29 Burst results for "National Book Award"

Inside New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's history of 'bullying' foes, staffers

With Friends Like These

05:42 min | 2 months ago

Inside New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's history of 'bullying' foes, staffers

"The headlines around cuomo's behavior has been about his sexual predatory actions right and there's been a lot of them and and We can talk about those. But i think there's something i haven't really seen disgust as much and other you get into it in. Your piece is just the general toxicity and bullying and how we don't have a lot of language for that right and we need to get better language for it. And one of the things that i found in as i was beginning to report this piece leading up to it and i reported it fairly quickly. Actually because it was in the midst of this big breaking news cycle around cuomo and i was trying to keep up and But one of the things that i noticed was happening is there was coverage of You know what is called the nursing home scandal which is a new york attorney. General james released a report showing that the cuomo administration had underreported nursing home deaths by fifty percent. And this is. It was an early governing decision. That cuomo in the administration made to send Elderly people who'd been sick with covid out of new york's overcrowded hospitals back into nursing homes and of course once in nursing homes covid spread like wildfire and many people died and the attorney. General did an investigation into this decision and and released a report showing that the administration is under reported the number of deaths Then his ablest address was caught on tape explaining to people that they'd actually hidden those numbers Because they didn't want to be targeted by the trump administration which is an incredibly trumpian move right to obscure the reality like as a political ploy. Then there was additional reporting showing that in factory of his top advisers including lists derosa had altered data had consciously and actively altered the data An altered reports to obscure those numbers. So it's a story not only begins with a bad governing choice and it continues to be about cover up corruption and deception And and that report comes out and then they're in. I think because that creates a weakness for this previously sort of impenetrable shell of andrew. Cuomo right he's been able to behave in all kinds of bad ways over ten years and still you know he has incredibly high approval. Ratings people still view him as immensely competent and just really skilled at hard knuckle politics. But then there's this moment of weakness in in that space comes as state legislator assembling ron kim who describes how in the wake of the nursing homes report Andrew cuomo is called him at home as he's bathing his kids to threaten his job if he keeps criticizing him about the nursing homes and and that gets a lot of national attention run. Kim goes on the view. Then comes the story from lindsey. Boiling a former aide. Cuomo alleging that he sexually harassed her in a very sort of classic sexual harassment way. She worked for him. He asked her she alleges that he asked her to play strip poker that he kissed her against her will that he referred to her by the name of another woman. He said that she resembled. Who is rumored to be his ex girlfriend Then then the story becomes sort of bifurcated thing and this is one of the things i was trying to get at. I am going back to your question. I promise between. There's the story of the nursing homes report and efforts to cover up those numbers. And then there's a story of the sexual harassment and i felt like a lot of people. Were titling back and forth between those two stories In fact to me it seemed very clear that they were one story. And that ron. Kim was another element of that story. And it's it's a story of power abuse that's what the story is yet so a couple of things one. Yes there is a through line here right like it is not. It is not bifurcated stories. There is one story and it all has to do with white male patriarchy and this idea of is political. Theater is the perfect way to describe it because the theater part i think is something you talk about. Your piece doesn't get talked about enough in the coverage of this which is what gets sacrificed when you have a bully in charge is what we saw in the trump administration which is nothing gets done. Like things don't happen government doesn't work because there's all this energy and time and prioritizing of the so there's a bunch of really like deep questions here what is power what is power for. And what do you use it for. How do you build it right. And and how do you maintain it. And how do you make it grow. And and there are a lot of different answers that but here's a traditional answer in is one that andrew cuomo in body right you you establish power by establishing dominance how do you establish dominance by subjugating other people. This is something that a former speechwriter spokesman for the story. Who's this brilliant writer komo felix. Who worked for him as a speechwriter. When she was young she has since gone on to write literally a book of poetry that was nominated for a national book award and yet. She told me that she wrote more than thirty speeches. And sets of remarks for andrew cuomo. She thinks he used one okay so and she writes about the experience of having been a young black woman in his administration where she understood that he was nice to her in her case. She's she doesn't complain about ill-treatment from him. That he didn't use her work he didn't he didn't value her intellectually and she describes the feeling of kind of token ization and what she calls a subtle form of ritualized abuse which is understanding that she was there to benefit him. She says to be in the press releases but not to do the work of shaping his speech and his policy in his

Cuomo General James Cuomo Administration Ron Kim Andrew Cuomo New York Derosa KIM Lindsey Andrew Komo Felix RON
Growing Up In Style: "Patterns of the Past" by Susan Choi

Vogue Podcast

08:03 min | 3 months ago

Growing Up In Style: "Patterns of the Past" by Susan Choi

"I'm here to introduce a series of original essays titled growing up in style writers on discovering fashion in america in this one the novelist susan choi author of the national book award winning novel trust. Exercises writes about her love of fabric patterns as a child in south bend indiana here susan reading her essay patterns of the past. I hope you enjoy. Historians of fashion seem to agree that by the time i was born in nineteen sixty nine. The son was already setting on the golden age of sewing. But there were few signs of this decline where i was growing up in south. Bend indiana my mother like so many mothers owned a sewing machine and knew how to use it how this come to be. I asked her recently. She gave a verbal shots over the phone from houston where she lives. Now if you read the directions and follow the pattern it would come out all right. She recalled she didn't even remember perhaps because they were as ordinary to her as grocery shopping. Our trips to the fabric store. Oh the fabric store. Even now decades later when google those words and look at the photos my heart thumps with desire to be clear. These are not photos. A fabric for sale online but photos of the interiors of actual physical places where one goes to touch bolts of fabric cards of rick rack buttons buttoned to a stiff cardboard backing or tumbling loose in a jar dispenser displays of threat arranged by color the spools curved surfaces gleaming like candy and every kind of beautiful ribbon in every color and texture and pattern the fabric store. Unlike the grocery store made me hungry the for. What exactly wasn't clear at the time. It was something much larger and much less defined than the outfits. My mother would make me from the items. We chose the fabrics and notions and trim but the outfits i loved with my whole heart and remember as clearly as if they still hung in my closet. The ruffled pinafore made from a white on white print of tiny flowers trimmed with red rick rack and finished with the application juicy. Strawberries on the bib. The shirtdress of multicolored cotton printed with patterns resemble embroidery the truly glamorous halter dress with a triple tiered skirt of pastel. Blue pastel pink. Pastel yellow says my mother now in her eighties on the other end of the phone. I lovingly describe her creations. She is impressed. I remember so while she has zero memory of sowing the any of these things though she does remember making herself address with extremely big sleeves. They were in style that year. She says she wore it a few times and decided the sleeves looked so stupid that she tore them off and wore. The dress sleeveless the fact that unlike me my mother is white exceedingly pale small boned blue eyed and with the cheekbones of film star both oppressed me throughout my childhood. And lay somehow outside of thought even to articulate it now feels uncomfortable but the facts were and remain that my pale blue eyed mother never matched my black haired brown eyed dark skinned self always far darker as a child than i ever get now because i was outside all summer. In an era before sunscreen in elementary school in indiana. I was cast as the lone indian in the thanksgiving play more. Generally i was constantly looked at especially or at least so it seemed to me when standing next to my mother. We didn't match. I harbored a fantasy fearful half escapist that i would turn out who've been adopted from some faraway land. Even my father who really was from a faraway land only explained my appearance without removing. My anomalous miss. He was to novelists himself ends that hunger. I felt at the fabric store. Larger than any one outfit could satisfy for the choosing of the fabric and the notions and the trim was always secondary to the choice of the pattern and the choice of the pattern was never i understand. Now about the pattern it south. It was about the girls the winsome the willowy and the overwhelmingly with token exceptions white girls who modeled the pinafores and shirt dresses and halters the tiered skirts and even the full body. Pajama like halloween costumes. On the outside of the rectangle envelopes housing the patterns. Remember those remember how they were often filed in boxes so that your fingers walked through them as they would later walk through. Lp's at the record store. When i think of patterns my mind says butterick. And i bet that the majority of the close my mother made me were from patterns put out not by simplicity or mccall's but by the butterick company which also produced vogue patterns having licensed the name from conde nast bruising those patterns of my past online where especially at sea they abound as if the golden age of sewing never ended. I have to wonder if i always chose butterick patterns on the strength of the package illustrations alone. The simplicity girls are oddly wooden and slightly mis proportioned the mccalls girls look like cartoons but the butterick girls still quicken my heart. I recognize my secret childhood. Self that lanky limb d- flush cheeked auburn-haired spirited white girl. I was deluded enough to imagine. I might be twin sister to anne of green gables. No less than two miniature area clock recognizing that hopeless longing to be entirely unlike myself delicately white as affirmed by one hundred percent of my world is a part of moving past it and perhaps even a part of reclaiming those buttons and bows those bullets at every possible fabric delicious all on their own after concluding online photos that it might well be the store of my childhood. I called stitch in time in south bend but it had only opened in nineteen ninety. Three there was a fabric store back then an ireland road by the old scottsdale mall. The woman who answered stitch in times phone told me. When i explained where i lived fashion fabrics that turned out had opened in nineteen seventy one just in time for my first toddler outfits and closed just under two decades later having withstood. Even the machine made onslaught of gloria vanderbilt. I know about that story. Because i worked there. The stitch in time woman went on. But before i could exclaim that maybe she'd helped me choose buttons or ribbons. She politely ended the call. An actual customer having arrived looking. I imagine for the modest but real transformation that a pattern and some fabric can provide.

