18 Burst results for "National Black Police Association"

"national black police association" Discussed on Catch my Killer

Catch my Killer

04:45 min | 10 months ago

"national black police association" Discussed on Catch my Killer

"A father and son lost to violence. Fifteen years apart. Dacia going to the funeral home. You know at his batter. The father hosea abdala. Dying in two thousand five. The son also named hosea killed in a robbery in february paper. Here in than don't feel safe. Because i don't already dallas has exceeded last year's murder total of one hundred and ninety eight this year at least two hundred twenty seven have been killed in dallas is on track to have the most murders in sixteen years. It's almost one every night. Sheldon smith president of the national black police association downtown. They happened in southern dallas. North dallas the occurring all over the place. This statistics show most homicide. Victims are black males often killed by other black males. We cannot bypass the fact that african american males young african american males are dying at a higher rate. Leaving natasha to be yet another grieving black mother they talk about black lives matter and we did all the marching in protest but do black lives matter. Two men and a woman have been accused of killing her son. One of those men. Shane right was released on bond in september and with court trials had compare for. She worries about her seven-year-old grandson christian that one. I'm going to get them back. And i don't want him to feel the it has to be taken and fears. Another generation will be lost to violence to him. Saying i don't wanna die. I don't wanna die. There's nothing i can do but hold him in dallas. I'm tanya is. hello this is more. I write a weekly newspaper column about true crime unsolved homicides and the paranormal. You can find links to my social media accounts and collins on my website titled the marquette dot com. Welcome to the catch. Mike killer podcast..

hosea abdala dallas Sheldon smith national black police associat Dacia hosea North dallas natasha Shane tanya collins Mike killer
Dallas Deputy Chief Tapped to Run Prince George's County Police

Rush Limbaugh

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Dallas Deputy Chief Tapped to Run Prince George's County Police

"Also Brooke, announcing the next chief of police for the county and after this long and thorough process, I am very proud to announce today that I have selected deputy chief Malik Aziz, who is deputy chief for the police department in Dallas, Texas, to be our next chief of Police County executive also Brooks, noting Chief Aziz this commitment to community policing his leadership in the National Black Police Association and advocacy for police Reform. We know we acknowledge me. Have never hidden from the fact that we also have a very serious issues in our department similar to other departments across the nation. Barbara Brute W E Mail

Malik Aziz Police County Chief Aziz Brooke National Black Police Associat Advocacy For Police Reform Police Department Dallas Brooks Texas Barbara Brute
"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

07:14 min | 1 year ago

"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"We're on par with Los Angeles, which has four million people. We have less than half of that in the city of Dallas. And I want to play the three pieces of audio. That are important. That kind of give you the idea of what's going on here. Let's start with cut number one again, please. They talk about black lives matter. And we did I have the marching and protesting, but do black lives really matter? It's a woman who lost her son, the homicide in Dallas. And now the grandson is saying I'm afraid I'm gonna get killed next, and also I want revenge. And she sees this homicide. Hell that's going on. I'm nothing's changing. In fact, it's getting worse. Last year murders rose 27% of Dallas this year. It's even higher. Amazing. Here's some of the reasons why here Channel it says no one can point to any one reason for the following the rising number of killings here, some reason cited by, uh one of the police officers. With one of the unions. Failing leadership at the top of the department. There's two black police unions. By the way, There's actually one that is actually pretty good. I know what the guy who runs it. It's not the race pinpointed, hear about in the news all the time. This is the National Black Police Association. Sheldon Smith. I've met him. I've worked with him on some things in the city. He's a good guy. It's the other one. You hear about the ones who kissed the butt of the chief and and cover for her, But this guy's different. This guy's a great guy, he says. Here's the reason some of the reasons he cites failing leadership at the top of the department. Many of Dallas most seasoned commanders have left since U Haul chief U Haul sparkles assumed command of the department three years ago because of who she is a disaster. Why? Because she's exactly what teaser TC Broadnax wanted. The City Council wanted someone who does not fight crime but supports criminals. And goes after cops. No clear cut crime fighting plan is another reason. The court systems. I told you it, Z What's What's his name Loving Go cruise? Oh Cove. It has stopped the court systems. But also they're sending a message to the criminals they can commit crime with impunity, which is absolutely true has been going on. In fact, the D a Announced what last month and he was he was trolling was chumming the waters looking for people who had evidence to put cops in jail. While the black lives matter riots and such for going on, So literally, that's why This is why it's happening. Go ahead and play cut number two. Yeah, I see that one. I'm gonna get them back, and I don't want him to feel band has to be taken. That's the her grandson, the son of the guy who was murdered. You hear that you that passion and that pain in her heart? That's the reality. Meanwhile, the City Council members, the city manager They're all in La la land doing the social justice crap. The D A. Um, And this woman, meanwhile, sits suffering in silence. See, she is the grist for the mill for black lives matter. Um, she asked Play that cut one again. They talk about black lives matter. And we did I have the marching and protesting. But do black lives really matter? Not to them them? No. You were used You're used to play cut number three. Have him sing. I don't want to die. I don't want to die and there's nothing I can do, but hold him. Isn't said that people like this vulnerable woman and her vulnerable grandson. In her pain. Was used. By the Marxist. Political organization Black last minute she was used What's this going to do to folks like her? This many, many African Americans who are used for this political cause for this lie. What is that going to do? Two. To them. Could be too late, But then they fully wake up and realize that they were used. And it's not getting better and it will not get better. As long as black lives matter isn't charge. Nike is supporting it. Theo NFL NBA. All them are supporting it. It's in vogue. And as long as that's going on, it's gonna get worse and worse and worse, people. Who are the most vulnerable and the weakest and in the middle of this crime and are dying and suffering, being robbed, raped, mugged and beaten. It's going to get worse for them much worse. Before and or if it ever gets better, based on Who people decide to put in charge of their country and their communities politically. W F A T V. Channel eight requested to interview chief U Haul AK sparkles. And they did that She was not available. She refused to talk to him. Second of all, the department didn't make anybody any senior commanders available. There is no one at the helm and when there was somebody at the helm, she made more homicides in more violence happen because she was anti police in pro criminal I want to share with you. By the way, the head of that police organization. I told you about a second. Who's a good guy, he said. We cannot bypass the fact that African American males young African American males are dying at a high rate in Dallas. The big question is what we can do in order to reduce that type of violence within the African American community. It's something that definitely needs to be addressed. Well, remember what I shared with you? Number what I shared with you. The other day. When Mayor Johnson released his breakdowns of the homicides. And he's exposing how horrible and pathetic it is in the city of Dallas. You have to see what just came out. I went in depth in this and it blew me away. The district's in Dallas that have these Social Justice warriors. These cop haters. He's black lives matter. Activists like Adam dissolved wa in them. They have the highest homicides. The number one district in Dallas with 43 homicides This year is dissolved was district. He's the one who says Get the state police out of here. I don't want him. He's one of the cops are racist. He's one This is black lives matter. And meanwhile, the people that he claims to care about are dying, being murdered, beaten and raped on the streets. They don't matter. They're being used. Meanwhile, this mother told Channel eighth when you're hearing from who's all emotional got a summer had a summer sun was murdered. She says her grandson's having panic attacks. He's got so much anger, she said. I feel so helpless to have him, you know, panicking, saying I don't want to die. I don't want to die and there's nothing I could do, but hold him. That's what's happening in black, uh, inner City America and impoverished America. They were used to feel good for political cause to gain money..

Dallas National Black Police Associat City Council Los Angeles America Nike Oh Cove Sheldon Smith Channel Um African American community La la Mayor Johnson Theo NFL Adam NBA
"national black police association" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"national black police association" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The only winner last night Indecision is the fire and police commissioner in Milwaukee fails to choose a new police chief. They ended up tied 33 once again just like they did a week ago. We have not reached any type of agreement. The air's stuck between FBI Special Agent Hoyt, My Hayley and Dallas police. Major Malik Aziz will be there for for Gunnery seven, which is our first regular meeting of the year. January 7th coming after December 23rd, which is when acting chief Michael Bronson is set to retire, We walk, you'll have a police department. There'll be somebody running it if a decision isn't made before that meeting scheduled in January, But there are a couple things here in play the fact most importantly, I guess among them. His disease. The Dallas police Major hey was named one of seven finalists for the chief's job in Dallas is well yesterday. Dallas morning News, says City manager T. J. T. C. Broad next plans to have a new chief in place by the time the outgoing one leaves at the end of this month. So that's going to happen before the commission meets and disease is saying that he's going to take whoever comes to him. First. He was in the running three years ago in the current chief got hired. The Journal Sentinel says he was considered a favorite among the rank and file. At that time. He told the local paper back in November that he will feel job offers on a first come first serve basis. In his words, quote. I don't plan on waiting on somebody to make a decision for me. I should seize the opportunity that's before me If you want me to be chief yet To sit and of quote Aziz getting local traction. Having picked up endorsements from chapters of the end of the bosses steal it from Terra National Black Police Association and forward Latino as well as from several community activists. May Hayley. Meanwhile, as local ties that's one of his big, strong points East Milwaukee native who has a handful of endorsements from a group of North side clergy, people, as well as some business executives, the third candidate that was in the mix that being Portland deputy chief Chris Davis has been Pretty much from consideration. He's one of four finalists to the or for the chief's job in Madison Davis did. I couldn't vote when the commission want uptight a couple of times last week, the paper says that if a new chief isn't in place when Bronson retires has set on the 23rd, there are two assistant Chiefs Wesley Feely or Geoffrey Norman, who could fill that role. 8, 13 and WTMJ. We knew sports with Brian D. Next. This report is sponsored by CBD. American shaman, A CBD like no other The holidays, family.

