rolling

Oprah Winfrey London BBC Rainbow Parties Orson Welles CBS Gergen H. G. Wells England Mercury Theatre Tokyo National Gallery
"national gallery" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:11 min | 3 months ago

"national gallery" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Must take responsibility for for those employees at work, so you since she saying that the some of these museums are treating the members are. Say working for tight enterprises over the National Gallery Company as as if they were arms, length employees employed by a separate company. Yes, so their position is that these? Are you know they've set up a for profit company, and therefore you know unless they're generating profit than than the stuff achieving their function, our position is that the shops and restaurants and places inside the galleries museums, all fundamental people's experience of culture in. Taken away. Their keepsake is absolutely Paul of the experience of his own museum, and and is part of what will inspire young people particularly. To to taking an interest in these institutions so While the galleries and museum seems to be saying well, they're into price contracts. They have retail staff. And therefore they must generate profit pieces view, is they? They perform that function for the gallery, but they impact is much more important than you know somebody that selling clothes on the highstreet. I think that's a really important point, isn't it? Because I was asking just a few people before this telephone call, do you perceive any difference between somebody? WHO's working in the shop and somebody who's in the galleries as a as a visitor assistant, and it's really clear to me that there is no you would not perceive a distinction between any of these people right so so. Am One group of people is employed by the gallery and the other and the other group of people isn't in theory. So this is a really crucial question, because are all front of House, and they are all representing the organization. Yeah, of course. They will have to wear a branded clothes, and they will have to meet the tape behaviors and standards, and in fact. The take gallery in good times. talk about one tight and the idea that they are they are. They won't one one-step Treatment Vista from one kind of approach, but we've seen that you know very quickly. Fade away the last month or so where they you know the Thompson, not so good, and they're not generating much money, but certainly for for anybody visiting the Gallery you would not know who worked directly for the tate, and who who worked as the enterprise contract to accept by knowing what functions are outsourced them amont ones or not Roy said. Can you tell me whether you're members when they join? These organizations have any idea that they might be treated differently when they're joining the the organizations do they think they are becoming a member tight store? I think the answer is probably yes, and I think you know to be fair institutions. They will probably say. It's all branded as state enterprises and that's that's what they contract says but. In the same way. As as anybody at work, you go to your place of work, and these people work at the tate, and they feel that they're part of Tate, and they feel that they contribute as I mentioned to the kind of cultural and institutional. Values, if the tight and so yeah, I mean if I went round, my enterprise members and say way. Do you work? The answer would be tight. They wouldn't say that. They went to take tecoma so tweets or or Enterprise and you know that that that's really important for them that they they feel part of that group that that larger collective. One of the really interesting aspects about this, and I think it's really important..

tate National Gallery Company Roy Paul Thompson
Washington DC's National Gallery Sculpture Garden to reopen

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 4 months ago

Washington DC's National Gallery Sculpture Garden to reopen

"The National Gallery of art sculpture garden is reopening today and seven thing constitution Avenue northwest no matter how many times you've seen it Roy Lichtenstein's house one is a perspective masterpiece shapeshifting as you move by and now you can check it out again the sculpture garden is open from eleven to four of course you'll have to peer over your face covering to take it all in and you'll have to keep up social distancing for those of you getting a snack the dining furniture at seven thing constitution will have enhanced cleanings the other sitting areas will not neither will the artwork like the giant spider and four sided

Roy Lichtenstein National Gallery Of Art
Washington DC - National Gallery’s Sculpture Garden to begin limited reopening

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

Washington DC - National Gallery’s Sculpture Garden to begin limited reopening

"Living around Washington comes with benefits one of them is the Smithsonian's extraordinary art collection if you've missed it there's some good news on Saturday the sculpture garden re opens on the national mall seven street no matter how many times you've seen it Roy Lichtenstein's house one is a perspective masterpiece shapeshifting as you move by and now you can check it out again starting Saturday the sculpture garden is open from eleven to four of course you'll have to peer over your face covering to take it all in and you'll have to keep up social distancing for those of you getting a snack the dining furniture at seven constitution will have enhanced cleanings the other sitting areas will not neither will the artwork like the giant spider and four sided

Washington Smithsonian Roy Lichtenstein
Hundreds of protesters rally in London, Berlin over U.S. death

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

Hundreds of protesters rally in London, Berlin over U.S. death

"President trump says the U. S. government will designate the anti fascist group antifa as a terrorist organization as NPR's Joel rose reports the trump administration is linking it to protests against police brutality that have turned violent in recent days president trump said on Twitter that the US will be designating antifa as a terrorist organization but didn't offer any details it's something he's called for before Attorney General William Barr blamed radical agitators for hijacking peaceful protests Barr said such violence is quoted domestic terrorism and will be treated accordingly it's not clear how many if any of the protesters involved in violent clashes around the country are associated with antifa as protests over the death of George Floyd have grown government officials have put the blame for violence and destruction on outsiders officials in Minnesota where Floyd was killed offer a very different assessment of who those outsiders our governor Tim Walz says far right white nationalists maybe sparking the violence Joel rose NPR news governor walls also said today protests were mostly peaceful in Minneapolis overnight after National Guard troops joined local and state police in a show of force to quell violence but governor wall says it will take far more fundamental changes to address the problem in his state we don't just right near the top on educational attainment we rank near the top on on personal incomes on homeownership on life expectancies things that make this and when they came out awhile back we are we rank second in a survey of the fifty states second in happiness behind a white but if you take a deeper look and peel it back which this week is peeled back all of those statistics are true if you're white if you're not we rank near the bottom wall cited unequal educational opportunities for children of color and lending practices that suppress black homeownership demonstrators turned out in Berlin Copenhagen in Toronto today saying they were rallying in solidarity with American protesters and NPR's Frank Langfitt reports hundreds of people marched on the U. S. embassy in London the protests began in London's Trafalgar Square where hundreds face Britain's National Gallery and took a knee the March continued across the river Thames to the U. S. embassy where protesters packed enough against a police cordon a black lives matters group in London organized the protest a Twitter account for black lives matter U. K. which said it is not affiliated with the London group questioned a mass gathering while Britain is still largely under lockdown adding quote we are currently discussing the implications of calling a mass March in the middle of a pandemic that is killing us the most government statistics show British blacks of African descent are nearly four times more likely to die from covert nineteen than white Britons Frank Langfitt NPR news this is NPR this is WNYC in New York I'm lance lucky governor Cuomo says new York's Attorney General will investigate the NYPD's actions during yesterday's protests the demonstrations turn violent at times with protesters hurling objects at police and police pepper spraying protesters video also show police SUVs driving into a crowd of protesters Cuomo says any allegations of police misconduct should be investigated by an external authority nuts local officials are they really in a position to be feet fair and objective they will say yes I say from a public confidence point of view have the investigation done by someone else Blasio has announced two of his some point appointees are conducting an investigation into the violent protests in the past few days in addition to the NYPD's internal probe the governor says the AG's review will be done by next month and in his press conference this morning mayor de Blasio largely praise the NYPD for its approach to policing this weekend's protests but he said his administration needs to do more to identify police officers in leadership or on the beat who he said are not cut out for the job that work needs to be amplified it speeded up intensified we need to make sure that anybody who should not be a police officer is not a police officer the NYPD says three hundred forty five people were arrested and thirty three officers were injured last night it is not clear how many civilians were