Susan Choi Bend Indiana Pastel Yellow National Book Award South Bend Indiana Rick Rack Susan Houston Butterick Conde Nast America Google Mccall Green Gables Scottsdale Mall Auburn Gloria Vanderbilt
Charles Yu Talks About Interior Chinatown

The Book Review

04:21 min | 4 months ago

Charles Yu Talks About Interior Chinatown

"Charles. You joins us now from irvine california. His latest novel is interior. Chinatown at just won the national book award for fiction. Charles thanks for being here. Thank you kremlin. I'm excited to be here and let's start with that. Winning the national book award. Your speech was so great. I just loved it because you used seemed genuinely surprised. Don't what was that moment like for you. I was genuinely surprised. I was screaming. As they're reading the citation my family. And i wear all sort of looking at each other and just yelling and we didn't know what to do and my son after while that i think you need to give a speech and so i sort of pulled myself together but i didn't really because then i proceeded to forget to thank my wife my kids and my parents so a half of whom were in the room with me. It was just awful. You know there's a fine tradition. Though i think of of leaving like the most important people out in acceptance speeches hoax out. I don't know. Do you think it would have been different. If it had been in real life. I guess it may must have been nice to even if you forgot to thank them at least have all those people. Those class close family members in the room with you. One of the weird unexpected. I guess benefits of having a virtual ceremony was that we got to hug each other immediately after and then change back into shorts. And why didn't you think you'd win. The chances are pretty good. When they're you know only a certain number of finalists. that's true. I suppose maybe underestimated the chances a little bit but i i don't know it just seems like something that happens to other people. Well it happened to you. I think deservedly. So this is your fourth book affection and they all have really amazing. Titles which i'm gonna read aloud. And then i love you to start. Walk us through them before we talk about this latest novel interior chinatown so the titles are third class superhero. How to live safely in a science fictional universe. And sorry please thank you which is a collection of stories. I mean just those titles thanks. I do enjoy titles. I wish there were a job where you could just title things. Maybe i'm trying to make up that job. I don't know what that would be exactly but yeah it's fun it helps me both. I think sometimes have a handle on what i'm trying to do and also i just imagined when somebody encounters that title. I'm hoping that they get that feeling of. Oh i want to flip to that page and see. What is that you know. It's funny when you say like you wish you could have a job coming up with. Titles i just feel like i have to bring up the fact that writing fiction is not your first job. It's not your only job that you started off as a corporate lawyer. How did you get from that life to this one. Well it took a while. I graduated from law school in two thousand one and as i was supposed to be studying for the bar I found myself in the bookstore instead. Reading george saunders and lorrimore and and people like that and and just kind of diving into the world of i guess contemporary fiction at that time and just getting really excited about it and i think also procrastinating from studying and so then i I started to write these sort of weird. The first thing i wrote was A love story. That is a set of physics problems like that you would find an undergraduate physics textbook Thought i don't know what this is but it's something to do you know on nights and weekends when i'm waiting for waiting for the senior associate to tell me all things did wrong in my merger agreement so severe that it. It'd be it was just this sort of thing. I was doing on the side for many years. And somehow i was creeping towards this. Tv land without even realizing it. Because a few years ago. I i was at work at the time working in house for a tech company as a lawyer and i got a call to come meet for potential spot on the writing staff of this show westworld and i thought well this is. This is not going to happen. And but somehow they hired me so so that was few years ago. And that's what i've been doing since as my day job

National Book Award Irvine Charles California George Saunders
Barry Lopez, Acclaimed Author And Traveler Beyond Many Horizons, Dies At 75

Environment: NPR

04:27 min | 4 months ago

Barry Lopez, Acclaimed Author And Traveler Beyond Many Horizons, Dies At 75

"National book award winner berry lopez was famous for chronicling his travels to remote places and the landscapes he found there but his writings weren't simply account of his journeys they were reminders of how precious life on earth is an our responsibility to care for it. He died after a long battle with prostate cancer just months. After a wildfire forced him from his oregon home he was seventy five years old. Npr's dave blanchard has this remembrance berry lopez spent more than thirty years writing his last book horizon. He don't spend that much time on a project without going through periods of self doubt when i met him at his home last year he told me when he was feeling defeated by the work. He'd walk along the nearby mckenzie river. Every time i did there was a beaver. Stick in the water at my feet. And they're of course their workers. So i imagine the beaver were saying. What the hell's wrong with you. You get back in there and do your work up. In his studio he had a collection of the stakes are little tooth marks. It was a lesson for lopez. Every day i walked in that room. I saw the signs of. Don't lose in yourself. This was the world of barry. Lopez beaver could teach you the most valuable lessons. Lopez was born in new york but his father moved the family to california when he was a child. Hugh eventually settle in game. Notice for his writing about the natural world he win the nineteen eighty-six book award for nonfiction. Work arctic dreams at the time he told npr how he approached the seemingly empty arctic environment. I made myself pay attention to places where i thought nothing was going on. And then after a while the landscape materialized in a in a fuller way denied. I imagine that at first glance in lopez books. A cloudy sky contains grays of pigeon feathers of slate in pearls packs of hammerhead sharks in the galapagos. Move like swans million a city park pond composer john. Luther adams was a friend and collaborator of lopez. For nearly four decades he says lopez writing serves as a wake-up call. She surveys the beauty of the world. And at the same time the cruelty and violence that we humans inflict on the earth and on one another and he doesn't with deep compassion lopez experienced that cruelty first hand as a child. He was sexually abused by a family. Friend he i wrote about it in two thousand thirteen. He later told. Npr experience made him feel afraid and shameful around other people. The animals encountered in the california wilderness. Offered something different. They didn't say oh. We know what you went through. I felt accepted by the animal world. Lopez would spend his life writing about that world in particular the damage done to it by climate change. That hit home for lopez. This past september much of his property was burned in wildfires tore through oregon partly due to abnormally dry conditions. His wife deborah gordon says he lost decades of notes and correspondence and much of the forest around the home where lopez had lived for fifty years. He talked a lot about climate change in. And how it's so easy to think it's going to happen to other people and not to you but it happened to us. It happened to him personally. And i think that the fire was just a blow. That not just couldn't quite ever get back from when i spoke to lopez last year. He said he always sought to find. Grace in the middle of devastation is so difficult to be a human being. There are so many reasons to give up to retreat into cynicism or despair. I hate to see that. And i i want to do something that makes people feel safe and loved and capable in his last days. His family brought objects from home to him in hospice. Among the items the beaver stakes from his studio dave blanchard. Npr news

Berry Lopez Lopez Dave Blanchard Lopez Beaver NPR Mckenzie River Luther Adams Oregon Prostate Cancer California Hugh Barry Arctic Deborah Gordon New York John Grace Npr News
Charles Yu novel, Malcolm X bio win National Book Awards

What Book Hooked You?

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

Charles Yu novel, Malcolm X bio win National Book Awards

"And i usually know like five or six key scenes that are that are very important to the book that are going to happen in that book and i call that the spine of the novel and then me you drafting. The novel is basically the process. By which i try to figure out how all those little parts of the spiner connected seoul swift was a really good example me writing and writing and writing all the different ways. Those pieces were not connected until i finally slowly painfully figured out how they were connected

Seoul
A.O. Scott on the Work of Wallace Stegner

The Book Review

03:33 min | 1 year ago

A.O. Scott on the Work of Wallace Stegner

"Were some of those big questions that stagner wrestled with in his writing the segments such a fascinating writer for one thing, and I don't really get into into the peace, but he really spans generate. I don't think there are that. Many writers who cover quite the same amount of time as he does, so he he's born in nineteen o nine and grew up in various places around the western United States to Seattle Salt. Lake City not just the United States schedule on, but he started writing in the thirties is first. Four novels were published in the thirties and kept writing and kept going up until his death in. In nineteen ninety-three, the big novels that people tend to read the to that that are probably the most red angle of repose and crossing to safety are from the seventies and eighties. And he already had you know four or five decade career behind him. At that point, you know it's almost a cliche to think of him as a Western writer because he taught at Stanford for many years, he founded the creative writing program. At Stanford, the creative writing fellowships still bear his name there. A lot of his nonfiction is about the West about ecology about the settlement of the West. He wrote a really fascinating book in the forties called Mormon country about Utah Settlement Utah. Conflicts between Mormon and Non Mormon? Population and native Americans there, so the West is kind of his big theme, but it's always in opposition to the Western as we think been in movies or in popular Western literature sort of the mythology the west so. The whole idea of cowboys and railroad man. Rugged individualists, the whole myth of. Western expansion Western settlement something that he's always looking at from a very critical angle. When we think about this idea of like the great American writer and the Great American novel, which is probably all just a false notion, while the feels like in many people's minds like a terrible. Oh, that people know of Wallenstein. They, know the title usually angle of repose and crossing to safety both books that sold very well as in addition to being critical success says. But he's not one of those people that's on the curriculum. For example you said in your essay that he's the writer that you come across on shelves of books where you like you rent a cabin for the summer, and there are inevitably a copy or two of worn paperbacks of his novels, and and and that's the way I came across stagner. What is his reputation in the country? Did he get the recognition that he deserved I think in his lifetime. He was pretty well. We won or was a finalist for most of the major awards Pulitzer in the National Book Award, and he he was a very powerful and important figure in the world of creative writing. I mean the the the list of his students you know includes Berry. Edward Abbey Tillie Olsen Robert Stone Larry. mcmurtry Ken Casey so the people who pass through Stanford and were stagner fellows. There is part of legacy in American writing. Kind of off to the side of whether people are still reading his books, but but I think there is this interesting status where it's not that he's obscure, forgotten neglected, but he's feels a little bit. Marginal to me a little bit, maybe unassimilated.

