32 Burst results for "National Cancer Institute"

Research Shows It’s Never Too Late for Cancer Patients To Quit Smoking

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 4 d ago

Research Shows It’s Never Too Late for Cancer Patients To Quit Smoking

"New research by the World Health Organization shows when cancer patients stop smoking they heal faster experience fewer side effects from treatment and lower the chances of tumors returning doctor Mike Fiori the director of the center for tobacco research and intervention at the university of Wisconsin school of medicine and public health says it's never too late for patients to quit we now call smoking cessation S. fourth hello our cancer care along with chemotherapy surgery and radiation therapy quitting smoking has almost an equal impact is those other approaches a twenty seven million dollar national Cancer Institute program is helping fifty three cancer centers integrate tobacco treatment into care I'm surely after

Mike Fiori Center For Tobacco Research An University Of Wisconsin School World Health Organization Cancer Tumors National Cancer Institute
New studies show people who get COVID-19 less likely to get reinfected

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:31 sec | 7 months ago

New studies show people who get COVID-19 less likely to get reinfected

"As the pandemic wears on. There's more evidence suggesting that people who recover from covid. Nineteen infection develop an immunity to the illness. Researchers at oxford university and the us national cancer institute believe that immunity could last up to six months. Both studies show very low. Numbers of people getting reinfected when showing signs of either antibodies or testing positive for the presence of virus. Neither study suggests the immunity was years or lifelong and recommend people could take precautions to prevent future

Us National Cancer Institute Oxford University
Investigating NASA's Use of Big Data

Innovation Now

01:23 min | 7 months ago

Investigating NASA's Use of Big Data

"Nasa is increasingly using artificial intelligence to help code and read peto. Bytes of data collected each day. Now those same. Big data techniques are revolutionizing biomedical research. This is innovation now. Nasa recently renewed a research partnership with the national cancer institute extending the development of data science to support cancer research. The early detection research network or e. d. r. n. is a consortium of biomedical investigators who share cancer related information working with nasr's jet propulsion laboratory in california. The scientists use the same computer software used to study a star or planet and recognize how the readings from different instruments relate to one another to study statistics from anonymous cancer patients. Working together since two thousand. Jpl and fdr n have discovered six new biomarkers approved for use in cancer research diagnosis. By the food and drug administration. The biomarkers have already been used in more than one million patient diagnostic tests worldwide. While nasa proves their big data science capabilities biomedical researchers correlate information collected about cancer improving early warning detection. That benefits us. All

Nasa Cancer Peto National Cancer Institute Nasr California Food And Drug Administration
"national cancer institute" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

01:56 min | 9 months ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on American Innovations

"Wellcome gets wind of this, they have their chemists make the placebos as bitter as the but then some trial patients begin taking their pills to labs to have them analyzed but the trial is having much more serious problems. At the National Cancer Institute Sam Broder's phone has been ringing off the hook with updates at twelve doctors supervising azt trials around the country. This is broder. They almost never call with good news. We lost another one SAM PCP just like the last one. Sorry to hear that until the Safety Board right away. Some of the patients on. Aren't doing so great either. How can you tell their on Z. T.? Well, you listed anemia among possible side effects and of my patients are severely anemic to of already had transfusions and another three or slated to receive this week. Rotor takes off his glasses and rubs the bridge of his nose. Out of two hundred and eighty-one patients in the trial for are now dead another fifty or anemic and losing bone marrow not.

Sam Broder National Cancer Institute Safety Board
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 11 months ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Targeted lung cancer treatments help reduce death rates: study

All Of It

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Targeted lung cancer treatments help reduce death rates: study

"Officials say improved treatments have helped lower lung cancer death rates as NPR's Richard Harris reports, The trends are also driven by a decline in cigarette smoking. Death rates from lung cancer have been falling for decades. But it's been tricky to tease out how much of that is because fewer people are smoking and how much is due to improve treatment. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that new drugs introduced in 2013 are playing a role. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute found that only about 20% of people who take these drugs have a long term response and the majority of people who are diagnosed with lung cancer still die within two years. But the drugs help enough people that it shows up in the death trends. Another class of drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, introduced in 2015 also appears to be beneficial.

National Cancer Institute New England Journal Of Medicin Richard Harris NPR
Coronavirus conspiracy theories on the rise

Sunday Morning with Elizabeth Espinosa

05:56 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus conspiracy theories on the rise

"So the video is conspiracy theory as you know it's and the basic idea seems to be is that some shadow we elites are conspiring to use the pandemic to seize power maybe make money by creating vaccines and the star of this twenty six minute clip that went viral is this woman named Judy make of that too has become a kind of hero to the anti vaccine crowd she's a discredited scientist who published a book in April called plague of correction and that sort of depicts her as a truth teller fighting scientists who aren't willing to accept inconvenience facts and so far right publications began to promote her book in this documentary that is forthcoming will apparently be taking an even closer look at these sort of baseless conspiracies this video has since since it kind of blew up has been taken down but tell us about some of the crazy accusations and I mean one of the things that keeps popping up I think it was the main thing that really got to pull down was they were saying that wearing a mask will literally activate your own virus that's right and that is the thing that got it taken down platforms like YouTube and Facebook generally do not want to remove content from the network and they tried to enable a maximum of free speech but they do make an exception for stuff that is actively harmful and while a lot of this video plan that make is just kind of conspiracies saying don't forget a lot of people are making money and other people are going to become more powerful that's not what it got taken down I got taken down because as you say it warned people against wearing masks you know saying that it would re inspect them which of course there is no basis for that whatsoever but you can imagine if a lot of people watch it's that and believe that you could have a really negative a stacked on public health so initially Facebook did it want to remove it but when it sort of stumbled across that particular claim it said okay we've actually got to take this thing down any doctor Judy make if it's for herself she does have a degree in biology from the university of Virginia a PhD in molecular biology she worked on the national Cancer Institute she has a lot of things under her belt but then she started getting into work about chronic fatigue syndrome and vaccines and this is kind of where she was derailed a little bit a lot of people discredited a lot of the later things that she was researching so like in two thousand nine she had published research saying that a mouse retrovirus because chronic fatigue syndrome which got a lot of attention but it was discredited a couple years later and the journal ultimately retracted it and it in this sort of like a weird aside story she was actually put in jail on charges of staffed which apparently involves computers disappearing those charges were dropped but the whole thing was a scandal and she was kind of sidelined and lost her scientific career but after that she sort of drifted into this anti Bax crowd and because of the credentials that you mentioned the anti vaxxers have sort of lifted her up as this brave truth teller even though what she saying is largely nonsense so let's talk about how something like this goes viral the usual players come up obviously Facebook and you to have a huge part in this but there was a lot of Facebook groups that we're sharing this and then beyond that even as you mentioned there's a lot of mistruths in this video but it also takes time for their fact checkers to go through this so as you've mentioned they didn't take it down right away it kind of was circulating around for a while while they were trying to do some of that fact checking it's a really interesting story the way that things go viral on Facebook and you tube is always changing based on the things that the platforms due to try to stop bad stuff from happening and sort of like as soon as they fix one problem another emerges so over the past year Facebook has put a lot more attention on groups getting people to join groups kind of moving away from that news feed and there are a lot of conspiracy groups anti VAX groups where this video clip was very popular in what happened is people were sharing it in the group and what they were sure it was actually a link to you too and so from those Facebook groups they were able to send seven point one million views to one video within a period of between thirty six and forty eight hours so just within a short period of time Facebook drove all of that traffic to you too and so it was kind of an unwitting tag team between the two platforms that sent this thing viral as you noted it did take awhile for the platforms to fully understand what was in the video the video is twenty six minutes long it contains a lot of claims and they had to go through it sort of point by point and ultimately make the determination that it had to come down but it sort of speaks to this cliche this quote that is attributed to Mark Twain that the lie gets halfway around the world before the truth can put its shoes on and that was definitely the case here and it was also this whole thing with obvious all the algorithms and it's this big cycle she had just self published a book not too long ago and it became this thing where searches for her name brought up searches for the video and vice versa searches for them he would bring up searches for her name so it's kind of this big cycle where it's just feeding off of itself for a while until Facebook and YouTube took these things down and you know I think it's important to remember that Judy megabits has something to celebrate she has a book to sell into this whole viral events on Facebook and YouTube has been very good for her she had a number one best seller on Amazon over the weekend yesterday was still at number six so all of this is bound to be huge benefit to somebody who is selling this very day Alicia's ideas that just doesn't have any basis in