Donald Trump President Trump
Paul Burston:  So Many Men, So Little Time

Probably True Podcast

09:59 min | 5 months ago

Paul Burston: So Many Men, So Little Time

"It was nineteen eighty-eight so I would have been twenty two. I think I finished university and I devoted myself base being a full-time seen queen and I was having a lot of fun of fun. There wasn't really low drugs around that I was not that I was aware of anyway. People get drunk on beer or steal beer. Sometimes I could not that pint of that so it wasn't that kind of like glass frontier. We're happy to be seen. It was all quite behind doc windows. And it was like ultra ultraviolet lights everywhere because everyone's dandruff. On their showed there's video. Scrimmage was a novelty a video screen and a bar and you can pay money to choose videos. We should be done for videos in those days to watch pope whenever you want it to always have. Don't leave me this way by Bouncy. Cb there was always on when whenever into Harpoon Louie's that was on and there was. I WANNA dance with somebody by Whitney. Houston they take me back to those year to that place there were different of tribes within that as well so that look you had that kind of Franken Hollywood's look should. I was pretty those Saturday night at half and that was I was the only night at Heaven which I actually came out by going to heaven so I came. I didn't tell anybody I just went to have on my own and stood outside and I knew I knew there was GEICO. Having everyone knew that and I've seen something in time out magazine I think it was And I went to long understood outside. I spiked up. Hair like friendly McCullough from Akron. The bunny man. I had plucked eyebrows and makeup. I think two hearings in each year on knows that as well and I stood side for about two hours. Watching these men queuing up. None of looked tore like me. They all looked like village people and number shirts and moustaches and I couldn't. I just couldn't go in so I said as a chain smoking I went back to Waterloo train back to Richmond and university again but I went back the next Saturday and the next Saturday and then invention third week I actually picked up the courage to go in getting a little bit closer and I went down those hallowed stairs and I remember that the sense of the smell which I didn't mechanism bustos was poppers. Didn't what he wants to start old socks and you walk into this room and the first thing I heard was this guy sort of swished by saying so many men so little time extra popular tune if the time and I just turned and ran out again because it terrified me and then the funding we went back and I stood literally lately with my back against the wall. Didn't talk to anybody. Stood up against the wall looking people as nineteen of so terrified and then eventually someone talked to me and then not wanting another with that particular. One just generally without something with that particular. Someone broke my heart though. Of course best bastard but to do it come out. It wasn't the best way probably be go to pick new. Only be terrified. Puts ME IN MIND TO SWIM? You start off just you in the water. Then you float. He's on and yes and above our and then you start moving around and I. I've always tend to jump into things too much so I have my local Gay Mitchell. After goes the biggest gates and in the whole world. The time probably to do it. Yeah just throw from seven to that. I left. I'd many many many great times than many great times then over the subsequent years and there so many men so little time. Well they were yes definitely in both senses because we didn't realize then just many men. We're going to have so little time unusual. Change very very quickly became quite prophetic. Really I was making up for lost time. I had fun. I made lots of new friends. Even if you didn't the names at least at least we were together. I'm quite choosy like that. Yeah I actually had sex with somebody wants waiting for night bus into Vulgar Square. Actually in the night in the queue of the night in the kids. Yeah Yeah Yeah by. The National Gallery was no one else in the queue tempted to join in offer offer. Some kind of the neighbors and developed square knows. Days was a real hotbed activity. Whatever would come from heaven or Soho in the middle of the week and they just be. So many gay guys queuing the but Vulgar Square. Honestly say people from that period for similar stories of just like getting on the different night because you fancied some but in finding you in Eastland and you live in Richmond. Just there was. There was a hottie on the and hoping that they'd give you some wet they usually did of charity for me. Part of the fun of those of that period of my life was that you'd go out and you'd meet people and you would normally meet meet a cross section of people. I have friends all different ages. Different backgrounds and sexualities and genders much more fragmented later and I think that the sex it can victim of own success in a way. Because there wasn't there wasn't the connections after AIDS happens because that was a huge thing in my life or knows about twenty five twenty six most of my gay male friends at that point. Were some years old me because I was I I wanted to learn. I wanted to own it someone to be my older brother and teach me and show me the ropes and some and they were the ones that died so I lost all of them pretty much and then I became an aids activist and got me involved in that and the for all of the for all the things that I would not change for anything but a lot of things about the eighty S. I would never want to have back. But there was a sense of community. People did pull together and they did rally and there were. There was communication between different generations. Different tribes within within our communities. And now it is. That's true anymore. I think that there was a break in the chain because there was generation that was kind of lost to HIV AIDS. There was the generation that we're impacted by it like my generation who went to flow of grief innovation space sandwiches very traumatic. And I'm probably not really over yet still in there some degree and then it becomes a very difficult subject to talk about so you don't talk about it very often and then the younger kids come in. And they've got half of this happens. They know the history half the time when you talk to. You have no idea what was going on ten fifteen years before they were. Because why would you know? I didn't WANNA die. Young either. Must be about twenty two when I first heard about it my boyfriend at the time. Read something in one of gay papers and said we have to stop using condoms and I was like. Whoa and then I'd heard that someone I was at college with who was a mature student and he disappeared for a long period. He didn't come back after this term. I then learned on the grapevine that he was gay. Had THIS BOYFRIEND WHO AMERICAN. They basically both contracted dictionary and he died really community rapidly. I wasn't really. I didn't know he might just name to say hi to billy and he was the first person that was. I that I knew of and then the guy was living in the in the tower block with who I was very close to and it was the real mentor of mine. I moved and I went to see him one night and He was he was all something ought to buy it. The whole evening was very strange and strained and I remember asking him about how he say. Seeing somebody recently this new boyfriend and I saw how things go with a boyfriend and he said Oh. What's been difficult because he he's he's a he's upset because I don't I don't have sex now that I majorly positive. And that was how that was how he told me. And I just put the spray face on and just get through this conversation. I was absolutely shocked. Devastated because at that in that back. They're not meant to death. Sentence there was there was no treatment and I remember sitting to this dinner feeding. Obser- your phone and then getting home on the train and just crying. The whole journey home. He became really really quickly and then he was. He won't one of his dying wishes as you wanted to go to. Amsterdam you know Vietnam and his friends. Most of them were straight women elected person to take him and I went. I took him to them on this trip and I spent the whole time. What thinking he was going to die on me. And how am I going to manage to get him what I do? I was twenty four years of age. Twenty five this. It was horrendous. It was very frightening when he was hospitalized to visit him and habit. Bobi helping with things. I remember one time picking up urine bottle onto the bed and tipping acid typically myself and being paranoid even though I knew deep down that this was not something that was good pose. Any risk to me. We didn't really know people didn't really know no. There wasn't much information. And this is before lady. Diana went into the AIDS. Ward this before this sort of stuff happened it was it was still appeared it was not really spoken about if it was spoken about hushed voices and it was very frightening time and he was a very very good community minded person he he was involved in the running of the building and everyone knew who he was he would chair meetings and whatever and then after he got. L. Someone Daubed on his front door house of AIDS on his front door and then he died and I was really in the state about it and reading the papers. There was a meeting happening at the London. Lesbian Gay Entering Cow Cross Street and Farrington. Which is not no longer there but it was very popular but place back then and there was a meeting happening and his act up and I I knew I act up was happening in America. Knew what actor boss I went to this meeting. I just threw myself into it and it took up my life completely for like three years and it was way of channelling the grief because in an over over those three years it was just one funeral after another. He was just he got to the point. Where you'd actually dread answering the phone. And I used to a Filofax that was an effects back in the eighty s. My member year just taking all the names out taking people out because people are just dying all the time even my family. I mean little bits but they just did not understand why this was any different to my grandfather dying because that's expected because he's fucking eighteen easily and he smokes these ill and mentioned me dying and late. Twenties and early Thirties. It's it's completely mad. It was it was like there was a war going on but only we knew about it was the why was completely oblivious and yet within our world which is very very contains. Gay London world. There was a war going on and people were dying all around us and we were expected to carry on as normal. What you have the you do that.

Aids Vulgar Square Harpoon Louie Geico London Gay Mitchell Whitney Houston Franken Hollywood Mccullough Richmond America Farrington Soho Filofax Eastland National Gallery Akron
Michael Kenna