Michael Bronson acting chief Dallas Major Malik Aziz Dallas police deputy chief Terra National Black Police As Milwaukee Chris Davis Hoyt FBI Brian D. East Milwaukee Madison Davis City T. J. T. C. Broad The Journal Sentinel
"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Murders and 16 years. We're at 227 right now. We're on par with Los Angeles, which has four million people. We have less than half of that in the city of Dallas. And I want to play the three pieces of audio that are important. That kind of give you the idea of what's going on here. Let's start with cut number one again, please. They talk about black lives matter. And we did I have the marching and protesting, but do black lives really matter? It's a woman who lost her son, the homicide in Dallas. And now the grandson is saying I'm afraid I'm gonna get killed next, and also I want revenge. And she sees this homicide. Hell that's going on. I'm not things changing. In fact, it's getting worse. Last year murders rose 27% of Dallas this year. It's even higher. Amazing. Here's some of the reason what channel it says No one can point to any one reason for the following the rising number of killings. Here's some reason cited by one of the police officers. With one of the unions. Failing leadership at the top of the department. There's two black police unions. By the way, There's actually one that is actually pretty good. I know what the guy who runs it. It's not the race pinpointed, hear about in the news all the time. This is the National Black Police Association. Sheldon Smith. I've met him. I've worked with him on some things in the city. He's a good guy. It's the other one. You hear about the ones who kissed the butt of the chief and and cover for her. But this guy's different. This guy's a great guy, he says. Here's the reason some of the reasons he cites failing leadership at the top of the department. Many of Dallas most seasoned commanders has left since U Haul chief U Haul sparkles assumed command of department three years ago because of who she is a disaster. Why? Because she's exactly what teaser TC Broadnax wanted. The City Council wanted someone who does not fight crime but supports criminals. Goes after cops. No clear cut crime fighting plan is another reason. The court systems. I told you it, Z What's What's his name Loving Go cruise? Oh Cove. It has stopped the court systems. But also they're sending a message to the criminals they can commit crime with impunity, which is absolutely true has been going on. In fact, the D a Announced what last month and he was he was trolling was chumming the waters looking for people who had evidence to put cops in jail. While the black lives matter riots and such for going on, So literally, that's why This is why it's happening. Go ahead and play cut number two. Yeah, I see that one. I'm gonna get them back, and I don't want him to feel Vance has to be taken. That's the her grandson, the son of the guy who was murdered. You hear that you that passion and that pain in her heart? That's the reality. Meanwhile, the City Council members, the city manager They're all in La la land doing yourself of justice. Crap. The D A. Um, And this woman, meanwhile, sits suffering in silence. See, she is the grist for the mill for black lives matter. Um, she asked Play that cut one again. They talk about black lives matter. And we did I have the marching and protesting. But do black lives really matter? Not to them them? No. You were used You're used to play cut number three. So have him saying I don't want to die. I don't want to die and there's nothing I can do, but hold him. Isn't said that people like this vulnerable woman and her vulnerable grandson. In her pain. Was used. By the Marxist. Political organization Black last minute she was used What's this going to do to folks like her? This many, many African Americans who are used for this political cause for this lie. What is that going to do? Two. To them. Could be too late, But then they fully wake up and realize that they were used. And it's not getting better and it will not get better. As long as black lives matter isn't charge. Nike is supporting it. Theo NFL NBA. All them are supporting it. It's in vogue. And as long as that's going on, it's gonna get worse and worse and worse, people. Who are the most vulnerable and the weakest and in the middle of this crime and are dying and suffering, being robbed, raped, mugged and beaten. It's going to get worse for them much worse before and or if it ever gets better, based on Who people decide to put in charge of their country and their communities politically. W F A T V Channel e requested to interview chief U Haul A K sparkles. And they did that She was not available. She refused to talk to him. Second of all, the department didn't make anybody any senior commanders available. There is no one at the helm. And when there was somebody at the helm, she made more homicides in more violence happen. Because she was anti police in pro criminal I want to share with you. By the way, the head of that police organization. I told you about a secretary who is a good guy, he said. We cannot bypass the fact that African American males young African American males are dying at a high rate in Dallas. The big question is what we can do in order to reduce that type of violence within the African American community. It's something that definitely needs to be addressed. Well, remember what I share with you? Number what I shared with you. The other day. When Mayor Johnson released his breakdowns of the homicides. And he's exposing how horrible and pathetic it is in the city of Dallas. You have to see what just came out. I went in depth in this and it blew me away. The district's in Dallas that have these Social Justice warriors. These cop haters is black lives matter. Activists like Adam dissolved wa in them. They have the highest homicides. The number one district in Dallas with 43 homicides This year is dissolved was district..

Dallas National Black Police Associat City Council Los Angeles Nike Oh Cove Sheldon Smith Mayor Johnson Um African American community Vance Adam secretary La la Theo NFL NBA
"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"So you gotta hear more of this audio? Because let me make this clear. I didn't hit around enough in the last segment. Make this really clear Thie. Um For the first time that I'm aware of in the past two or three years and sparkles has been the chief Of Dallas U Haul. For the first time ever that I'm aware of the Black Police Officers Association is publicly Disagreeing with her publicly going after a decision that she's made Understand. I have never seen them do that. Second of all. The audio that I'm hearing tonight from Dallas Police Association. That interview was done. What? By Clayton J. Clinton J. Neville, Our reporter? Yeah. He seems to Ah pretend That like this was already the way it wass. But that's not what the black Black Police officers association says, and that's not what channel it says. I don't know why they're towing the line for you. Hall tonight. But let me tell you something. Let me make this really clear. The people who hate the cops. That broke the law and disobeyed the law. And went on that bridge that night. Have one tonight. They have gotten policy changed where the cops have even less options when they when these protesters that are breaking the law. With 600 people, which is very dangerous as you know, and crowd control needs to be used and when when these same folks have been in other Gatherings where there's been violence, Maybe not by them. You mean we don't know. But some in the crowd that they've been out at, you know, nights previous were looting, rioting and beating And so I support our cups. 110%. They've done nothing wrong. But Chief you Hall has changed policy and let's let's let's dig it on this here is The channel a report saying that, in fact, do not believe the lies. It's true are cops have been further neutered. Listen to the Channel eight reporter, And On Wednesday, Dallas Police chief Rene Hall announced new protocols for protests, restrictions that will dramatically limit the use of these tools in the future. Dramatically limit the use in the future again. This is not This is a new restrictions. These are new restrictions. And the protesters when this one No. You want to know what's what's making these decisions who was You want to know how this happened? You ready? This is exactly why our cops have just been neutered. Listen to this. The most controversial knight was on the Margaret until Bridge. We just kind of headed west onto the bridge. Hamza Khan was one of 600 plus protesters detained. Yeah, it's frustrating. According to the report, police deployed pepper balls and at least two gas canisters at different points. They later dropped the charges against all those detained and I looked back at the line of officers. And I mean like, I contact with with one holding one of those paintball guns, and he shot me right in the face every instance that I personally have been out and that less people. Forces then use it's the instigated but he d. Do you hear the guy right there? Who is a supposed protester who talks in questions? You noticed that associate producer Douglas That he continues throughout this interview. And you're going to hear more. Its executive producer Douglas says. He sounds like a soy boy. Yes. What is this soy boy for people that don't know. I know what it is. Drink soy milk. And gets the man boobs from the soy milk. Yeah. They have a lot of estrogen. Okay? Yeah. Basically all town of estrogen going through his blame beans because he drinks a lot of soy milk. That's what a soy boys it's with the pop culture folks call a soy boy that is a soy boy. Soy boy. I'm willing to bet you Has never gone to five minutes or one minute of police training. Soy boy, I I know he doesn't look like he's done a pushup Douglas, but that's beside the point. Um I can practically get into your soul voice and I'm gonna one minute of police training to see what it's like to do what their jobs are. Soy boys, I am powerful. Sipping on his soil. And boy I love I gotta be honest with you. I love it when soy boy breaks the law and gets into your guests. Going in alive. So what this is is rubbing the cops nose like a dog in a turn. Bad cop, bad cop and soy boys in control. Listen to for the first time ever. In 2 to 3 years of chief u hauls. Horrible running of this department. Sparkles Eyes first, the first time ever being attacked by the National Black Police Association in Dallas. For the first time ever. It's amazing. We have no intention of wanting to go to jail as a result of of working But if you take tools away from office because if you take the less little away from officers, then Ah Olsen and they're left with their hands. And they left with their weapons. The freaking National Black Police Association, you know, in Dallas For the first time ever going after chief you hall. This is amazing. Again. Don't believe the lie that this is not further Neutering your you know what's have been cut off even more. The left. One was gone now they got the right one. Let's continue on no one has ever meant like no one mentions de escalation as part of that part of it. Yeah, Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, Yeah. Yeah, but she votes for for pale. Yeah, Beto. Yeah, Yeah, yeah, He's Hispanic. You know, Beta on with soy boy. Soy boy is telling the freaking cop..

Dallas Douglas That National Black Police Associat Black Police Officers Associat Dallas Police Association Black Police officers associat you Hall reporter Rene Hall Clayton J. Clinton J. Neville Margaret until Bridge Hamza Khan Ah Olsen Beto executive producer producer
"national black police association" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To make and then you implement those changes and there is a third party who's monitoring in the previous segment there was some discussion around who are conduct that kind of oversight and I do believe that it needs to be an independent third party whether SV an oversight or some other entity that does that to make sure that it happens it's not impossible but we need to work toward a solution that is really workable and can last without putting in jeopardy the safety and security of people who actually live in the city and would you say that's one of the main obstacles to enacting reform well I mean any these obstacles can be overcome there are a lot of obstacles nothing worth doing is really free of of of some level of difficulty but just because it may be difficult doesn't mean that we don't know for something has to happen Minneapolis police department obviously is in need of serious reform how you go about doing it is a different discussion a lot of police departments are policing in general needs reform I think we made that clear in our task force report but I think we need to be careful about how we go about doing it to make sure that we don't have these unintended consequences that could easily happen if it's not carefully thought through yeah and and and that's where I get concerned with the conversations around disbandment of defunding I we just need to think about what we do in its place how will that happen I'm not saying it's impossible I'm just saying it needs to be carefully thought through final words from you consummate Fletcher you know you heard walked out Charles just said tell us you know what's your response to that it why hasn't reform worked in Minneapolis five I I think it hasn't worked because the people within the MPD don't want to accept it and I think we can't make that culture change happen legislatively I'll just say I I really appreciate the point that Camden never had a moment when they didn't have coverage I'll say Minneapolis has already had a moment that we didn't have coverage and that's part of what's driving my constituents to be much more willing to look at alternatives is that we have felt what it's like when our police department stopped protecting us because that's what happened last week they were fiercely escalating protests and defending their own precincts and letting the businesses in our community the robbed and burned and we saw what happens when there's not a nine one one response were already there so we're looking for alternatives from a place where we don't have the luxury of costs and we don't have the luxury of taking our time quick response from you just twenty seconds president trump tweeted today line order not defined and abolish the police the radical left Democrats have gone crazy what is a consummate transaction I have never once cared about Donald trump's opinion about what we should do in Minneapolis and I'm not going to start now C. fighter represents the third ward on the Minneapolis city council Charles Ramsey is the former police commissioner of the Philadelphia police department in the former police chief of DC's Metropolitan Police department he's also the co chair of former president Obama's task force on twenty first century policing and Sonya Pruitt she's the captain of the Montgomery County police department and chairperson of the national black police association thank you all for joining us we have a tax cut we'll only ever send you one text today it's the fastest way to connect with us and details about how to sign up can be found in the ask.