A disgraced scientist and a viral video: how a Covid conspiracy theory started

Cyber Talk Radio

03:48 min | 1 year ago

A disgraced scientist and a viral video: how a Covid conspiracy theory started

"The last week we saw the first true hit conspiracy video the coronavirus era it was called the plan Dimmick and got over eight million views on Facebook and YouTube the video has since been removed but not before making the start of discredited scientist Dr Judy make of it this video also purported to say that if you wear a facemask it could reactivate the corona virus in your body for more on what to know about the plan to make a conspiracy video will speak to Casey Newton Silicon Valley editor at the verge so the video is conspiracy theory as you notes and the basic idea seems to be is that some shadow we elites are conspiring to use the pandemic to seize power maybe make money by creating vaccines and the star of this twenty six minute clip that went viral is this woman named Judy make of that it's who has become a kind of hero to the anti vaccine crowd she's a discredited scientist who published a book in April called plague of corruption that sort of depicts her as a truth teller fighting scientists who are willing to accept inconvenience facts and so far right publications began to promote her book in this documentary that is forthcoming will apparently be taking an even closer look at these sort of baseless conspiracies this video has since since it kind of blew up has been taken down but tell us about some of the crazy accusations and I mean one of the things that keeps popping up I think it was the main thing that really got to pull down was they were saying that wearing a mask will literally activate your own virus that's right and that is the thing that got it taken down platforms like YouTube and Facebook generally do not want to remove content from the network and they tried to enable a maximum out of free speech but they do make an exception for stuff that is actively harmful and while a lot of this video plan that make is just kind of conspiracies saying don't forget a lot of people are making money and other people are going to become more powerful that's not why it got taken down I got taken down because as you say it warned people against wearing masks you know saying that it would re inspect on which of course there is no basis for that whatsoever but you can imagine it's a lot of people watch that and believe that you could have a really negative a stacked on public health so initially Facebook didn't want to remove it but when it sort of stumbled across that particular claim it said okay we've actually got to take this thing down and Dr Judy make if it's for herself she does have a degree in biology from the university of Virginia a PhD in molecular biology she worked on the national Cancer Institute she has a lot of things under her belt but then she started getting into work about chronic fatigue syndrome and vaccines and this is kind of where she was derailed a little bit a lot of people discredited a lot of the later things that she was researching so like in two thousand nine she had published research saying that a mouse retrovirus because chronic fatigue syndrome which got a lot of attention but it was discredited a couple years later and the journal ultimately retracted it and then in this sort of like a weird aside story she was actually put in jail on charges of the staffed which apparently involves computers disappearing those charges were dropped but the whole thing was a scandal and she was kind of sideline and lost her scientific career but after that she sort of drifted into this anti VAX crowd and because of the credentials that you mentioned the anti vaxxers have sort of lifted her up as this brave truth teller even though what she saying is largely

The White House sets a testing goal but will it be nearly enough?

Jay Talking

04:42 min | 1 year ago

The White House sets a testing goal but will it be nearly enough?

"The White House has laid out its plans for re opening the country Assistant Secretary for health admiral Brett Gerard discusses the white house's testing plan with ABC's George Stephanopoulos there is a strong consensus out there that we're gonna need lots of testing to reopen the critics are saying the White House guidelines don't go far enough you need mandates the national strategy more funding here's what senator Patty Murray had to say your plan doesn't set specific minimum goals or for a time frame identify ways to fix our broken supply chain or offer any details whatsoever on expanding lab capacity or achieving needed manufacturing capacity what's your response to senator Murray home my response is the blueprint we did was meant to outline the roles and responsibilities as well as the core objectives of a testing and rapid response program I guess senator Murray just does not understand the details of what we're doing on a state by state basis our team has contacted or working with every single state D. C. Porter Rico to define really the specifics of what that state needs according to their state re opening plan and the two percent really is sort of a minimum floor there many states that want to do four percent six percent eight percent every month we have the supply chains figured out we know what we can supply the state so we really are much more sophisticated the overall strategy is a strategy it's not a state by state plan that's what we're doing individually with states there is no it's not just senator Murray's had this kind of criticism even of one of the president's strongest allies former governor Chris Christie of New Jersey say that the White House has sort of the president has to order the use of the defense production act to fix the supply chain to make sure every state has what it needs you know I'm in the middle of this everyone he's commenting is really on the periphery of it let me tell you the ground truth the ground truth is for most circumstances the DPA is not necessary because there's maximum production all the industries are working together on the supply chain related to testing there will be a DPA action today but it's not one of the forceful DPA actions it's a hand up it's an investment in American industry that will greatly expand the testing we need some of the testing supplies so that particularly by fall when we may have coded circulating with influenza and need drastically more tests than we have now will have the supplies that we need but the DPA has been used selectively when it's necessary but in most regards regarding certainly regarding testing it's really unnecessary but they hand up you will see will be will be implemented as necessary and I guess one of the big questions is is that hand up going to be enough I know you've seen this report from the experts at Harvard he say that we're gonna need to really open the economy to get started we're going to be needed neatly testing five million people a day in June a twenty million in July and that the guidelines you've laid out can't get us anywhere near that so we don't believe those estimates are really accurate nor are they reasonable in our society what we're talking about the two percent number let's just put that in context two percent per month is almost double the per capita rate that South Korea has achieved over the last four months accumulated this is a massive amount of test in in many states we're going to be doing four percent six percent eight percent according to the state guidelines we know for a fact that we can supply the states with the full supply chain the swabs the media the testing capability to achieve those goals and remember on this particularly in the summer it's not just about task because we can look at syndromes there is no influenza circulating in the summer so when someone comes in with an influenza like illness to the iolite network that is nationwide we'll have a good idea that that person is likely covert infected and concerts to that area so tests are absolutely important or critical they will be expanded dramatically as we re open but it's not the only tool we have in the tool box I know you're also working to dramatically expand the antibody test you satisfied now with the quality of the tests that are going to be going out in the states so as we stated many times particularly the point of care in a body test could be fraught with inaccuracies and that is why the national Cancer Institute along with the FDA and the CDC are really running the full panels of these test against what we believe is a gold standard you'll be seeing some of those results were really soon on many tests are just not up to par and some seem to be performing very very well and that's very very important and it actually took a whole appendix in the blueprint we talked about yesterday about why having a very highly specific test particularly for an antibody to talk about immunity is it's really critically important so you'll be seeing those results very soon

White House Brett Gerard ABC George Stephanopoulos Country Assistant Secretary
"national cancer institute" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"To develop these therapeutics for the American people thank you very much thank you bye just an hour ago and committee with oversight released findings that the FDA doesn't have any review of the antibody tests that are on the market there are no guidelines to tell which ones should be out there and there's no way to test here is either quite worried that these are jobs tests on the market because I've reviewed before they were true still under our policy we provide flexibility what we've told manufacturers is that in order to market in the US they have to validate their tasks they have to tell us that they validated their tasks package insert they have to let people know end users labs X. cetera that those tests were not authorized by FDA we've authorized for as I mentioned more in the pipeline on in these tests that have come in without any information to us but have been self validated as I mentioned at the podium a couple days ago we are working with the national Cancer Institute as well as CDC to perform our own validation of the tests that that have been sent to us so will provide as much information as we possibly can and there is transparency in our website about those tests and also the tests that we have authorized I thank thank you Mr president.