Photography Radio

10:08 min | 7 months ago

Michael Kenna

"On today's show. I'm talking to Michael British fine photographer. Best known for his images of black and white landscapes. His work has been displayed. All over the world he has permanent exhibitions in the Museum of Decorative Arts in the Victorian Albert Museum in London National Gallery of art in Washington. Dc and in the Bibliotheque in Paris. Let's dive straight into my conversation. Ninety nine percent of your photographs are square format black and white images as far as I know and you have been doing that for for for more than forty years. So how on earth does one stay motivated and keeps shutting mainly landscapes in the same format for for such a long time. Good Morning Tom. Shannon Seattle you're in Switzerland so it's a slightly different time zones. I'm very interested statistic of ninety nine percent that you could be ninety seven point seven five. I don't ask much well. You know I I started with many different is many different. Cameras experimented with the panoramas in thirty five millimeters horizontal eight by ten four by five. Lots of different ones for the first ten years. I I use thirty five millimeter. I found as often happens when using the same camera over and over it becomes to be predictable which is has the pros aide also has comes because you tend to get little trapped into those formats and I moved into the two and a quarter medium in the mid eighty s purposely to break up my rhythm essentially on now used a waist level finder so everything was back to fronton slimy upside down and made photographing a little more difficult. And I think that is one of the keys to photography generally is that we don't want to get too comfortable at anyone at any one time. Now I've been using this camera on off since the mid eighties so yes thirty years thirty years to great camera at the same time. I've experimented with different other formats die off news holders little cheap plastic cameras I often feel that the camera has very little do to do with the photographic journey just happens the hassle but I use is is is really a utilitarian quite precise but very basic camera. It comes with his basic functions of Lens Body Film back Viewfinder and those are interchangeable. So if they break down I can replace them days. I can old lawn mower for me. I I know the camera very well. I don't think it has much to do with the camera in terms of one's passion for photography. I think it has much more to do with one's in a drive to discover to be curious to constantly be investigated and explorer I can see you know using the same camera for the next two hundred years and finding sufficient material to keep you motivated for many lifetimes. That never been an issue with me. There are so many places so many countries so many things to photograph them. I just look at that. I I just don't ever see it as an issue kind of the lack of inspiration for me. It is much more a matter of trying to rein in all the divergent diverse. Numerous different possibilities and I hope that that is for everyone is just life is so amazing the Janica so amazing though so many fantastic places to go photographs that it's difficult for me to understand kind of the lack of inspiration lack of drive. I think there's so much out there when you talk about the cameras you actually answered my question. You know which I have prepared for later so because I can imagine that Photographic equipment itself. You know camera. Lenses are relatively low exactly on your personal credit but in order to pursue a certain vision certain look or simply a similar format of images to choose photographic gear accordingly right. I think it means to me. It would make sense to us a digital camera with all these bells and whistles for example. It's just not my character. Ibkr semi old is like an old guitar. I've been playing these niyaz years. Yes go into electronics. Thrall Bandon all these other things but when it comes down to the instrument you're using it needs to be a part of your body almost a part of your creative function. I have no interest in the GADGETRY. A as such Simpler the better for my way of working but that is just me and as you say. Everybody has to choose their own instrument of communication so for some people it is drones and and various new cameras on techniques. And and that's perfectly fine. It just doesn't fit with my way of working. What was it that extended to you about this square format? You are mainly known for square format images. Right I would think so at this point. Yes but certainly wasn't the first ten years of Korea because I did use it. What fascinates me? I think it is. It is for me. An Open universe I don't find that. I am confined as with most other. Formats such as thirty five millimeter. In which as I mentioned you already have to make decisions of whether they should be horizontal vertical. And how do I fit things into this rectangle with a square you'll basically playing with four equal sides and so you can compose accordingly? I still have the option often. Use it to crop lighter not necessarily into scored. If you actually look at work I do. Not many of them are real scores. A slightly horizontal slightly vote to goal. Sometimes I make score into a panorama either vertical or horizontal. So for me. It just gives me an enormous amount of flexibility. Would you say Composing Square format? Composing Damages is in a way easier or is it just more open. I mean like you know gives you more options. I think it gives you more options. I don't think it's either. Easier are more difficult. I think it's just another possibility. And how about black and white. Because again I I would be hard pressed. I think to to recall a color image of yours. Only commercial only commercial work. I just can't find. I have a proclivity towards the monochromatic spectrum. So most of the work that I that I appreciate his monochromatic. Black White again. It's it's just a personal thing. I've often say that we we see in color all the time. That's how world so when you reduce something to black and white. It immediately becomes more of an interpretation. It's mysterious or more calming offer. Me More meditational almost often use the the the the reference to writing and I said I prefer to be more of a Haiku poem we just a few elements of simplicity but a great amount of suggestion as opposed to an insight encyclopedia with huge amounts of facts and description. That is not what I'm interested in doing road Does happen at all these days for you that you you know using whatever it might be Shoot some color images while not seriously I mean I recently finally came around to getting one of these smartphone things so I can take snaps of wherever I go in. Another polaroid doesn't exist this. Icu very useful. Because it tells me what I am when I go back later to Reference Place so yes. I photograph in color just to make snacks. But it really doesn't interest me very much into the first thing I do is converted back into a white to see what it looks like. I just find black and white enables you to use your imagination much more than color. But it's a personal thing in one of your interviews from from several years ago. I guess you said there are great photographs by ordinary photographers and ordinary photographs by great photographers. Smart knows days so let me ask you. You know for your own. Very subjective opinion. How often does Michael Kenna manage to to produce a great photograph? I'm still trying haven't got one yet but one of these days. That's an impossible question because you could never put out to the description of one of your own photographs are you are you. Are you happy own photography? Never an I don't think one should be Yes contend that I'm on this wonderful journey as being an amazing Expedition But I. I don't think anybody should ever be satisfied with what they do want. You be striving. You know there's this you know. My favorite football team has Everton and they have this motto. It's called nil. Satis newsy optimum which wanting means nothing but the best is good enough so you give your best all the time. You strive for perfection all the time but hopefully you never reach it because if you reach perfection the the image probably would interesting is one of the things I resist with. The digital revolution is that is so easy to make things so perfect so clean so tidy that they kind of lose the ability to To evoke a reaction to evoke emotion it becomes a little antiseptic. I think So affect Striving for perfection is wonderful. But but I don't think I've ever reached out ever. Will I hope

Michael British Switzerland Shannon Seattle DC Washington Museum Of Decorative Arts Paris Michael Kenna Football Victorian Albert Museum Korea London National Gallery Of Art ICU
Michelle Obamas portraitist and 96 Tears

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:37 min | 1 year ago

Michelle Obamas portraitist and 96 Tears

"My father was the first of his family to go to college he was a dentist so I mean all those things matter it's about creating a legacy and they didn't see that happening with art you know my father was a dentist my great uncle was Titian and my aunt's found a way to get their master's degrees at Nyu back at that time they have programs for that kind of stuff but So education was important there was there was a Bishen yeah it was a way out yeah how did you make your way to art and decide I want to do this. I'd say it just chose me I don't you know I had a great art teacher who really encouraged me even from high school to create images that were my own ideal and it's just I don't know what I felt comfortable doing I didn't have to interact with people I was super self conscious and you know I didn't do a lot that was interested in because I didn't want to be in ruins the people that I didn't know it was just like over the top self conscious so it was easy for me to do it and it's what I excelled at and the There's no conversation about visual learning them but I was a visual learner so it's just you know what my proclivity was to do this stuff or to be jeff that's what I was cooking and you were like the last pre internet generation as well I got my email address when I was twenty which which might be why you have the time inclination to do this yeah I mean I say that when when people ask me why do I do I think it's because of when I was born because I didn't I had a Tandy two thousand we had to pretty much coded ourselves like make the Games work and for me making art was I figure I really didn't know who Jackson pollock was Andy were haller you know these other craters and thinkers that were bending the rules so I this is what I thinking I was supposed to do and so that's what I did to be good and be really be good be realistic yeah did you ever have a a non representational phase I kind of did when I studied with grace hard again in in graduate school the paintings got a little looser little drip easier but ultimately never lost the figure and it just wasn't something that I knew I could expound on on for the rest of my life and so I knew I was still looking for what it was that I was going to make you seem like you need an armature or I'm going to do within this thing you need some kind of almost conceptual aesthetic structure maybe me you to make work yeah I mean like you're not doing changing crazily from abstraction to this to whatever well the thing is you know I mean if you know you're doing this kind of know what you're doing once you become known or something then that's kind of what you do like I could change it but I think at this point in my career that would be a mistake career wise then you can expound on that and and you know like I went from individual to these multi figure and I'll keep challenging myself to do different things but they will all tie into you know what I this body of work in a practical view yeah well you know I had friends who particular one friend who made really great work became really well known and didn't want to make that work anymore any stops making the work and he doesn't he didn't have a gallery after a while he ended up not being an artist one time he still trying to make his way back in do you ever like God I'm going to do a still life or landscape to the I'll just keep it secret no I had no interest I love painting this painting the figures Silvio bombs yeah are they the only a commission you've done yes you want to do any others really I mean if I could choose to people to do I would do Serena Williams Do Meghan Markle I could happen yeah maybe when it was unveiled Obama told this story of meaning you at the interview in the Oval Office now I've been in the Oval Office wants with no president in it just empty and it's pretty amazing justice the thing is you a it's a big job interview the biggest job interview and it's the Oval Office and there's the president and the first eighty what was in your heart and feeling ahead I was I was nervous the first thing that happened and I don't know whether anybody else notices when they walk in but the rest of the White House has like this really kind of strange fluorescent green light and then when you walk to the Oval Office it's like lit for television and that almost triggered my brain to think that it wasn't happening when it really was happening here for about five seconds hours like stuck in this moment of like am I aaa meeting or is yeah or or is Barack walking towards me and so I sent out of it and yeah shook his hand I was nervous life so if she had been you know Michelle Robinson Chicago Hospital executive would you why would the image be precisely what we see in the National Gallery that's interesting Probably Yeah because what I presented to the world I think is the real well her and not the the image of you know the millions of photographs that we have on with her on the Internet means private and that's the kind of feel that I wanted to to something personal in private and not a glamour shot or anything like that it's a painting and it's it's a sobering moment in history and making it exactly but at the end of it when I look back at it like those are the things that I that I think we're kind of circulating in my head in ten years it will just be one big thing did you look forward to that time when it's not all about that all about the Michelle Obama's portraitist yeah it's funny I went from the artist who survived a heart transplant to become a famous painter to the artist painted Michelle Obama and I'm pretty sure sure I could climb out ever and I still be that because she is still who she is and she has such a great influence you know worldwide and you know and I guess I'm okay with that I mean sure it has been a great pleasure meeting you nice to meet you meet you thanks thank you

Titian NYU Five Seconds Ten Years
London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:01 min | 1 year ago