Writer Stanford Edward Abbey Tillie Olsen Robe United States Stagner Utah Seattle National Book Award Lake City Wallenstein Berry
Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

Native America Calling

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Book of the Month: The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich

"So much life happens in Louise urges latest book the night watchman this Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians author takes readers to the termination era. Were the threat of losing. Land in a tight. Something important is firing up. One of the characters was inspired by the life of this author's beloved grandfather in the book we follow this character named Thomas as ams up to share his words in Congress on the pages we also meet a cast of characters which includes strong indigenous women who define resilience of their time although set some generations. Back this story. Informs Present Day indigenous struggles including exploitation of our women racism and attacks on sovereignty and the land that are native nations connect to. I look forward to hearing how you're gelling to the story. And we invite you to join the discussion with their march book of the month. Author Louise and thanks to harpercollins publishers. The first ten p the first ten people who make it on air with a question or comment. We'll a copy of the night watchman. Our phone lines are open now so go ahead and dial in. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native and today joining us from Washington. Dc is Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa author Louis Surgery. She is a National Book Award and National Book Critics Circle Award Winner and she was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. She lives in Minnesota with her daughters and is the owner of the small independent bookstore. Birchbark books my pleasure to have her here. Louise Welcome thank you so much. It's my pleasure. Tehran I'm delighted to be here into Louise. I really appreciate when our authors teach us about our own history and sometimes that history includes troubling times until this book takes us right to the heart of what termination the threat of termination losing the ability to say that we are a sovereign nation. Your characters take us to this moment in so I'm set the scene for us a little on just how much it's impacted not only the characters in the book but of course your own tribal nation. What would you like to say about termination? Well first of all I. I BELIEVE. Termination was a long time in preparation. You know when you look back through the history of what was happening just before you see that there was a big housing Bob. Postwar housing boom so termination came out of The the narrative of dispossession The government really wanted some very large stands of timber and those were on the cliff and the menominee reservations and they were among the first terminated. So there was five that were on the first light and turn on the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band of Chippewa was one of them. So it didn't come out of nowhere. There had been some plans in the making and they got the perfect interface with two houses of Congress under Republican control and also the President Eisenhower Republicans so they had a sort of a clear shot termination at that point and the person who is the commissioner of Indian affairs at the time was a guy named Dillon s Myer and he had presided over the incarceration of Japanese American people. Right right during the war. So we have this Guy Dylan Myers. Who's all set up knowing exactly how to he? He was going to relocate everybody right that was the plan. That's that went hand in hand with relocation and then there's Arthur v Watkins who who was Passionately for termination. He had grown up on Allotment land that went into tax forfeiture and his family. Got It so he. He's the other person the main person and then Then there's the people who suddenly got this notice that your tribe is going to be terminated or emancipated. The word was you. Get your freedom. That's how it was couched. Those are the phrases. Did that make you feel it? Being compared to this that you are now mandated. You no longer have to be a native. It's it's so it's so it's so of all of our times I mean this is the language that is used when Dispossession is the real motive. flowed out some high-sounding kyw principled words and let people think I mean. They thought they were going to pull this over a native people right and not. My grandfather had an eighth grade government boarding school education but he got it immediately and he and I think most people did but the the the kind of shock is that this kind of rhetoric would come out with the expectation that native people would not even understand that there was nothing to emancipate that freedom meant freedom to lose all of their their land and their their treaty guaranteed privileges as long as the grass grows and the river. Shell slow you know that those words would be would be meaningless because Both houses of Congress had voted to abrogate treaties that have been established since the very beginning of this country

Louise Welcome National Book Award Congress Guy Dylan Myers Turtle Mountain Chippewa Band DC National Book Critics Circle A Thomas Washington Minnesota Pulitzer Prize Tehran Dillon S Myer Menominee Louis Surgery Arthur Commissioner President Trump Watkins
The Life of Audre Lorde born - Feb. 18, 1934

This Day in History Class

03:26 min | 1 year ago

The Life of Audre Lorde born - Feb. 18, 1934

"Day was February. Eighteenth nineteen thirty four writer and Activists Audrey Lord with born Lawrence was born and raised in Harlem. Her father was from Barbados and her mother was Grenadian. Her father was a real estate broker and was able to put Audrey and her sisters and Catholic school. She loves to read from an early age and she was particularly connected to poetry. She began writing her own poetry during her childhood and she published her first poem in Seventeen magazine while she was in high school. Lord graduated from Hunter High School in Nineteen fifty one after working and traveling around North America for a while she went back to New York to get her bachelors degree from Hunter College in Nineteen Sixty one. She got a master's degree in library. Science from Columbia University. At that point Lord began working as a librarian. She married an attorney in nineteen sixty two and had two children with him. Though the couple later got divorced Lord was still passionate about poetry and she gave readings published more perverse her first volume of poetry. The first cities was published in nineteen sixty eight that same year. She left her job as a librarian at town school library and taught a poetry workshop at to Glue College in Mississippi and her poetry Lord touched on social issues like race class gender. She related her personal experiences to broader societal concerns and she also spoke out on matters like sexuality some of her early collections of poetry include cables to rage published in one thousand nine seventy and from a land where other people live life published in nineteen seventy two the latter explored themes of identity and global issues and it was nominated for a national book award by the Mid Nineteen Seventy S. Lord was a critical voice in the rams of poetry activism feminism and Black Arts. Her writing became more political and in one thousand nine hundred ninety six coal. Her first collection released by a major publisher came out two years later her collection the Black Unicorn it was released Lord also wrote prose one of her most notable nonfiction works. Is the cancer journals. Published in nineteen eighty. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in the late. Nineteen Seventies in the book Lord documented. How it felt to deal with illness. She went on to help launch the publishing house kitchen table. Women of Color Press with a writer activist Barbara Smith and she helped establish a political committee called Sisterhood in support of sisters in South Africa which she remained active with until the end of her life. She wrote essays for left wing and black publications and she wrote the acclaimed novel. Zami a new spelling of my name. Laura continued to struggle with cancer for the rest of her life. Her Essay Collection a burst of light addresses cancer race. Parenthood and other topics related to her personal life and the world at large she went through experimental treatments in Europe and in her later years she lived in the US Virgin Islands. She continued to teach write and lecture on social and political issues until she died of liver cancer in November of Nineteen ninety-two.

Audrey Lord Mid Nineteen Seventy S. Lord Cancer Hunter High School Writer Barbados Harlem Grenadian Hunter College Columbia University Seventeen Magazine Laura Barbara Smith Town School Library National Book Award Virgin Islands Black Arts Catholic School
"national book award" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

09:48 min | 1 year ago

"national book award" Discussed on KGO 810

"Well I mean that's some good stuff right there that's obviously a fantastic righteous and true an undeniable is any words ever spoken but this man MLK hold more sway today over either either black people or I don't know young liberals then E. room X. candy who we've talked about on the show before he's got that hot book out how to be an anti racist that so popular right now he's won the National Book Award he's a big deal how to be an anti racist view of things that some people subscribe to is that if you aren't actively being anti racist all the time I mean every day in your job in your whole life in in the way you vote in the just everything then you are a racist there's there's only two options right and if you're you know you have some plumbing company just started new working eighty hours a week and you just need do nothing but work contract and your family you are a racist because you are not an anti racist well it includes by the way I mean not only just all kinds of different ways in your daily life which are difficult to understand difficult to do and they they get to change the rules constantly so you never had to live up to the being anti racist thing anyway but it includes like political positions like on Medicare for all if you're not in favor of that sense disproportionately black people have worse health care the white people then you are all races site definitely holding this am in Hebron Kennedy wrote the book how to be an anti racist yeah don't you start at the end if if anything has what they say is a good or bad outcome for black America you're either a racist for supporting something that is not helping or on anti racist for supporting something that is helping even if it's unconstitutional whatever just doesn't matter so the the question I have is does he hold more sway over people or is he just kind of like internet phenomenon or are your worn in the what's the crowd that Elizabeth warns most popular with educated liberal white women in the suburbs yeah is it more of a phenomenon with that crowd or is MLK still bigger deal I don't actually know the answer to that the college or Martin Luther king junior is problematic is the university of Oregon according to our Robbie suave a who we've had on I'm not surprised by that a bit I'll bet there are a number of universities where they have some problems with MLK and his vision of its not he should be judged by the color of your skin but the content of your character university of Oregon student in which which recently considered removing MLK junior's I have a dream quote from the wall of a campus building crates because the statement only references one kind of diversity skin color and is therefore not inclusive how boy oh boy wow you people are crazy you have no capacity for logic you're like a deer in rocked her a dog in heat you just have if you're so caught up in your ideology you can't stop to think every are you suggesting that everybody has to take on everything all the time and and the miracles of of progress the doctor king and so many other people with them what are are in validator not worth recognizing because he didn't work other miracles this just have your first many time among humans I don't know if I'm being too cynical or not that's why I was hoping to hear from people in the text line not getting that much response getting tons response on the tax line I'm just not on this particular topic it might be because it is MLK day and people that are tied into university campuses have the day off and you are listening to the radio I don't know yeah we got one nice email from a guy who's in political science again quite a few history classes and Martin Luther king junior's never come up they've got about the sins of Cortez in Columbus and and the rest of it but just his contribution to America just has never come up so if you're listening to this in the future and podcasts or whatever who won the Superbowl call me if you know what you think about this how MLK junior is is is seen in certain circles I'd like to know that tax line for one five two nine five K. FTC for one five two nine five K. FTC speak insuperable I'm trying to get the hash tag going hash tag Superbowl of racist mascots all I'm gonna get that we'll what we'll all hot because he got kill me he got the forty niner guy who who represents people coming to the state of California after center center for gold discover detector coming here no pressing Chinese people call me oppressors there was a supporting national resources polluting the reverse the San Francisco pressure so the obviously the forty niner is a problem yes hash tag Superbowl of races mascot yeah even start with the cheap and we're races Senador royal jelly you pitch that old pitch hash tag Superbowl Saturday because it is easy Yanick that it's on a Sunday if it were on a Saturday it would be the Superbowl and Christmas and the fourth of July all rolled into one everybody would get it would be just a back and now it would be if the the laws of god and man would be suspended would be so huge I think the reason is it's already huge and you get all the money from the Saturday and Sunday I think you had a day of eating and drinking and revelry and just make you know more money that way I think I don't know you start pitching Friday is Super Bowl leave and I don't know you know have somebody right at towards the night before Christmas style palm gonna make a religion out of this no not exactly but I don't I Saturday nobody disagrees with that Jack except you make it's no I don't agree by the way I'm I'm kidding about the Superbowl of racist mascots but that seems like the sort of thing that could catch hold this time I'm sure there is somebody want to talk a little he well yeah it wasn't getting back to doctor king in the whole modern anti racism critical race theory thing which again is a form of insanity and doctor king I'm pretty sure woods is stay Ole you're going to ruin it all you're gonna ruin what we got the incredible beauty of his speech about somewhere I read talking about the constitution is that there is no counter argument it is beautifully powerfully simple and it points a finger all Americans and says these are your sacred principles all we want is for them to apply to us that's all we're asking and that is that is said that its nuclear bomb powerful it's it's undeniable it's nobody can full meant an argument against it and then you come along with the idea that well we're going to change what it means to be racist every single day and you either agree with us or we're going to call you a racist and nobody but poor impressionable college kids and educated white women in the suburbs cringe before that illogic in the end its similarity to various idiotic radical movements through the years and yet there's a certain number of people particularly in the press who either like that argument or they're terrified of it we've heard so many times many people look the crazy **** woke crowd on colleges is a pretty small minority but they're so vicious and so loud they win the day a lot I'm hoping that's the same with the critical race theory people because if you want a full man just racial you know hatred and racism and ugliness in the rest of it just keep going the way you're gone it's awful awful hash tag Superbowl racist mascots half right she this I think I could do that I think I can be that person I think I'd be easy well you don't have to go very deep with it all right in your argument you made is actually decent the forty Niners one is a stretch I mean they're a bunch of the poor do faces who thought they were gonna get rich and ended up stopping most of them the vast majority but the chief thing I'm a little surprised the chiefs are still exists as a name why what what's what's what what's the problem offense or just in the modern age I'm not saying I have a problem with it is just it's a reference to Indian tribes in as well as our arrangements to Indian tribes a problem all cultural preparation that's the biggest load of crap ever my number came up with that yeah but it's popular yeah I know Ricky nine now I mean if you've got a symbol that like the Cleveland Indians kind of you know that that logo and everything I can see I have a problem with that yeah in addition the skills I get chiefs of never understood what the problem was with cheeks yeah I just I don't understand why a guy well that's fine yeah well you're not an Indian aria honoring native I'm sorry an Indian listen to me I was racist is Columbus a native American no you're not Joe you are not as rich this is Columbus mama I'm pretty sure I'm not Nancy Pelosi taking on Facebook and it's kind of interesting that with one of those companies hit a trillion dollar value over the weekend by the way to are all fits in the other I think and prince Harry's brave decision are we gonna do a whole hour on that tour all right I am actually willing to talk about it I think there's greater societal significance to it than a cynic like you was willing to admit what is a cynic this madness seconds ago he was a double wild eyed progressive we have a cynical way like the stock market Indonesia.

