2 Episode results for "National Association Of Color Women"

Warriors: Ida B. Wells

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Warriors: Ida B. Wells

"Having lost by paper had a price put on my life and been made an exile from home for hinging EPA truth. I felt I owed it to myself and to my race. To tell the whole truth this is encyclopedia. Manica I'm chantey. Goal are hosted a brown to politics guest hosting today's episode born into slavery. Today's warrior became a journalist. Educator civil workers rights activists in suffer. Just she is best known as the leader of the Anti Lynching Movement her reporting on the violent injustices faced by African Americans and the work to make United States or more equitable place significantly impacted American society. Let's talk about ib well IDA. Bell Wells was born in Holly Springs Mississippi on July Sixteenth. Eighteen sixty two six months. Before the emancipation proclamation. She was the eldest of six children. When I was sixteen. Her parents died in a yellow fever. Outbreak Ida was determined that she and her siblings would not be split up so she got jobs a teacher at a rural country school in eighteen. Eighty two item move with her family to Memphis Tennessee. Two years later I was riding on a train from work when she was asked to move. She was instructed to move to the colored car which also served as a smoking area. Furious either refuse when the conductor forcibly removed from the train ida bit how she sued the Railroad Company and ultimately lost the case according to a story in me obey the injustice inspired beginning of her activism in journalism career while working as a journalist Ida wrote about ride subjects she was an outspoken reporter and weighed in on issues such as disenfranchisement and segregation rapidly. Ida became one of the most prominent black journalists have her time and was called the princess of the press in eighteen ninety two. I disclose friend and two other African Americans were murdered by Lynch mob. The killings motivated IDA to expose the reality of becoming one the first reporter city so I don't wrote articles condemning the attack and the wrongful deaths of African Americans and one article titled Lynch Law. In America I wrote the nineteenth century lynching mob cut off. Ears toes and fingers strips of flesh and distributes sugars person at the body as souvenirs among the crowd. Her Writing Ida documented the dangers that black southerner face after one particularly controversial article. That either wrote a mob stormed the office of her newspaper and destroyed the press. Fortunately I wasn't in the office when the incident occurred still the attack understandably Friday nighter and she left town. She moved to New York where she worked at the New York Age and African American newspaper. There she continued her work exposing lynching and wrote a report on the subject for the publication. Ooh In eighteen. Ninety eight IDA brought her campaign to the White House. She discuss lynchings with President. Mckinley Alami Congress for a National Anti Lynching Law in one thousand nine hundred five item to Chicago and married for an Ed Barnett with whom she had four children in Chicago. Idaho for many prominent civil rights organizations including the National Association of Color Women That Alpha suffrage club and the end ablaze c. p. she actively fought for the women's suffrage movement during one suffers parade organizers told IDA and the other black women incidents to march in the back the organizers feared that women of color would offend southern delegates but either refused standing her ground despite the enormous backlash she received. Ida's fight for. Social Justice was relentless. She continued her activism and to her death in one thousand nine hundred eighty one at the age of Sixteen Ida is best remembered for her invaluable role as a social pioneer Ida a risks her life repeatedly to fight against the score of lynching and to protect African Americans all over the country. Join US TOMORROW TO LEARN ABOUT OUR FINAL WARRIOR. A LEGENDARY PRINCESS A BURKINA-FASSO. Talk to you tomorrow before you go. I want to tell you about a campaign that we're really excited about studies. Show that women and men are labeled differently in the workplace for the same behavior due to unconscious gender bias and because bias is Are So ingrained in society even the most progressive among us are guilty of perpetuating the issue become a catalyst for change this international women's Day by joining the bias correct campaign catalyst dot org slash bias correct and by using the Hashtag biased correct.