London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

"Returned to Artemis Magenta Leschi in two thousand eighteen the National Gallery in London announced that it had bought Genta Leschi self-portrait to sink Catherine of Alexandria that work has just been on a tour of unusual British venues from Glasgow Women's library to a doctor's surgery in Yorkshire a Catholic High School in Newcastle and a prison in send Surrey Tori is now back at the National Gallery ahead of a survey of gentlest work that opens at the Gallery in twenty twenty in January nineteen. I was joined by not at Travis the National Gallery's curator of later Italian Spanish and French seventeenth century paintings to talk about Artemisia and that remarkable new acquisition the teacher. Can you tell me I more we're about Artemisia. Gentle Leschi the woman and the artist. She's obviously a name now that many people have heard of not just people sort of in the art world or interested in art and I'd I'd say that's quite a recent occurrence <hes>. She was really sort of rediscovered in a way <hes> in the nineteen seventies. She featured an exhibition in L._A.. On women artists artists and a number of her works exhibited then and so she sort of came to the fore then and number of feminist historians focused on her and her work <hes> throughout the latter part of the twentieth century but it's only really since she started being the subject of shows monographic show in two thousand and one in New York and then more recent exhibitions that I think she really came to wider public. I think now she is not necessarily a household name but I think people have heard of her a third of her as an artist but also her life story and I think a lot of the interest around her sort of people's view of her as a kind of empowered women derives from her biography rather like carbohydrate zone biographical stories somewhat somewhat sort of overshadows the art but I think Artemis as an artist now is coming to the fore and I think that's I'm looking forward to working on this show in two hundred twenty because I think it's very much focusing on her. As a painter ops you can't ignore what was happening in her life and the big events that the that obviously influenced that's how life in Harare but it is very much artistic abilities. Can you tell us something of that biography then before we get into into the to the painting the nationals occurred. Uh ultimately has seen very much as a sort of exception. I think it's important say she was quite exceptional that she wasn't the only woman autism the seventeenth century. I mean there had been other successful artists before her. Aha but she was born in Rome to Aratu gentlest who was a well established painter in Rome and a lady prudence and Artemis mother died when she was just twelve so she was actually brought up in a male household so brutal by her father and she had three brothers she was in fact one of five to two died <hes> and the brothers and Artemis rule trained by rats here in his own workshop but it's clear that she was the one that he saw had greater talent than than the brothers <hes> and a and sort of everything changed when she was raped by Agostino. Tassie Passy was <hes> an extremely successful painter of SORTA Trompe l'oeil architecture and who was working at that time without C._E._o.. On a large project the casino limousine he was brought in to teach Artemisia Perspective and he raped her <hes> and they Taylor have sexual relations for some months and then he was brought to trial buyouts and this is very famous as perhaps the most famous episode in Artemis Life because remarkably all the trial documents actually survivor a large portion of survive so you can actually read optimizes own words in the witness box and you read the accusations against us. It's quite extraordinary to have that kind of sort of documentary evidence still survive from the seventeenth century and he's effectively found guilty of de flowering her because what what is bringing against Casey is the fact that not only did he rape his daughter but he didn't do the honorable thing and marry her afterwards and this is sort of idea the lack of honor the the so dishonor on his family. That's very much motivating the trial so he's found guilty although his punishments never enforced and Artemis married off two days as later to the brother of her defense lawyer and with him moves to Florence and obviously this episode was obviously a great tragedy in her life when she describes in in her own words is really violent attack on her. It is quite harrowing but I think if that had never happened. Her life would have been very different. She would have carried John. Working probably in her father's studio in Rome but as a result herbs sort of enforced moved Florence really was the making of her and it's incredible things that how she turned the situation around and really I mean I like to think in Florence. You really became Artemisia. She found her own sort of autistic voice and it's why she really gained independence in Florence and she's there for about seven years and then she comes back to Rome very different sort of person she's very much in demand very successful and we know this from letters says from her husband that survived saying you know they've got cardinals and princes around the house all the time. She after music doesn't even have time to eat. She's so busy and then in sixteen thirty she settles also in Naples where she lives till the end of her life at least sort of twenty five years and runs a very successful workshop. I says you pretty much stays in Italy except for a brief trip to London in the late. Sixteenth extent thirties which in itself is quite unusual for women to be traveling internationally. Elaine indeed just one thing about the biography that makes her have a certain currency. Today is as you say in those documents around the trial. It's clear that she is being put on trial. In the trial and and in fact is is is tortured a- as as part of that process I mean laws be made of that and I think there's been a very much more measured reading of those documents in a wider sort of frame. If you like particularly particularly <hes> one social historian Elizabeth Cohen quite a lot of work on actually the documents relating to the trials of young virgins in Roman that period and it seems as a sort of standard way of leading these trials and actually it falls quite within that I wouldn't call it a pattern but within that but if you really read carefully the words mean she was tortured by using the which were these ropes tightened around her fingers while she was in the box but the judge also beforehand is it will right if we do this and it's clear if if you really read the the original Italian it is clear that it's in a way that they're asking if they can torch her to in a way prove her innocence in a sense sort of <hes> just to make sure that what she's saying is actually true and and it is while she's the torturing her with a C._B._S.. That she says you know it's true. It's true it's true. She repeats the what she says is true and so I think in a way it was sort of in supportive her innocence in this situation. I think you can already read in the language. That's used that. It's in a way away to catch tassie out right now. The the making of her in artistically say was was her moved to Florence say something about her experience there what kind coin of Education for instance did she did. She have there and will she in another painter studio straight away. No I think the really remarkable thing is that she sets up independently. She was trained in her father's studio. You know these sort of kind of family workshop tradition existed since the Renaissance and not just in Italy but it was often a father to Assan workshop so it's quite new female members of the family would be involved but as I say after means is not the first loving Fontana. Her father was very successful. So do you know in a way has sort of training. Rome wasn't unusual as perhaps be unusual because she was a woman but the whole learning from your father your trade from your father wasn't unusual the fact of her moving moving to Florence and having to set up independently is the thing that really made her. I think we have no real indication of having a student with with pupils assault. She worked effectively from her has junior. It wasn't her home. Her husband was apparently a painter but very sort of modest kind of renown. She was the very first female MEL member of the Academy in Florence. She was member from sixteen sixteen so you know she. She arrived in around sixteen thirteen within two three years. She's already really established herself. That's a really shows incredible determination but also kind of recognition of her skill and I think it's partly to do with her resilience. I think it will start to do with who she came into contact with in Florence. Not you say how education but also the circles. She moved in one of her great sort of protect us. There was Michelangelo Buonarroti younger who is the great nephew of Great Michelangelo and Artemis is only documented picture in Florence is in the ceiling of one hundred thirty still today and there she is alongside other Florentine artists of her of her time so she seems to have integrators of quite quickly and Florence <hes> and one of her close friends was Christopher. No Laurie won the greatest painters in the seventeenth century in Florence who is also godfather to her son Christopher so she clearly immediately set us you know sort of entered into autistic circles intellectual circles because she was a friend of Galileo and she worked for the MEDICI and did did she carry her Caravan Jasko style that she would have learned in Rome with her two phones or did she very much incorporate new styles and influences from her surrounding same sex. It's such a hot topic. That's so discussed because she has been called a chameleon and and I think as a result of this now many pictures get attributed to her that aren't necessarily by her because you can still use it as a dolphin well. She's communiqu. She changes all the time I think in the kind of broad sense she is quite community. She can adopt US style but it's part of her sort of business strategy. I think so you know she spent twenty five years. Working in Naples pictures look look really neapolitan but of course they would. She's been living in Naples. She's working for Nipples and patrons and I think when she moved to Florence. I think actually more than Caravaggio it is her father is rats. Here's pictures and rats. Here's handling of paint that's most of present in her mind and in the picture the the National Gary bought <hes> <hes> you know the thing that became very clear as as the pitcher was being cleaned as just that technically the way she paints the flash and so on. It's very ratu still very present in her mind. I think we'll sure influences. She's looking at these Florida artists. She's frequenting. She's using Carter analogy that you see in Florentine painting at that time she's also painting pictures for Medici tastes so that it also makes sense but when she comes back to Rome in sixteen twenty that's when Carava Chisholm off to Caravaggio is death ten years after is when cartridges is really the height of its popularity and I think there is definitely a renewed interest in this heightened naturalism start lighting and you can see that in the pictures of the sixteen twenty s can can you say more about the circumstances in which he would have created the specific work which the national now has well. The conservations been really interesting because you know I think a lot of living has been spilt on Artemis but not a huge amount of being written about her technique and I think this is actually played such an important role in actually understanding after media. It's been a lot written about you know dating's and attributions and also sort of the Mall gender-specific interpretation of her pictures in the iconography but I think had technique is absolutely fundamental understanding astounding to me. It's not Jason. Weeding out the pictures that aren't by her that are currently sort of sitting in this sort of limbo so during the conservation the National Gallery painting. We noticed similarities with obviously rats. Here's painting technique we notice differences. The pictures very closely related to two paintings one. That's in Hartford <hes> Connecticut at the Wadsworth which shows is a self portrait of her playing the lute and the other is a sin Catherine in New Jersey and the the suit of similarity between these pictures is not just sort of superficial fullness similarities but she's taken direct borrowings from one and the other. This is almost kind of amalgamation of these two other pictures which she knows sheds. It's light on her practice. You know how did she did. She transfer these designs to choose tracings. I mean we know how far the rats here uses tracings a lot <hes> did she have these three pictures which is in the studio once <hes> did the pro sort of composition evolve in the national painting. Does she know exactly what she was doing. From the very beginning I mean there are certain technical aspects of the pitcher the suggest it did evolve into Katherine. I'm perhaps didn't start its life as Catherine so I'm very interested also in how she uses her own image so the picture in halt that is clearly a self portrait very characterized face and all is a little bit idealized and I think there's been too much discussion in the post about whether picture easel isn't a self reporter. I think there's a kind of disguise self portraiture in a lot of her works where <hes> she would clear have expected people to kind of vaguely recognize her features a note. It was painting by women of a woman who looked like Artemisia but it doesn't necessarily have to be a self Putin a very literal sense. I think that's that's a really interesting aspect isn't it because how much of it is in that is almost like an advocate for for her capabilities and also for for her personality for her strength or strength of character and it's very easy easy to read biography into it isn't it because it's such a striking image and we know about this history of hers. Yes I mean I've had inquiries from the public. Since we announced the acquisition was saying you know other you know signs of torture on her fingers.