National Book Award
Andrea Lee Reads Haruki Murakami

The New Yorker: Fiction

09:12 min | 1 year ago

Andrea Lee Reads Haruki Murakami

"We're going to hear barn burning by rookie Murakami translated from the Japanese beneath by Philip Gabriel which was published in the New Yorker in November of nineteen ninety. Two when you try to put it in words it doesn't sound like anything special but if you see it with your own eyes for ten or twenty minutes we were just chatting at the bar and almost without thinking she kept on performing. It gradually the center offensive. Reality is sucked right out of everything around you. The story was chosen by Andrea Lee. WHO's the author of the National Book Award Nominated Memoir Russian Journal and four books of fiction including the forthcoming Rhode Island House which we published in twenty twenty one? Hi Andrea Hi Deborah. So so wh what made you choose a story by Murakami to read today. Well this is always been a story that I was very fond of I. I read it a longtime ago actually in the magazine and then I read it again when the collection came out on the elephant vanishes but I was reminded of how much I liked it when I saw a film film that is somewhat based on it which is Burning that just came out this year by Lee Chang Dong the Korean that Korean director which is is a wonderful fell so I went back and of course reread the the more comedy story and and remember just how much I how much you know. Satisfies satisfies me in every way has everything I like in a story. So what are those things that you look for in a story. Well what I particularly like again in stories and more coming in particular is the grounding that he does in the details of the everyday world and then somehow managing to enter subtly in other dimensions into other realms. This particular story would starts out almost in a banal fashion becomes uh-huh terribly frightening it becomes a mystery. It becomes frightening on on so many levels. Yeah it's interesting that you called it a satisfying story because for me. It's the story that leaves many many questions unanswered or unsatisfied. But maybe that's is that his faction of like about it. You know the satisfaction for me is the fact that it's mystery that it is completely unsolved at the end and yet somehow there is that that is a very that is a solution for me and interestingly enough the film goes in a different direction and much as revealed the end and I wasn't quite satisfied with the you know with quite a definite solution into the mystery in the film as I was to the mysteries of the remains in the story. Yeah Yeah it allows your your imagination to provide the ending. Yes exactly exactly. The story was written Quite early in in Murakami's writing career. It was published in Japanese in nineteen eighty-three when he was I think in his mid thirties or early thirties. do you think that it feels like early work for him or do you think it's consistent with his later writing I think it's consistent with With all the themes. I can't really speak as a more copy expert because I have not read everything that he's written but I feel that it's consistent in all of the stories. I've read of his. This feeling of parallel lives parallel. Worlds this terrible cre- penis that enters into ordinary live I think it's all they're running. I think You know it has all the elements that we recognize as as being classic Ugh more common elements. Yeah we'll we'll talk some more after the story. Now here's Andrea Lee Reading Barn burning by rookie Murakami translated from the Japanese knees. Bhai Philip Gabriel Barn burning. I met her at a friend's wedding reception here in Tokyo. And we got to know. Oh other three years ago. There is nearly a dozen years age difference between us. She being twenty and I thirty one not that it battered much idolize. ELSOM my mind then and didn't have time to worry about things like age and she didn't care about the difference at all. I was married to but that didn't bother her either for her your age or marital status or income. Were like your shoe size. How high or low your voices the shape of if your fingernails in other words? Not the kind of thing you can do anything about come to think of it. I guess she's right. She was studying with that guy. I can't remember his name. That famous mime and working as an advertising model to make ends meet but she usually found it too much trouble to go out on the assignments. Her agent got her so her income didn't amount to much what it didn't cover her boyfriend's made up. Of course I don't know for sure but things thinks she said seemed to hint at that kind of arrangement. I'm not saying that. She slept with men for money. Maybe there were times when something close to that took place but but that's not the point. Something else was at work. In her relations with men there was a simplicity about her that attracted a certain type of man he look at that unabashed simplicity and want to put it together with his own complicated bottled up feelings. I can't explain it well but oh I think that's what was going on. You could say that. She lived on her simplicity. Naturally you couldn't expect things to work that way all the time that would turn turn the whole structure of the universe upside down. It could only happen under certain conditions in a certain time and place the way it did with the tendering appealing appealing. Let me tell you about. This tangerine peeling as I mentioned when I first met her. She told me she was studying. Mime that so I said and didn't surprise me too much young women. These days are all studying something or other. But she didn't seem the type who'd be serious about perfecting a skill then she showed me the tendering peeling as the name says it involves peeling. A Tangerine on her left was a bowl piled high with tangerines. Insurance on her right Abo- for the peel. At least that was the idea. Actually there wasn't anything there at all she taken imaginary. Very Tangerine in her hand slowly. Peel it but one section in her mouth and spit out the seeds when she'd finished one tangerine she'd wrap up all the seats in the peel and deposit it in the ball to her right. She repeated these movements over and over again. When you try to put it in words it doesn't sound like anything special but if you see it with your own eyes for ten or twenty minutes we were just chatting at the bar and almost without thinking she kept on performing it gradually? The sense of reality is sucked right out of everything around you. It's a very strange feeling. A long time ago. When Adolf Eichmann was on trial in an Israeli court someone said that fitting punishment for him would be locking him in an airtight room and slowly pumping all the air out? I don't know how he actually died. The story just sort of popped into my head. You're pretty talented. I told her this. It's easy s nothing to do with talent. What you do isn't make yourself believe that? Their tangerines Rian Stare. You forget that the tangerines are not there. That's all sounds like then I could see we were going to get along. We didn't go without all that often about once a month twice in most at caller up and ask her where she'd like to go we'd have to have a few drinks in a bar and talk up a storm arm and listen to her talk. She'd listened to me. We had hardly anything in common to talk about but that didn't matter. I guess you'd say we were friends. Naturally I paid for everything. Thank all the food and drink a few times. She called me up usually when she'd run out of money and was hungry on those occasions. She ate like you wouldn't believe I was is completely relaxed when I was with her. I could erase everything from my mind all the work. I didn't want to do the jumble of senseless ideas people people carry around in their heads. She had that effect on me. She didn't talk about anything in particular often. I would just Kim nodding my head not really picking up the gist of her words but listening to her made me feel relaxed as if I were gazing drifting clouds far off in the distance. It's I talked about all sorts of things too. I told her as honestly as I could. My thoughts on everything from personal dilemmas to the a state of the world. You name it. Maybe she was doing the same thing. I did just nodding her head as she listened to me without any of its sinking in. But I didn't care what I was looking for was a certain feeling. It feeling that had nothing to do with sympathy or understanding

Murakami Andrea Lee Philip Gabriel National Book Award Lee Chang Dong Bhai Philip Gabriel Barn Rhode Island House Director Russian Journal Adolf Eichmann Tokyo KIM Rian Stare
"national book award" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"national book award" Discussed on KCRW

"Towing to her punishment. looking for us listen order was right dad says walking back with mom now excited and seemingly over his anger. she made a blind we would like to like they were closed. when we left the later that evening Dan was doing to try. they pulled out of the parking lot and headed off to Houston and their pay off the brake lights temporarily fixed in dupes of black electrical tape. I watch as a truck disappears it looks like every other piece of no broken down equipment we've ever owned resting miserable totally criminal. well when I turned south back to Brownsville. mom is our usual quiet self except this time she plays a radio louder this means the stinking. it's getting dark and I'm sleepy so I sleep. she'll get us home. she knows the way. for that I could trust her. during my teen as reading a story from his collection the boy kings of Texas which is a memoir and a finalist for the National Book Award. two. get away with it after the beep. said a show as a re run a couple weeks before it originally was broadcast we invited listeners to call into a special phone number that we set up here the radio show and tell us what things you have gotten away with.