FDA US national Cancer Institute CDC president
A Couple Of Appointments From The President

Doug Stephan

03:53 min | 1 year ago

A Couple Of Appointments From The President

"A couple of appointments from el Presidente a the announcement of let's see the new acting as love this the acting deputy somebody rather this is apartment of homeland security Mr Chad wolf is stepping in I think Kevin make even me given me given back to land in India all right so what's the this is a he was we work for the former DHS secretary ms Neilson right what do you know about this guy I don't know actually Chad wolf says that you should be a radio host right Chad Bentsen Chad Chad Bentsen meets Chad wharf I appreciate that his name is easy to say and spell so that's pretty cool but right exactly I he's been where he's were both for Democrats and Republicans about that as good a word that's seat I was talking remember those my daughter and I are having this conversation about people or was it here we're talking about now is here we were talking about having I've I made reference to Elizabeth McCord who is the hello folks if you don't know she was madam secretary and she's now madam president on the CBS show that airs Sunday night at ten o'clock and she had to as part of her election scheme she ran as an independent and had a Republican running mate and they've had part of the theme of the show is they have a little car fluff holes but I thought that we are making a light of something that was done I think there was a story about Republicans Democrats doing something together Jennifer and you said I thought this would be kind of an interesting idea we're looking we're talking about who would make a good vice presidential candidate for some of the very as Democrats and were they ever put the pick a Republican and the lady seems saying do that wouldn't happen Hey this guy's work for both that Obama and previous Republican sing for bush matter of fact as so we'll see what happens he's not big he's not as tough on immigration enforcement apparently as some of the from stirs would like him to the E. says that sudden death for him or he would have made it this far I would have thought Jennifer if they had really kind of screen right yeah everybody gets a fair chance right okay now over in putting over at the fools and drugs administration the president says he's nominating oncologist Steven hi to lead the FTA he's the chief medical examiner the university of Texas cancer center chief medical executive work for seven years as a senior investigator with the national Cancer Institute two years as its prostate at the prostate cancer clinic there they've come and work in nineteen ninety six SO the acting FDA commissioner had to return to the national Cancer Institute and so these guys coming in again be confirmed by the Senate yadda yadda yadda so what do we know about this guy anything is that not a name that's also name does he have to drink the Kool aid in order to get in how does somebody becomes no he's not I think I have the qualifications and he's got to have the background so you can execute the job right well but he doesn't come from industry which is sort of short circuiting what normally goes on here usually these people that run these eight which is passed he was a prize well he was a researcher medical executive chief medical executive university of Texas cancer center before but I like that yeah I think it's better than bringing somebody in from the drug bugs that's for sure yeah seven nine of them again yeah right we think that's better yeah for sure

Seven Years Two Years
Medicine is plagued by conflicts of interest

Second Opinion

03:29 min | 2 years ago

Medicine is plagued by conflicts of interest

"This is dr michael wilks with a second opinion. Medicine is plagued by conflicts of interest by conflicts of interest. I mean times times when the goals of two different parties are incompatible in health that usually means the health and wellbeing patience is in conflict with the interests i of the biomedical industrial complex by biomedical industrial complex i refer to the network of doctors and hospitals and drug companies and device vice makers that all provide healthcare usually for a handsome profit. There are so many conflicts in medicine that i could fill a book. Take the the use of antidepressants. Yes antidepressants have some limited benefit but the psychiatry community and the drug industry have teamed up to heavily heavily promote their use which is a conflict of interest both doctors and drug companies stand to benefit as sales and prescriptions christians increase the best current evidence suggests that a minority of people prescribed anti-depressants benefit the remaining people people are unnecessarily put at risk of drug side effects and they're often denied effective safe alternatives like proven types of psychotherapy repeat and there are other problems with antidepressants like suicide attempts heart problems and withdrawal reactions after discontinuation of long-term long term medical therapy another recent conflict pointed out by the loan institute involves a friendly sounding group the national partnership for maternal attornal safety. How could they be devious. Will they publish a list of recommendations for reducing deaths from blood clots in pregnant. You didn't women and in women who've just delivered a baby they recommend enormous drugs that could be dangerous to women and would cost asked millions of dollars. Well it turns out. The national partnership for maternal safety is a drug company funded group that seeks to push these is blood thinners. Another problem is that many medical journals that published the research that we read or highly dependent on drug company money making them anything but objective when it comes to publishing drug company funded research and policy papers this same type of conflict flicked exists with drugs that need to be used quickly after the onset of a stroke neurologist many of whom have taken money from drug companies see the drug as vital to treating stroke patients but many other experts like emergency physicians site dated show the drug is much less effective at the industry and they're paid neurology advocates claim and researchers at dartmouth reported that in two thousand seventeen half of the directors actors of the national cancer institute centers receive payments from the drug industry. This is a serious financial conflict of interest in all all of these examples. The problem isn't a disagreement over the science but it's a lack of transparency and the power of money that drives arrives toward serious conflicts of interest that put patients and patient health at risk. This is dr michael wilks with a second opinion.

Dr Michael Wilks Dartmouth
"national cancer institute" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"In this episode of point of inquiry. We have to heavily credential individuals who I'm very excited to talk to Dr Avram blooming received his m d from the Columbia, college of physicians and surgeons he spent four years as a senior investigator for the National Cancer Institute. And for two of those years, he was director of the limb foam treatment center in Compal Uganda. He organized the first study of lumpectomy for the treatment of breast cancer in southern California in nineteen seventy eight and for more than two decades. He has been studying the benefits and risks of hormone replacement therapy. That's H RT administered to women with a history of breast cancer. Doctor blooming has served as a clinical professor of medicine at USC and has been an invited speaker at the Royal College of physicians. In London and the Pasteur Institute in Paris. He was elected to master ship and the American college of physicians and honor, according to only five hundred of the over one hundred thousand board-certified internists in this country, Carol Tavarez received her PHD in social psychology from the university of Michigan. Her books include mistakes were made. But not by me. I'll talk about that. In a second with Elliot. Aronson anger, the misunderstood emotion and the miss measure of woman, she has written articles op-eds book reviews on topics and psychological science for a wide array of publications, including the L A times, the New York Times book review and the Wall Street Journal. She is a fellow of our own committee for skeptical inquiry and also a fellow of the sociation for psychological science, and she has received numerous awards. For her efforts to promote gender equality. Science and skepticism the show is going to be centered around the widespread misconception that estrogen and breast. Cancer are linked that taking estrogen can or will cause breast cancer. It's a wild story about how this misconception came to be. And we have the two perfect people to be talking about it. I've been in this world of dealing with religious questions and paranormal questions and wild claims for almost twenty years now and bene- student of these sorts of things for probably closer to forty years. There is a short list of books that help us understand how we humans come to believe the things we do and how our minds operate once. We do hold those beliefs and mistakes were made but not by. Me is one of the books, and every skeptic atheist free thinker, whatever you call yourself should read this book, and you will see parts of yourself in it, and you will see parts of people in it that all beliefs that on the surface. You can't believe how someone can believe something so ridiculous. The book we're going to talk about today. However is called estrogen matters why taking hormones in menopause can improve women's well being and lengthened their lives without raising the risk of breast cancer. Now when I first heard about this book, of course, I'm familiar with Carol Taveres, she's one of the heroes of the world of skepticism. But it didn't strike me as something that I would be that interested in a man, I don't go through menopause. This didn't even seem like a subject that was. Was clearly in the wheelhouse of what the center for inquiry deals with. But then I started learning more about this book. And boy was I wrong. First of all, if you don't live in a cave, you probably know woman somewhere in your life. I have a wife mother mother-in-law assist assist in law nieces and lots of women friends. So anyone knows a woman who makes it to the age of menopause, and cares about her has a stake in her health, and that may involve her taking estrogen at some point in her life. So we take you now to the Hollywood hills and my fascinating discussion with autumn blooming and Carol Tavares. We are here with Adam blooming and Carol Taveres were talking about Astra. In matters, why taking hormones and menopause can improve women's well being and lengthen their lives without raising the risk of breast cancer. How did this get started? How did you decide? Why did you write this book? I'm a medical oncologist about sixty percent of my practice has been devoted to the treatment of patients with breast cancer. And I've watched the prognosis in breast cancer improved dramatically..