Florence Artemis Rome National Gallery Naples Artemis Magenta Leschi Tassie Passy Italy London Harare Caravaggio Artemis Life Travis The National Gallery L._A Alexandria Newcastle New York Genta Leschi
M Pei, Louvre And National Gallery Of Art discussed on Toby and Chilli

Toby and Chilli

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

M Pei, Louvre And National Gallery Of Art discussed on Toby and Chilli

"Legendary architect. I M Pei is dead at the age of one zero two Chinese-American architect is best known for his icon of glass and steel pyramid at the Louvre other famous projects include the JFK library in Boston, and the east building of the National Gallery of art and Washington

M Pei Louvre National Gallery Of Art Boston Washington
"national gallery" Discussed on Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

"I think that's one of my favorite items sounds fascinating because the film so monolithic and Kubrick has this legendary conic figure there's something so human about that the you you can find through exhibition, I suppose Kubrick the man, a smaller. Yeah. I think that was something we really weren't too shy to people especially because we had the fortunate opportunity to work closely with the family to kind of dive into who he was and, you know, a lot of people describe him as obsessive genius. And guess he was a genius. But for me, it really shows throughout the research that we've done is the care that goes into each detail. Detour item would go into one of Kubrick's films on noticed. And I absolutely love the. Fantastic is the one film from this span that you've covered that that you find more fascinating than the others through this research. I have to say it is it is very Linden. It's a film keeps appraising me. And I mentioned earlier he wanted to film, everything by KENDALL lines. You create the mercy of fantastic picture of the eighteenth century, so no artificial night, and to do that he had to get different land. Because the lens at the time. We're not we're not officiant any stumbled upon this lens originally developed for Naza to do space photography. And I mean, if you look at the picture, and if you've seen very Linden, but it's like each picture each image is almost like a painting and today really strive to mimic eighteenth century paintings are few paintings in the National Gallery. They're very close some of the scenes, I don't I think that the time and dedication in making this film as of Antic as possible is I think, yes. One of my favorite moments. Yeah. I think we're in agreement the bar Linden is. The hidden gem in the cubit crown isn't that we discussed on this podcast only a few months ago. Didn't we went ahead of its release trying to thank you so much fear time? So this exhibition is at the design museum in London runs until September. Fifteen and I hope it goes. Well, he'll make it down there. Thank you so much, and that brings this bumper episode of truth in movies too close next week as we said miss not attritional episode, but we'll be reporting from the canned film festival you'll hear from us and the twilight faithfuls thank you for listening. I Mike leader as always this has been a seven digital production..

Linden Kubrick Naza design museum London National Gallery
"national gallery" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"national gallery" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Join me yesterday at that gathering. His name is Otis Johnson works here at the National Gallery of art. His message to President Trump was quote, Mr President if you really can relate to how the federal employees feeling you need to go ahead and open the government backup. So are people who want to work can get back to work in handle, America's business present? I wish President Trump was listening to Otis and all the other hard-working federal employees met with yesterday. If you talked to them he could hear their stories, and he would know that they are suffering. As are the American people who every day are losing access to important services. So I want to thank my colleague from Virginia Senator Kaine and on my other colleagues, and I yield the floor. Mr president. Minnesota Mr President I come to the floor today. Join my colleagues invoicing my sincere hope that the president will end this Spence lists senseless shut down the American. People are tired of our country being held hostage and our economy threatened. There are real consequences. I see it all the time. Of course, my state. Unlike us with these center van Hollen state of Maryland or the state of Virginia may not have as high percentage of federal workers. But every worker that's been hit by this. It is the same story at our airport. Just this weekend. I talked to countless TSA officers, and they said we will continue to do our job. But now, we're not going to get paid. And so you think about these people on the front line that are doing the work for our country. That are keeping us faith that are not getting paid. Because of this sense was shut down. You hear about the garbage piling up in our national parks. You hear about people having trouble paying their rent or mortgage? You look at the fears about airport security line. So everyday Americans are affected by this as well other consequences of this shutdown are less visible, but deeply painful for those affected.

Mr president President Trump President Otis Johnson Virginia National Gallery of art TSA government Senator Kaine America van Hollen Spence Minnesota Maryland
Yosemite National Park visitor died during shutdown

WCBS Programming

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Yosemite National Park visitor died during shutdown

"Investigation of the Christmas day death at Yosemite will be delayed though because of the government shutdown nine one one call to about the incident was received by the assembly national park emergency communication center. They did pull the man out and gave him medical attention. But he died anyway. Smithsonian museums the National Gallery, the national zoo all closed liberty island Ellis Island would be closed. If not for New York state paying workers salaries. There are no federal staffers to answer questions at the Lincoln Memorial and across the US national parks are cluttered with trash and human waste but the historic clock

National Gallery Ellis Island Lincoln Memorial Yosemite New York United States
"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"When we think of the paintings of Claude Monet typically, we think of gardens of water lilies of beautiful bridges, under- weeping willows, but independent exhibition at the National Gallery in London, Mona and architecture. We see another side of the impressionist painters of it's remarkable that money had a career spanning sixty years and for fifty years of those. He was repeatedly painting a real variety of buildings from the most humble cabins on the edge of a cliff through to rule fedral, and he's using them in very different ways. That's Roselend mckeever curatorial fellow at the National Gallery. It's not necessarily about the characteristic of architecture. But it's what the architecture can do for the structure for color for the balance of his painting, for example, when he travels to Boorda garra, which is on the Italian Riviera's new Taurus town. He paints not only the Shita out of the old city of Boorda garra. But also the new palace that have been built. And he uses that plays those two structures off against each other. Another thing he does often is use color. So for example, red roofs of buildings is something that plays against the green of landscape to give him a real exciting color palette in a pitcher. So for Monette architecture serves his painting through buildings and bridges weekend. Identified.

Roselend mckeever Boorda garra Claude Monet Monette architecture National Gallery Shita Italian Riviera London fifty years sixty years
"national gallery" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mansa? National Gallery has. So funny. So the reason that it was banks. He put the shredder inside the frame not just in the national portrait gallery quality, which is which is sort of funny. And I'm sure made him laugh you ever saw that video. Now, here's where the story picks up the pieces now called love is in the bin. But banks he took to the internet. Explain the whole thing was supposed to be shredded. Right. What happened? Now, he that's that's historian. Over the weekend. He he released a little video in which she said that that all these trial runs that the work had been totally shredded at past all the way through the shredder, and, you know, destroyed the work entirely, and that what happened at the auction house was a kind of a busted run it only got about halfway towards the full shredding. And so it didn't work nearly as fully as they'd hoped. But as with everything that he does it's, you know, it's hard to know, exactly. What is real? What's intended? And what's just sort of story layered on top. And it's certainly possible that came off exactly as he intended. And that he meant all along to release a video like this one in which he explained that it had been only a partial success. Yeah. We'll never know. He's he's written the urge to destroy us. Also, a creative urge do you think this this this stunt fits into his or do you think this is like a stand alone piece of art? Well, I think you know, he's had a publicly hostile relationship to the art world as a kind of a commercial world since he became famous, but it hasn't done anything to diminish his standing among major collectors. I mean, he's he's a much sought after artist. And I think that you know, he keeps trying to exhibit and billions and hostility and as a result. He's only embraced more and more by it. I think this sort of continues that trend where it's he's he's trying to say that tell you something about how his works shouldn't be commodified in this way. And yet, you know, the person who bought the workers thrilled with on the spectacle is happy to have the pilot shreds, and I'm sure the auction houses very happy to so so weird story in which can really have it both ways. And you know, this is another act in that same story. David Wallace deputy editor at New York magazine. Thanks so much for walking us through all things banks. Thank you. After a quick break. This is Brian Lehrer a strong democracy.

National Gallery Brian Lehrer deputy editor David Wallace New York magazine
"national gallery" Discussed on Searching for Salai

Searching for Salai

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Searching for Salai

"But why us I am a man who is displaced in time. I know you're a time traveler. No, no, not that my body my life. It belongs in the Italian Renaissance. But my heart my soul belongs here. This is a technological Renaissance. I live for this time. This was more than just a belief for Jack for him. It was his purpose. He believed that the reason he keeps fighting himself at this time is to share what he knows. I am from a time where people are opening their eyes again learning to look at things in a different way Innovative, Jack feels like he was sent here to teach people how to look at things in New York to usher in this age of innovation and he thinks that I am here to help him in your essay the last page you use a quote from Leonardo. I know it. Well it says off The the science of art study the art of science develop your senses, especially learn how to see realize that everything connects to everything else. Yeah, I'm looking at it right now. This is what you are meant for your art is storytelling you must help people to see this is not the moment that convinces me. Jack is telling the truth knowledge obscure part of my life does not mean that he can time travel but it does mean something right. I'm not saying that it was impossible to find out about this contest. But for the life of me, I could not figure out how he had that coupled with every other aspect of his incredibly detailed story certainly had piqued my interest. Okay, so not convinced but wanting to know more off after I got off the phone with Jack that night. I knew I needed to dig further. I needed to find out everything I could about him. I just didn't know where to start from an initial search there seemed to be no record of Jack Finney that matched his description no real credentials in the art world the call I made to the National Gallery where I asked for information on the contest. I also asked if a Jack Finney ever worked they're dead. Never heard of him. The.

