8 Burst results for "National Council On Behavioral Health"

"national council behavioral health" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:02 min | 5 months ago

"national council behavioral health" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Post Master General. Louis to joys recent cost cutting measures to the US PS small business owners in West. Virginia. Say They are relying on the post office more than ever to keep their companies afloat during the pandemic on Friday to joy reshuffled the leadership at the agency. After critics claimed his operational changes have caused mail delivery slowdowns Jenny. Riser owns catering company MS groupies kitchen in Charleston and says, the pandemic forced her company to switch to using suppliers that ship through the post office. She says, she can't afford the delivery delays that have happened as a result of joys adjustments. It's not easy doing business right now we have to jump through hoops during covets. Now, the slow down at the post office is yet another hoop that we're going to have to jump through to keep our doors open Julie, says, changes are to address the agency's growing deficit. The Postal Service reported a two point two, billion dollar loss during the second quarter of this year I'm Diane Bernard. Democratic investigation into the USPS Bell. Delays also will examine the potential impact on mail balloting, prescription drugs, and other significant mail a bipartisan group of senators recommending that a twenty five, billion dollars stimulus bill help support the postal service president trump abruptly evacuated for the White House briefing room by security Monday after shots were fired near the White House grounds that from CNN, they report trump return to the briefing room minutes later. Confirming, a shooting trump ended I like to thank the Secret Service for doing the always quicken for effective were a senior administration official said that the shooter is in custody federal stimulus funding barely helping states such as main with their behavioral health needs also known as mental health and Substance Abuse Treatment according to the National Council behavioral health fewer than five percent of behavioral health organizations got the bulk of targeted cares act funding. Meller Shaughnessy Executive Director of the alliance. For addiction.

Riser Postal Service White House Meller Shaughnessy US trump Virginia Louis USPS Jenny National Council Diane Bernard Julie Charleston Executive Director MS CNN official president
"national council behavioral health" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

12:41 min | 1 year ago

"national council behavioral health" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"High quality treatment and to have prompt access to it and we help our members with technical assistance and training. Now many of your listeners may know about one of our national programs mental health first aid. We've trained over two million people To give mental health first-aid when they run into somebody in their community or their family that is in distress from a mental illness. Earn addiction is a great training mental health. First Aid is an excellent program. I am an instructor so I I. I really believe in the program enough to teach and for longtime listeners. We did a previous show on what is mental health first aid so you have to go back and check that out if you want more more information. Great all right today. We're going to discuss mass violent and its relationship to mental illness now given the high profile instances of mass violence in this country. Many people people mistakenly believed that we don't necessarily have a mass violence issue but we have a mental illness issue. What are your thoughts on that? Well you know I think they need to take look at the data and the studies around it and You know we're GonNa have a great conversation today but if your listeners want to learn more they should go to the National Council Council website the National Council Behavioral Health Mass Violence. If you put those search words in your browser you'll get our report and There'll be a lot more information and then we'll have time to go over today. That said there are really two separate problems. There is some overlap but if you eliminated mental illness so you would not be eliminating violence. I think that many people believe that in order to commit mass violence. You must therefore be insane insane to use layman's terms. People have trouble wrapping their head around any sort of violence on that scale. Not being mental illness this I really don't understand that way of thinking. I don't see how it how it's more sane to kill an individual to kill your spouse to kill your brother. What what is it about it being multiple people that seem that makes it aprio rory as a fact mental illness and it also depends what you mean by mental illness? You know one of the things we found reviewing all the studies on this is the amount of mental illness. Involved depends on how the researcher defined mental illness and there is not a standard definition agreed to among researchers or a federal definition. That's been worked out by the Department of Justice or the Centers for Disease Control as to what we're going to call mental illness. In the context of mass violence the definitions go from everything to mental. Distress to the clinician would call a mental illness. And things like schizophrenia. Major depression bipolar disorder. If you look just at the mental illnesses on that list you would only account for four point. Seven percent of people that are perpetrated mass violence if you go with mental distress well that's about seventy percent of anybody at any given time. I think this is what confuses people of course because I think that people believe that you are either