breast cancer menopause Carol Taveres Dr Avram psychological science National Cancer Institute Carol Tavarez American college of physicians Royal College of physicians Compal Uganda California Pasteur Institute Carol Tavares investigator London USC clinical professor of medicine Elliot Wall Street Journal New York Times
National Cancer Institute chief to serve as acting FDA head

WSJ What's News

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

National Cancer Institute chief to serve as acting FDA head

"The director of the National Cancer Institute. Ned sharp less will. Will become acting Commissioner of the food and Drug administration. Succeeding, Scott Gottlieb, who's leaving the post and a few weeks sharpness and in colleges. Previously worked at the university of North Carolina. The Wall Street Journal reports that he's in line for the permanent Commissioner job and is the candidate favored by Gottlieb to assume the post

Scott Gottlieb Acting Commissioner Ned Sharp Commissioner Food And Drug Administration National Cancer Institute University Of North Carolina The Wall Street Journal Director
"national cancer institute" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"There's not as much money to be made in prevent to. How do we change? How do we change the way that the healthcare system is financing? I mean, these are huge questions we're grappling with all the time. But part of the the frustration is that everything you're saying makes absolute sense to me. And I just don't know how we, you know, move the three plus trillion dollar industry that exists that that doesn't think this way into moving in that direction. Well, I think it's always an uphill battle. Because quite frankly, you know, I was born in the fifties. And I I wanna magic bullet. And I think, you know, there was a deal made, you know, in the deal was give profession the profession of medicine, a great deal of power and resources, and we will take care of your ills. Now it. We know that it's not that simple. Right. That magic bullets can't cure everything. Maybe we will. Maybe we'll find out in the end that you know, mental illness is a result of a leaky gut. You know who knows? But but point is is there are people dying now, and there are people suffering now. And there are things that we know about the conditions of life that matter, and so I don't think that this is going to be a very popular view. And I think the best way to think about it is I think the recent statistics said something like the National Cancer Institute gets ten times or one hundred times can't remember was a huge number the amount of money that the National Institute of mental health gets. So it's not only, you know, you know, medicine versus people in the population in the community. But there's also a pecking order of diseases and cancer has made tremendous strides mental health has not. But if you have a, you know, a third of the fire. Finances to work with what would you expect Saint make his Clinton about public health? Absolutely. A tiny percent of of how we do. But we know that the return on investment is so great..

National Institute of mental h National Cancer Institute Saint Clinton trillion dollar
"national cancer institute" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"You're never gonna have a role without disease. We cannot forget those who have these some talk that through need understand all those technologies in how they're leading to precision help. And so I have panels where I have folks from both sides. We had great prep call from one of the panels. Folks, I brought together that never spoke to each other unexcited be able to work together. But a so awesome. Linda, you know? So the big big reason why we started outcomes rocket is because we believe that is poss-. To break down the silos of communication between healthcare leaders doing amazing things. And what you're doing this meeting is so in line with our with our mission and our purpose. It just it just gives me goosebumps. And it makes me excited that you're doing this. So congratulations on getting all these awesome people on their one roof. Well, absolutely. And I'm really appreciative too. You know, health two point now, he agreed to produce the conference. I certainly couldn't do it without their help. You know, totally agree. Those you know, Matthew Holt. And and the folks over there are just, you know, in new they're just outstanding had a chance to be out of that meeting, and they were very supportive of outcomes rocket as well. So I gave you guys a big banks at health two point zero as well, you guys are supportive of all those who who have a vision in healthcare. And so big thank you goes out to you, all Linda, let's let's talk about a little bit. I know this this this conference is excite. Getting. But, but why don't you share a one of your proudest leadership moments to date that you've had in your in your career? I think for me. One of the interesting challenges. I was offered an opportunity to work at the National Cancer Institute in what we're really the early days of precision medicine. There was a program the cancer nanotechnology program that I was brought in to help launch. And to me, it was this fabulous experience to leverage, my background. My physical science background in knowledge of nanotechnology be on NIH main campus, and I could go to tumor boards. I could go to lectures, I was just a sponge for all his clinical information talking to clinicians really understanding what were some of the challenges air easing in. How we could move things forward. Any now, I I took a risk. I was living out in bay area. And then it's, you know, moved to Washington DC I define myself as being entrepreneur. Moore in the now, you know. So this was I felt the time, you know, bit of a risk to take. But couldn't have turned out there. Innovative things into people you need to spend some time in that environment in so I would really like to see more people sit in other seats of people are in see really understand. I mean, not just go in visit the FDA or go in talk to date assigns, a go and work with them side by side to really try to understand what they're facing into me was really I think. And I have huge respect or people in government who do take risks and try to bring four invation, then I think that's such a great call out. And you know, what kudos to you for doing that? You know, you're you're in the Silicon Valley, you're an entrepreneur. And you're thinking this is my track, and you got a DC and you totally stretch yourself. You get yourself out of your comfort zone. And now you have this appreciation that you didn't have before that's going to that. That's that has made you an even better entrepreneur. So listeners take this note from Linda and go beyond what you're comfortable with you know, I definitely I'm taking a note for myself. You know, what is it that I can do to become more to stretch myself beyond my comfort zone. So that I could also be a better whatever I am just fill in that blank for yourself. And for me, it'd be a contributor to to health care. And so what is it for you? Linda, great, great a message there. So let's pretend you, and I are building a medical leadership course on what it takes to be successful. In medicine today is the one one or the ABC's of Linda moaner, and so we're going to dive through four lightning round questions..

Linda moaner Matthew Holt ABC NIH Washington National Cancer Institute Moore FDA
Is Saturated Fat Bad For You? Here's What The Science Says

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

03:16 min | 3 years ago

Is Saturated Fat Bad For You? Here's What The Science Says

"And it's a very common problem in our society and the fat thing you said forty percent in Kita, genyk diets, and having amazing results versing diabetes, what do you think all that? Well, you know, I think the human body is highly adaptable to different diets. If you look at eskimos very, very high fat diet. So again, there's no requirement for carbohydrates, so you can definitely do that. You can adapt to it and I think that you know somebody who's coming out with key tone supplements the yes and actually to give kind of cheats they. Yeah, reduce insulin. Yeah. But you know, that's not something I favor. I think you, you know, diet, exercise, lifestyle bows lifestyle is really the way to go. I don't think you can't cheat mother nature because a lot of those people, oh, my Documenta pill for hypertension. I'm gonna go to the steakhouse right, exact. So. So let's talk about two other controversial areas around fat. One is saturated, fat, and one is a Megan six refined. We call him back. Loyals or grind. What's your view on. This happened was because the government basically tells us eat more of these plant oils less Hatchard fat. So the American college cardiology and Heart Association. And I think there's some conflicting date on that. If you look at the national institutes of health, each of the institutes has their own philosophy of nutritional. So if you look at the National Cancer Institute where I was funded for twenty one years, it's mostly fruits and vegetables, seven to nine servings a day because of what I call fighter nutrients. You call them phytochemicals, but I don't think a nutrient necessarily has to provide calories. It just has to provide a positive benefit. Rifai these now create a healthy microbiome, the inhibit cancer cell growth at cetera. And so that's part of the NHL be I is all about. Yeah, and they're very stayed with that because it really promoting statin use is basically what happens. We've been sold his whole thing about cholesterol and heart disease forever. You talked about Marquette stead this morning and the sugar lobby. Well, it turns out and for people don't know that history. We had this whole cholesterol myth for a long time. It turns out that heart disease is really an inflammatory disease, and it has to do with inflammation in the blood vessels Alzheimer's disease. Inflammatory cancers are inflammatory breast cancer, prostate basically, diabetes easy and diabetes also inflammatory the diabetes. One is really interesting actually, and it's related to your sugar hypothesis. So every time your blood sugar goes up, your Packers has to put out a squirt of insulin. There's a little protein called insulin associated poly peptide which feeds back onto the pancreas to turn off the little squirt of insulin after it goes up. So if you look at your blood level, it looks like the surface of the ocean. But underneath you've got all this activity going on maintaining shirt, Lucas. People are obese. They excrete one hundred fold excess of the insulin associated pollyanna gets back into the cell in what's called the plasma particular the cell and blows it up and kills over a period of two to ten years. So type two diabetes, which we never understood in medical school is really caused by obesity. I call it diabetes city because ninety five percent of the people are obese and we can solve this problem tomorrow. We have very large studies, the diabetes prevention program, five percent, weight loss when people already had high blood sugar very late in the disease. We get people who are on insulin.