"national black police association" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The the the father of modern policing is Sir Robert peel he create the bodies in the U. K. and he had a set of nine principles for ethical policing and the nine principles basically say that without the public we don't exist and we should be working hand in hand to make this a an effective and safe and Jack's relationship so I agree with that I think that it can be done I think that we've we've allowed a lot of time to pass but it's not impossible but we really do have a a lot of hard work to do Charles take a listen to this we heard from several former officers with concrete ideas about police reform including Elmer from South Florida who left a message using our app one a vox pop I'm African American and I'm also a retired federal agent with the US department of justice I support police reform some of the changes I would like to see included first and foremost community policing I believe the community policing is very important and that it will help to improve relationships between police and the members of the community that they serve there are a lot of misconceptions and terms of what people believe about black and brown people and interacting with us on a daily basis will improve or get rid of a lot of those misconceptions Charles your thoughts on Elmer's comment well I mean I agree wholeheartedly I think the challenge and what has to happen you know a lot of departments that say they are engaging in community policing but it's no more than just words all you have to operationalize the concept and by that I mean you have the integrated into all aspects of policing or some departments that have done that I certainly in both Washington and Philadelphia worked very hard to to actually make that a reality but it's it's it's it's very difficult to do so we need to make sure that they are in fact engaging in true community policing he also touched on a subject of training Russia police in dealing with the issue of implicit bias one of your callers earlier talked about you know D. A. what I picked up a two major themes in some of those conversations one was selection of police officers and I think we have to change the way in which we go about recruiting and selecting police officers to make sure that we have people that have a service oriented mentality and and not just you know want to you know go lock up the bad guys are you know me is so we need to think about that and find out ways in which we bring people and that really do fit the mold of a good community armed police officer and then obviously training I just mentioned very impartial policing are getting with the issues of police of implicit bias the captain mentioned something that I think is very important and that is the history of policing in the United States there's a reason why there's hostility and tension in some communities versus others and a lot of it has to do with the history of policing in the United States which has not been that positive over the years in fact the further back you go the less positive it is you know what are what are some positive examples of change positive examples of changes real community policing and community engagement and you could actually see it during a protest some cities the way in which the police interacted with protesters taking a knee walking with protesters not being heavy handed not using the tear gas rubber bullets all that sort of thing now you know I mean there was some writing that went on and so forth that's of that's a very small group of people that really aren't there to protest the issue of use of force or anything else have their own agenda for the most part the vast majority of people that were out there were peaceful law abiding people who just want to see change and so I think we have to adjust to make sure our tactics are consistent with actually protecting their rights to protest as opposed to seeing it as something that we have to control or put down and you can see the difference it right there in Washington the way in which they cleared Lafayette square Lafayette park and I was the police chief there I thought it was very heavy handed and in my opinion unnecessary and that was the federal police to did that not not the local Metropolitan Police thirty seconds many cities that you have examples of that are you know an act that enacted real police reform yeah our Camden New Jersey it may not be the largest city but they had tremendous problems crime lack of trust in community they they actually are created at the Camden County police department under the leadership of out Scott Thompson who is now retired but he brought to campus an entirely different philosophy of policing and they're benefiting from it to this very day that is one of the most positive examples anywhere in the country we're talking with Charles Ramsey a former police chief and commissioner and the co chair of former president Obama's task force on twenty first century policing also with us is Sonea Pruitt she's the captain of the Montgomery County police department and chairperson of the national black police association coming up what happens when a city says its police department is beyond reform we'll hear from a council member in Minneapolis who says that's exactly the case transaction environments more from our guests and from you in just a moment if you're having trouble getting sleep these days you are not alone that constant inflow of anxiety provoking uses really led to people being more anxious but there are some things you can do to help start concentrating on your breathing take a deep.

Sir Robert peel
"national black police association" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The third week of protests against the killing of George Floyd Brianna Taylor and Ahmad armory and police brutality and racial injustice many politicians for mayors to lawmakers on Capitol Hill the responding to demands from protesters by promising police reform but in Minneapolis the city council's pledge something else dismantling its police department all together we'll hear from a member of the city council about why he feels the department is just beyond repair the first how much can police departments change my name is Austin I'm calling from Marietta I used to be a police officer in the state of Louisiana I first hand witness excessive force on a regular basis and many examples of police brutality thank you for calling this is one of the many reasons I decided I could no longer be a police officer I joined thinking I could change the world and I found that you know being on the police force is actually changing me as a person thanks Austin for sharing your story with us today we'll talk about police reform what needs to change and whether reform is enough joining us now from Philadelphia is Charles Ramsey is the former police commissioner of the Philadelphia police department and former police chief of Washington DC's Metropolitan Police department he was also the co chair of former president Obama's task force on twenty first century policing Charles welcome to when I thank you with us from Washington DC is Sony up Pruitt she's the captain of the Montgomery County police department and chairperson of the national black police association hi Sonya hello thanks for having me so yeah I do wanna take a minute starting with you just to reflect on the moment that we're in right now what's what's on your mind well it looks like that we're in a change season and that there is definitely no going back the people are calling for us to take a look at what we're doing inside our police department so that we can be of the greatest service to the public what about you Charles talk about this moment that we're in right now well I I would agree I think that this is now looking like a sustained effort so it's really moving from a protest to a movement which is a good thing I think that it's it's long overdue when I served on president Obama's task force I mean we submitted our report in two thousand fifteen and which provided a framework for reform course with a change of administrations are the focus shifted but we did lay out the outline reform is possible it is it is not an easy task but it is possible yes Johnson V. moved from a protest to a movement in this iteration Sonya it comes from what we saw play out more than a week ago Derek shop in the former Minneapolis officer who kneeled on George Floyd's neck now he had at least a seventeen prior complaints against him during his nineteen year career can you tell us how does that happen how how broken is our policing system you know I I want to defer to a chief Ramsey but I will say having internal affairs background that that is nothing but a signal for trouble with the police officer I don't know all the parameters of the law and the protections that police officers have in Minnesota that could have something to do with why he was still on the force but really that is a red flag for sure what do you make of the fact that the two other officers that were involved are using the the rookie defense they're saying that they had only been on the force for a short time and they had to follow shamans orders listen when we swear we take the when we swear to protect and serve the public and to protect life you know that's a human thing you don't have to have anything besides a little common sense to know that when someone is in danger of losing their life that you need to take action so while I know that that what what I will say is the culture of policing would make it very difficult for someone to do otherwise and to do other than what they're training officer might tell them but you're human nature I think should kick in in a situation like that Charles you mentioned your work with the former president Obama's task force on twenty first century policing that tells what were the main areas of reform that you were focused on what we identified six areas that we felt were very important we knew it was an all encompassing we had they did have that long a period of time to put a report together for the president this this site was put together within let's say about forty five fifty days are quite frankly but we did identify six key areas one and most important in my opinion is building trust and legitimacy with the communities that we serve without that nothing else really can take place our policy and oversight technology social media unity policing training and officer wellness and safety those realistic ski areas which we refer to as colors but we also had overarching recommendations the very first being data a national commission be established to look at the entire criminal justice system and I would hope even now that the discussion would broaden beyond just police reform which is very important don't get me wrong but the rest of the criminal justice system needs reform as well prosecution courts corrections we need to look at the entire our criminal justice system and we also need to address the drivers of crime poverty poor L. lack of education job opportunity housing I mean the list goes on and on and on and so if we're going to take a comprehensive approach and dealing with the issues that affect us in this country that we have to go beyond just police reform because that's just something matic of a much larger societal problem uhhuh we're talking with Charles Ramsey former police commissioner for the Philadelphia police department also with us is Sonya Pruitt she's the captain of Montgomery County police department in Maryland Sonya you know we're seeing reforms being laid out in different cities yet one of the questions that we keep coming back to is you know who is actually going to monitor and track these reforms and make sure that they're being held accountable well you know I think that that's a multi pronged approach right there we're gonna have to have some very strong and courageous police leaders inside police departments so on the ground level you know they're going to need to take a look at how they are monitoring on inside police department I'm not sure that we we have the best models right now I mean there's some police departments who do but I obviously we can do an extremely better job but I'm talking to peers that are discussing how can we use legislation jurisdiction only meaning on the local level on a state level and then nationally to handle the monitoring peace and we were just in conversation with the national black police association with representative Omar's office concerning what type of maybe a board that we could put together that would monitor when we have these extreme use of force issues excessive force and in custody death so it's gonna take a lot of oversight and the oversight is going to have to come from many different levels but I do think that in the in nationals some consistency consistency nationally would be a great answer now we asked many of you what changes you would like to see in law enforcement I really believe it's important that the screening for police academy or any police Canada B. we re evaluated the police should have body cams sometimes they're on sometimes they're off there should be Swiss firing at anyone who shows any aggression or brutality this should be a national training and reading hello all local law enforcement I'd like to see a little more humanity they need to realize that society doesn't exist for them that they exist for the citizenry and too much ego leads to the kind of things we're dealing with thanks to Karen from Pennsylvania Michael from Colorado penny from Ohio Maxine from Virginia and Mike from Virginia for those comments Sonya what's your reaction to what we just heard I agree with everyone's comments any other some some things that we have been speaking about my peers and I concerning some some some national action that can be taken but you know having spoken to people who are just my friends they've come up with some very interesting ideas that I think we should take also take a look at for instance they wanted to know well how officers trained in the academy and then what happens once they get on the street we just we just talked about to officer the two officers in Minneapolis who were trained trained being train trainees right and so yeah we probably need to take a look at that less powerful police unions that's a huge left but they have a really tight hold on policing perhaps if we loosen the whole we can get some things done and then education and the education piece that I'm hearing most about is do police officers know the history of the intersection between the black community and policing perhaps not perhaps not enough maybe there's a lack of understanding some of it they may know and don't care but to that extent we need to as a police departments and law enforcement agencies make sure that we teach them what it is that they need to know what's your experience of that talk about you know what it was like for you in the force over the years as we've watched incident after incident of police violence against black people around the country what was your experience is so many different emotions you know I enjoy my career my bout to retire in about thirty days congratulations for the heat thank you for the most part even though it was fraught with some obstacles and some challenges very difficult to navigate for me personally as a black woman I was very outspoken about when I saw things that I thought were you know not in alignment with protecting and serving and there's push back when you do that the policing culture is very very deeply entrenched and you know I think that as a black woman it was a major issue but I don't I don't think it's just black women who will get that push back if you do not agree with what's going on within the blue line so it was interesting time and you know something that I would love to talk about you know in thirty days well here's a question from Sharon who wrote on our Facebook she says our common she's as hire more people of color who want to help and protect a given neighborhood increase neighborhood policing reform the police unions to support good policing not brutal policing the intention for all reform it must be for police and citizens equal justice for all and a better world for our children your response to that Sony I am me I can be more in agreement so.