Ida reporter Sixteen Ida Ida New York Age EPA United States Memphis Lynch Law Bell Wells Tennessee New York Chicago America National Association of Color Ed Barnett African American newspaper Holly Springs Mississippi Mckinley Alami Congress
SMNTY's Female Firsts Playlist, Episode 1: Banking and Ballet

Stuff Mom Never Told You

53:35 min | 1 year ago

SMNTY's Female Firsts Playlist, Episode 1: Banking and Ballet

"Have you heard about the new show little. Fires Everywhere Academy Award Winner, Reese, Witherspoon and Golden Globe nominated Kenny Washington both star in and executive produce the eight Episode Limited series only on Hulu. You can watch new episodes Wednesdays on Hulu. The series follows the intertwined phase of the picture, perfect Richardson family and an enigmatic mother daughter duo who move into town up in their lies with devastating consequences, it explores the weight of long held secrets, the ferocious pool of. Of Motherhood and what it means to be a mother, as well as the danger in believing that planning and following the rules can avert disaster now streaming checkout new episodes every Wednesday, only on Hulu I'm honey German and I'm Carolina Bermudez, and this is life in Spangler and you know we're cooking it up in here. We got that Arrows Combo. You're waiting for you. Why are you looking at me so confused because I'm like what we cook and I don't. You got the I'll you know that you got the Mungu we got it all for you? Life and Spangler Ongo. Any type of food listen and follow on the iheartradio APP or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. This is Anne and you're listening to stuff. I'll never told you. And is a very special bonus episode. The first of a bonus segment about first so this is pretty exciting and to help me with this very special super bonus packed. Episode is my good friend and CO worker Eve. So let's get to it. So now we are joined by good friend of mine and CO worker Eve's. It's good to see you again. Yes, you've heard of from Eve's on episode. We did around invisible disability and we're going to do this segment that we hope will be a regular segment. About female I and we spent. A decent, not embarrassing amount of time trying to come up with an acronym. I love doing ridiculous acronyms. Alah Shield from marvel movies so right now. We're working with female. I empower. We'll get there. We'll get there. Has To be done though we're not giving no, no, no, please write in with here your suggestions. I actually came up with one of these. The other podcast I knew an like no one will get on board with it I'm like it's time for another. Segment of plate in, they're like any. But you can also hear. Eve's on this day in history class and one of the reasons I. Am really excited to have you on here is because. Part of doing this show. I've just come to realize there's so many women who've done amazing things. That I'd never heard of was never taught about. I can say that I've ran into that to this day. In history class, and I'll just get so excited when I found out things about women to like. Oh, my Gosh, they did this they did this. Everybody needs to know you know. So I think even if there are people that we know about. Maybe we don't know everything about them. And then there are people that or who we haven't heard of at all. So I'm excited to be able to talk about. People in history. Who did amazing things? And put a spotlight on on women who? have either been erased or just never gotten the spotlight. They deserve on that something. We talked about in our wikipedia episode of just how many? kind of forgotten to time and Yeah I'm a big big history nerd. So. I. Am Very happy to to include this and. Today you have? To two women who kind of There's a couple similarities some more important than others. Start with him. Did you go through a whole checklist of like similarities and? I can see you doing that. Good listen, I really do. Yeah I think it's important to talk about them but I. WanNa. Talk about I I in general, because I think there's kind of some I know hesitancy over celebrating sometimes I do think it's really important to look back in history and see how started and see how they snowball on from the things that happened in the beginning. like things have presidents. They don't just come out of nowhere. And I think that can get a little lost sometimes, so it's definitely import into recognize the first women, the first black people to do this. The first native American people to do things like we have in today's episode, but. I think that. There's an argument to be had about the value of I because. It kind of is like one of those things that sounds really nice in really pretty on paper, but there's definitely an argument to be had about the value of I especially when it comes to I when they are mixed with like gender and ethnicity. Because a lot of the times they'll be the first woman to do something and then a first black woman to do something, but a lot of times people weren't recognized for the very reason of ethnicity break, so it kind of does in a way. At times overshadow people's achievements in history so. How how do you have any thoughts on that? I think. It's kind of like you said a nice. It's a nice thing, and it is important because we've talked about time and time again. Seeing yourself represented directly impacts what you think you can do, but at the same time it is. It's a complex. There's a lot of people