Inflammatory Disease Inflammatory Breast Cancer Diabetes Kita National Cancer Institute Heart Association Obesity Megan Packers Marquette Alzheimer Lucas Ninety Five Percent Twenty One Years Forty Percent Five Percent Ten Years
"national cancer institute" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on What It Takes

"It happened that in the national cancer institute which was to flaws away from us in the old building where i would go up there all the time as the infectious diseases concert because they were getting immunosuppressed and they were getting infections so we got the idea that if we could somehow give a cancer drug at a low enough dose but monitor the immune function and the white cell function of the people enough to kinda titrate the dose could you turn the disease off without any of the secondary complications and we did and we took a disease that was ninety eight percent fatal and we had ninety three percent remission rates in there so from way back then we use that model to create therapies that would have been unheard it was very daring to do that then to give people looked at me like i was crazy white you giving a cancer drug to someone who doesn't have cancer that's really what i was doing very successfully and i became probably prematurely well known because of that and just as a stroke of fate i always had this nagging feeling about wanting to do something that is involved fundamentally infectious diseases that involve things that were broadly impacting globally and then almost like a court the fate at a nowhere in nineteen eighty one comes into z's that is clearly an infectious disease that's impacting the immune system like we've never seen anything like factious disease that actually attacks the immune system what the hell is going on here and for a couple of years before the virus was discovered by month and year and then by gallo to prove that it is we were seeing things that were amazing just he almost couldn't make it up we had a ward full of young almost all game in who will otherwise well who would come in with the most devastating opportunistic infections and it was that kind of involvement back then with very little attention paid by the public or the government at the time that was another triggering thing for me to make a creation and that's what you might call anthony thoug she's next transformation from an in the trenches dock a bench scientist to the guy calling the shots and setting the direction of a massive medical research institution something he'd never imagined for himself i looked down upon ministration on my god administration with a bunch of stodgy people don't know what they're doing and then the directorship of the of the nationalist allergy and infectious diseases opened up so they asked me if i wanted to do that traditionally before them directors never saw patience and they never had any lands so i figured i had nothing left to lose so i said you know you know i will be happy to do this but what i had in mind was if i did it i was going to take this sleepy field of infectious diseases which was like the sixth seventh largest institute at nih with the budget that was like three hundred less than that it was sort of about three hundred billion dollars at the time and i was gonna make it something bigger because in particularly i was going to use it as the bully pulpit to get attention to hiv aids so i told the appropriate people who have picking that i'd be happy to take the job but a half the still be able to see patients and have to continue to to run my lab and they said my god you can't do three nobody's ever done all three i said fine you know then i won't do the job so the rather inciteful director of the nih at the time a man named james winegarden said okay take give it a shot and that's really what i've been doing since under anthony fauci the budget of the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases went from that three hundred million to now close to five billion dollars if i were wall street mogul i would get some kind of a golden parachutes but not so what would happen was a series of events and that's why when i talked to students and fellows when i give commencement addresses particularly at medical schools say you really have to keep an open mind because a lot of times things that dramatically influence you in your life with things that you don't plan that completely unintimidated and you have to have the training and the and the insight in foresight to see that.

three hundred billion dollars five billion dollars ninety eight percent ninety three percent
Researchers say poliovirus may help treat brain cancer

24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 3 years ago

Researchers say poliovirus may help treat brain cancer

"More the selection is ridiculous polio is now helping doctors to fight deadly brain tumors doctors say survival was better than expected for patients at a small study who were given modified poliovirus they say it helped attack the cancer it was the first human test of this and it didn't help most patients or improve median survival but many who did respond seemed to have long lasting benefits about twenty one percent lived three years longer versus four percent in a comparison group of previous brain tumor patients the treatment was developed at duke university with help from the national cancer institute results were discussed tuesday at.

Duke University Twenty One Percent Four Percent Three Years
"national cancer institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Coast hi bolliger with us along with your calls tie back in the nineteen twenties a fellow by the name of harry hawk see a former coal miner insurance salesman in a radio personality named norman baker put together something that they treated they say treated cancer it came from watching their great grandfather who observed a horse with a tumor on its leg cured self by grazing certain herbs out in the past year now they've got their clinics which the fda shut down in the nineteen sixties as worthless and discredited so they went to tijuana where they have their treatment center and they promoted as a cure for cancer now the fda the national cancer institute have found no evidence they say that the hawks he therapy is an effective treatment for cancer what say you well i'd have to say i've interviewed some patia they're in tijuana at the f it's called the bio medical center now and i i have to say i've i've seen some evidence that it works i interviewed a lady there and twenty fifteen names pam kelsey issue is diagnosed with quote terminal pancreatic cancer thirty five years before so that would have been what nineteen eighty she was diagnosed in nineteen eighty with pancreatic cancer which george you and i both know you're diagnosed with pancreatic cancer here your history usually you're gonna without year that's what killed actor patrick swayze patrick swayze and and she's alive thirty five years later because of the hawks tonic i it's you're right harry haughey's grandfather saw the horses out in the field eating burdock root and and poke rude and red clovers and a lot of things that are in what's called the hawks tonic now they formed a little inkster with it that people would drink and and it was curing cancer well roberson cancer like he's word cure but reversing cancer it was in a clinic in dallas texas in the nineteen forties in the fda literally ran out of the country so they're in there in mexico now but they're very successful i interviewed a a grandfather and his grandson there i never forget the interview georgie he was diagnosed with quote terminal cancer about twenty years before and and he didn't at that time he didn't have any grandchildren and he went down to the clinic there the bio medical center got on the hawks treatment and now he's got a sixteen year old grandson that they do everything together using the sweetest thing georgia sixteen year old boy holding his grandfather's hand i love that i love that steven jobs had pancreatic cancer as well he did apple computer aided and he he actually used quite a few natural things to try to turn it around and it was and from what i've heard from people that knew steve he actually had was doing very well with the natural treatments it was only when he went back to work at apple that the cancer kept recurring and my speculation is that there's so much darn emf that building that he couldn't fight it let's go to robert nell paso texas wildcard line hi robert go ahead hey how's it going to see what your opinion on alkaline water to prevent cancer is what your opinion is and feel flew to do they also called canvas i don't ever owned up to my ear i'm always using a well that's okay what do you think of bluetooth first of all them we'll talk about alkaline water yeah okay so bluetooth do 'cause they do they they actually magnify the radiation so there's some some recent studies that i've been reading that is worse than if you just held your cell phone don't use blue to if they have different things that you can use that are that don't magnify the radiation and i can't remember the technology but they're like it's using basically the same thing that we would have used before with like a hollow tube that you can use the doesn't magnify the radiation at your head and bluetooth basically especially the ones that go over your head in both years you've got radiation literally going through through your brain when those two things communicate to each other so there's some there are some options i'll i'll i'll see if i can get to my research on.