George Floyd Brianna Taylor Minneapolis
"national black police association" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

08:18 min | 2 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

"National Guard said that about five thousand of its personnel were activated in fifteen states, and Washington, DC to eight law enforcement with protecting lives and property is clashes that began last week spread beyond Minnesota at least one city New York investigators said that outside anarchist groups fueled the on Rasta curfews initiated the over the weekend were being extended in several cities. We saw curfews of course on the fourth day of protests. Relative to the heinous death of George Lloyd something once again that we can all agree upon, but we saw those curfews both Saturday and Sunday nights in Denver Eight, forty, now thirteen ten KFI. Thirteen ten K. F. K. A. Dot. COM MORNINGS WITH GAIL fueled by great. Western, patrolling, live and local via the auto collisions, specialists studios, but again I ask the question that I asked this morning does hate lead to anything other than hate. How do you write a wrong by doubling down on wrong? Do you correct injustice with more injustice as innocence are being targeted with all of the looting, small businesses while small and large businesses of being destroyed in large urban areas across the country and do indeed these riots in sight, just more crime. Do they invite more crime and not a justice? And as a result. Lacks end up suffering more when hostility to police makes it impossible to maintain any sort of order. So these protests when they turn, violent are devastating to the very people including George Lloyd in whose name they demand justice. The brutal death of George Floyd at the hands of that Minneapolis police officer again fan, the flames of racial discord violence, and unlike other incidents, in which officers believably believably credibly might have felt a need to use force the sickening video. Video of that officer pressing his knee on George Floyd's neck for more than almost nine minutes has been roundly condemned. This is something that we can all agree upon this could have been a pivotal moment in writing wrongs across the country. Unfortunately, it's been hijacked hijacked by those who have a different agenda entirely those who want to destroy America and its institutions. Violent protests been decried by black twin cities residents who are witnessing the devastation of their communities. Floyd's girlfriend as I mentioned this morning. Her name is Courtney Ross. She urged the protesters the violent protesters to stop the looting and burning in George Floyd's name, saying that Floyd loved the city and would be devastated by the destruction. And again the violence! Particularly in Minneapolis, well it elicits elicits flashbacks of the riders in Ferguson Missouri this after the August two thousand fourteen police shooting of Michael, Brown, after shops were set aflame, stores were looted then governor Jay Nixon said that many of those arrested have come from outside the state including as far Chicago Ferguson. Residents suffered deeply in the wake of the violence. Public bus service was suspended were seen that in Denver. Be People couldn't get to work volunteers from churches in the area. Brian donated food. Because so many local stores and restaurants were nothing more in the aftermath of all the riots and the looting and the arson nothing more than burned out shells. In Minneapolis says in other sites, violent protests throughout the nation well. Kudos again. Yeah I'm being snarky. To the mainstream media that throughout. These very troubling sights and scenes these troubling times well, they've they've helped to stoke racial animosity. A CBS reporter condemned the disparity between police responses to the rights had been the apples and a recent demonstration by mostly white crowd at the Michigan capital, omitting that the latter protests was indeed nonviolent. And perhaps because of the heightened media. Scrutiny Minneapolis police showed significant restraint, and that well could have emboldened rioters ABC's and burn down that police precinct. Devastation will likely continue. After the ashes cool, and the remains of shops and other businesses are swept away. A pattern known as the Ferguson effect has emerged across American towns and cities racked by anti police protests in recent years to avoid charges of racism officers have stepped back from fully enforcing the law. It's a state of police nullification. In which entire neighborhoods have descended into free fire zones where street violence and homicides have skyrocketed. Now after the two thousand fifteen police shooting of a black man in Cincinnati, civil rights activist descended on the city to decry the institutional racism of law enforcement, and when officers subsequently declined to enforce the law. There was a significant increase in murders in one crime ridden black district, the civil rights advocates who led the protests didn't have to live with the consequences of LAMESA's when they return to the safety of their own neighborhoods. And then you have to remember this. Is the piece by Robert L. Woodson can find it in the Wall Street Journal. He is a president and founder of the Woodson Center, but he also worked with the National Black Police Association. Animosity says toward police also makes some blacks reluctant to cooperate with law enforcement think about this in Saint Louis last spring, eighteen children children under the age of fourteen were killed by gunfire, but many residents withheld information from police, and only one arrest was made by the end of the summer. Last year eighty six percent of police chiefs nationwide said recruitment had declined since two thousand fourteen, and in many cities law enforcement hasn't been able to respond even the most desperate of nine one one calls. And communities. Just like George Floyd's. will feel the greatest impact of this dearth of law enforcement. And protests says Mister Woodson. It won't reverse very frightening trend. Those who are truly concerned about addressing the tragic loss of black lives should look for proactive measures that could reduce the incidence of violence between police and civilians. He writes I witnessed Mister Woodson did one example several decades ago when he worked with the National Black, police, association, which called for policy that would require a police officer to restrain or arrest of fellow officer if he witnesses him using undue force. One of the police officers. There were four involved in this arrest..

George Floyd Minneapolis officer Robert L. Woodson George Lloyd National Black Police Associat Denver GAIL K. F. K. A. Dot DC National Guard New York KFI president and founder arson Courtney Ross America Wall Street Journal
"national black police association" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"They they got together of Thirteen groups of officers from when say thirteen thirteen city came together in? Saint Louis In nineteen seventy two had our first meeting And organize the The National Black Police Association as Maryland entity. And we've been rolling ever since and the fight has not changed. We are still fighting and expertise in our police department but our mission also includes that we stand for our community for the black community. We will stand for any community but primarily the black community because we are the community that has the most issue with law enforcement. So that's what we do in a nutshell and we do that. In a variety of ways we have a huge community service base. All of our. We have chapters all across the country in the UK and Canada. And we all do a lot of community service community outreach But we sometimes they also have to take on issues and the way we take on issues now well back. In the day they took issues by filing lawsuits which is not out of the real possibility. Now but with social media the way that is we can get a message out there across the country and across the world By just going on twitter going on facebook and then letting people know what's going on and then there's that pushback on the community like wait a minute. You know you can't you can't do this. You can't do that. Do this. To these black officers so by highlighting issues that we have in our police department is the way that we that we Mostly address issues now and then. Of course there's some conversations that we have that maybe not privy to public consumption to try to move along issues when we when we come across so There's a recent problem or that happened. I'm sure that you heard about this believers in Maryland. Dc area where the this black police officer Shot someone who was posing handcuffed and his car. Seven times and You many people have been talked to me about the speed at which to this officer was Arrested and they feel as if there was some type of inequity in the process Many people decide to me. Maybe this is you know anecdotal. Maybe we're just reading into this way too much but they're saying that If would have been a white officer. Took months for him to be released days to for him to be arrested So is that the type of inequity that you're addressing. Or how do you feel about that particular situation? Well here's the thing I might so things. It's hard to prove things. Even though we have enough evidence to prove it that black and we talk about it we know. No black officers will be taken to task very quickly very quickly. No braff they. They're under arrest where why office let him in. How about this for a moment and let them on pay? Yes that does happen. However here's what you can't justify if authors wrong it's hard to come to his defense because he really is wrong And so I actually live in county. Prince George's County Maryland. And we all have some difficulties with How long is being In Prince George's County Maryland. For instance. There are no body worn cameras that well. There's some officers who have them but it's not something that is a requirement at this time and the with the with the county executive and the police department has been well. We don't have enough money. Well Prince George's County is one of the richest counties in Maryland along with Gummy County Maryland. And all the county of surrounding Chris Georges County especially in Virginia on Gummy County. Maryland Washington DC. They have made it a priority for officers to have body worn cameras. And we're trying to figure out why doesn't press Georgia's county which is having a number of questionable shootings issues with police officers. Why it's not a priority that they have body worn camera. That is a huge question. Yes we are questioning that They Push County. Police has a LAWSUIT PENDING AGAINST FEDERAL LAWSUIT. That was brought about by Officers of Color Latino and and black officers in the police department about Racism and discrimination. So there are some of the Prince George's County Police Department. Had that officer been wearing a body worn camera. We might have been able to see what happened right so we can't we can't we can't stand for him if he did something wrong. And it looks you know. It looks pretty bad when you have. You have shot a handcuffed man. Seven-time handcuffed and stacked into Europe police. Cruiser we're not come stand you for that. I mean even if you know we want you to get due process and there's nothing that says that he's not getting due process but yes he was he was he was arrested. Fair fairly quickly And so we do know the you know the irony when a black officer. Nothing s compared to a white officer. Gotcha. Let's talk about the importance of black officers. Are Black officers even really necessary? I mean From from the perspective of the Community. is important for young kids in the community to see officers who look like them. Portola ministries or or is that something. That really is not necessary. A white officers can do just as good of a job Is that or or we can. Was We as black horses making a big deal out of nothing no. I don't think we're making a big deal out of nothing. I think it's extremely important especially that young people not just young for the whole entire black communities. See doing what we do because we do it really well and that thing is no committee has become this really I. You know. It's like a buzz phrase but it actually should mean more than maybe it means now as the used overly use you know you know. Some people think community policing is having coffee with a cop but it's really not that You is deeper than that. Actually building relationships that Bill Trust and an intern we become legitimized and is of the community. So we'd like the original community police officer back in the day when you know. It was hard for us to be hired and finally. They hired us. They didn't put us in a car with a partner. They've had US walking the beat and I own neighbor and.

officer black community The National Black Police Asso Prince George's County Police Maryland Prince George Gummy County Maryland County Maryland Officers of Color Latino Push County Chris Georges County Saint Louis Gummy County US UK braff twitter
"national black police association" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