perfectly healthy. You have perfect mental health or you have mental illness your crazy or insane and they don't understand this concept of everybody has mental health and while most people have a good mental health. Most of the time you can still have what you referred to as distress or a crisis point or a mental health issue. And that's where we have to start discussing it because if anybody can have a mental health crisis then we can start to do things to prevent that and really start to look into controlling and preventing mass violence in this country. Why I think you made an excellent point mental health and mental illness or not all or nothing? It's just like physical health you can. You may not have cancer and you may not but have quadriplegia and be paralyzed but you can still be very physically unhealthy the same thing with mental health. You may not have schizophrenia bipolar disorder. But you may still have distress and have trouble getting through your day and interacting with others comfortably. Let's talk about mass shooters because that's kind of one of the most common come in once. Let's get that out of the way quickly. Are there any common characteristics that all mass shooter seemed to have well here. You've you've come across the other another another big problem. We found looking at the research. There is no settled definition of what is meant generally by mass violence. And now you've used the term mass shooters news which is a subset of mass violence. There are people that kill large numbers by running a vehicle through a crowd or by stabbing now. It appears that that over ninety percent ninety five percent in the United States is due to shooting that is the large majority also. There's no standard definition of what the word mass ask means. Some studies use three or more some use for more some exclude when it involves family members some exclude when it's done as part of a Crime I'm an attempted theft so another place we need help. We need really the government get active is we need again. A standard definition of what we mean by. I math violence or mass shooting the number of and the types of deaths we're going to include. Then you have the problem. What do you do by about near misses We looked at one case of a person who had fired over forty rounds at a crowd only hit one person. She was a lousy shot. 'cause she only killed one one person. Does that make that. How's that different from somebody that had hit five or eight? Is the difference between a mass killer in singer killer. How good a shot? They are so the listeners. Need to be aware that if you re different studies you get different answers because they use different definitions of all these very important factors that said the most common characteristics is almost all her men very few women. The second is almost all are using guns. They're much more effective at killing people than than other means especially in in large numbers. Almost all of them are angry and resentful. They feel the world has has been injustice either to them personally or to some other group that they identify strongly with almost all of them are more isolated on average than other people. They you have fewer social relationships family relationships Many of them have had a a recent disappointment. Either with a relationship with with a partner or with family or the job but it is resentment anger and isolation that are actually much more common factors than the presence of a mental wellness. If you look at what is usually meant when you see a psychiatrist or psychologist or therapist in clinic mental illness. Things like schizophrenia. A AH recurrent major depression bipolar disorder. It appears that about twenty five percent maybe of people when perpetrating mass violence silence had recently or at the time they did the act had a mental illness but at any given time about nineteen percent of everybody in the nation has a mental illness. So it's not much different. The other problem you get into is assuming that the mental illness caused the violence. You can certainly have something and not have it causes ause you to take a particular action now in some cases with mental illness. It's pretty clear that there's a cause. A few cases people had command hallucinations heard voices telling him to kill much. More commonly people had problem with depression or anxiety. It's unclear how being depressed or anxious makes you wanNA kill somebody so assumption of causation is another air. But in general about one in four people that have perpetrated mass violence by the best evidence available bowl which is pretty spotty at times had a mental illness. That a clinician would call it mental illness at the time they did the act compared to about nineteen nineteen percent of people with a mental illness for the general population. Let's talk about the research for a moment because you you've laid out that we don't have good standards for this and your research. Research is only as good as your data. That's a well accepted. The scientific method. Is there for a reason. And it doesn't seem like the federal government is looking to close these loopholes. So I I guess that's my first question. Why doesn't the federal government want to get a good study on this so that we can get a handle on it? I know you're not the policy. Director turbot the National Council does do policy advocacy. Did they have any thoughts on this. I mean we have specific recommendations on our report that that I'd I would urge all of your listeners to talk to their elective representatives about If you think about airline crashes another horrible in rare cause of of Math Steph. We have the National Transportation Safety Board. Who keeps say staff of investigators who has a standardized system of investigating every crash Josh and there's mandated reporting