Dan Houston National Book Award. Texas Brownsville.
Toni Morrison's Contributions to Literature and Society

1A

01:37 min | 1 year ago

Toni Morrison's Contributions to Literature and Society

"Of the late Toni Morrison the author died Monday night and we're making the space to honor her contributions to literature and American society at large we're speaking with Paula Giddings professor emerita of the of africana studies at Smith College and Dana Williams chair of the English department at Howard University Toni Morrison did eventually split her time between editing and being a mother of two and then also to write her own work but there was a time when her work did not receive awards forty eight black writers including the likes of my Angelo the car Amir baccarat and Alice Walker penned a letter that the times book review then published chastising the literary world for not recognizing Morrison either for the National Book Award or for the Pulitzer Prize beloved did to then win the Pulitzer Prize that April in nineteen eighty eight critics talked a lot about the absence of white life in her work which she pointed out as a deeply racist sentiment there's a moment circulating on Twitter right now from an interview Tony gave back in nineteen ninety eight with a journalist cheta went went pushed her on why she didn't give more attention to white experiences in her novels let's listen and you will maintain this safe place for yourself for your account you don't think you will ever change and write books that incorporate white white lines into them substantially I have to in a substantial way you can't understand how powerfully races that question as you could never ask quite often when

Toni Morrison Smith College Dana Williams Angelo Alice Walker National Book Award Pulitzer Prize Twitter Tony Cheta Paula Giddings Professor Howard University
"national book award" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"national book award" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Native American literature where the fictional lives there also instead of being fiction so I think in a weirdly trump has caused a lot of people to pay attention in a better way to marginalized communities and making structural changes that hopefully or sustainable not just a pendulum swing and away from we're talking backstage about how the pendulum's always swinging hard to the left hard to the right and you're saying what if she would just sort of concentrate right in the middle here that was really the I thought that was really right on top of it hi we're going to open it up to questions from the audience in a second here but I wanted to ask you one more question before we did that which is that your book was nominated for the National Book Award as a finalist in the fiction category in a long list and I I wondered if you had any kind of ambivalence about this idea of it being an American novel he knows that is a the idea of the American novel something that you were trying to write yourself a position yourself against and I've I've given actually little thought to the idea of being an American well like sort of being a native American because the term native Americans not referring to being an American it's it's actually referring to being pre American in a weird way I I was super grateful the big dollars to and I know that I am American I think you know people from a lot of different cultures who grow up in America connect with some of the ideas of identity in the novel that are about mixed heritage I think the matter what your background is you are a hybrid dominant culture related person see you have to relate in this in a similar way that all the characters relate to their native heritage as an American as you think you might be that might even make you more American than you want they're comfortable with bang so you can feel free to clap I don't I don't know how I feel about that but the book award at I'm grateful that these different words are happening and I don't have I'm not in a place to fill criticism toward people are trying to give me awards at film.

National Book Award America
"national book award" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:28 min | 2 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Were National Book Award finalist and now this new book in the new book is called shout Aaron I I'd love for you to share with us a little bit about what you want to accomplish with this book and and then a little bit about the book itself thank you so much for the opportunity Frankie can you speak up I'm I'm not hearing you thank you I'm sorry can you hear me better now yes much better okay very good all I appreciate the opportunity thank you so much this book is a result of not only you know my own experience as a survivor of free but twenty years spent listening to other survivors and particularly talking with high school and college age students and recognizing that we've had it all wrong in our culture for hundreds of years when we put the onus on survivors of sexual violence and and we blame and shame them instead of putting the responsibility on the criminals who commit these acts and I guess this book is my way of saying that the days of shame are over and that is it the time has come when anybody who's been harmed can feel secure in speaking up about what happened to them and then we can begin to have the rational conversations that this country has needed for so long so that we can teach your kids what healthy consent based sexuality is and we can help anybody who's been harmed by to get the support that they need yeah yes I just I just wanted to ask you what your thoughts are on and each gene coming out and sharing her story I think she has a sister hood as millions of women and I think her hearse stories very very similar that problem is obviously when you don't tell somebody for decades it makes it easier I think for a lot of people who aren't familiar with these situations to dismiss what you're saying all but the truth is is that for for most survivors of sexual violence it can take decades before they feel confident enough to be able to not and when you are when you know when the person who hurt she was somebody who has attained spell public status or celebrity your job becomes that much harder it's in it's very telling to ask people how many of the victims of bill Crosby did it because he did it take before you believe them Jacqueline and there's this is an internal tipping point that varies from person to person but it went once back it is reached everybody because of no I think we're we're seeing it again so I would love for you to share a little bit about your story you were extremely young when you were raped you were what thirteen years old thirteen years old yeah yeah eight so it's a very common story it might situation was complicated a bit by the fact that my family my parents we're going through a very very rough times my father had PTSD in was an alcoholic we were bouncing around in two different homes to different school districts and we had just landed in a new community again and a boy I met who I thought was on the on boy is kind of attracted to him I've known him for a few weeks and we went for a walk on a beautiful August day and what I thought was just going to be a nice kiss turned into a in turned into rape and I didn't tell anybody I went home and I I didn't tell anybody for twenty three years my largest fear was I was afraid that if I told my father would hunt the boy down and shoot him and then that would be my fault and then my dad in jail and so you know I I I did I think with so many people did and and remember always when we're talking about the victims of sexual violence we're not just talking about girls and women there are plenty of boys and men I was just going to say it's an equal opportunity problem absolutely and on college campuses the the group that has the highest rate of sexual violence are transgender people so this is this is an equal opportunity like you say crime and so I I push it down I just honest I'm just going to keep moving on I'm going to keep moving on I did a lot of the things that not many survivors to which is I turned to drugs for a while to kind of know my pain and I struggled in relationships I struggle to learn how to trust people and my own PTSD didn't go away until finally finally twenty three years later I found a great therapist and began working through when it happened I I wish your story as as you said what was not the norm more was not so common but it is and so what what are you when you give the book when you give talks when you work with young adults especially when I was in college you know this this was very common it was very common that that are friends would come back from it from an evening Aaron do they were rate date rape it was very common error and and it frightened us if I may I think it's time for us to not use the word date rape anymore because we don't say that somebody got date robbed you know if if if if if your date bless your wallet rate is very Sir yes absolutely point well taken absolutely but that's what we did was called back then absolutely it precisely and that's why for example you know we we allow the judicial system and law enforcement to soften crimes that are primarily carried out against women with modifiers like date rape or domestic violence and you know as if that should be treated differently than any other kind of attack and an E. it's because it used to be treated differently marital rape we used to be legal and I think that maybe that's where some of those old Attar attitudes came from and we have very slowly culturally and legally been you know making sure that the rules are engine and then there are still you know generations of people involved who haven't gotten the memo no no and that's why you're on today we're doing a double segment stay tuned we'll have more with Laurie Halse Anderson and and your website guy had the new book is called show and.