behind that right and a lot of people that were probably forgotton. Again going back to wikipedia. There's just so many. Women. Are other marginalized people that did the thing, and then we're recognized for it right? So I do think I are important, but you should always, and I'm just a big proponent of this in general. HAVE THAT CONTEXT BEHIND? Why were they the first are like? Were there other people that preceded them and made it possible for them to do the thing that we're also not recognizing exactly in the way you put, it makes me think of how sometimes I get shoehorned into things like start adding on a bunch of adjectives qualifiers to make thing. I like the first. And the first season the first we had episode on This Day, in history class on the first jazz recording, which by band of white men, and we know that jazz has history and African American communities. And Is still a thing of note to talk about talk about it, but there's also a history behind that I jazz recording, and there was a reason that white band was the band that got to have that recording in the first place so. I just want that awareness la just because something is a first doesn't mean that there's not another history behind it. That's just as notable. yeah, so, do you want to talk about our first? Our first our first historical. Today I I just throw who gave? This also now I'm going to come up with like my own I. Like the First Anne, too. Have A podcast. The knee y doing him first segment with Eve's. History books now. For that reason now the other? This. Yeah, yeah, let's let's get into it. I'm excited to talk about both of these women. Yes, so. Our first woman is Maggie. L Walker the Brim Lena. So I wanNA just set the scene I so. At the time when Maggie Lena Walker was alive, or just in the beginning, women didn't have the vote, and she was born right off the back of the civil war essentially, so she was, she grew up during the reconstruction era, which is an era when President Lincoln began planning the reconstruction of the South and so at this time. There were many people were enslaved, who were newly declared free, so it was a time of major upheaval like essentially there were things like black codes which were laws that attempted to undermine black people's freedom and people were desperately trying to hold onto that system of slavery at the time. which showed up and things like share cropping and. Lynchings and segregationist policies also really big. Jim Crow laws that we're talking about. So but at the same time all of these things are happening. Black people are also becoming more involved in the political process and. Education was playing a huge role in the way that. Black. People were interacting in the community in churches. We're a big part of that so there. It was just a turbulent time basically, and this was the. Period that Maggie Walker lived in and I think it's just really cool in general to think about. Women specifically or black people specifically who are making moves in such a transitional period. Is Really Inspirational. Like, don't forget how inspiring that's another thing. That's important about context. It's like wow, yeah, because I'm thinking like Oh i. WanNa. Put these dishes in the dishwasher today. And I'm like wait a second Maggie Walker. Board right after the civil war ended and she started her back. You know so I. Don't Know Yeah. That's another thing that I like I like to think about that. They're. They're really inspirational. When you put them in context, complain about stupid like all the dishes are not. I. Mean that is a fair complaint. Right? Yeah! The first black owned bank that was chartered in the United States was a savings bank of the grand founded in the United Order of true reformers, serious name, so you know it serious and that was founded on March second, eighteen, eighty eight, and it opened on April third eighteen, eighty, nine, so. That was the first black. Don't make that was charter, but the first US bank that actually opened was a capital savings bank, and that opened in DC in October, eighteen, eighty eight, so there was stuff bruin before Maggie Walker came along, but nineteen three Maggie. Lena Walker became the first woman in the US to charter and become president of a bank, so she was the first woman period, not just black woman. She was black, but she was the first woman in the US to charter and become the president. And this was in Richmond Virginia. And I say it like that, because which was the capital of the confederacy? Yes. And it is also an hour away from Charlottesville. you know just think about the history of this place where she was opening a bank. Yeah Yeah when searching hair, I saw I found. Two laws that I thought were really interesting. That were active at the time. One of them was apparently in Richmond and probably a lot of other places, but Bridgman. You couldn't once you got married. You had to say goodbye a job. I saw that. What right Oh? Man So she? When she got married, she had a job as a teacher. She got married and then. I heard I had to give it up. Yeah, and she went on to do big. Great things so I guess now that teaching is an amazing. Oh No, no, not saying that, but you know. She stayed active her whole life doing things, but yeah, that's that was a really. Wow, that's. Very specific and what a law yeah! Yeah she. She volunteered a lot right. There was an organization that she volunteered a lot. Yes, there