and their standardized data and it goes into databases and they use it to improve the engines? They use it to improve pilot training. They use it to improve airport airport design. Why don't we have something like that with mass violence? If we're going to make the problem better we need to have that serious systematic investigation set of standard Definitions and data basing and mandated reporting instead of a lot of one off studies and just feeling bad about it. Second is there's not decent federal funding to look at the causes of violence either related to mental illness. If you're worried about that almost all the studies are retrospective studies. Eddie's the last major prospective study done was done about twenty five years ago it was mostly funded by a private foundation the Macarthur Foundation by the way that study study found that people with with serious mental illness are no more likely than the general population to be violent unless they also have a substance use disorder so no perspective studies studies and look at all the restrictions on Violence with guns. There's very little funding and there's a lot of restrictions on what you can study so if you have mass violence where ninety five percents guns but you have us as a nation. It's not just our elective representatives. We decided this as a group saying that. We don't want to seriously study this stuff for whatever reason. Listen why should we expect anything to get better now just to take us out for a moment. Many of our listeners are familiar with prospective studies. Retrospective Studies. Can you explain that for us. Real quick wacoal. I'm sorry yeah. A retrospective study is where I take information. That's been gathered for other purposes. So I look at everybody after the shootings as of occurred I look at them as a group afterwards and try and find out if there was a violence related to mental illness. A prospective study would be where I look at thousands or tens of two thousand people with mental illness before any violence has occurred and I follow them over ten or twenty years. It's a much stronger study methodology. Because you're not it just looking at the subsection and missing all the people that haven't been violent yet. Thank you so much for explaining that now. One of the reasons that we want to do these studies reason why the National Council advocates. These studies is because in doing so we can prevent violence potentially because we can do things like threat assessments now we have have threat assessments. Now what are those in. What are they based on? If the studies are so wonky well again it depends on what you mean by threat assessment. What we are referred to in the report is threat? Assessment is a multidisciplinary team and this was a process that has been developed over time by the FBI. I That is not just all clinicians. That does an ongoing investigation of someone. Were there's concerns that they could be dangerous so people are brought to the attention of this team and maybe somebody that has become more solid at work has started muttering that he's GonNa take it anymore and somebody's gotta pay and someone got worried and called up and it came to the team's attention how the team in the case of workplace would consist probably if somebody from HR somebody from the local police because has it is potential for a crime a lawyer that's knowledgeable about rights because we want to protect the person's civil rights also and behavioral health professional in case there is a mental mental illness related to it and they they gather information around the person before they talk to the person then they decide who talks to the person about what and and it's an ongoing process. It's not a clinician alone in a room talking just about medical symptoms. We'll be right back after these messages. Want real no boundaries..

National Council federal government National Council Council United States FBI National Transportation Safety schizophrenia rory theft cancer depression Macarthur Foundation Centers for Disease Control Department of Justice Josh
"national council behavioral health" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:48 min | 2 years ago

"national council behavioral health" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Of your risk to learn about what's happening in communities. There's a lot of mutuality stories are shared as well. We share research with you. In fact, new research on the benefit of community choirs. So the power of arts, for example in our lives. We see connection as necessary for wellbeing both physical animal channel and harder to attain for low income older adults. So I'm even looking out at colleagues it's things like hearing loss and low vision or vision loss, which are real predictors and also causes and we need technology to change. It's not it's very expensive for low income people to get what they need in terms of hearing devices. So that technology changeable matter let's all get back in two years. Those comments from Lisa Marsh Ryerson foundation, president for AARP by ten percents. It'd be interesting to come back to the measures. We need those bowl goals questions here, my colleague Eleni and care here with with microphones so thoughts comments, otherwise I'll call on you. Yes, right here. Hi there and tell us who you are Bill or known with the National Academy of social insurance some years ago, Audrey Hepburn. The actress was asked you often feel lowly responses don't confuse wanting to be alone with Lloyd this. Is there some confusion even the two interesting there is so I'll jump in but others can jump. So I'm glad you said that it is true that you can be socially connected and still be lonely. And you can't be at socially isolated and not feel lonely at all. So again, I think of it at a top level is loneliness is