Jack Finney Italian Renaissance Leonardo National Gallery New York
"national gallery" Discussed on This American Life

This American Life

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on This American Life

"Flaunts apartment feeling bad for him, but also frustrated. It's still seemed like maybe he was holding something back and he didn't know if he would ever see long again. But then the next morning long was waiting for Kirk in the lobby of his hotel. He told Kirke had been thinking then decided to quit, tying flies with exotic bird feathers. He was afraid though that he'd lose the few friends. He still had. He said they only liked him because he tied beautiful flies Kirk long, spent the next two days hanging out. They walked around the city together, mostly sightseeing. The one point they met up on the steps of the National Gallery were -mongst, painting. The scream was stolen in nineteen. Ninety four by thieves who broke through a window, and I just decided like, screw it. I'm just going to. I'm going to just do one more. Attack on his defenses here and see if I can get him to admit anything. I heard from like two separate people that. Like in the last year, you've told them that. You have so much Indian crow and you don't. You don't have any need for it and. And so what am I supposed to do with that? Like when I you do whatever you, but is it true? Yeah, that you have a lot of Indian crow. No, I have like. I still have some of the packages of the ones was was so okay. Lung kept those packages. He was supposed to sell for himself. After Edwin was arrested, he sent back the bird skins, but he kept the feathers. And I suddenly like, okay, like this. Now we're getting somewhere like how many and he was just miserable under this line of questioning. But he finally estimated that he had between six and eight hundred of these feathers from from Edwin. But eight hundred is a lot of feathers. No, and he didn't have that many anymore. He had sold half of them again back before he knew they were stolen and kept the rest which he had been tying with ever since he was now down to about one hundred feathers Kirk says long, also admitted that the number of birds Edwin sent him was more like ten or twenty rather than just a few. We check this with long and refutes it. In any case, Kirk finally felt like he was closing in on what he'd been after..

Kirk Edwin Kirke National Gallery two days
Poland, Spain and Portugal discussed on Midday on WNYC

Midday on WNYC

02:27 min | 2 years ago

Poland, Spain and Portugal discussed on Midday on WNYC

"A house for a while by the police and then escorted back to managua he's he's he said by the conference to be okay now america's edison now more of what's happening in the world with debbie there's been a second day of street protests in chicago over the fatal police shooting of a black man body cam footage has been released by police sharing the confrontation between the victim and officers before he's shot thirty seven year old harris augustus appears to reach for a gun and he's waistband demonstrators believe the incident was racially motivated at a news conference chicago police superintendent eddie johnson encourage people to see the video and decide for themselves it is what it is you know we're not trying to hide anything we're not trying to fluff anything the video speaks for itself i don't need to narrate that video for you when you see it you know you come to y'all conclusions about what happened the authorities in the syrian town of men bridge say the last members of the kurdish y pg militia have left the local arab militia controlling the towns said the white pg had withdrawn military advisers who helped to train local forces the wipe e g is a member of the syrian democratic forces the kurdish arab alliance that defeated the islamic state group in syria turkey considers the way pg to be an extension of the outlawed kurdistan workers party the pk k and has demanded its withdrawal from northern syria italy has allowed four hundred and fifty migrants who have picked up from an overcrowded boat on saturday to disembark in sicily the decision was taken after italy said that france germany mortar portugal and spain had agreed to take fifty migrants each to hungarian tourists have admitted trying to steal bricks from the ruins of a crematorium at the site of the former nazi death camp outfits birkenau in poland they were spotted on saturday stuffing the bricks into a bag the tourists were each fined four hundred dollars and given a one year suspended prison sentence for theft of a cultural asset and london's national gallery is facing legal action from twenty seven expert guides who claimed they've been unfairly dismissed one of them has worked there for more than forty years his david silica the national gallery says this is just a reorganization all of being offered the chance to apply for a new job and says their contract states they were freelances the educators disagree saying they were employees tax through payasyouearn with.

Poland Spain Portugal Germany France Sicily Superintendent America London Theft Managua Italy Syria Kurdistan Workers Turkey Kurdish Arab Alliance Eddie Johnson Chicago Debbie Four Hundred Dollars
"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"The drown well which describes a london where the cs of risen and so it's all these people living on the roof of the ritz and they're returning to their brutal savage sides and how morality degrades along with the buildings everything's falling upon as the physical structures around these people full apart they fall upon inside themselves as well and it's such an incredible book it such a good any of his london books i'll take i'll take on any any concrete island actually i i really concrete and i find how to read because i think it's so it makes me feel so paranoid and costra phobic because it's about someone crashing off the west way and being stuck between two bits of the motorway and not being able to scape my congest imagine it happening to me in blood yuba i'm not just stuck with just me and the joy of game looks like we're here in tennessee might yeah let's hope someone chuck's over kind of coke until everyone's iphone runs out that exactly that's it so basically dead after four and a half but in the special to the harsha more balodia novels where you end up with highrising this massive building where everyone is slowly turning on each other because we're not meant to be living in these concrete spaces and same with country island not meant to be surrounded by that much concrete it's making us fall apart mentally and the big thing with is the is that he swim ratty as cutting the any second could drop and so we can all act entirely nicely to each other but within flash we can suddenly turn and we will allow our facing instincts and so looking at the work of of edry shea you see these concrete spaces that i just barely holding onto what they were designed for and that barely holding onto what they've become and you can see things falling upon i don't think ballot is necessarily all that judgmental when he talks about them because so many of the characters listening bellows protagonists always when there's a there's a fight going on there's some sort of awful moment they walk into the fire they never walk away from and they consider walking away from it and walk straight into it just because they curious about knowing what they'll do in that situation i feel maybe that said shave it and maybe not almost coal warnings against that kind of totally running to so many of the of the characters in those novels cool james and the and the doctors and the and the live in west london they they clearly him crush is was based on him having a gulf into his into some weird sex of amongst many other things and is him trying to navigate having these incredibly difficult urges and being with someone with with urges that are unconvinced and how we deal with within a city and how the city affects us now we think about cars and technology and how technology could be sexy and how crashes can be sexy and how that's really conflicting emotion and that really relates back to russia which is you idiots i can't believe you're doing this it's a war with doing this i i guess we're having sex with we've had a car crash i guess that's the thing we're doing now it's just this big shays never quite so distorted as have a quite so like you know it's all going to he's more let's just keep cruise along the highway okay we've got a switch to tesla now but still the the kind of the american dream is there in the background he never quite stamps on it in the way that coal does he didn't never quite says stop i guess for shave his cards closest chesler the other people that we talked about kind of having i've kind of put that they've planted flag in whichever territory they've kind of wanted to it's fascinating stuff i can't believe we've gone from the hudson valley to the highways and byways of los angeles we ended up in shepperton via bolton five kind of wild wild west beautiful land that brings us to the end of today's program you can see both exhibitions of every shea and thomas the national gallery until the seventh of tober thank you very much indeed my two guests today eddie franco and austin ward and my producer of course all the fisher we'll be back at the same time next week but for the time being i robert found and thank you very much for cheating

london two bits
"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"So it's kind of open ended piece at the end she doesn't really give you the on sir like we should do this but it's we should look them through this new lens as if to say it's not like it was before it's not this kind of grand statement it sort of crumbling it's doing the thomas cole thing it's becoming part the landscape again and we should look at new and maybe criticize it for its kind of slightly overpowering or factor you know think we'll shouldn't it just returned dust and citizen explicit link you making between the thomas cole nothing ever stays the same empires is in full and this kind of idea of the kind of golden age of land was probably what the fifties and sixties when these places was still in the middle of no other was kind of you definitely had the sense of pilgrimage of getting there by by crook and then kind of having to give yourself up to the the land in the landscape in the weather and stuff and i mean we do all the time in the world we travel too much and you know i've been to some of these places and had these huge journeys to get there and multiple planes and you don't think about it and i suppose what she's saying is that that's really what's behind some of this that may be we should be re engaging with the landscape but as it is now an you know maybe not thinking about these things as heroic about thinking as kind of failing objects and woah just just generally to satisfy mike uriel sti possibly that if we're lucky of alice's well what the regional the land artists with a with a proto kind of conservation where some of them tend to think they must have been super political people yeah it was that that was the high point of the sort of environmentalism of the seventies they will you know they were getting back to the land ecological precarity was the watch word of the day and they will thinking about this but it's like then it becomes this great big tourists i and then it becomes a monument you know and then then it changes its meaning somehow i think maybe at some point we lost that original impetus and that now we need to reconnect with that so i think that's sort of what it's about i also think that the design of being designed to degrade is also some richard loan there's his walks out the yeah when he leaves those marks the meant to disappear i think that's a really important and essential the conserving them destroys the intention of the yeah i think that's maybe why you know because i was richard long and he doesn't like the term landa maybe that's the problem he has with lando that it's creating monument whereas as you said he walks in the amazon makes a circle of palm leaves takes a picture and then leaves her and then you know they'll they'll degrade and rotten that will just become nature again in his intervention was fleeting and i think he maybe has a problem with these things they they're still there fifty years later artificial long will lest eyebrows and get him on that's eddie you'll further reading on the topic of coal and russia of the novels of jj valid especially the ones set in london i can kind of see link but took us through this one it was quite hard especially because i had four more positive feelings fed raven thomas cole the thing that actually thomas called made me think of more than jj ballot was the industrial paintings of the impressionists so monet's paintings of the gulf and stuff like that where he's very smokey pollutant environments and i think the reason i like them so much is because there's no judgment that either this is also just documenting what's happened to a space i think that is that's probably why my heart goes a bit more to france than these reckons why didn't you have what's his name michelle back oh yeah you can have michelle welbeck's that you need to contemporary allowed figure you wanna system in phone so you can split so i think the thing about ballad that's really inching in relation to russia and cold especially in terms of its specifically his london novels so the drowned world concrete island high rise crash these novels about concrete brutal places that are changing and that as they change morality changes with them so if you think about.