was she ended up being involved in a lot of organizations, and I'm going to get to a list of them later, because it's really a will, and if you want to come up with an acronym for all of her organizations that. I tell him to. Just, got really excited. So I guess I'll go through her background a little bit i. you see how she became this person who was so involved in all of these organizations she was born in eighteen, sixty four in Richmond Virginia, as I mentioned earlier, and her mother was Elizabeth Draper Mitchell, and she was a formerly enslaved assistant cook for Elizabeth Van, Lew, who was a union, spy and unions by? And abolitionist, who she kind of the education of her servants, and Maggie's biological father was an Irish American man that her mom had made on the Dan Lewis. State, so the two of them did it marry, but shortly after Maggie's birth, she got married. Her Mom Elizabeth got married to a man named William Mitchell. Who was also at this estate, but he was a Butler and. William became the head waiter at a hotel a little bit later in Richmond, but unfortunately he was later found, drowned in a river, which was a very like sad point of you know a sad part of Maggie's life. Yeah, because his death was ruled a suicide, but Maggie believed that he was murdered. really sad. But at age fourteen, she joined the independent order of Saint Luke's, which was the organization that she became a lot more heavily involved in over the course of her life, and actually was until the end of her life and at first it was an organization that helps the sick and the elderly enrichment. It was a burial society at first then. As it grew and developed her into a fraternal order in a life insurance company It was a black organization. If I didn't say that already I sure the order provided financial and social support to people, and they did things like Lyndon. Money to people who had financial difficulty and raise many members who had health problems, but after Maggie's Mom's husband after her husband died, Maggie Rulli. Rulli began to work with her mother to help her out financially, so she helped her mother on the line. Do Business, so she delivered lows of close to people as part of her mother's launch, business and laundry was one of the few things that like women do at the time that was accessible to them as work and domestic work in general and I'm sure you know how. Important, domestic workers in history of women yes so. We'll get to that later, but at this time she kind of started realizing the social gap between black people and white people in America, so she went to the Lancaster School, and she went to Richmond colored normal school, and then after she graduated in eighteen, eighty, three, she went and she started teaching in the Public School System, which leads to your point. When she gave her job because she was married or she had to give up because you have so Maggie was part of the independent order of Saint Luke's. As I said earlier, she started being involved in that organization as a teenager and the. Started providing these weeklies, sickness and disability benefits and death claims for members beginning in eighteen, ninety five, which is very important, because at the time why firms deny the black community access to? Disability and Life Insurance in that Jim Crow era, so that was. A big deal like it provided a lot that people didn't have in the black community at the time, so over time her Maggie's leadership in growing the membership of the organization really allowed. More payment of death claims and lower costs for premium, so she really helped the organization in that way and Maggie's contributions also contributed to the development of modern African American communities that provide it services like business and real estate, financing, and education and food and clothing and things like that so. That was important at a time when communities black community specifically, we're building in the United States And, so the over the course of her life, we'll call it the S. l.. Still kind of hard, but the name. Independent, order of Saint, Luke's is also kind of a mouthful. Call. So she did a lot in the. L.! Over the years of her life that was something that she was heavily involved in, and so in eighteen, ninety five, she co founded the Juvenile Department at the IRS l., which provided leadership opportunities for Black Children kids. We're taught things like financial responsibility work, ethics and hygiene skills running the gamut here. At one point, the order began giving kids metal pocket banks, so they get filled them with money and then open a savings account at the Saint Luke Penny Savings Bank, which is her bank that she found it, which will get to a little bit later, and so in eighteen, ninety nine. She became the right worthy grand secretary. Had The independent order of St, Luke's and at the time that she became the order was like it was kinda dwindling. There were only a few thousand members, and it was in debt, and to really built up the organization to over one hundred thousand members in twenty four states, and she made it this kind of vehicle of economic empowerment or black folks and for women. The order also collected three point five million dollars over the time of her leadership, while she was there and build up a hundred thousand dollars. Built up one hundred thousand dollars in reserve, and she held that Grand Secretary position until two died, so