subjective and 'isolation as objective, and yet it's very clear that they're connected. Very clear. Yeah. No, absolutely. I I would say. It's clear that it's become more socially acceptable to be single, right? And not to seek to be in a relationship. That's a good thing. That's a really good development. And I welcome that. What concerns me more is that many people who are not in relationships were attributing their unhappiness and their loneliness to the fact that they were not in a relationship people want it, and they can't find it. If it's allusive brought in some way that it wasn't in the past that is of itself concerning. Yes, right here. Thomas kujo from Baltimore, Maryland. The question is are hold the mic closer. There you go my question. So there's a book out palaces for the people Aaron Klein in Burke, he talks about social infrastructure in this book. And I'm curious to know, what your thoughts on what type investment in social infrastructure policies can be done to improve loneliness. There's one other thing I wanted to mention which is sort of related, and we have seen in our research in recent years and hasn't been mentioned, which is the role of religion and the rise of their religious nuns in our society. And I don't know if that. Contributing to this at all. But people have fewer and fewer connections to religious institutions and are attending church or temple or wherever it might be much less frequently and that's especially true among the young. And in the cygnus survey, the young were among the most likely to say that they were lonely and feeling disconnected. So that's just another interesting thing to throw in the mix visa reflections on social infrastructure, and what kinds of investments we ought to be thinking about. Yeah. I think it's critically important that we're thinking about investments, and that were writing the balance of inclusion in its broadest sense across social infrastructure across this nation as well. So for me that's everything about policies that address issues of access. So when you think about it as access to quality care, that's really important in this conversation that we're having when you think about I know there was a question earlier about what happens in cities so to be local policies as well. That's think about inclusion of all. All individuals, all neighborhoods all people policy that reflects that we all lose. When people are lonely and are not able to share their gifts and talents with our community. So many more issues that we can speak about later. Yes, right here. Hi janine. Jacob question as we think about the metoo movement and gender dynamics. How does that play into loneliness are people now more afraid to interact with individuals of the opposite sex because of perhaps some of the implications. That are now being Kate questions about nine thousand of the twelve thousand words. So the short answer is that the data I relied upon for this piece does not obviously yet reflect anything that's happened in the wake of me to and yet. This was a theme that came up in my interviews. We're both men and women talked about a new tentative Nessin hesitancy and sort of uncertainty about how or when to make the first move part of the difficulty and untangling this and figuring out how much of it is me too. And how much of it is other things is that a bunch of other things that also changed in the past ten years right online dating has has become over a very short period of time, really the acceptable way to meet people, and by some measures the most common way that people are meeting each other. And it just doesn't work that well for all people. So, you know, is it more awkward destroyed up a conversation in real life? Because people expect you to do that the tender or is it more awkward to strike up a conversation with somebody like because of me too. Or is it more difficult to strike up a conversation in real life because the settings in which we used to do that. You know, we're now on our phones and the answer is probably all of those things. I talk in the piece about how I met my husband in two thousand and two on an elevator. And this came up in my conversations with a bunch of young women specifically where they asked me they saw that. I was married. How did you meet your husband, and I would tell them, and it would prompt these sort of size of like, oh, I would love to meet somebody with that way. And yet it's never going to happen that seems to be perhaps also sort of a self fulfilling belief, right? Like, we don't believe that people are going to talk to us in physical spaces, perhaps it's not going to happen. I just commend you. It was just a wonderful wonderful treatment of the social. I mean, I just I I love that section of your of your peace with regard to the metoo tensions that are out there. I just thought it was brilliant. Let me just just imposing ask you another question. On society broadly in how awareness raising is part of an also taking action which which which we were asked to do today. And I'd be interested in what the three of you think are the things that one could most due to again, make some progress on on isolation, really broadly, mental health, and I just add just in my own comment. I've been so impressed with the national council behavioral health and something they call mental health first aid, which is to try to make mental health first aid and training, a kind of CPR new CPR, and they've created over a million people in this front and a million people out of three hundred million people may not sound like a lot. But it's a start that they've had a million people of all different. And that's a sign of like people making an effort to engineer because dealing with mental health is not an easy thing of others if posted there, so I assume that in the insights, the three of you have just