13:56 min | 2 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Investigative sergeant in a supervisor of the School Resource Program in Twenty Nineteen. Pruitt was promoted to captain. She currently serves as a deputy. Commander Supervising Calls for service. Countywide PRUITT is a past president of the coalition of black police officers among only Maryland. In since two thousand eighteen has serves as the chairperson of the National Black Police Association chills. Bs In criminal justice from University of Maryland University College and an Ma in front of psychology from argosy university. She's an adjunct professor of Criminal Justice Administration at the Montgomery College and teaches courses including introduction to policing criminal investigation in Police Organization and administration. She's also a member of law enforcement action partnership otherwise known as leap as well as myself so without further. Doing Ladies Gentlemen we are going to be discussing the importance of diversity within police department so I. WanNa thank once again my special guest Captain Sonia Pruitt to Captain Hunters podcast. Here is the interview all right so once again. We're talking to Captain Sonia Pruitt and thank you so much for being on Captain Hunters podcast. Thanks for inviting me. Your member of Law Enforcement Action Partnership as M. I in so just tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do for that organization just yourself in general okay Well I I call myself a transplant from north. Carolina ended up in the Washington metropolitan area as a student at how university Undergrad In nineteen eighty one. I've been here for a while now and I feel like I'm a a member of DMV as we call it the district Maryland. Virginia Became a police officer after deciding that being a doctor was not for me. I knew I was NOCCO. Stay up all night long doing any kind of internship or residency or anything like that. So they're not because I'm a science geek. I tried to go into Research so worked at the National Institutes of helpful. I don't like the repetitiveness of research This is no not for me so I became a police officer because as I was working for the US Postal Service Inspection Service. Which is their law. Enforcement Ranch I decided I wanted to go into law enforcement so I became a police officer as a yeah could be outside like being outside. I like being around people. This'll be fun and exciting. I did not know what I was getting myself into. Actually but I was ready for it. So that's how I became a police officer. I've been a police officer for twenty seven years. I'm currently a captain in charge of community engagement for the Montgomery County Police Department and I am also the chair woman The National Black Police Association and I got my my hat and various other incendiary rings of law enforcement and speaking and things like that. Very good awesome. Awesome my cousin. A currently works for the inspectional services. I'm hoping saying that right for the post office. He works service. He'd probably kill me tells me so many times but he actually is Located in Tampa Florida. So he's got a actually fairly wide range of territories. He's gotTa deal. With as far as his responsibilities e e installs Even saying he's installs a security surveillance equipment. Try to catch the postal workers. Stealing or yeah. Yeah yeah he's got some really cool guests. Can I wanted to have you on because I had a previous conversation with another person Leader of a black national black police officers of Association of America and So I wanted to have you on to talk about the importance of black police officers. And you know we're having a problem right now with the recruitment overawe police officer people do not want to be companies. Police officers overall but particularly. It's it's problematic within the black community. I want to have you on his to kind of talk about that and what we can do to fix this problem. Are you seeing A problem with getting more young people or more people particularly people colored black people to become police officer I'm not sure whether that is that. An urban legend or not Let me tell you why so in my career. I have worked in background investigation and we did. We were having that same dialogue always so hard to find particularly black people to become the police but I contend that there are plenty of black applicants out there. You just have to hire them. You cannot Find excuses not to hire them because of your implicit biases or your Your your overt biases. You cannot put them into a are you you. Can't you can't measure them by measurements? That are not the same measurements that you measure all the Atkins by meaning once they pass the basic parameters you don't get to add extra parameters for and I'm going to use this as a as a true example once you pass the parameters you can't say well they well. They have to have a bachelor's degree which they have but they didn't pass a class when they were in Undergrad. There's no such parameter. They have a bachelor's degree which is what the with the parameter is so I have seen that happen and you know question that and you know I had argued about it and that person was not hired so I'm going to say that if you're not doing everything you can to diversify your police department in a fair and impartial way that I'm going to throw out the window. That argument there are not enough Black Africans not enough women applicants not enough. Latino applicant is whatever the you know the category is. I'm going to say unless you're doing. They're fairly at across the board. And then I'm going to also add if you going out of your way to bypass the parameters in order to get certain hype of applicant or a certain category. Then you're not. You're still not playing fairly okay. So I am not clear Sir. Captain that that is really an issue. I think Anecdotally that it doesn't excuse because what I see is okay the black community. They have an issue with us so we can always say that they don't want to become the please I'm just not. I'm not convinced that when we had a black cat who was the director of our Personnel Division for instance with my police department. We didn't seem to have that issue. You one has to wonder what the issues really are. Okay that's that's a very fair very fair point. I too But I here's here's Mike attention and I too was a member of our background team in on all that kind of stuff recruit team and so. I went to colleges the schools Two Barber shops churches etc tried to get many applicants to sign up and many You know when you go to colleges we were heading You know some universities here in You Know Yukon Wiscon- Western Connecticut State University and other other schools. Rama stated Connecticut and even our home city and the people that were taking. The applications are showed some type of interest generally were white and many black applicants or or potential black applicants. Were would tell us straight out that they weren't interested in Assam down that saying that any didn't but those who dead Show some interest. Obviously you know they. They came on the Chicago Tribune. Awhile ago maybe I read. This article may be back in October or so September October. They did a really good article. I I can send it to if I can find it and it was talking about this whole problem that they were having in Chicago with all the problems. That Chicago Police Department has and they want more black people To to apply in their head of their personnel division for the city now as the police officers but for the city was talking about. How come there were no Not Enough Black applicants and one of the things that the that the personnel director was talking about was was similar to what you were just mentioning about about Going through with with this selection process many people are being weeded out for silly things that others others were not being weeded out as on on. And she was saying that. There's the legacy groups particularly Latino legacy groups right so so we have you. You remember the National Black Police Officers Association right so their legacy groups so a Latino groups Were actually staying with their applicants throughout the process right. So they're helping them back. Prepare for the physical prepare for the written. Prepare oral. And that was the difference. In why the Latino Applicants were doing better on the test whereas black people black officers or black applicants were taking a test and then that was it next time you see them was for their physical prison for the physical portion and they couldn't pass it will one of the reasons is obviously because you groups were not doing enough to make sure that they passed it so that was one of the critiques that the Personnel Director Had. I'd seen know and I liked the idea of Following the applicants so when I first apply My blue background. She was my and not in the background investigator Recruiter I missed my first test. I exit show up. I'll be lazy. You know that happens a lot with the cruise black white brown. You know because we are young and we're not Dedicated yet and and you know we're young. So she called me and she said. I'm a need you to come to this test and I said yes Ma'am I showed up so when I was in background I I remember having a conversation with one of the The executive that was there at the time and I said hey you know I had this idea. Why don't we make sure that we follow up with our African because we're having a problem with adversity A problem there's somebody says they have not sure really had one but anyway. Why don't we call advocate? Who we think things not to want to come and take the test to make sure they come in and take the test and she said well. We can't do that and I said why not. She said because that's against federal loss will turn we tell me see that we can understand it. Can we find that in the federal wreck so that we can read it and she never answered because there is no such thing so I suggested then because I got the impression that she was still some kind of way about calling black Africans? Why don't we just call? The Africans have to just call the black Africa's we can call them all and make sure that you know. They know that they need to come and take the test because they are most of them are young and we probably need to give them a little nudge ono that we can't do that. That's the guest federal rigs. That was like okay. So it's it's stuff like that they keep us from being able to hire qualified Women and Black and Latino Asian and so forth advocate in my opinion so my small vantage point and I and I take that unaccept- that I think that that's I think that what you're saying is absolutely valid and I and I'm not pushing back against that I'm trying to add to it and say that It is a it is a problem we do need to. Give people a nudge and we also have noticed. Where as you mentioned as you sat in your I out so meetings. Whatever and talked about okay. Wh why are we mountains personally because when they were? Fourteen smoke weed. Wh what are we talking about here So why are we? Why are we doing that? And we we had to have the same conversations with. Wait a minute okay. This guy got a ticket when he was eighteen. These these thirty three. Now what are you talking about? You know so so. Sometimes I think that the that the rules if not a fairly across the board can bounce people who could be potentially good applicants. I completely agree with that. So just tell us a little bit about The Organization the National Black Police Officers. Tell us a little about them. And what you do and as you are the chair woman and what. Your responsibilities.

National Black Police Associat officer National Black Police Officers National Black Police Officers black community Captain Sonia Pruitt Montgomery County Police Depar Law Enforcement Action Partner Police Organization Chicago Police Department Maryland personnel director University of Maryland Univers argosy university supervisor Personnel Division Commander Captain Hunters president
"national black police association" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