harry hawk salesman norman baker thirty five years sixteen year twenty years
"national cancer institute" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:08 min | 3 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Coast to coast hi bowler with us along with your calls tie back in the nineteen twenties a fellow by the name of harry hawk see a former coal miner and insurance salesman in a radio personality named norman baker put together something that they treated they say treated cancer it came from watching their great grandfather who observed the horse with a tumor on its leg curate self by grazing certain herbs out in the pasture now they've got their clinics which the fda shut down in the nineteen sixties as worthless and discredited so they went to tijuana where they have their treatment center and they promoted as a cure for cancer now the fda the national cancer institute have found no evidence they say that the hawks he therapy is an effective treatment for cancer what say you well i'd have to say i've interviewed some patients there in tijuana it's called the bio medical center now and i have to say i've i've seen some evidence that it works i interviewed a lady there and twenty fifteen names pam kelsey she was diagnosed with quote terminal pancreatic cancer thirty five years before so that would've been what nineteen eighty she was diagnosed in nineteen eighty with pancreatic cancer which george you and i both know you're diagnosed with pancreatic cancer here you're history you're gonna within a year that's that's what killed actor patrick swayze yes it is patrick swayze and she's alive thirty five years later because of the hawks tonic i it's you're right harry haughey's grandfather saw the horses out in the field eating vai burdock root and and poke root and red clovers and a lot of things that are in what's called the hawks tonic now name they formed a little danger with it that people would drink and and it was curing cancer well cancer don't like use the word cure but reversing cancer it was in a clinic in dallas texas in the nineteen forties in the fda literally ran them out of the country so they're in there in mexico now but they're very successful i interviewed a a grandfather and his grandson there i never forget the interview georgie he was diagnosed with quote terminal cancer about twenty years before and and he didn't at that time he didn't have any grandchildren and he went down to tijuana clinic there the bio medical center got on the hawks who treatment and now he's got a sixteen year old grandson that they do everything together the sweetest thing georgia sixteen year old boy holding his grandfather's hand i love that i love that steven jobs had cancer as well he did it apple computer aided and he he actually used quite a few natural things to try to turn it around and it was is and from what i've heard from people that knew steve he actually had was doing very well with the natural treatments it was only when he went back to work at apple that the cancer kept recurring and my speculation is that there's so much darn emf building that he couldn't fight it let's go to robert nell paso texas wildcard line hi robert go ahead hey how's it going good your opinion on alkaline water to prevent cancer is what your opinion is and flew to do they also called campus i don't ever owned up to my ear i'm always using well that's what you what do you think of bluetooth first of all them we'll talk about alkaline water yeah okay so bluetooth do 'cause they do they they actually magnify the radiation so there's some some recent studies that i haven't read that is worse than if you just held your cell phone don't use blue to if they have different things that you can use that are that don't magnify the radiation and i can't remember the technology but they're like it's using basically the same thing that we would've used a with like a hollow tube that you can use the doesn't magnify the radiation at your head bluetooth basically especially the ones that go over your head and both years you've got radiation literally going through through your brain when those two things communicate to each other so there's some there are some options i'll i'll i'll see if i can get to my research on.

harry hawk salesman norman baker thirty five years sixteen year twenty years
"national cancer institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The one thousand nine hundred twenty s a fellow by the name of harry hawk see a former coal miner and insurance salesman in a radio personality named norman baker put together something that they treated they say treated cancer it came from watching their great grandfather who observed a horse with a tumor on its leg cured self by grazing certain herbs out in the past year now they've got their clinics which the fda shut down in the nineteen sixties as worthless and discredited so they went to tijuana where they have their treatment center and they promoted as a cure for cancer now the fda the national cancer institute have found no evidence they say that the hawks therapy is an effective treatment for cancer what say you well i'd have to say i've interviewed some patients there tijuana it's called the bio medical center now and i i'd i'd have to say i've i've seen some evidence that it works i interviewed a lady there and twenty fifteen names pam kelsey she was diagnosed with quote terminal pancreatic cancer thirty five years before so that would have been what nineteen eighty she was diagnosed in nineteen eighty with cancer which george you and i both know you're diagnosed with pancreatic cancer here's your history usually you're gonna without year that's what killed actor patrick swayze is patrick swayze and and she's alive thirty five years later because of the hawks tonic it's you're right harry hockey's grandfather saw the horses out in the field eating burdock root and and poke root and red clovers and a lot of things that are in what's called the hawks tonic now name they formed a little tincture with it that people who drink and and it was curing cancer cancer dot like he's the word cure but reversing cancer it was in a clinic in dallas texas in the nineteen forties in the fda literally ran them out of the country so there there in mexico now but they're very successful i interviewed a a grandfather and his grandson there i never forget the interview georgie he was diagnosed with quote terminal cancer about twenty years before and and he didn't at that time you didn't have any grandchildren and he went down to the tijuana clinic there the bio medical center got on the hawks treatment and now he's got a sixteen year old grandson that they do everything together using the sweetest thing georgia sixteen year old boy holding his grandfather's hand i love that steve jobs had pancreatic cancer as well he did apple computer hey did and he he actually used quite a few natural things to try to turn it around and it was and from what i've heard from people that knew steve he actually had was doing very well with the natural treatments it was only when he went back to work at apple that the cancer kept recurring and my speculation is that there's so much darn emf building that he couldn't fight it let's go to robert and el paso texas wildcard line hi robert go ahead hey how's it going what your opinion on alkaline water to prevent cancer is what your opinion is and flew to do they also called kansas is i don't ever put my own up to my ear i'm always using a well that's okay okay what do you think of bluetooth first of all them we'll talk about alkaline water yeah okay so bluetooth do 'cause they do they they actually magnify the radiation so there's some some recent studies that i haven't read that it's worse than if you just held your cell phone don't you split to if they have different things that you can use that are that don't magnify the radiation and i can't remember the technology but they're like it's using basically the same thing that we would've used a four with like a hollow tube that you can use the doesn't magnify the radiation at your head and bluetooth basically especially the ones that go over your head in both years you've got radiation literally going through your brain when those two things communicate to each other so there's some there are some options i'll i'll see if i can get to my research on.

harry hawk salesman norman baker thirty five years sixteen year twenty years
"national cancer institute" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on WTVN

"Life and welcome back to coast to coast ty bollinger with us along with your calls tie back in the nineteen twenties a fellow by the name of harry hawk see a former coal miner and insurance salesman in a radio personality named norman baker put together something that they treated they say treated cancer it came from watching their great grandfather who observed a horse with a tumor on its leg cure itself by grazing certain herbs out in the past year now they've got their clinics which the fda shut down in the nineteen sixties as worthless and discredited so they went to tijuana where they have their treatment center and they promoted as a cure for cancer now the fda the national cancer institute have found no evidence they say that the hawks he therapy is an effective treatment for cancer what say you well i'd have to say i've interviewed some patients there in tijuana it's called the bio medical center now and i i have to say i've i've seen some evidence that it works i interviewed a lady there and twenty fifteen names pam kelsey she was diagnosed with quote terminal pancreatic cancer thirty five years before so that would have been what nineteen eighty she was diagnosed in nineteen eighty with pancreatic cancer which george you and i both know you're diagnosed with pancreatic cancer you're you're history you're gone without year that's what killed actor patrick swayze patrick swayze and she's alive thirty five years later because of the hawks tonic it's you're right harry haughey's grandfather saw the horses out in the field eating burdock root and and poke rude and red clovers and a lot of things that are in what's called the hawks tonic now and they formed a little danger with it that people would drink and and it was curing cancer well you know roberson cancer don't like he's word cure but reversing cancer it was in a clinic in dallas texas in the nineteen forties in the fda literally ran out of the country so they're in there in mexico now but they're very successful i interviewed a a grandfather and his grandson there i never forget the interview georgie he was diagnosed with quote terminal cancer about twenty years before and and he didn't at that time he didn't have any grandchildren and he went down to the tijuana clinic there the bio medical center got on the hawks treatment and now he's got a sixteen year old grandson that they do everything together using the sweetest thing georgia sixteen year old boy holding his grandfather's hand i love that i love that steven jobs had pancreatic cancer as well he did he did compete hey did and he he actually used quite a few natural things to try to turn it around and it was and from what i've heard from people that knew steve he actually had was doing very well with the natural treatments it was only when he went back to work at apple that the cancer kept recurring and my speculation is that there's so much darn ems building that he couldn't fight it let's go to robert nell paso texas wildcard line hi robert go ahead hey how's it going on to see what opinion on alkaline water to prevent cancer is what your opinion is and flew to do they also called campuses i don't ever owned up to my ear i'm always using well that's okay what do you think of bluetooth first of all them we'll talk about alkaline water yeah okay so bluetooth do 'cause they do they actually magnify.