as we close on what you would add that we could think about it actually proactively doing. So I would say. It's been addressed today. But I think it's very very important that we recognize that very few people talk about loneliness or social isolation with their healthcare clinicians at any level so to educate those who are clinically trained across the broad definition of health care to bring up the subject to understand people's needs. And then to have an essence social prescriptions are interventions if you screen you have to intervene, so really attack this with the same vigor, we would other chronic diseases, and then I would say on a lower touch the conversation. We're having about everyone being able to solve be the best possible neighbor, you can be you will feel better for reaching out. And your neighbors lies will be improved. As a result, Kim. I think that as as we see with many issues that we spent studying public opinion raising awareness about an issue can really move the needle and change opinion. I think we've been studying teens in their attitudes. And there there are a lot of concerns about anxiety and depression teams are really feeling it and parents have teens are extremely concerned about this. It's on everybody's radar. So I think that's a positive sign because it's becoming more part of the dialogue. If we can have more high profile, people addressing the issue, we've seen it that can be very influential in public views and and discussions too. So I think it's I think it's a process, but we're moving in the right direction. Yeah. I would absolutely sort of second that and say that the thing I would most like to see some changes in our thinking about is Atta leci- specifically. And I think this has sort of important Ramic patient ramifications for parents for caregiver for for care providers for educators policymakers I think for too long we thought about adolescence is almost a holding pan. People just have to get through it. And then they get to adulthood, and a lot of research is coming out. It really shows it's pretty crucial developmental period. And if you just skip through it, you know, if you're not having that experience developing relationships, not just romantic ones tonic ones as well gets much harder. When you're in your twenties to be able to do that in sort of lasting and meaningful ways. One thing I thought was really fascinating food for thought as I was working on. This piece was looking at how other countries are responding to some of these same developments and in the Netherlands where teenagers are also having sex later and less good thing. They're they're holding hands less and flirting less and kissing this. And they've studied this and the Dutch are really concerned about this. They sort of say if people aren't getting that kind of experience connecting. How are they going to be able to do it as adults? I think we should take it just as seriously. As Margaret low comes up to share with us. I wanna say thank you so much. That's a big big random applause for keep Julian of the Atlantic. Lisa Marsha Ryerson right here at the AARP foundation. And Kim Parker the trust. Thank you so much. Thank you. Yeah. Thanks, steve. And Lisa and Kate and Kim for raising our awareness, so beautifully. You know, this was a rich conversation. It's not very often. I mean, we start a lot of conversations in the work that we do saying we want to talk about solutions. It's actually was a rare moment where you everybody up here. Sort of talked about meaningful things. Whether it's getting to know, your neighbors, I loved Dr Murphy's recommendations be present help others recognize your own gifts. There's enormous power net guidance. I don't know if I.

Kim Parker Kate vision loss Lisa Marsh Ryerson foundation AARP Eleni social isolation Audrey Hepburn Jacob National Academy of social Maryland Aaron Klein president Lloyd Netherlands Baltimore Thomas kujo Bill janine
"national council behavioral health" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:35 min | 2 years ago

"national council behavioral health" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Is there some confusion you the two interesting there is so I'll jump down but others can jump fan. So I'm glad you said that it is true that you can be socially connected and still be lonely. And you can't be socially isolated and not feel only at all. So again, I think of it at a top level is loneliness is subjective isolation as objective and yet. It's very clear that they're connected. Very clear. Yeah. No, absolutely. I I would say. It's clear that it's become more socially acceptable to be single, right? And not to seek to be in a relationship. That's a good thing. That's a really good development. And I welcome that. What concerns me more is that many people who are not in relationships were attributing their unhappiness and their loneliness to the fact that they were not in a relationship. So people want it, and they can't find it. If it's allusive brought in some way that it wasn't in the past that is of itself concerning. Yes, right here. Thomas cujo Baltimore, Maryland. The question is. Closer. There you go is my question. So there's a book out palaces whether people Aaron Klein Enberg, he talks about social infrastructure in this book. And I'm curious to know, what your thoughts on what type of investment in social infrastructure. Our policies can be done to improve loneliness. There was one other thing I wanted to mention which is sort of related, and we have seen in our research in recent years and hasn't been mentioned, which is the role of religion and the rise of their religious nuns in our society. And I don't know if that's. Contributing to this at all. But people have fewer and fewer connections to religious institutions and are attending church or or Templer wherever