14:37 min | 2 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Website. Read over and look over this news one special report art. It's a three part series. The first part is black versus blue. Second part is policing black. America and a third part liberty and justice for all so he's also they also have a number of other articles that can be explored on the website without further ado ladies and gentleman. Here's the interview with Dana. Dana Jones. Thank you day. McKay Jones for being on our show. Thank you so much I appreciate it. No problem no problem my a pleasure. Okay so just tell us a little bit about yourself. I did read your bio but just tell tell us a little bit about yourself and what you got going on with your plans for the future and things like that well I'm Correction Office in my profession. That paid the bills. I worked for the Westchester County Department Department. Correction I'm on my third year and Almost cone on a Black Westchester magazine. I am New York State representative the beginning of of blacks and law enforcement of America also. I'm a CO founder of Westchester Black Political Conference. So keep myself I keep myself busy is sounds like you do so your state rep for the blacks and law enforcement so is that electric Alexa medicine. You know that that organization started ten years ago and at that time we I was at that time I was in North East regional president of the National Blackley sociation and we had Little Disagreement Well big disagreement with the president at that time was name is Melinda. Z's I believe he was the Deputy Chief of Dallas Police Department we. We didn't like the way the organization was going. They what they was Dressing issues on the national level which National Organization when is Asian should so myself in a couple of other members decided to leave and start blacks and law enforcement of America to actually give black communities of boys from from a law enforcement perspective and Retired and active law enforcement. Oh okay the organization is fairly active. Then right I see in your newsletter that you are constantly putting articles and dressing dressing now getting situations that are happening in New York but situations around the country. Yes yes We we try to give that voice And we we also vichy where we're trying to work together with the NASA Blackley so they have a new president Sonia Pruitt and She's a good system. I was on the board with her when we was When I was in the National Black Police Association we was on the Board and I'm also part of the National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice and the great thing about these these organizations especially blacks National Association Blacks and criminal justice because of their history and the need for Young black officers throughout the country to participate in these organizations. Because we've seen you've seen lately that Black officers which is is is not surprising. You you don't get the same representation and and and then on Push with the same zeal of defending Black Officers As they do their white counterparts right when the biggest cases that comes to my mind we talk about that. Is that situation happen in Minnesota. I think his last name was not war He was recently convicted. Right right right and yes yes yes yeah he was. He was convicted. Part of that too. You know Great great that you brought that up so part of that also is is the. DA's office when they prosecute cops seems like when his white cops is a higher threshold Oh to indict but when there's black cops the threshold is is is a lot lower and We have to look at that. You know The the bias and the justice system even when it comes to black law enforcement not saying that they shouldn't be accountable but we see that they're treated differently than in their white counterparts and that goes that goes back to having a national organization that can come into thin and defend in the office. And you know. I don't think we will defend you. Know police brutality cases. If you're going out and violating black people's rights but there's certain issues I get calls from all over. You know Black officers feel that they had been asked about a union and in the US not fighting for But you know I think that's needed and no out. I can't think of the state offhand but the black organization in one city and they have instructed then they're black officers to come out of the come to come out of the F. O. P. So I think is black officers starting to be aware that in the union representation when it comes to black officers is little to none. Yeah I was watching another podcast. I think it was rule the mar and I do forget the brothers name and he was. He was definitely saying that he was a current police. Officer who was saying that The black officers need to stop giving these union dues now not. I'm advocating for either way but but it there's a problem there's a problem. Didn't we need to address that problem. Exactly what I wanted to talk about. His Swab addressed this criticism. It's two thousand nineteen. Do we need these organizations. You know why guy separating yourselves you talked with a little little bit about it but just addressed at that point exactly. Why do we need these particular black organizations or do we need them? You know. Well well we still need them because the reason y the organizations was were created. Those same problems exist today when the first black law enforcement position was created in Houston and The issues were you know racism in treated unfairly. Those issues exists today. I mean it it really it really. Hasn't it really hasn't changed. You know we might have more black faces in managerial positions But but it's still. The culture of policing is still racist. It's still biased. I mean it's the DNA that's what it was created for. It was created to and to enforce the the slave codes and the black codes. I mean you know stop question and Frisk was created from from how the the patrollers I used to stop and question flays so I mean nothing. Nothing has changed in the attitudes towards black people haven't changed attitudes for in the attitudes for black people in this coach. Having chain you know just having a badge on. Don't don't let us not be fooled that the attitude for black officers changed at saddened. Terrible right would think that we've come so far but Apparently not in some people's minds. You're absolutely you're absolutely right. I remember remember when when I joined National Association in Nineteen Ninety two. You know. I'm twenty three years old. You know I'm going to these conferences as you know and I'm walking around and I'm looking at these guys and black law enforcement. I mean these brothers that they came up. Join join Policing in the sixties and and you know in the civil rights era in the seven the black power ever and and these are some strong brothers and sisters man and I I had that feeling like wow man you know. Freedom is just around the corner eating what I'm saying like these brothers and then twenty some odd years later. I'm dressing the same issues that addressed in the nineteen ninety-two and that's that's really sad. Do you think that we will ever ever break it. Do you think we'll ever get to that level that these organizations aren't necessary that people really are completely judged on their performance in their abilities rather than the color of skin. Ever think. We'll ever get there. I believe all ethnic organizations on necessarily right even if it was peachy keen in the police department. I think all ethnic organizations are necessary for networking for for for for gaining knowledge. You Know Oh folks for the conferences. The conference is beautiful but I think as as as the reason you know why organizations organized differently than black organizations right you know. Black Organization was created to fight the racism. White organizations are created to keep power. It's a different. It's a different while these organizations you know and and and the reality is white organization. You know really don't need because you know people say to you. Make what if I make a white police association. See your dot one your local police department. We're outnumbered right. We're we're out usually usually in police departments. You know unless it's like you know like like Jacksonville Mississippi where that it's like a nine percent black police department. You rarely see the police departments like that. You know I mean they're out there there are few but they're very very very very rare. And if you look at the numbers I you know. I live in in New York Westchester County. You Got Westchester County. This is New York right. This is this is this is where people think black folks is doing. Good New York right. Black folks are doing because they're making money. Got Big houses and say these benzes Bucci Louis Vuitton but then when you take a city like yonkers New York which is the third largest the city in in New York state out of three hundred offices they got twelve black caps and when I tell people that they laugh like you like really like they got last time they had more black tops in the eighty. Then they doing twenty nine thousand nine hundred okay. So let's address that because I went out of the right before I retired. I was part of the recruitment team. And I've been talking talking about this and dealing with this I read an article in Chicago. I WANNA say defender Chicago Tribune or defender Windows magazines out there in Chicago where they were talking about the about their inability to to attract black officers. I was there I went to numerous colleges. We went to barbershops. We went to churches we. We can't get black officers come. I was hired nineteen ninety-five doing during the Clinton Crime Bill. They're targeted black officers. We we all came on and now how today fast forward to two thousand seventeen eighteen. Nineteen we can't get black people to want to become police officers so speak about that. I think I I think is is is the lack of accountability of law enforcement within within itself to attract Black People My wife is a detective For my Gurney. We have we have two children in their twenties and early thirties. And they don't WanNa be pleased they don't WanNa be a part of the system right you know because what because of what they see even though you know. They've seen me out there. They see their mother out there doing work in the community. Give it back community being good law enforcement officers right for but their experiences you know. They're not not just what they see but their experiences Hansen's theirselves with other law enforcement officers in other in other jurisdictions and other cities. You know I mean we had to really go go after one Hispanic officer. That was totally disrespectful. Then you know to my daughter to to literally tell her that she wasn't smart enough to attend Attend University of Miami. Are you kidding me. We paying three thousand dollars a month and you have the nerve to tell somebody not that you know when when when they show you this student. Id Card you know and and and then you and then someone that looks like that you would think the understands. This wasn't a white top Spanish Cup right right so so when when our children experience these things some other kids they don't have parents than law enforcement. That could make the offices apologize right that that that know how to get that person that Eh violated them so you know imagine what the average black child you know it is thinking when they see it and they experience so it was very the hard to get those power five people. Now you know to to to take these tests because they have no faith in the system and they don't trust the system so you know and and a lot of times you know they they look at us as enemies to even though you know we're like let's make good life we can make you make some money right. You have a good pension. You have good good benefits you know what for your kids and everything and you're like man screw that I'm not being part of that right right. I don't care how much how much you know. I'm not going to be a part of that so you know that that's what we still try to do that. Then still trying to get people to take the test. Don't don't still try so it's a constant effort but the numbers are getting smaller and smaller smaller. I regret that they are getting smaller and smaller. I had the same conversations with my children. I mean I kind of don't really want them to be cops because of the danger and all that stuff but but you the opportunities to progress into be a positive in your community. I coached for our police activity league. A new number of different sports can so I had interacted obviously with them. I interacted with a lot of other black kids And you know for them to grow up and sit and have that same mindset is really disappointing. My Son's twenty three. His friends are are twenty three and I try to get in the take the last round of police tasks..

Black Organization National Black Police Associat Black Westchester magazine New York Westchester Black Political Co America Westchester County Department National Organization Dallas Police Department McKay Jones blacks National Association Bl Dana US Westchester County National Association of Blacks New York Westchester County Minnesota National Blackley sociation
"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

09:38 min | 3 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Home. Dallas is no slip of tongue. It is exactly how she thinks and what she thinks. And that's exactly. Who they wanted to hire for the police chief, for the city of Dallas? It black lives matter activists. And that's who she is. So she does think that it's not their fault, and the people that are committing crimes are forced to do it. And it's funny because the the highest elected official in Dallas county. Klay, J judge clay Jay. Judge clay, Jay is going off on how particularly evil it is with these transgender murders. We're going to get into that such big time. With. I've been telling you that the city of Dallas is so politically, correct. So. Diversity, you know, worshiping that they refuse to tell the truth to the transgender community and to us about whether it's prostitution or not that plus what clay Jay said that they will throw you through the roof in detail is coming up at eight forty five do not. And I mean that miss this. I mean, we got a double barrel. Shotgun tonight. Of stuff. That's like holy crap. I don't make the news. But Gus when it comes out like this, it's incredible. It's messed up. But it's incredible. The national black police association. They're Dallas chapter, the president of the Dallas national black police sociation attack chief. And if you didn't hear what she said she said, basically, you know, she, she didn't say, basically she said, if people that are committing crimes violent crimes are not it's not their fault. They're forced into it. They are socio economic issues that are related to crime in this city. There are individuals in the city who have returned from prison who cannot find a job who are not educated in those instances, those individuals are forced to commit violent acts. So that is why we as a police department have gone just beyond arrest and, or apprehension otherwise she said they cannot find a job. They're trying chief knows this. She Paul noses remember, she was picked by black lives matter advocate, who, by the way, has been convicted of beating a black baby boy and. And this is charged with beating his black baby mama, but that's that should teaser broaden the city manager of Dallas. Just got too excited. He he overlooked. He knew that he's a black baby beater, but he said, you know what gosh, she's amazing? He led the black lives matter rally that kill five are cops. This is who we need to help pick the chief, who better. But I mean they're trying she said they're trying to find the job. These von criminals socioeconomic issues that are related to crime in do don't understand this you white folk, there are socio economic issues that are related to crime in this city. There are individuals in the city who have returned from prison who cannot find a job and can't find a job. They are trying. They get out of prison in the first thing that he was put their resume together, the resumes together. They've got fifty copies of the resume on that nice watermarked paper. And they are hustling, and they are spending every waking day, way much more so than an illegal immigrant. Does you know what I mean way much more so than legal immigrant does? They are hustling. They are hitting the street. They are applying for jobs. They're applying for more jobs than there are hours in the day. They're applying for more jobs in there are minutes in the day. And nobody wants to hire because most of them are black, or Brown and you put them in jail in your racism, you got off the same crunch. You put them in jail. And now they're forced to commit a violent crime against you. And, and you expect me to arrest them and everything like that. And you and you say, oh, cheap. Chief. Jeevan forty-one Burs last month. Hey. I disbanded the vice unit which goes after drug dealing prostitution. And gangs. I'm sorry. Drug prostitution and gambling. I disbanded that I disbanded the cold case unit, I have only thirteen detectives in homicide unit when China Tonio has fifty in Houston has eighty. And I'm doing the best I can. I making this police department and the city as black lives matter. As I can't. But it takes time you. And she said this before our like our last press comes you need to step up. We need you. And she said it again in this do press conference. We need you to step up. We can't do it, you, it's up to you. We are socially and fundamentally transforming this city and you either get on the bandwagon or get out of the way. But this is not on me. This is new to change things not to put these black people in jail, or these Brown people. I'm here to change and get them jobs in my in the district. Attorney in Dallas county. Is is is on board with me one hundred ten percent. What's the lesson? Don't be bored. Yeah. There is. Erkel RDA. So they're they're together on board. It's all it's all how, how are you? Why are you surprised? This is who the city this is who we voted into the city council. There's some people this is who the city council hired in this in, it's a city manager and this is the city manager hired as police chief blessed by the council. I made it all flows. Neat. And nice. The only problem is that, you know, she misspoke, what she feels believes and what all these folks that put her in Bill, even feel but she misspoke it like she spoke to plainly indirectly. It's not time that you, we're not there. Fully Bernie Bernie Sanders winning an election and coming out and directly saying, how socialist socialism's great how we're going to do socialism, and how, you know whatever something that was like that ninety percent of Democrats couldn't even handle or ninety five saying something, so direct as opposed to getting his getting the getting the presidency and then tip then in the year, two boom boom boom, boom and saying something that would have made your jaw drop today, but now to spend three or four years, you know, the fraud boiling the water. You know what I'm saying? That's the only mistake she made was that she. She didn't. She the water wasn't boiling, when she when, when she dropped us in today yesterday, you know that's the problem. Eight hundred two eight eight WBZ AP is our number. Eight hundred two eight nine two two seven. The good news is one statue is gone. And that's part of the plan and the other statue has covered up because that's really been what's killing people so much. We have had eighty nine home asides so far in twenty nineteen in Dallas eighty nine. And as of last month may, we are more than two times per capita, the homicides of Chicago Illinois. And we are working our way towards, and we've already overtaken them as of last month, which is wonderful, but we're also working on turning into Los Angeles when it comes to homelessness, the number of homeless people has jumped twelve percent across LA county to nearly fifty nine thousand and we have our DA to help with that. You know what's the lesson, don't be bored? He's going to put people, he's going to not let anybody go to jail, if they're, you know, panhandling, or aggressive or squatting or, you know, camping defecating and doing God knows what this homicides sex assault in his a homeless camps the homeless camp, they broke up before about three years ago in Dallas every woman that was interviewed in there by the Dallas news. I believe it was the news was sexually assaulted in some way that live there. It's just a way of life there. They found a skeleton underground in Fort Worth homeless encampment like the like. It was a guy that used to play cards there. They make their own rules in these things, man. They so they can they can rape or grope at will there's drugs, all sorts of drugs. And when you give the money you help them by the drug, which is so cool, you keep them high so they can be extra rape. You know what I mean? So you're helping keep them high and rape, and it's just. And are not wanting to charge them for anything. Okay. Up next. If the stuff I haven't shared with you yet hasn't made a jaw drop. This will. I finally have an answer, definitive unequivocal answer for you. If prostitution is what's involved in killing these transgender.