Aaron National Book Award twenty three years thirteen years twenty years
"national book award" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:19 min | 2 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A finalist for the national book award early hawk shield is a professor emeritus at Berkeley and was born in Boston Massachusetts. So you or the child of a foreign service officer? So you sound like you grow up all over the world. Yeah. I lived in Israel. And from aged twelve to fourteen very pivotal experience. And then New Zealand Wellington New Zealand, and then my folks were in Ghana, and I spent a summer in Ghana. But by then I was in college, and then they weren't Tunisia. So I was very fortunate really to can't to experience that. Yeah. Yeah. Was there a religious or spiritual background to your childhood in your family, or in those places? Yeah. Yeah. I would say, my parents were very religious unitarian. For unitarians. I the message I took away is that it's a very big world. And we have to learn to get to know and empathize with people in radically different cultures. I think by the time I was sixteen. I had that message. But I felt something missing. And I got interested in the Quakers who seemed to be much more, okay, gang. So what are we gonna do about it? Interiors were very talky. Talkers, you talk talk talk of the Quakers looked like they were kind. They were doers. Yeah. Well, then I think how you've spoken about how. Living in that diplomatic world. So you are you are known within sociology is the founder of the sociology of emotion. And I just want to summarize, and you tell me if I get this wrong, but it feels important I want to really dive deep into that. So that the backdrop of in terms of how we analyze and address political and social dynamics, and especially in a time of discord like this where where the sides become more defined and everybody seems incomprehensible to everybody else. And so, you know, you you describe in the book kind of there are ways of thinking about how people are being manipulated or bought. There are ways of analyzing how people may are being misled. And then there are ways of us describing, you know, how we're just different and distinct cultural values, and you've said that for you. And especially as you watch this last few years unfold. In American and now global life like what is missing for you in all of this. While all of these ways of analyzing are useful. What's missing is an acknowledgement of the reality of emotion in politics. Right, and empathy, and empathy. Right. You know, the idea of emotion being basic and foundational to social and political life is not new. I mean, vapor talk to that and Emil Dirk. So that's not new, but I found that this important foundational reality of our feelings. We didn't have a language a way of conceptualizing if that was useful. And so certainly three decades ago. The idea was that either you were thinking or were you? Feel. So I thought the something wrong about that. Because Lynn, your emotional, you, you are seeing the world in a particular way. And you have thoughts about the way you see it. You know, you are thinking, and when you're rational mean take the stock exchange or people are making quote rational decision spout by sell buys stocks on the stock exchange. They're excited. They're later. They're depressed their emotional. So these two are intertwined in ways. We have not carefully. Understood. So yes, it led me to become extremely interested in emotion in managing emotions evoking, emotions and suppressing emotions in daily life and in work. So I got interested in that. I mean, you're shining ally. Right. I think that's some. Yes, that we don't have a language for it. But that also especially in the late twentieth century. I think we don't we don't know how to take emotion seriously. But I think this is such an important statement you make it. Cut runs all three years through work that also we think the other side is being emotional, and we're not. The really important realization is that we are all that. This is a piece of how we are all inhabiting pneumonia. That's right. That's right. Exactly. Yeah. And that it's social right? That's one of your big points that that this line between our private emotional lives and social realities is is acknowledging that is just being reality based it's kind of like being in the world as it is. And not as we fantasize it should be. Right. Right. In my latest book strangers in their own land. I got very interested in something. I call the deep story, which is a way of thinking about emotion. I live in long taught sociology at Berkeley, California. Which is a blue state is, you know, blue town. They'd heard. And in two thousand eleven I realized that already the country was falling apart. There were increasing divide between Democrats Republicans left, right? And that I didn't understand those on the right? And that I was in a bubble. So I determined to get out of my bubble and come to know people that were as far, right? As Berkeley California was tight and to try and climb. What I called an empathy wall. To permit myself a great deal of curiosity. About the experiences and viewpoints of people that I knew I would have differences with and it turned out to be an extraordinary experience. It took me five years of really getting to know people asking, you know, where they were more where the school was what row they sat in in school. What their favorite thing to do was rather ancestors were buried and in the course of going fishing with them. Of course, it really getting to know them. I came up with this idea of a deep story as a way of getting to emotion. So that wasn't a free use before the deep store. No. The narrative has felt right. That's an important. So how would you start to tell? How would you start to tell the deep story of our time as you inhabited it well at experience. What I came to feel and realize is that both the left and the right have different deep stories. So what is the deep story of deep story is what you feel about a highly salient situation, that's very important to you. You take facts out of the deep story, you've take a moral precepts out of the deep story. It's just what feels true, and I think we all have deep stories, whatever our politics. But there were not a flea aware of that they're dreamlike and told through metaphor. And the metaphor for the right wing deep story that I describe it and strangers is that you're waiting in line for the American dream that you feel very much to serve. It's like waiting in a pilgrimage and the light line isn't moving. And has an feeder tired feel you properly deserving of this reward. That's a hat and the idea is you don't begrudge anyone. Right. Right. Okay. This in this, right? Deep story. Don't begrudge anyone. You're not a hateful person. But you see then second moment of the right link deep story, somebody cutting head of you. Why are they getting special treatment? And then another moment. The president the country Barack Obama who should be tending fairly tall all waiters in line seems to be waving to the line cutters. And he in fact is he line cutter. The idea is how did his mother she was a single mother not a rich woman afford Harvard education of Columbia education, something fishy. That was the thought there. And so in final moment, someone from the coasts someone highly educated someone from that so called elite turns around, and they're really close to the prize or they have the progress, but they turn round look at the other two are waiting in line. And. Oh you backward. Southern ill educated. Racist, sexist, homophobic. Right. And then that is the strange thing that insult. And then they felt like strangers in their own land. Wait a minute. And they would say one man told me, I live your metaphor. Another one said, you read my mind, another one said, no you have it wrong that the people are waiting line are paying for the line cutters. So that's why we're in rage. Another look we leave that line. We secede, you know, getting another leader. So they can but you can see it's my effort to get at fewing, and how detached it can become from facts. Yes. And I think a lot about and to me this comes through in you talking about the deep story because and as you said, the facts facts and moral precepts. Arise out of the deep store. And we'll take some take them out. Move them from about facts, and it's not about moral rights either. It's a felt true embodiment when I went back and forth between Berkeley, and and the people I came to know and really respect in the other world of the south. Southwest louisiana. I came to to realize that there were different truths different truth. So there are facts, I believe in the reality. Yes. Yes. The deep story. And again, the all have a story. It repels certain facts that don't fit it. And it invites other facts do. I'm Christa tepid. And this is on being today with the esteemed sociologist of emotion arly hawk shelter. You in a strangers in.

Berkeley Ghana national book award Tunisia New Zealand Wellington New Zea officer Israel Boston Massachusetts Emil Dirk Berkeley California Christa tepid professor founder Lynn Southwest louisiana California Barack Obama Republicans
"national book award" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And when there is a sense of celebrating dictators as far as I know, I can't imagine that happened before next time. What's new in voter suppression techniques in two thousand eighteen with national book award winner. Candy the Brian Lehrer show at ten AM on WNYC. WNYC is supported by hospital for special surgery ranked number one in the country for orthopedics for nine straight years. According to the two thousand eighteen two thousand nineteen US news and World Report. Best hospitals ranking says how you move is why we're here. WNYC's a media partner of strand bookstore, presenting Pulitzer prize winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas for the launch of his book. Dear America notes from an undocumented citizen September twentieth at some culture influence, strandbooks dot com. This is the takeaway. I'm Sarah Silas, filling in for ten Zena Vega to Washington now where in allegation of sexual assault against judge. Brett Cavanaugh has thrown his prime court confirmation process into question on Sunday, the Washington Post published in article with Christine Blasi Ford. She is a research psychologist in northern California who says that Cavanaugh assaulted her at a party when the two of them were teenagers in the early nineteen eighty s according to Ford Cavanaugh was stenciling drunk when the assault took place breath Cavanaugh has denied the allegations saying in a statement Monday, this is a completely false accusation. I have never done anything like what the accuser describes to her. Or to anyone? The Senate Judiciary committee has scheduled a public hearing regarding the allegations for next Monday Alana shore is a congressional reporter for political. And she's with me now to discuss where Kavanagh's confirmation process goes. From here. Hi alana. Thanks for having me Alana, both Brad Kavanagh and Christine Blasi Ford. The woman who accused the supreme court nominee of sexual assault. Have now been called to testify and those will be public hearings. And this is a big deal. Can you just talk to us about what that means shirt? But it's important for your listeners to remember that Dr Ford has yet to accept this invitation. And when you really think about it, her lawyer has said that she is willing to testify in a fair proceeding and this proceeding so far has been run and managed entirely by the GOP. It's not clear whether Democrats would even show up if this hearing happens because they have strenuously boycotted to conducting this process so fast without what they have described as a filler FBI investigation. So so that's an important first step here because this seems like a big deal, but a lot of moving parts continued to be stolen flocks. And no one on the hill is one hundred percent sure that this hearing will truly happen as it's envisioned who made the. Vision for these hearings to be public, regardless of who ends up testifying. Why do you think they did that that was under pressure from Republicans on the Senate Judiciary committee, specifically Senator Jeff flake who said no just talking to them on the phone in private is not enough. The American people deserve a hearing on this Republican leaders were essentially forced by this handful of Republicans led by flake, but Senator Susan Collins played a role Senator Lisa Murkowski, really just swing votes on the nomination. And so as you said there were a handful of Republican senators that did say that these allegations needed to be looked into by the Senate Judiciary committee before the confirmation process could proceed, but other Republicans have complained that Democrats only went public with allegations in order to throw Kavanagh's confirmation into disarray at the last minute. Can you remind us of how the timeline here compares to Anita hill and her testimony against the prem- court Justice Clarence Thomas when when she accused him of sexual harassment. There are indeed. Some uncanny parallels between this case and hell case in both instances the woman stepped forward and said I'm willing to tell my story after the initial hearings had already ended on the nomination. But senators had been talking to the woman in question at least one Senator before the hearing Scott started and in this case with Brad Kavanagh. It was Diane Feinstein the top democrat on the Senate Judiciary committee who was the only Senator aware of this far enough in advance her colleagues on the democratic side. And the committee didn't really get the full picture until last week. After a news website already had reported on the existence of this mysterious letter. So it's all happened fairly eleventh hour, and it is debatable. Whether Senator Feinstein should have told her fellow Democrats earlier, she says, I did the only thing I could do in this situation. Because Dr Ford wanted to remain confidential. What was I to do? Republicans say we're not telling you to out Dr Ford against her will. But why didn't you refer this to the F? When you've got it back in July and the rest of the committee Democrats because they weren't aware until the last minute are a bit caught in the middle on this. So in that respect, it's different from hill in the sense that really only one democratic Senator had the semi soul picture, and how likely is it that this allegation will cost Cavanaugh votes on the Republican side of the Senate. That's really impossible to speculate at this point so much depends on whether and how Dr forgets to air her side of the story in public because right now these undecided Republicans have only just heard strenuous denials from the judge will remind us how many people need to flip their votes in order for for cabinet confirmation to nocco forward, of course, in a fifty one forty nine Senate it takes too. That's because one defecting Republican Senator will flip it to fifty fifty and vice President Mike Pence can ultimately cast a tie breaking vote important to note if Pence does this would be the first time in history that a vice president at do this for a supreme court nominee and on Monday. President Trump spoke with. Reporters and said, he was okay with a delay in the confirmation process. We want to go through a process we want to make sure everything's perfect. Everything is just right. I wish the Democrats could have done this a lot sooner. Because they had this information for many months, and they shouldn't have waited till literally the last days they should have done. It a lot sooner. But with all of that being said, we want to go through the process prizing from President Trump because a lot of his allies had expected him to go after Dr Ford, and we hear the reason that he was able to give such a measured response is that he likes how judge Cavanaugh has been handling this. It's frankly straight out of President Trump's own playbook when women have accused him of sexual misconduct. Just deny deny in a vocal and one hundred percent airtight way. That's exactly what the nominee has done. So the president was able to say stand-up guy. I support him. I'm gonna stand Alana shore is a congressional reporter for political things so much Alana. Thank you. And calls have been.