it might be much less frequently and that's especially true among the young. And in the cygnus survey, the young were among the most likely to say that they were lonely and feeling disconnected. So that's just another interesting thing to throw in the mix. Lisa reflections on social infrastructure, and what kinds of investments we ought to be thinking about. Yeah. I think it's critically important that we're thinking about investments, and that were writing the balance of inclusion in its broadest sense across social infrastructure across this nation as well. So for me that's everything about policies that address issues of access. So when you think about it as access to quality care, that's really important in this conversation that we're having when you about I know there was a question earlier about what happens in cities. So it could be local policies as well. That think about inclusion of all. All individuals, all neighborhoods all people policy that reflects that we all lose. When people are lonely and are not able to share their gifts and talents with our communities. So many more issues that we can speak about later. Yes, right here. Hi janine. Jacob question as we think about the metoo movement and gender dynamics. How does that play into loneliness are people now more afraid to interact with individuals of the opposite sex because of perhaps some of the implications. That are now being Kate questions about nine thousand of the twelve thousand words. Here's cake Julian of the Atlantic. This sort of short answer is that the data. I relied upon for this piece does not obviously yet reflect anything that's happened in the wake of me to and yet. This was a theme that came up in my interviews. We're both men and women talked about a sort of new tentativeness and hesitancy and sort of uncertainty about how or when to make the first move part of the difficulty in untangling. This figuring out how much of it is me too. And how much of it is other things is that a bunch of other things that also changed in the past ten years right online. Dating has become over a very short period of time, really the acceptable way to meet people and by some measures the most common way that people are meeting each other. And it just doesn't work that well for all people. So is it more awkward to strike up a conversation in real life because people expect you to do that via Tinder or is it more awkward to strike up a conversation with somebody like because of me too. Or is it more difficult to strike up a conversation in real life because the settings in which? We used to do that. We're now on our phones. And the answer is probably all of those things. I talk in the piece about how I met my husband in two thousand and two on an elevator. And this came up in my conversations with a bunch of young women's specifically where they asked me they saw that. I was married. How did you meet your husband, and I would tell them, and it would prompt these sort of size like, oh, I would love to meet somebody with that way. And yet it's never going to happen that seems to be perhaps also sort of a self fulfilling belief, right like if we don't believe that people are going to talk to us in physical spaces, perhaps it's not going to happen. I commend you. Just a wonderful wonderful treatment of the social. I mean, I just I love that section of your of your piece, but with regard to the metoo tensions that are out there. I just thought it was brilliant. Let me just just in closing ask you another question on society broadly, and how awareness-raising as part of an also taking action which which which we were asked to do today. And I'd be interested in what the three of you think are the things that one could most due to again, make some progress on on isolation and really broadly, mental health, and I just add just in my own comment. I've been so impressed with the national council behavioral health and something they call mental health first aid, which is to try to make mental health. I eight and training a kind of CPR new CPR, and they've created over a million people in this front and a million people out of three hundred million people may not sound like a lot. But it's a start that they've had a million people of all different. And that's a sign of like people making an effort to engineer. Because dealing with mental health is not an easy thing of others if posted there, so I assume that in the insights, the three of you have just as we close on what you would add that we could think about it actually proactively doing is. So I would say and it's been addressed today. But I think it's very very important that we recognize that very few people talk about loneliness or social isolation with their healthcare clinicians at any level so to educate those who are clinically trained across the broad definition of health care to bring up the subject to understand people's needs. And then to have an essence social prescriptions, interventions if you screen, you have to intervene really attack this with the same vigor, we would other chronic diseases, and then I would say on the lower touch the conversation. We're having about everyone being able to solve be the best possible neighbor, you can be you will feel better for reaching out. And your neighbors lies will be improved. As a result, Kim. I think that as as we see with many issues that we set studying public opinion raising awareness about an issue can really move the needle and change opinion. And I think we've been studying teens and their attitudes. And there there are a lot of concerns about anxiety and depression teams are really feeling it and parents have teens are extremely concerned about this. It's on everybody's radar. So I think that's a positive sign because it's becoming more part of the dialogue. If we can have more high profile, people