Dallas prostitution Dallas county clay Jay Home. Dallas black police association rape Judge clay Bernie Bernie Sanders Klay official Gus China Tonio Paul Jeevan Brown Fort Worth
"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

07:31 min | 3 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"You could drop off in person at his Fort Worth office Richardson, office or online. You can donate, like, I, I don't know. I might bring into donation. I don't know but or online at PB J drive dot com. Okay. I gotta tell you. I am so excited and giddy like a kid because I get to share information that so many people don't know about to show you, why everything I say is so true. And so angering outrageous and messed up. So I've been telling you a lot lately that the city of Dallas is thirty three percents short of the amount of cops that they had only ten years ago. But yet we've increased our population by one hundred thousand and some estimates have six hundred Cup short. There's a bunch. But and I've told you about how the cold case unit was shut down, and they'll say, well, it wasn't shut down. We're just using them for other things right now, but it was in my opinion, and then second of all, I told you how we only have thirteen detectives for homicide in Dallas. But yet. San Antonio has fifty and Houston has eighty I told you how they there's the Dallas police is run by, you know, these, the Rene hall, and city manager and all the black lives matter, folks, that they don't do proactive policing. They do reactive policing and. You know what else chief U haul has not at all gun apoplectic, and said, hey, we don't have enough cops, we need more. She is being a good quiet little black lives matter, Black Panther activist and not at calling for more cops, but I will tell you including today, I'll give you more details on that. But I will tell you that something I did not know that I just learned today, that is unbelievable to put it on. I mean, I didn't even know this and I can't believe what I keep learning. It just keeps flowing. The information about horrific, the city of Dallas is with its police department how bad it is. Because guess what else I had forgotten this? So they disbanded own. They, they disbanded the cold case unit, which as early as recently as February, about three months ago was bragging, bad solved a couple of cases on the DVD website, which I think is great. But they've disbanded that they have only thirteen detectives when they should have fifty or eighty depending on fifty to eighty. And they also two years ago, disbanded the vice units it all works together. Doesn't it? They disbanded and this is all in the chief U home. They disbanded the vice unit remember because of what she said today. She said it's not their fault. They're forced to commit violent crimes are socio economic issues that are related to crime in the city, which is sitting here. I'm a black lives matter. Black Panther person as an African American. You don't understand. And it's the system. The man white power, and white privilege is sending them to jail and is forcing them to commit violent crimes are individuals in the city, who have returned from prison who cannot find a job who are not educated in those instances, those individuals are forced let me, let me pause that because you, you the white man, and the Powell white power structure, has this is literally what she thinks. I'm just trying to translate for a little bit more you in the white power structure, the white privilege structure is racist government in prison, complex institution. That's roy. Run by white, rich folks. Many of them liberal folks up in north Dallas claim and like in Highland Park like meteorologist, who claim to care about us, y'all have purposely, not educated us, y'all have purposely not allow us to go schools, y'all have blown up our families in, y'all have kept us held down by not educating us and not allowing us to get work in forcing us to then turn to a life of prime and y'all put us in jail for little things that you'll never get caught with. And if you do get caught you get let off on. And once we get out, it's y'all make us then commit violent crimes to survive because we can't, here's the rest of what she said prison who cannot find a job who are not educated in those instances, those individuals are forced to commit violent acts. So that is why we as a police department have gone just beyond arrest and or apprehension. That's why we as a police department has gone just beyond arrest in that pretension. Do you see what she's saying? Again, this is the Brock Obama two point. Oh fundamentally transforming. The city of Dallas becoming. I mean it all fits together. Like I said, what the DA with the city manager commit violent acts. So that is why we as a police department has gone just beyond arrest and or apprehension. Yeah. So I mean, this is the new Dallas and it's been this way for a couple of years. I mean, she disbanded vice two years ago. Narcotics officers all the sudden had to work drug prostitution and gambling cases so since no longer there, since it's no longer vice unit for two years. Which is all part of the whole thing about homicide in Texas. We have we don't have you don't even have. I mean we have like a ten percent of the homicide detectives we should have we have. No vice we have no cold case. And with thirty three percents short. What the heck do you expect? And you're thinking. Well, that's why she's blaming it on poverty. It's not their fault. No, no, no, no, no, no. This is how she thinks she thinks your that. We're forcing black people to commit violence upon black people because we don't allow them to have work and to be educated, and we and we, we charge them and prosecute them. Unlike we unlike any way, we do with white folks. This is how it is in the city. Now, this is, who is running the city. This is teaser TC broad next. The city manager, this is you Rene hall. And I think if you want to sum it up in one picture, it's when she got the job. And she started she, she took a picture of herself in a Black Panther outfit crouching down with a gun on holstered pointed out at the ground with a leg that, that forgive my language, but the bad ass pose on a gun range. No uniform no nothing. Black panther. Full black black outfit like a Black Panther and was there like I'm a bad ass. And, and I'm a Black Panther and we're here, we're here and welcome to. It's finally happened and black lives matter picked me. I was there pick. And so this is the natural progression. Eight hundred two eight eight WBZ eight hundred to eight eight nine two two seven one of the, the, the unions were speaking today and you know, it's amazing, then the national black police association is disgusted with what she said the national Latino offs. Peace officers sociation is disgusted with what she said, the, the regular, quote unquote, Dallas police association is disgusted with what she said, do you know that there's not one union, even black and Hispanic unions denounce. This revolted by this. And the reason why is because even if they're leftists or social Justice warriors, they see the filth and vermin that they have to interact with every day that murder and rape, in oppress, their own people..

Dallas national black police associat Rene hall Fort Worth Richardson Brock Obama WBZ Texas San Antonio Highland Park Powell prostitution murder Houston rape two years six hundred Cup three months
"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