ty bollinger harry hawk thirty five years sixteen year twenty years
"national cancer institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:05 min | 3 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In the one thousand nine hundred twenty s a fellow by the name of harry hawk see a former coal miner and insurance salesman in a radio personality named norman baker put together something that they treated they say treated cancer it came from watching their great grandfather who observed a horse with a tumor on its leg curate self by grazing certain herbs out in the past year now they've got their clinics which the fda shut down in the one thousand nine hundred sixties as worthless and discredited so they went to tijuana where they have their treatment center and they promoted as a cure for cancer now the fda the national cancer institute have found no evidence they say that the hawks therapy is an effective treatment for cancer what say you well i'd have to say i've interviewed some patients there in tijuana f it's called the bio medical center now and i i'd have to say i've i've seen some evidence that it works i interviewed a lady there and twenty fifteen names pam kelsey she was diagnosed with quote terminal pancreatic cancer thirty five years before so that would've been what nineteen eighty she was diagnosed in nineteen eighty with pancreatic cancer which george you and i both know your back nosed with pancreatic cancer you're you're history you're gonna without year that's what killed actor patrick swayze patrick swayze and and she's alive thirty five years later because of the hawks tonic it's your harry hockey's grandfather saw the horses out in the field eating burdock root and and poke root and red clovers and a lot of things that are in what's called the hawks now name they formed a a little danger with it that people were drinking and it was cured cancer well russian cancer don't like us cure that reversing cancer it was in a clinic and dallas texas in the nineteen forties in the fda literally ran them out of the country so there there in mexico now but they're very successful i interviewed a a grandfather and grandson there i never forget the interview he he was diagnosed with quote terminal cancer about twenty years before and and he didn't at that time he didn't have any grandchildren and he went down to the tijuana clinic there the bio medical center got on the hawks treatment and now he's got a sixteen year old grandson that they do everything together i the sweetest thing georgia sixteen year old boy holding his grandfather's hand i love that i love that steven jobs had pancreatic cancer as well he did he did computer hey did and he he actually used quite a few natural things to try to turn it around and it was and from what i've heard from people that knew steve he actually had was doing very well with the natural treatments it was only when he went back to work at apple that the cancer kept recurring and my speculation is that there's so much darn emf building that he couldn't fight it let's go to robert nell paso texas wildcard line hi robert go ahead hey how's it going to see what your opinion on how water to prevent cancer is what your opinion is and flew to do they also called kansas i don't ever owned up to my ear well that's what do you what do you think of bluetooth first of all done we'll talk about alkaline water yeah okay so bluetooth do 'cause they do they actually magnify the radiation so there's some some recent studies who haven't read that is worse than if you just held your cell phone don't you spoke to if they have different things that you can use that are that don't magnify the radiation and i can't remember the technology but they're like it's using basically the same thing that we would have used the full like a hollow to that you can use the doesn't magnify the radiation at your head and bluetooth basically especially the ones that go over your head and both years you've got radiation literally going through the third year brian when those two things communicate to each other so there's some there are some options i'll i'll i'll see if i can get to my research on.

harry hawk salesman norman baker thirty five years sixteen year twenty years
Enemy turned ally: Poliovirus is used to fight brain tumors

24 Hour News

01:40 min | 3 years ago

Enemy turned ally: Poliovirus is used to fight brain tumors

"Clearly oaks share prior tells k geo tv she's gotten some good news but still hasn't been told when she can return home i houses okay he say whatever that means i'm just banning the whole enormity of everything news was not as good for katie brogan and her husband who have been through this before but this time have nothing to go back to two thousand twelve we've been evacuated six times now jerry brown declared a state of emergency in lake county where the biggest fire is raging about one hundred twenty miles north of san francisco lee county sheriff brian martin says while evacuations have helped clear the area not everyone is getting worse people live off the grid completely out here so we are also making door to door notifications all the impacted areas unusually hot weather high winds and highly flammable vegetation turned brittle by drought helped fuel the fires that began over the weekend the conditions mirror last year's this other states deadliest and most destructive fire year in two thousand seventeen polio is now helping doctors to fight deadly brain tumors doctors say survival was better than expected for patients in a small study who were given modified poliovirus they say it helped attack the cancer it was the first human test of this and it didn't help most patients or improve median survival but many who did respond seemed to have long lasting benefits about twenty one percent lived three years longer versus four percent a comparison group of previous brain tumor patients the treatment was developed at duke university with help from the national cancer institute results were discussed tuesday at.

Katie Brogan Lake County Brian Martin Duke University Jerry Brown San Francisco Lee County Twenty One Percent Four Percent Three Years
"national cancer institute" Discussed on Motorsports Monday

Motorsports Monday

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on Motorsports Monday

"For over the seven hundred twenty thousand people who are living in the us today with a seven hundred twenty thousand with primary brain tumor right now while that's what would what would this particular act do so what it would do is it increases funding in the nci and and i sorry the national cancer institute in the national institute for health and what that does is allocated more funding towards brain tumor research and a lot of people don't realize this point that brain cancer is the number one childhood cancer killer mass leukemia past any other disease so you know it's just trying to get that message out there that people don't really realize and get that in the ear of congress and luckily we were able to get that passed through the house last year and we're getting through the senate and try and you know last year we had unanimous support from it and it's move very quickly and unique thing is bipartisan bill so you're not advocating for the left or the right you're just advocating for those families that are suffering 'ring and and those families on average have to pay one hundred thousand dollars medical bills year well that's out almost nobody can afford that now and there's just no help and there's only four treatments for over one hundred forty different types of brain tumors so you know it's just it's unbelievable that's the state of it but luckily advances have been coming and hopefully with the passage of this act we can get a lot of things change in that room did you offer to take some congressmen on some hot laps if they'd support this or that workouts yeah.

us nci brain cancer leukemia congress senate national institute for health one hundred thousand dollars
"national cancer institute" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"Mm three one thousand twenty eight patients has been enrolled so additional information regarding the heartbeat three will be forthcoming vigilence for unexpected complications with the heart mate three should be maintained unusual twisting of the outflow graft has recently been reported nevertheless given the observed lower rate of pump thrombosis and reoperate for pump malfunction it already seems likely that the heart mate three will supplant the heart mate to in clinical practice still even with this next generation device other elvis related complications occur at an unacceptably high frequency and there remains a pressing need for additional improvements in elva technology genetics and pathogenesis of diffuse large b cell lymphoma by roland schmitz from the national cancer institute bethesda maryland diffuse large b cell foam is our pheno typically and genetically heterogeneous gene expression profiling has identified subgroups of these lymphomas according to cell of origin activated b cell like germinal center b cell like and unclassified that are associated with a differential response to chemotherapy and targeted agents these investigators extended these findings by identifying genetic sub types of diffuse large bacillum foams based on shared genomic abnormalities and uncovering therapeutic vulnerabilities based on tumor genetics four prominent genetic subtypes in diffuse large bcell infomer termed mc b b n two n one and easy be were identified genetic aberrations in multiple genes distinguished each connectik subtype from other diffuse large b cell lymphomas these subtypes different pheno typically as judged by differences in gene expression signatures and responses to immuno chemotherapy with favourable survival in the b n two and easy be subtypes and inferior outcomes in the mc d and and one subtypes analysis of genetic pathways suggested.