Christine Blasi Ford Senate Judiciary committee Senator alana Brad Kavanagh Brett Cavanaugh WNYC President Trump Senator Feinstein Senator Jeff flake assault Ford Cavanaugh Senator Susan Collins Senate Senator Lisa Murkowski US reporter Brian Lehrer national book award
Jean Friedman, Stacey Abrams and Jonathan Karl discussed on Kilmeade & Friends with Brian Kilmeade

Kilmeade & Friends with Brian Kilmeade

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

Jean Friedman, Stacey Abrams and Jonathan Karl discussed on Kilmeade & Friends with Brian Kilmeade

"President trump is now warning it might not happen there's a chance that it'll work out there's a chance as a very substantial chance at what workout i don't wanna waste a lot of time and i'm sure he doesn't want to waste a lot of time trump administration officials are now sounding a little more flexible as they say american investments and technology could benefit pyongyang if that regime denuclearize the president suggested he could back down from insisting that kim gives up all his nukes at once it would certainly be better if we're all in one does it have to be i don't think i want to totally commit myself but all in one would be a lot better president trump seemed to blame china for the complications saying kim jong un changed his tune after having a second unannounced meeting with the chinese president abc's chief white house correspondent jonathan karl a longtime business partner of president trump's personal lawyer michael cohen has now taken a plea bargain jean friedman known as the taxi king pleaded guilty to one count of tax evasion he'll serve no jail time in exchange for cooperating with state and federal investing gators including those who are looking into konate scene is another possible way to pressure cohen himself to cooperate with federal investigators democrats stacey abrams has won hers party's primary in georgia's race for government aid us all to be energized and we need to be side by side so we can succeed and so i hope that you will all join us in our fight for the future she wins the november the former state house minority leader would become the first black female governor in us history the associated press is reporting novelist philip roth has died his book american pastoral won the pulitzer prize for fiction back in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight years earlier in nineteen sixty he received the national book award for his first collection of short stories goodbye columbus phillip roth was eighty five years old you're listening to abc news doors are being slammed in.

Jean Friedman Stacey Abrams Jonathan Karl National Book Award Pulitzer Prize Philip Roth United States Georgia Donald Trump Michael Cohen Partner Chief White House Corresponden ABC Kim Jong Un China President Trump Pyongyang One Thousand Nine Hundred Eigh Eighty Five Years
House approves bill rolling back banking rules

Jay Talking

02:00 min | 3 years ago

House approves bill rolling back banking rules

"This is cbs news on the hour presented by liberty mutual insurance i'm jim shanavie president trump is sounding more pessimistic about that plan summit next month with north korean leader kim jong the president's is talks on the singapore meeting are moving along but he now suggests the date might also move that may not work out for june twelfth but there's a good chance that we'll have the meeting sitting alongside the south korean president mr trump said conditions for talks with the north still have to be met he didn't describe when asked what those conditions are whether or not it happens you'll be knowing pretty soon but we're talking right now the president was asked by a south korean reporter whether he could assure kim jong un safety mr trump said quote he will be safe steven portnoy cbs news the white house houses joined the senate in passing legislation to roll back some of the banking rules instituted under the dodd frank act a measure that was meant to guard against a repeat of the two thousand eight financial crisis the house voted to fifty eight to one fifty nine to approve the rollback legislation of doddfrank it's a big win for the president who made getting rid of the landmark law campaign promise the bill raises the threshold at which banks are deemed too big fail the bills aimed especially at helping small and medium size banks including community banks and credit unions but critics say the likelihood of future taxpayer bailouts will be greater once it becomes law bill raikov cbs news washington knows another day of dodging lava flows on hawaii's big island workers believe they've been able to seal off a geothermal plant to prevent that laver from causing a toxic gas released from swells governor david ige feel like at least at this point in time it's plugged and the plug is holding and the pressure is decreasing the nineteen day long eruptions still shows no signs of letting up author philip roth has died he was considered by many to be the seminal american novelists winner of the pulitzer prize for fiction in nineteen ninety eight is works included goodbye columbus which won him a national book award his human stain and american pastora got him the pulitzer favorite subjects were the.

Pulitzer Prize Pulitzer Washington Steven Portnoy Singapore Kim Jong Jim Shanavie CBS Pastora National Book Award President Trump Philip Roth David Ige Hawaii Senate Reporter
"national book award" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Not a stream of articles in the literary press over the past ten years wondering why the american novel had become so anemic so in would turning so esoteric so removed from everyday life or removed from the life of society either was rather obvious suggestion mean why don't you just get up and look around and and and see what's going on all seem to come from a statement that philip roth at made at a time when he was the hottest young novelist in the united states won the national book award for goodbye columbus he lit up the sky with portnoy's complaint and he said we live in an age in which the imagination of the novelist is helpless before what he knows he's going to read tomorrow morning's newspaper but it seems to me an entire generation of american novelist exactly the wrong conclusion from this perfectly accurate piece of evidence they began to avert their eyes go into these rather esotique eric forms of of the novel culminating and i'm a marvelous novello by robert couvert of course very prestigious novel which began to start with i went to live alone on an island and committed suicide and that was the first senate and in this avella there are no flashbacks which it was a tremendous piece of virtue wasi but as something of a dead end i countersign tom wolfe speaking in nineteen ninety mr wolf was the author of novels including the bonfire of the vanities and experimental nonfiction like the nineteen sixty eight book the electric kool aid acid test how he claimed to never have used lsd himself but that books tales of ken casey and ken keesee rather and the mary prankster's had a kind of you are there quality none the less he didn't look like a guy who would have such a grasp of the counterculture tom wolfe was famous for wearing a white suit all year round in nineteen seventy six when he appeared on this program to speak with barbara from about as essay collection moved gloves mauve gloves and madmen clutter and vine he discussed why so few men at the time were willing to step out in style this new book of yours is all about what you call state has.

philip roth united states national book award portnoy robert couvert senate tom wolfe mr wolf lsd ken casey ken keesee barbara ten years
"national book award" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on Overdue

"And i have not heard of this book before but of yeah ally her work seems to be like critically well received they she wins an award basically every time she releases henny weigh um this one a national book award in 2011 an alex award in 2012 yet the odds weren't their school because there are books that resonate with black teens but their intended with alex for with the hair intended for adults um which is pretty cool sorry you're out in her the rise is gonna and then she won the national book award for her most recent novels seeing unburied seeing which came out last year in 2017 yes yes and she got him macarthur genius grant in 2017 as well yeah she's pretty accomplished for like as she will admit in in interviews that it is surprising how many people know about her books like when she got the first national book award she pleasantly surprised because she knew that people like critics liked it but didn't really know how many other people were we see has she apparently had some trouble getting her first book gatt heartless there's like a threeyear journey between finishing it and finding someone to publish dole has given up on on writing it all at that point but then it was published in then um and then it is you went from there obviously she's publish other stuff since then so yes she was born in ninety seven friendlies from mississippi as she got out she got her degrees from stanford and then also got an mfa from michigan she's taught of a couple different universities.

national book award dole mississippi stanford alex michigan threeyear
"national book award" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The university of virginia of accused creative writing professor national book award winner jon casey of sexual misconduct both recently filed complaints with the school one accuser says casey repeatedly touched her and others and made vulgar remarks about women she says case his behavior was an open secret who won the national book award a 1989 for his novel sparked tina a school says it's investigated the la gatien's case he has said it's too early to combat because the cases ongoing michaels for pay kfi news pick from the helpful socal honda traffic center watch out for a stalled car in so maher on the fives with outside of the five that's going to be rocks fruit secondly for the left is blocked these are just beckham it behind that it actually traffic from the helpful socal honda traffic center chuck norris stalled car in film are on the fives with outside of the five that's going to be rocks fruit secondly the left is blocking suspect enough behind that it actually states pretty heavy to just beyond the ford team also on the fives is heading south getting into the boyle heights syriasouth live report the sixty got a crash in the middle lane things they're pretty heavy coming away from fourth flippant by through a warmup area slows down off and on from imperial highway overdue bad atlantic look at that crash in this for the past northbound 405 to see a more poland in that's where an overturned car has the right two lanes block things are going to be heavy from getty center marina to sixty a day street crash they made it to the senator for this item boulevard kfi and this guy hopes gig pastor time j would a wet start to your monday your forecast next i think i've told the story of the air before but i was driving eastbound or southbound wherever wherever you you call it on the 101 and a guy in front of me as a convertible and he takes is in and out bag right outside the convertible then the cop than the straw an unlit but in that order the bag verse gets caught the wind and disappears the bags gone nearly hit my car and then the cup goes push it's gone and then the lid and the.

professor jon casey national book award la gatien senator kfi university of virginia honda maher chuck norris poland getty center marina
"national book award" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Right oh my god don't be stop this is one of the most psychotic women in the history of politics a low life of the lowest of the highest order of no impact whatsoever all she does this chant impeach 45 and now listen to this for that she was granted the glamour woman of the year award if this strikes you as bizarre it isn't bazaar in america and in america that has been stolen by the psychotic left i enquired about the national book award now the national book award as established in ninety two it was given to great right as in the past william faulkner bernardin element philip roth john updike norman mailer saul bellow flannery o'connor and then something happened suddenly the national book awards were stolen by the same sick mentality who has taken over for example the glamour awards what taken over the pundits on msnbc i don't care if they're liberals but these are not rational liberals these are haters who use hate as their weapon of choice who were the judges who are the judges have you seen who they're giving the national book award to these days do i have to tell you who is selected shows an actress no one ever heard of a nobody should be the lead spokesperson at this year's national book award an actress no one ever heard of who's only claim to fame is that she apparently hates men that was enough to become the spokesman for the national book awards and take a guess who gets the national book award in virtually all the categories of fiction poetry young people's literature do i have to tell you who gets those awards do i have to spell it out for you no i don't universities have been destroyed the academy has been wrecked every aspect of our culture has been taken over during the long march to destroy this nation i don't need the national book award i mean i've written 25 thirty books i can't keep up the count the one i've written now god faith in reason is absolute stunning book that shouldn't that shouldn't get the national book award it should get a nobel prize do i expect that no and how would have changed my life it wouldn't i.