08:41 min | 3 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Is going off on how particularly evil it is with these transgender murders. We're gonna get into that such big time. With. I've been telling you that the city of Dallas is so politically, correct. So. Diversity, you know, worshiping that they refuse to tell the truth to the transgender community and to us about whether it's prostitution or not that plus what clay Jay said that they will throw you through the roof in detail is coming up at eight forty five do not. And I mean that miss this. I mean, we got a double barrel. Shotgun tonight. Of stuff. That's like holy crap. I don't make the news. But Gus when it comes out like this, it's incredible. It's messed up. But it's incredible. The national black police association. They're Dallas chapter. The president of the Dallas national black police association attack chief. And if you didn't hear what she said she said, basically, you know, she, she didn't say, basically she said, if people that are committing crimes violent crimes are not it's not their fault. They're forced into it. They are socio economic issues that are related to crime in this city. There are individuals in the city who have returned from prison who cannot find a job who are not educated in those instances, those individuals are forced to commit violent acts. So that is why we as a police department has gone just beyond arrest and, or apprehension otherwise she said they cannot find a job. They're trying chief knows this. She Paul noses remember, she was picked by a black lives matter advocate, who, by the way, has been convicted of beating a black baby. Boy. And this is charged with beating his black baby, mama. But that's that's should teaser broaden next the city manager Dallas just got too excited. He he overlooked, he knew that the that he's a black beauty, but he's, you know what gosh, she's amazing? He led the black lives matter rally that kill five are cops. This is who we need to help pick the chief, who better. But I mean, they're trying she said they're trying to find the jobs. These criminals are socio economic issues related to crime in do don't understand this you white folk, there are socio economic issues that are related to crime in the city. There are individuals in the city who have returned from prison who cannot find a job. They can't find a job. They are trying. They get out of prison. And the first thing to do was put their resume to the resumes together. They've got fifty copies of the resume on that nice watermarked paper. And they are hustling, and they are spending every waking day, way much more so than an illegal immigrant. Does you know what I mean way much more so than legal immigrant does? They are hustling. They are hitting the street. They are applying for jobs. They're applying for more jobs than there are hours in the day. They're applying for more jobs in the minutes in the day. And nobody wants to hire because most of them are black. Or brown. And you put them in jail. In your racism, you got off the same crunch. You put them in jail. And now they're forced to commit a violent crime against you. And you expect me to arrest them and everything like that. And you and you so chief chief. Cheapens your forty one murs last month. Hey. I disbanded the vice unit which goes after drug dealing prostitution and gangs. I'm sorry. Drug prostitution and gambling. I disbanded that I disbanded the cold case unit I have only thirteen detectives the homicide unit when China Tony has fifty and Houston has eighty. And I'm doing the best I can. I making this police department and the city as black lives matter. As I can't. But it takes time you. And she said this before, like our last press comes you need to step up. We need you. And she said it again in this press conference, we need you to step up. We can't do it, you, it's up to you. We are socially and fundamentally transforming this city and you either get on the bandwagon or get out of the way. But this is not on me. This I knew to change things not to put these black people in jail, or these Brown people, and I'm here to change and get them jobs and my and, and the district attorney Dallas county. Is is on board with me one hundred ten percent. What's the lesson? Don't be four. Yeah. There is that. Erkel RDA. So they're together on board. It's all it's all how, how are, why are you surprised? This is who the city this was who we voted into the city council. There's some people this is who the city council hired in this in, it's a city manager and this is the city manager hired as police chief blessed by the council. I made it all flows. Indeed. And nice, the only problem is that, you know, she misspoke, what she feels believes and what all these folks that put her in believing field, but she misspoke it and she spoke to plainly indirectly, it's not time we're not there. Fully like Bernie Bernie Sanders winning an election and coming out and directly saying, how socialist socialism's great how we're gonna do socialism, and how, you know whatever something that was like that ninety percent of Democrats couldn't even handle or ninety five saying something so direct as opposed to getting his getting the getting the presidency. And then, you know, then in the year two boom boom boom boom and saying something that would have made your jaw drop today, but now to spend three or four years, you know, the frog boiling in the water, you know what I'm saying? That's the only mistake she made was that she. She didn't. She the water wasn't boiling, when she when, when she dropped us in today yesterday, you know that's the problem. Eight hundred two eight eight WBZ is our number. Eight hundred two eight nine two two seven. The good news is one statue is gone. And that's part of the plan and the other statue has covered up because that's really been what's killing people so much. We have had eighty nine home asides so far in twenty nineteen in Dallas eighty nine. And as of last month may, we are more than two times per capita, the homicides of Chicago Illinois. And we're working our way towards, and we've already overtaken them as of last month, which is, you know, it's wonderful, but we're also working on turning into Los Angeles when it comes to homelessness, the number of homeless people has jumped twelve percent across LA county to nearly fifty nine thousand and we have our DA to help with that. You know what's the lesson, don't be bored? If he's going to put people, he's going to not let anybody go to jail, if they're, you know, panhandling, or aggressive or squatting, or camping and defecating doing God knows what this home asides sex assault in these homeless camps the homeless camp, they broke up before about three years ago in Dallas every woman that was interviewed in there by the Dallas news. I believe it was the news was sexually assaulted in some way that live there. It's just a way of life there. They found a skeleton underground in Fort Worth homeless encampment like the like. It was a guy that used to play cards there. They make their own rules in these things, man. They so they can they can rape or grope at will there's drugs, all sorts of drugs. And when you give them money, you help them by the drug, which is so cool, you keep them high, so they can be extra rapi you know what I mean. So you're helping keep them high and rape, and it's just not wanting to charge them for anything..

Dallas prostitution Dallas national black police a black police association rape Bernie Bernie Sanders Dallas county clay Jay Los Angeles president Gus WBZ LA county Paul China Tony Chicago Illinois
"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

07:32 min | 3 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"You could drop Muffin person at his Fort Worth office Richardson, office or online. You can donate, like, I, I don't know. I might bring into donation. I don't know but or online at PB J drive dot com. Okay. I gotta tell you. I am so excited and giddy like a kid because I get to share information that so many people don't know about to show you, why everything I say is so true. And so angering outrageous and messed up. So I've been telling you a lot lately that the city of Dallas is thirty three percent short of the amount of cops that they had only ten years ago. But yet, we've increased population by one hundred thousand and some estimates have six hundred cups short. There's a bunch. But and I've told you about how the cold case unit was shut down, and they'll say, well, it wasn't shut down. We're just using them for other things right now, but it was in my opinion, and then second of all, I told you how we only have thirteen detectives for homicide in Dallas. But yet. San Antonio has fifty in Houston has eighty I told you how they there's the Dallas police is run by the hall and city manager. And all the black lives matter, folks, they don't do proactive policing. They do reactive policing and. You know what else chief U haul has not it all gone apoplectic, and said, hey, we don't have enough cops we need more. She is being good quiet little black lives matter. Black Panther activist not at calling for more cops, but I will tell you including today, give you more details on that. But I will tell you that something I did not know that I just learned today, that is unbelievable to put it on. I mean, I didn't even know this and I can't believe what I keep learning. It just keeps flowing. The information about horrific, the city of Dallas is with its police department how bad it is. Because guess what else? I had forgotten this. So they disbanded they disbanded the cold case unit, which as early as recently as February, about three months ago was bragging, bad solved a couple of cases on the DVD website, which I think is great. But they've disbanded that they have only thirteen detectives when they should have fifty or eighty depending of fifty to eighty. And they also two years ago, disbanded the vice unit it all works together. Doesn't it? They disbanded and this is all in the chief Uber day home. They disbanded the vice unit remember because what she said today, she said it's not their fault. They're forced to commit violent crimes are socio economic issues that are related to crime in the city, which is sitting here. I'm black lives matter, Black Panther person as an African American. You don't understand. And it's the system. The man white power, and white privilege is sending them to jail and is forcing them to commit violent crimes. There are individuals in the city who have returned from prison who cannot find a job who are not educated in those instances, those individuals are forced let me, let me pause that you the white man in the Powell white power structure, has. And this is literally what she thinks. I'm just trying to come. Translate for a little bit more you in the white power structure, the white privilege structure is racist government in prison complex, institutions. Is run by white, rich folks. Many of them liberal folks up in north Dallas who claim and like in, in Highland Park like meteorologist, who claim to care about us, y'all have purposely, not educated us, y'all have purposely not allow us to go schools, y'all have blown up our families in, y'all have kept us held down by not educating us and not allowing us to get work in forcing us today, can turn to a life of prime and y'all put us in jail for little things that you'll never get caught with. And if you get caught you get let off on and once we get out, it's y'all make us then commit bond crimes to survive because we can't, here's the rest of what she said prison who cannot find a job who are not educated in those instances, those individuals are forced to commit violent acts. So that is why we as police department has gone just beyond arrest and or apprehension the. That's why we as a police department have gone just beyond arrest and apprehension. Do you see what she's saying? Again, this is the Barack Obama two point. Oh fundamentally transforming. The city of Dallas becoming. I mean it all fits together. Like I said with the DA with the city manager commit violent acts. So that is why we as a police department has gone just beyond arrest and or apprehension. Yeah. So I mean, this is the new Dallas and it's been this way for a couple of years. I mean, she disbanded vice two years ago. Narcotics officers all the sudden had to work drug prostitution and gambling cases so since no longer there since there's no longer vice unit for two years, which is all part of the whole thing about homicide. Detectives we have. We don't have we don't even have. I mean we have like a ten percent of the homicide detectives we should have we have. No vice we have no cold case. And with thirty three percents short, what the heck do you expect? And you're thinking. Well, that's why she's blaming it on poverty. It's not their fault. No, no, no, no, no, no. This is how she thinks she thinks your that we. We're forcing black people to commit violence upon black people because we don't allow them to have work and to be educated, and we and we charge them and prosecute them. Unlike we unlike any way, we do with white folks. This is how it is in the city. Now, this is, who is running the city. This is teaser TC broad next city manager. This is you Rene hall. And I think if you want to sum it up in one picture, it's when she got the job. And she started she, she took a picture of herself in a Black Panther outfit crouching down with their gun on holstered pointed out the ground with a leg that, that forgive my language, but the bad ass pose on a gun range, no uniform nothing. Black panther. Full black black outfit like a Black Panther and was there like I'm a bad ass. And, and I'm a Black Panther and we're here, we're here and welcome to. It's finally happened and black lives matter picked me, I. I was there pick. And so this is the natural progression. Eight hundred two eight eight WBZ eight hundred to eight eight nine two two seven one of the, the, the unions were speaking today. And you know, it's amazing than the national black police association is disgusted with what she said the national Latino offs. Peace officers sociation is disgusted with what she said, the, the regular, quote unquote, Dallas police association is disgusted with what she said, do you know that there's not one union, even black, and Hispanic unions, denounce this, and revolted by this? And the reason why is because even if they're leftists or social Justice warriors, they see the filth and vermin that they have to interact with every day that murder, and rape, and oppress, their.

Dallas national black police associat Fort Worth WBZ Richardson Barack Obama San Antonio Highland Park DA prostitution Rene hall Houston murder rape two years thirty three percent six hundred cups three months
"national black police association" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"national black police association" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Stop express. Convenience store shoplifter still one hundred twenty dollars worth of laundry detergent, so he's saying, whoa. Whoa. This guy could just take this. And and there's gonna be no prosecution. We're gonna turn our backs on petty theft. And everyone's going to be okay with it. Five guys steal one hundred twenty dollars a day at a business on day three. This is talking. What do we do about these things? On the top level. I like ways going, let's not flood the system with crap. Some these things aren't crap. Some of these things are not cramp. The president of the national black police association. First of all, I didn't know there was a national black police says he -ation his name is sergeant Sheldon Smith get them on the show. That's I wanna know what he's saying is it opens the door for some people to think they can commit crimes. Yes. But shouldn't we take a look at like nonsense crimes and see whether or not we want to prosecute? Maybe it shouldn't be a crime now theft in all cases should be prosecuted. Theft should be prosecuted. Different than let's say possession. You can get me to easily agree. That have a little bit of weed. Should not be a crime. Shouldn't be a crime by full disclosure. I have no we'd stop asking. But I can totally get how we're we're going after these these. Low level. You know, drug dealers drug users not dealers users because dealers, I think you can go after. But if I already got got it. So conceptually, I'm very very happy with the idea. Now, how do we put it into proper form? That's. That's a whole nother question. Indeed. Let's go back to some of the candidates running for president of the United States. Elizabeth warren. He wants to eliminate existing student loan debt. You mean, take alone..

Sheldon Smith theft president national black police associat Elizabeth warren United States one hundred twenty dollars