fifty years
"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"And this i mean this particular issues great it goes from we killing our tabet and paintings by badly restoring them to what phones doing to our museum going which is a really good piece jason moran really interesting artist pianist and the piece that i picked up on his cooled natural causes by any good free longman and it's about going to see some of these things like going to the lightning field going to see these big land these kind of some of the kind of land yeah so michael heizer robert smith's and all these guys you know i'm what they did so we'll to maria made the lightning field these hundred poles stuck in the desert you go they have to dry for hours you get you wait and see if there's any lightning and there isn't you stay the night on this little hut in the middle of nowhere and then you kind of have a wit disappointeed being done a few of them on the lightning fill that did some of i haven't done as actually she admits she didn't go to spiral jetty spo jetties kind of the robot smith's in one where he created this rock formation looks like a spiral in the middle of the salt lake but what she gets onto is how long it takes to get there it's a boy to get that it's hard work when you're that is the point i it's about pilgrimages about since your psyche to the wonder of the wall yeah a bully they didn't put that in the press release today afoot you're going to edit out so keep repeating but but the idea is you're you're kind of during the gas guzzling thing going there spending effort and energy and yes part the journey but you know the spiral jetty when smith's and made it was very quickly subsumed by the water by the level of the lake and now the drought and the weather is such that you can see again and it's covered in these salt crystals and looks beautiful but it's kind of also telling you something's going wrong with the landscape and the same with the demery ah the lightning field that ground is parched it's kind of falling apart and another famous work which is cooled school double negative which is just a big slice out the grounds like a big chasm it's falling in on it self is falling apart it's not the clean lines that it was kind of industrial cut anymore so that discussing whether to keep this work of land on conservative and make it right again or is it just gonna fall par is exposed to become one with we think about this i kind of wonder whether there is if it repainting and it worth a lot of money hanging gallery we would get the restores on it but if it's about the landscape maybe the change of landscape is profound thing it can possibly say i can't believe that robert smithson didn't think this would happen i'm sure he when he built spiral jetty which is so stunning which i'd love to go and see he knew that the the land degrades land changes you don't think for second that he was gonna enough to think that his stamp on the land should lost foot turn ity i think he wanted to grade he wanted it to fall upon to fall into disrepair all land is the land it should from i mean i think it it tells you about climate change and all that but i think these things are designed and deserve to to fall apart and i think it'd be sad if someone came along and started messing jetty i'd be very upset yeah i think that is the irony because dea foundation beholden to conserve it to some degree but smithson was all about entropy he was that was his work was about so i think some of these other guys which will gave out oh this work is going to last forever or and now they're discussing that is what is the point in a way she talks about you know people turning up in a helicopter or you know to come and see this work and then disappearing off again is kind of the art world tourism wrong and she's part of that and she understands it and then the backdrop of all of this is trump pulling out of the paris agreement and you know record levels of climate change and.

jason moran hundred poles
"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"Think there's a little positively in thomas because he's so clearly overwhelmingly in love with the american landscape because he doesn't have we didn't nick from china is sort of washed out structure out with focus everything he does is incredibly clean chris rise everything is so in focus and i don't massively like it but what he wants to do is document this beautiful country you know it's like with the australian impressions as well which this like we need to document is it's so perfect so beautiful i need to perfectly and that's you know funded board is this is what happens is in the eighteen fifties when kohl's were was being painted and then we go to the nineteen fifties to the to the eighties to the nineties and now with this we call them we're making lines at the landscapes kind of being trashed the is the man made things that we kind of my star roenick like these kind of crappy buildings we may be may be feel a sort of cultural ownership over the name that was on the side of that it would have had a good old the good old kind of cr white christian bluecollar name on it now it's called that was something you can't even read because it's in the korean alphabet for example or whatever it is to this sensitive maybe lost landscape russia saying we've also lost these surnames we used to have lost we've lost even the logos on the side of the buildings this is this is how impulse change yeah he's sort of down on the he's down under other that's that's a bit of the implicate it's difficult to know i did think that and i did immediate go to hope he's not upset that there's a korean supermarket should be the graffiti on the side of that building that's one of my favorite pairings those two paintings because also the original one is cooled tool and die which is obviously kind of tool and die stamping manufacturer etc cost but it's also it's pretty full bowed yeah tool and die and then you go to the korean thing and it's actually more interesting visually and the graffiti kind of upbeat it's not like oh the world's going to you know it's not all bad but i think what he can do is rem remain sort of aloof that's at russia language you know it's just like aloof you not quite sure where he sits on the fence you know any point quite sure whether to take these as like real forboding tales whereas thomas co you know because in his famous last painting which is called the ox bow which really is a glorious thing of eddie was talking about this kind of just looking at the landscape he's right at the front with his little hat looking out as he has to say you know you know don't you mess this up looking like a little challenge even though it's a tiny little guy he's like i'm sat in the middle of this wilderness and this is what i'm going to give to you but don't you go around screwing all up i think ever shea is fourth of a man that's afraid of the future because he's a big car guys we said he's kind of man that's documented the life of the american highway and the architecture directly off of it and when i mentioned to him a couple of years ago to studio in culver city he's got he's got a great collection is my treasured one is a nineteen twenties ford van at the kind of one of you had the collected the kellogg's matchbox cars that one but he likes to work in a tesla these days yeah yeah i think he kind of he gets he gets okay so you still driving is six cylinder base that small snippet of bug reformation we've solved we've sold the middle the riddle anyway it's beautiful stuff now this is the reading session now we wanted to we're going to stay in the united states we're gonna move to kind of landscape artist of depicted and used the american landscape tell us how whole edry shea let to this thing that you want to alert our allison's purely because i was reading this raw the cool magazines called even it's an art magazine it's new tennis shoes so that's like three years old guess at its boy someone that knows jason so i went to university of yeah good writer.

thomas china three years
"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"In this show the national gary these on the kind of what we call the beautiful things the los angeles county museum on fire or one of the kind of classic american guests stations from the nineteen fifties which i think we can all is now a beautiful things works architecture these kind of squat cinderblock kind of pretty ordinary buildings aren't they see beauty in this house it shame make you feel i find it really tough for them because he doesn't make me feel a huge amount but i really liked i feel like he coming at the tail end of pomp not necessarily about all that much emotion it's it's about reducing things down too much simpler snappier form of visual static and so i look stuff i love i'm just glad that it's then i'm like i keep the every time i think what i think about one edry shea because he's he's so calm so considered so laid back in the way he approaches things you paint so i don't actually feel huge mountain i look at those i think they're visual a bit like a logo yeah consumable drink all in yeah and that's that's what i get from get this through sense i need to be around i wanna drink in whereas when i look at thomas cole i got the sense that things are about to go to i think when i look at russia i think that he brings all of that history as well because you do look at it and you go that's just away you know on fire or whatever and you kind of do take face value but then he's always referring packs whether it's tomes coal or do show he's always working series processes and systems so that's kind of why you'll such a genius i did just taking pitches of all the gasoline all the parking lots on this sunset strip or whatever you know they're all based on kind of closed system and i suppose that's what makes him so attractive to younger artists as well so i was just in japan where i was looking at this book and also this book so no that's my version of an edward share where he goes down the freeway and throws a tv out the window and documents it and so this young japanese guy chuck them mac book out of the window of his car like his electric car in tokyo but made exactly the same book you know simile and it's just that repetition of something quite sort of basic you know the thomas cole thing is the rise and fall of the roman empire you know it's the kind of link just we will know the story and it's immoral fable yes it's going to come back around and is it is it all negative or do you at the end think wow yeah can't wait until this civilization just crumbles and we'll go back to gather is and so there is kind of hope is both i.