america national book award nobel prize william faulkner bernardin john updike norman flannery o'connor
"national book award" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Yes and by staff this is one of the most psychotic women in the history of politics a low life of the lowest of the highest order of no intellect whatsoever or she does this chant impeach fortyfive and notice that has for that she was granted the glamour woman of the year award if this strikes you as bazaar it isn't bazaar in america in an america that has been stolen by the psychotic left i enquired about the national book award by now the national book award was established 1950 it was given to great writers in the past william faulkner bernard melamed philip roth john updike norman mailer saul bellow floor o'connor and happened suddenly the national book awards were stolen by the same sick mentality was taken over for example the glamour awards what taken over the pundits on msnbc i don't care if they're liberals but these are not rational these haters who use hate as their weapon of choice who the judges who are the judges have you seen who they're giving the national book award to these days do i have to tell you who is selected uh they chose an actress no one ever heard of a nobody to be the lead a spokesperson at this year's national book award an actress no one ever heard of who's only claim to fame is that she apparently hates men that was enough to become the spokesman for the national book awards and take a guess who gets the national book award in virtually all the categories of fiction poetry young people's literature do i have to tell you who gets those awards do i have to spell out for you no i don't universities have been destroyed the academy has been ragged every aspect of our culture as when taken over during the long march to destroy this nation i don't need the national book award i mean i've written five thirty books i can't keep up the count the one i've written now god faith in reason is an absolute stunning book that shouldn't that shouldn't get the national book award.

america national book award philip roth o'connor fortyfive william faulkner bernard melam john updike norman
"national book award" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on WDRC

"Two and scottie by boosting the is one of the most iconic women in the history of politics a low life of the lowest of the highest order of no intellect whatsoever all she does this chant impeach 45 and knows that his for that she was granted the glamour woman of the year award if this strikes you as bizarre it isn't bizarre in america and in america that has been stolen by the psychotic left i enquired about the national book award now the national book award was established in 1950 it was given to great right as in the past william faulkner bernard melamed philip roth john updike th norman mailer saul bellow flannery o'connor and then something happened suddenly the national book awards was stolen by the same sick mentality who has taken over for example the glamour awards what taken over the pundits on msnbc i don't care if they're liberals but these are not rational liberals these are haters who use hate as their weapon of choice core the judges who are the judges have you seen who they're giving the national book award to these days do i have to tell you who was selected they chose an actress no one ever heard of a nobody to be the lead a spokesperson at this year's national book award an actress no one ever heard of who's only claim to fame is that she apparently hates men that was enough to become the spokesman for the national book awards and take a guess who gets the national book award in virtually all the categories of fiction poetry young people's literature do i have to tell you who gets those awards do i have to spell it out for you no i don't the universe these have been destroyed the academy has been wrecked every aspect of our culture has been taken over during the long march to destroy this nation i don't need the national book award i mean i've written 25 thirty books i can't keep up the count the one i've written now got faith in reason is an absolute stunning book that shouldn't that shouldn't get the national book award it should get a nobel prize do i expect that no.

america national book award philip roth nobel prize william faulkner bernard melam norman flannery o'connor
"national book award" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for fresh air in the following message comes from boomerang a new subscription video streaming service offering timeless cartoons and new original animated series boomerang is celebrating garfield during november so in dole jerk had it suit all month long relax while enjoying this lasagna covered feline this thanksgiving holiday visit boomerang dot com slash promo and use the promo code fresh to start your special 30day free trial today over her long career louise urged rick has written sixteen novels lately she's been on a real role three of her recent novels have won the national book critics circle award the national book award and been a finalist for the pulitzer prize our book critic marine corrigan says that urge rex new novel is something to celebrate as well here's a review of future home of the living god before i finally picked up and red louise urge rex new novel called future home of the living god there was a mighty obstacle that had to be faced an obstacle called the handmaid's tale after margaret atwood's majesty aerial achievement is there really room for another distort bian feminist novel about the overthrow of democracy by a christian fundamentalist regime that enslaves fertile women and reduces them to simple vessels of procreation the somewhat unsettling answer is sure urge rick reminds us here that the unthinkable could happen in a variety of ways rather than standing in the shadow of that woods classic urge rex tensson lyrical new work of speculative fiction stands shoulder to breese shoulder right alongside it future home of the living god is loosely structured as a series of letters that are heroin a 26yearold woman named cedar hawk song maker rights to her unborn child cedar is impelled to write these letters because well something weird is going on nature has doubled back on itself and plants and animals and fetuses seemed to be randomly devolving pregnant women are being rounded up by agents of the new religious government called the church of the new constitution the.

garfield louise national book award pulitzer prize marine corrigan margaret atwood rick woods heroin dole thanksgiving national book critics circle a book critic rex breese 30day
"national book award" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Many many years ago to review and uh have followed his career but i think underground railroad is this is best book it's just a it's not occasionally like the book that wins the national book award few what surprised than all the other awards turns out to just be got good and i think underground railroad this is that book yeah that's the only book of his that i've read but it was it was terrific john henry days whose first novels also amazing blow as you know this is part of the i ran episode and we decided for our guest today we wanted to find the only author that we know rivals rand in popularity with teenagers so congratulations for that way madam often dubious honor to be put in the same category of of profound head i mean i know i'm sure you guys are are trying to present a fairly unbiased case year but i have to confess that i am not unbiased when it comes to uh to uh iin rand i i'm not a fan we we might have done this to you on purpose so yeah i know i i i kinda guess will megawatt quizzes john playing with us today so he's playing a game called real celebrity children's book or something we just made up i don't wanna bracketed variant but i know a lot of real celebrity children's book you like i'm gonna be like i'm gonna do okay here us of our it's a will read you a title and a celebrity in all you have to tell us if it's a real book for children are something we made up so you don't need their ample the we kinda wanted to give you on any way so if we said her house stinky the cheese lost and then found his loss sneaker by hank green you would say.

national book award hank green john henry
"national book award" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The war was also a finalist for the national book award i'm pleased to have this author for the first time on this program well thank you so much for having me tell me in a sense oh sensitive about how you came to right this what is it when he was in because i grew up in the united states and say refugee from did not most morning didn't on but i came here announce for it and i growth well aware of how americans thought about their vietnam war and what that meant for me it's a good in his person was to know that i'm that i'm tim era can side of those totally excluded they're getting means experienced and now and i grew up with finished people who are always talking about the war thinking are feeling about it and they felt like that their sense of what they felt what it meant to them out impacted them not change your life was not reflect in in americans experience absolutely not and they're fear that there are histories would be forgotten feared the vinny's refugees here in the ninth straight sets fled from didn't are invited been defeated their jeff i knew there stories we're going to be a race can get man and then they can be kind of six in southern americans we're not interested at all in what the soft making music on threw me if you're the children what forget those kinds of stories that was a come environment that i grew up fan i mean i would that this is among to veteran they have many interested this question but in in essence what was it about their lives was is tempered that took touted their lambs was not they're always in one part okay live something with the with the totality in and they lost the war but they've lost the country in an intimate loss family members property identities pristine huge all that was wrapped up and what it meant to be a refugee and when i was skates and then to witness or children being american honors going growing up in a way that was radical it different from whatever they haven't mentioned their lots to be all that thing became news centralized around the fact that for predictor story of a few more was being told differently.

national book award united states vietnam war tim era vinny
"national book award" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Member the war was also a finalist for the national book award i am pleased to have this arthur for the first time on this program weapon thank you so much for having me tell me in a sense invest sensitive about how you came to right this what is it well i mean he because i grew up in the united states as a refugee from did not osborn it going on but i can perils for and i grew up well aware of how americans thought about their vietnam war and what that meant for me as it in his person was to know that i'm that in the american signed if there's totally excluded did it means experienced new knows now and i grew up with penis people who are always talking about the wore a thinking of feeling about it and dejando felt like that their sense of what they felt what it meant to them out impacted been i'm not change your life was not reflect in the americans spearing absolutely not and they fear that there are histories would be forgotten a feared within his refugees here in the united states of fled from getting under been defeated their duffing of their stories we're going to be a raced into and then they came to the central saw about americans we're not interested at all and what the self hitting as a gun during the if you're the children what forget those caught the stories that was a come environment that i grew offense i mean i would that this is among defense that of any answers to this question but in in essence what was it about their lives with his tepid that to tell their lives was not there always it one part with the with earlier live doing about the totality in and they lost the war but they've lost the country and many and that was family members property identities christine each all of that was wrapped up and what it meant to be a referencing in the united states and mental business or children being americanized him growing up and when i was roughly different from whatever they had a matchup.

national book award arthur united states vietnam war osborn
"national book award" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"national book award" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Member the war was also a finalist for the national book award i am pleased to have this author for the first time on this program weapon thank you so much for having me tell me in a sense the sentiment about how you came to right this what is it one nearly because i grew up in the united states as a refugee from did not announce morning didn't on but i came here announce for in i grew up well aware of how americans thought about their vietnam war and what that meant for me is a good in his person was to know that and that in the american side of this totally excluded it means experienced as you know and i grew up of innings people who are always talking about the wore a thinking and we're feeling about it and they felt like that their sense of what they felt what it meant to them out impacted them not change your life was not reflect in in americans expiring absolutely no and they fear that there are histories would be forgotten feared the vinny's refugees here nine state such fled from get monday been defeated they're duffing of their stories we're going to be a race when did not and then they can get tight it's it's all about americans we're not interested it all in what the soft making is a gun during the if you're the children what forget those kinds of stories those come environment that i grew up to a two i mean i would that this is a much attention we've been winning interested this question but in in essence what was it about their lives was is simply but took touted their lives was not there always in one part with the with the player line agreement with the totality in and they lost the war but they've lost the country and win ended last family members property identities pristine each of that was wrapped up and what it meant to be a refugee and i was states and then took goodness or children being americanized in growing up in a way that was radical it different from whatever they haven't match their lives to be all that then became news centralized around the fact that the predictor story of if you know.

national book award united states vietnam war vinny