addressing the issue, we've seen it that can be very influential in public views and and discussions too. So I think it's I think it's a process, but we're moving right. Yeah. I would absolutely sort of second that and say that the thing I would most like to see some changes in our thinking about is adult leci- specifically, and I think this has sort of important Ramic patient ramifications for parents for caregiver for for care providers for educators for policymakers, I think for too long, we thought about adolescence is almost a holding pen people just have to get through it. And then they get to adulthood, and a lot of research is coming out. It really shows it's pretty crucial developmental period. And if you just skip through it, if you're not having that experience developing relationships, not just romantic ones, but tonic ones as well gets much harder. When you're in your twenties to be able to do that in sort of lasting and meaningful ways. One thing I thought was really fascinating food for thought as I was working on. This piece was looking at how other countries are responding to some of these same developments and in the Netherlands where teenagers are also having sex later and less good thing. They're they're holding hands less and flirting less and kissing this. And they've studied this and the Dutch really concerned about this. They sort of say if people aren't getting that kind of experience connecting. How are they going to be able to do it as adults? I think we should take it just as seriously. As Margaret low comes up to share with us. I want to say thank you so much a big big round of applause for Julian of the Atlantic. Lisa Marsha Ryerson right here at the AARP foundation. And Kim Parker the future of the trust. Thank you so much and that Steve Clements, the Atlantic's Washington editor at large. Yeah. Thanks, steve. And Lisa and Kate and Kim for raising our awareness, so beautifully. You know, this was a rich conversation. It's not very often. I mean, we start a lot of conversations in the work that we do saying we want to talk about solutions. It's actually this was a rare moment where you everybody up here. Sort of talked about meaningful things. Whether it's getting to know, your neighbors, I loved Dr Murphy's recommendations be present help others recognize your own gifts. There's enormous power in that guidance. I don't know if I got them. All right. And then he said inside scoop. And then he said love is at the heart of addressing neat loneliness, which are sort of words live, by and nice words to leave you with. Thank you so much to KMart for enabling us to have this conversation. Thanks to all of you for coming. We know how precious your time is, and we're really grateful that you spent so much, and I hope you enjoy one another and have a wonderful evening. Thank you up. Margaret, low Smith president of Atlantic live, wrapping up this discussion hosted by the Atlantic that took place December tenth earlier this morning. Kevin Hassett who chairs the White House council of economic advisers spoke briefly to reporters outside the White House about the partial government shutdown and the stock market. All. Is that the fundamentals remain? Extremely sound Christmas sales were through the roof GP in the fourth quarter is looking like it's got to be very close to if not above three again. And so I think that the momentum that.

Atlantic Lisa Marsha Ryerson Kim Parker Julian Margaret low Kate social isolation Jacob Aaron Klein Enberg Maryland White House Steve Clements Netherlands KMart Kevin Hassett Baltimore janine Thomas
"national council behavioral health" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"national council behavioral health" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Her cohen with my cohost drew up a buck toma companies with zaka appelbaum pointing chillier pretoria lord the federal farrell with bars ring grin when rooster flex professionals and we have agreed let up against fuel surely including linda roosenburg see you of national council behavioral health christine jong president blue compass rail the cash un president coop round the ramin blohm and steve luba borbu brom owner of assisted hands whom care let's get the nor first guest in the rosenbergs you of national council behavioral health first linda what is the national council will be it will health will you guys doing what we do to wear a policy shop on the hill on not representing people with mental illnesses and injections are three thousand member organisations server that ten million adults and children year while were you from originally from new york city the franc's her how many brothers and sisters one brother one brother older young younger her in wooded mum and dad do for a living my dad's sold furniture and my mom wisdom homemaker so you're involved in an organization the earlier we were speaking you told us when you've got involved thirteen years ago it was twelve th they're for now two hundred three stephan probably the preeminent organization in its industry yes mmhmm so you really built disorganisation a really is depression of viewers isn't it it's the passion manet's with an opportunity on i didn't build it alone on the one thing i think i'm good at is picking talent and wanting to has smarter people around me and so i put together a strong team including a strong policy team the only really to mom and the moon we'll we'll you mentioned earlier the mom um um some stuff going on you were young grow what was going on back them to my mom was depressed they don't a we can use that word i come from a workingclass background dan die she just spent a lot of time in bed had migraines and my brother and i will left to our own devices so your mom was in bed with marty greens you and your brain other or lift he ruined the voices and.