los angeles county museum
"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"Destruction thanks talking tomasco it's amazing stuff how does the national gallery how how do these two shows work in tandem at listens renault edry shays work clean lean poppy modern his arch chronic close the landscape of the highway and architecture it is best viewed fifty miles in our in american automobile how does how do these two show square off each other than so it sounds so up stays with the series of five black and white paintings which advocated in the early nineties and the show different ugly bits of la so there's a tech chem applaud that a tool shop says a phone box a tire shop and so there's a hung quite high up and underneath them a new series or more recent which did for the venice biennale of the exact same views repeated but now in color and showing what those buildings have become so the tech him has become fat single fat which streaming restaurant the phonebox had been replaced by a bird and phone poll so everything's changed and so the way that relates back to something about the demise all the change of useful the demise some sort of empire reviews yeah and so one of the other things is black and white trade school now becomes a coordinator of it looks like a prison probably not presents just something empty looking so yeah for him the black and white ones were about blue collar la and they've become what those bits of los angeles once house these poor working close americans these buildings have turned into so one of them has become a korean soup market for example and so he's painted i in the garish colors of creon supermarkets so that was released record back to thomas coke thomas koehler saying look at how america's changing and it seems like raise going look at how america's changed i think there's a really massive difference now they approach it because thomas cole is full of warnings and and going please don't america go don't let this happen i begged you look what will happen if you continue on this path will end up destroying everything and they'll be wine don't let wine happen wine and pa is no and the thing but good times he sounds like a very boring tohis goal thomas but i don't think that's what he's doing i don't think marana cg thinking this is this is this the time they were changing and it's bad thing i don't think that comes across i think that's a that's a good thing one of the main reasons is like an autistic reason which is that it goes from monochrome to color as if life has seeped back into these spaces as as they've changed i really think is fundamental difference between the two of them which thomas causing stuff changing that's not good and we need to stop it and retreats going stuff changing full stop and i think that's a really interesting difference between because course of empire the other hand and then of just stuff happening man relax i think there's also the apocalyptic sky's the guy that's the kind of the reign as the fence yes there is full boating here and i agree he's probably not quite as buttoned up his co was or as moralizing he's he's just like you going to let this go it's going to happen what entropy we can't do anything and i suppose the natural state of empire you squeeze to tighten it popped up your hands anyway how does it make either both of you feel because i love his work and i felt there is something clean and clinical about it also something of an emotional response and by the way with these paintings that you're referring to.

shays
"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"The nineteenth century painted thomas cole is one of a handful of artists known for their mandic landscapes of the united states he was a founder of the hudson river school and all that movement dedicated to this start of depiction on the east coast his paintings off a dramatic dreamy vistas sort of fairytale image of the american wilderness re shea is an artist associated with pot walking across a number of disciplines he's known for his paintings inventory concern with landscape especially california as well as his word paintings an interest in typography well that so skies eddie nelson welcome to the program hey nice to have you both his talk through an exhibition at the national gallery in london which is fairly decent timing we're in a strange place or america seems to be in a strange place the rest of the world's idea of the united states is perhaps a strange stretched and maybe historic one who knows which way which end of the telescope we're looking also you know start with you tomas cole is the sort of old the old oils section of this show maybe can give ellison's a little bit of a potted idea of thomas cole who isn't what he looks like yeah he was born in bolton up north and then they do next in but didn't skip that let's edit the out okay on the northern accent is done so yeah he moved from bolton to america to philadelphia and then diverse other parts but along the way learnt from kind of constable interna learn the british way that say yeah and then arrived in america in this totally world different landscape you know the broad skies and so all of those things come to bear what's relevant today's that he was painting the demise of the american landscape even at the time we think of it as progress you know in the hudson river school it was just like a reaction against revolution in industry and stuff like people were painting the mills of manchester yeah yeah yeah and in in the mills where he famously would have seen the luddites burning the mills down in a car remember the town not leads but you know up north to the accent and so you know he would have seen the reaction first hand in britain and then moved to americans in a different kind of progress probably a big scale things coming you know big railroads things happening that were sort of threatening this landscape and he used the wildness of the landscape to kind of juxtaposed what would be the coming of industry the coming of the nineteenth twentieth century and what he kind of saw as something to destroy like this i mean the course of empire we want to talk about that worth five paintings that he did for a rich patron and the guy wanted them like around his fireplace so he'd made the scheme for these five paintings and they're pretty incredible because they go from the savage state which is basically the landscape in its original form kind of hunter chasing a deer and the rolling hills and everything looking becali wonderful as you said and then you go to the next painting which is the arcade ian or pastoral state and you get the same this more or less you can see this hill that's kind of throughout these five paintings and now we have people tilling the fields and kind of stonehenge in the background and more life coming and a little glimpse at the bottom of a soldier and you're like okay something's coming the next one is insane because it's called the consummation and it's basically like rome you know babylon everything coming all at once so suddenly there's thousands of people as huge processions as big neoclassical building a good time it's all going off right these entry point into this is go up for holidays going to be some wine everyone's having a good time everyone's dressed well yeah eddie tens and painting number four to structure in wish in which these these crowds this jamal chew ass crowd of people now start turning on each other's wall as burning buildings you know the starches have all been decapitated pretty serious anderson amazing painting because if you look close it's all going off now and then the final painting is called desolation so within back in the same landscape now everything's ruined everything's kind of been knocked over and nature's coming back there's no people that's it it's all over but you know it's returning back to its original so it's a psycho but in the middle of that this kind of.

united states founder hudson river school thomas cole
"national gallery" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

The Fun Kids Download

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on The Fun Kids Download

"Explorers with the national gallery log stand released you'll gun running around the gallery keyed please leaning towards all canvas lawyer downsides horrible new sprout planned gulf didn't pienaar's just to get colored we've you'll mucky boleslaw deal don't pacific rim be he's just taking a closer look and it's nice to ease enjoy in the gallery ice paintings are meant to be looked at to help free glenn rounds eve no there isn't much room in this clause growth newness report on the most arabian either diligent who was of yellow one might pittance next to the fight paul defeat over a hundred years no one dove engulf bold be the perfect picked up what he's yellow house point i think we can all agree that i am quite the most eyecatching boom in the where we will certainly go to begins dead the gallery set him for the day the likes to go it out he know what that means yes fondly we can all power these freimann cowan explore gratitude to do better the maybe hey all maybe a painting of the beautiful green are holding andrew's in heaven how about something of x why hills well all be walled yvonne case that keyed with these jamie lanes coming meteorologist conlon lung scope painting explore threat now as tall come on phasing explorers with a national gallery i didn't catch all the other episodes of painting explores by heading over to fund kids live dot com right he's time nice who asked me about anything in this way you send your questions i would survival we do our best to answer them for you at this morning's question he's from zachary and zachary so that he subscribes to the end sixty show nucci title thank yous accurate we appreciate your support but rival.

cowan gun running pienaar glenn paul andrew yvonne conlon zachary hundred years
"national gallery" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

Vogue Podcast

03:48 min | 4 years ago

"national gallery" Discussed on Vogue Podcast

"I really wanna see it. It's it's fascinating to see the collision of media, and politics and all wrapped make this stock. Well, it's interesting because I believe that the film was was directed by his former chief of staff you premiered at Sundance, and it was just a new directors new films, and it really is the kind of film making that I think is just so so crackling with energy and so fun to watch. And and it was great to see. I mean, more on point to to this film other movies that were really inspiring were. Of course, the September issue, which is which is a look at Anna. But then also National Gallery by Frederick Wiseman is one of my heroes along with the penny. Baker's the worm National Gallery is very pure cinema. Verite look at the National Gallery in London. And so that was sort of in a way we felt like if we could meld some of the great aspects of September issue National Gallery in this look at that's the the the challenge you feel like they were big shoes to fill after September. Because I mean, inevitably that's you know, what I hear a lot is, you know. Well, it's a septem- is it's very very different look and a very diff. Current story to tell so one of the things that drew me to make the film also was the idea of returning to the sort of mythology around Anna winter and being able to penetrate that to unpack it a little bit. And I thought that the September issue is is a wonderful portrait of her. But it's very much one side. I think and here it's interesting because I think her investment in the costume institute. Much more personal and we see her partnership with Andrew Bolton is very different from the one that she has with great. Exactly. So you see a different side of her. And I think that Anna as as a sort of figure in cinema, and the culture is kind of able to to have several different films or profiles of her men. So I was you know, whether this sort of lives up to some of the elements of of the September issue. It's not for me to say. But, but I hope that those who like are still drawn to those ideas and things enjoy the film great who came up with the idea of the title first Monday in may. So I actually came up with that idea. Well, you know, I was thinking of what could be the title. And when I was walking in one day to shoot, it's it's it's right on the door. It says the museum is closed to other days than first Monday. In may it's Christmas new years. I think thanksgiving and then the first Monday in may. And it's interesting because I think it shows you how pivotal disadvant- is to the museum's life. Right. It's almost like a national holiday for them. So to edit the film, the edit took about six or seven months, we started the edit about a month before the gala took place, and so that was like April and went to about December January. Congratulations. Andrew I'm particularly looking for what you're seeing a game. Although they some parts according to some people in this room looking forward to the back of film festival premium of which I hope they will have been important seat since I went to the Phil. And we're doing QNA's at the Paris theatre. Doing them with you. That address with a wonderful wonderful compensation that I ask the right questions. You fast. You are always obey cue. Thank you document. You documents Terry. And I hope that people check out the film, not just for everything else. But also for you because you are. Very the vote podcast is for vogue magazine recorded here at one World Trade Center and produced by Nagai Mohammadi and Hilda Couric sound engineering by David Lawrence and hosted by me..

Anna winter National Gallery Andrew Bolton chief of staff Frederick Wiseman costume institute Sundance vogue magazine QNA Baker London Terry Paris theatre World Trade Center Nagai Mohammadi David Lawrence Hilda Couric seven months