diffuse large b cell lymphoma roland schmitz bethesda maryland
The 30 Year Quest To Tame The 'Wily' Cancer Gene

Morning Edition

02:09 min | 3 years ago

The 30 Year Quest To Tame The 'Wily' Cancer Gene

"The time it was just video another acronym another medical term it turns out ross is the driving force in about thirty percent of all cancers a million cancer deaths each year and no drug can target this mutation at least not yet and peers richard harris picks up the story rafts is the very first human cancer gene ever discovered it also turns out to be amazingly common but so a major player in lung cancer and the major driver of pancratic cancer and also metric my own in phnom colon cancer and many other kansas as well frank mccormick was working at a small biotech company in the san francisco bay area back in the early 1980's when this cancer gene was identified and he convinced his company to look for drugs and tests to combat we took off from the so big got into the game and made a few eddie discoveries and fell in love with a whole project long time ago the healthy grass gene instructs the cell to make a protein that is basically an onoff switch the tells living cells wind to start dividing but encounter sells these which is basically defectors or stuck in the on state most of the time so cells just keep on dividing in forming tumors given the genes central role in cancer many drug companies jumped into the fray to develop drugs to fix this broken switch mccormick says people got into the drugs the regain very early for farrah's they tried and failed very early also so people moved away from wrath of the target it got the moniker undrinkable because we've been working on it for thirty five years and so far we don't have a dragon a clinic that works adrian cox at the university of north carolina has also spent her entire career working on rafts she says the failure to come up with a drug is not for lack of crying and speak has rats is a wily beast it's been described variously as a greasy ball meaning there is no good pockets to stick and drug into that's how other targeted cancer drugs work the gym up the works and kill the cancer cells but drug companies couldn't find a drug that would stick to this greasy ball then about four years ago that then head of the national cancer institute harold varmus decided.

Ross Richard Harris Kansas Frank Mccormick Farrah Adrian Cox Harold Varmus San Francisco University Of North Carolina Thirty Five Years Thirty Percent Four Years
"national cancer institute" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

Elite Man Podcast

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on Elite Man Podcast

"Um so they were big prove and all the documents when the movie and i have all these documents i'm talking about on the movies website brzezinski movie dot com i have a whole interact and transcript where you can watch the movie line by line of dialogue and you can look at the documents in four and you you know for a fact checking because it is such a crazy unbelievable story so this is the most amazing part of the store two in the nineties hey irish pharmaceutical company the ceos sisterinlaw was cured by presents right so he's like holy shit we should make a deal with this guy who discovered my sisterinlaw brain cancer so he makes the he makes a deal with this irish firms with company called yvonne one brzezinski employees to this recruited by eat line and they work together to try to find them duplicate patents unlike kind of rearranging this pattern in cooperation with our national cancer institute in the food and drug administration while the food and drug administration was filing grand juries against him finally got one to stick goes to federal court he he wins the trial brzezinski went to trial two trials they try he they feel the first time to go right back to court again two sets of jury trials not guilty in by the way they would not allow in the courtroom whether or not the treatment works from us that was not allowed to every witness understand that well yeah but again my up brain cancer oh no struck from the record can't have that theory ignore that yet and it was so crazy that the jurors from the first trial actually showed up two time off work should up to the second trial to protest the try they're like why is this happening what are we doing this man is insane on trying to say is um red after he was free.

pharmaceutical company brain cancer yvonne brzezinski
"national cancer institute" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Medical ethicists to the national cancer institute has acted as a source on bioethics has been quoted in among others the new york times washington post us news world report st louis postdispatch science digest smithsonian magazine consulted on the ethical aspects of gene therapy for japanese national television he's also written three novels one called nothing human fan mail and night vision those are some serious credentials professor welcome to the program you are among those really are serious bore your uh you you really have led a very busy live ellen motivating only flint open naughty boring as will look to books makes me well now people who write books into but see you wrote novels to defeat i do so i'm sure you're just not that boring ruler kroger groom turn seemed techniques who claimed the running of nonfiction which are making things a little easier for the reader and more interesting for the reuter well y you can't really instruct somebody if you can't keep their attention right i think you do but have been anyone um uh so so i guess you're good at doing that well right i i read a little bit of a of the story that slammed me and a lot of other people here recently the first cloned human embryo i guess people have a sort of a sense you know not an educated medical sense but they have a sense that this is big news in know perhaps really big news in the beginning of a big change in the world is it that well it it is it works it big news you become be that you refer to advance still technology actually law what is trying to put law right a rope or moonies serious soy doubt that they're going to be able to do that why they think that the technical problems or more difficult than advance technology advance technology got to be at which they were able to get in embryo devoid two or three oh arms in minutes thought and the truth of the.

national cancer institute new york times professor washington science digest
"national cancer institute" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:49 min | 4 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"To the national cancer institute mm has acted as a source on bioethics has been quoted in among others the new york times washington post us news world report st louis postdispatch science digest smithsonian magazine consulted on the ethical aspects of gene therapy for japanese national television he's also written three novels one called nothing human fan mail and night vision those are some serious credentials a professor welcome to the program you very much those really are serious bore your uh you you really have led a very busy life avenue literally the only open naughty borings will moot books makes me so well now people who write books but see you wrote novels to you know do so i'm sure you're just not that boring microsoft room cern seemed techniques who fiction the running of nonfiction which makes things a little easier for the reader and more interesting for the reuter well y you can't really instruct somebody if you can't keep their attention right i think you do but anyone um uh so so oh i guess you're good at doing that well all right um i read a little bit of a of the story that slammed me and a lot of other people here recently the first cloned human embryo i guess people have a sort of a sense you know not an educated medical sense but they have a sense that this is big news you know perhaps really big news in the beginning of a big change in the world is it that well it it is it works it big news the company that you were to advance technology actually paul what it's drawing to war right arroyo for many serious soy doubt that they're going to be able to do that why they think that the technical problems or more difficult than advance salt technology advanced technology got to be at where they were able to get in embryo booboy two or three times and then it stopped and the truth of the matter is that no one really knows how to go forward from that point but i'm confident they like others or could eventually this is a problem that in principle can be solved its scientific problem bed it looks as though you will admit to a swoop blue apron you enough resources an enough energy and effort is put in that.

new york times professor arroyo washington science digest microsoft
"national cancer institute" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"national cancer institute" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"The second revolution is precision medicine also known as personalized medicine instead of one size fits all methods to be able to treat cancers there is a whole new class of drugs that are able to turkey cancers based on its unique genetic profile today there are a host of these tailormade drugs call targeted therapies available to physicians even today to be able to personalize their therapy for their patience and many others are in development the third exciting revolution is immunotherapy and this is really exciting scientists have been able to leverage to an immune system in the fight against cancer for example there's been ways where we find the off switch as of cancer and new drugs have been able to turn the immune system back on to be able to fight cancer in addition there are ways where you can take away immune cells from the body train them engineer them put them back into the body to fight cancer almost sounds like science fiction doesn't it while i was a researcher at the national cancer institute i had the privilege of working with some of the pioneers of this field and watch the development first hand it's been pretty amazing today over six hundred clinical trials are open actively recruiting patients to explore all aspects immunotherapy while these three exciting revolutions are ongoing unfortunately this is only the beginning and there are still many many challenges let me illustrate that patient here's a patient with their skin cancer carmelo noma it's horrible the cancer has gone everywhere.

immune system cancer researcher engineer