cohen appelbaum linda roosenburg president ramin blohm stephan pretoria christine jong un steve luba new york depression marty thirteen years
"national council behavioral health" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"national council behavioral health" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The door first guest when the rosenberg sea of national council behavioral health first linda what is the national counts of will be it will help will you guys doing what we gillies aware a policy shop on the hell arm representing people with mental illnesses and injections are three thousand member organisations server that ten million adults and children ear while were you from originally from new york city the franc's the her how many brothers and sisters one brother one brother older younger younger her in wooded mom and dad do for a living my dad sold furniture and my mom ways a homemaker who so you're involved in an organization that earlier speaking you told us when you got involved thirteen years ago it was twelve staff and now it's one hundred three stephan probably the preeminent organization in its industry yes so you really built disorganisation a really is a passionate viewers is in it it's a passion um an affair with an opportunity and i didn't build it alone on the one thing i think i'm good at is that picking talent to and wanting to have smarter people around me and so i put together a strong team including a strong policy team minority only veliko mom and dad will will will you mentioned earlier the moslem had um some stuff going on you were young grow what was going on back then semi mom was depressed they don't a we can use that word i come from a workingclass background tanguy she just spent a lot of time in bed had migraines and my brother in iowa left to our own devices so you're moral m was in bed with migraines you and your brother or lift he ruined the voices and you mentioned that you were you felt fortunate be course you were breeding you got a ugo um is to come to certain schools what was going on you've got expose what was going on there so i was good in school on man i was able to skip a great and then go to a special high school in new york city way there are lots of young women it was a women's school who were not only smart but came from a very gung jumped in january to you were fortunate were you were invited into the school even though you guys didn't have any money and um it's interesting that it ever did it ever to you.

stephan iowa gillies new york new york city thirteen years
"national council behavioral health" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"national council behavioral health" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Insisted hands home care with no our first guest when the rosenbergs ceo of national council behavioral health first lindan what is the national council be it will help you guys doing what we do is aware a policy shop on the hill on not representing people with mental illnesses and injections are three thousand member organisations server that ten million adults and children ear while we're you from originally from new york city the franc's her how many brothers and sisters one brother one brother older young younger in wooded mom and dad do for a living my dad's sold furniture and my mom wisdom homemaker who so you're involved in an organization the earlier we were speaking you told us when you got involved thirteen years ago it was twelve th they're now two hundred three stephane probably the preeminent organization in its industry yes so you really built disorganisation there really is a passion of you isn't it if the passion with an opportunity and i didn't build it alone on the one thing i think i'm good at is picking talent and wanting to has smarter people around me and so i put together a strong team including a strong policy of a the only veliko mum and the moment whoo you mentioned earlier the mom had some stuff going on you were young girl what was going on back to my mom was depressed they don't and we can use that word i come from a workingclass background die she gets spent a lot of time in bed had migraines and my brother in iowa left to our own devices so your mom was in bed with migraines you in your brother or lift to your own devices and you mentioned that you were you felt fortunate because you were breeding you gotta you girl um has to come to certain schools what was going and you've got expose what was going on there so i was good in school on man i was able to skip a great and then go to a special high school in new york city way there are a lot of young women it with a women's school who were not only smart but came from june two so you were fortunate will you were invited into the squeezing in you guys didn't have any money and it's interesting that it ever did it ever cody you.

ceo stephane iowa new york new york city thirteen years
"national council behavioral health" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"national council behavioral health" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"National council were behavioral health christine joan president blue compass rail the cash yoon president cofounder herman blohm and steve lorber borbu bomb owner of assisted hands home care let's get the nor first guest the rosenbergs to you of national celts will behavioral health first lin wood is national council behavioral health what are you guys doing one what we do is where a policy shop on the hell on not representing people with mental illnesses and injections are three thousand member organisations server that ten million adults and children here while we're you from originally from new york city the franc's her how many brothers and sisters one brother one brother older younger younger her in one of the moment that do for a living my dad's sold furniture and my mom wisdom homemaker so you're involved in an organization the earlier we were speaking you told us when you got involved thirteen years ago it was twelve th they're for now it's one hundred three stephan i believe the preeminent organization in its industry yes so you really built this organization to release the pressure of yours isn't it it the passion manifesto with an opportunity and i didn't build it alone on the one thing i think i'm good at is picking talent and wanting to have small order people around me so i put together a strong team including a strong policy king early on we really mom and the moment where will you mentioned earlier the mom um some stuff going on you were young grow what was going on back them to my mom.

National council president herman blohm stephan steve lorber new york thirteen years