she was committed to the ass she was. Also employed a lot of black women. At the organization, she donated to black schools especially for girls. And she wanted women to have the same employment. The professional opportunities that men had and she wanted girls to be able to envision having those kind of opportunities as well careers outside of teaching and domestic work so on August Twentieth Nineteen One. At the annual convention of the order, she called for another Black Bank. There were only about twenty in the US at the time, so she said the following, she said I. We need a savings bank. Let us put our money's together. Let us use our money's. Let us put our money out at usery among ourselves and reap the benefit ourselves. Let us have a bank that will take the Nichols and turn them into dollars, so she was really into this idea of economic empowerment and. kind of self help and. Really building up communities and ways like that, so she also at the same time like in one, thousand, nine hundred see began publishing the State Luke Herald the newspaper of the Independent Order of St Luke's and she used that newspaper to it was distributed to people. She used the to encourage black people enrichment to establish their own institutions, and by nineteen sixteen. The paper had four thousand subscribers. So as we can see, she was just really. Like, she was really innovative and she was really trying all these new things to get. To get things going and she was trying to use this kind of. I was GONNA say Holy Trinity was trying to use this trinity of the paper and a department store that she later opened up and the bank to create this like bustling and thriving part of the black community enrichment. Right in like we said this when things were, it was reconstruction and things were getting built. Yeah love that. She opened a department store. Yeah, it didn't do so hot. ended up closing. I think it opened in nineteen o five and it closed in nineteen eleven. because. Black people weren't supporting it. And that's not. That can sound that well. The black people didn't come out to it, and they should have done this, but it's kind of like. They felt that pressure at the time from white owned businesses. They thought that there would be repercussions for them. Visiting that business as well because white owned businesses and white people were pushing back against the store, because Maggie was trying to use it as this place, where would feel safer for black people to go and would also employ a lot more black people, but because they didn't get to where they needed to be financially ahead to close, yeah yeah. So. Things fail sometimes show. Don't think that should attract us for our missions. Do you know? where it'd be just be at home watching movies Oh. Thank you. Use I I, you know. I don't turn it down. It I appreciate it I believe in you any, thank you. That's not what will happen life. Like, hit Pixar movies or anything? It just made me really fat for some reason. So. There were a lot of racial stereotypes. Discouraged bankers from loaning money to black people and because they thought that. Black people wouldn't repay. The loans stereotypes like that. And if black people were giving loans, they were often charged a higher rate of interest in white customers I mean. We don't have to get into payday loan. We will have to talk about lending practices today, but. There are precedents for things. A lot of things have been going on a long time in the United States when it comes to marginalized communities, but A lot of white banks did accept deposits from black customers, but some did it, and those managers thought that black customers would scare away. The white people who are coming into the business so. Maggie knew that it wasn't the best idea to go to. These white owned banks that there needed to be black owned banks that black people could patronize, so she wanted to be the person who could create that bank so. She was already clearly into women's empowerment and the empowerment of black people and building up communities, so the bank was just part of that, so she started building her banking and her accounting and her business skills by studying banks that were in Richmond Virginia. She recruited Emmet Burke the head Tiller from there to reformers bank, which was the bank that we talked about earlier, the I spy that was chartered in the US, and so after all that happened. is she her skills and Self educated she. Opened the saint. Luke Penny Savings Bank on the first floor of Saint Louis, call on November second, nineteen, eighty three. The goal of the bank was to encourage savings and facilitate loans, and yes, she became the first woman period to charter a bank in the United States in nineteen three. Yup. That's I love the name I. Don't know why, but. Like saving Vinnie's I've just had A good experience with every place that I've been to Scott that name. They're mostly bars, but penny the where the the opinion their name yeah interesting! So. Are you a person who picks up? On hits, but not pennies on hills, or do you not pick up pennies at all? Oh my Gosh! I actually feel a deep hang in my heart every time I see a plane I might. This is so sad because if no one picks you up, you're just out of our money circulation, yeah! Lost money. That's why I pick it up every time. I feel yes, and this is going to be so embarrassing because I'm going to sound like a cheapskate saying this. But I'm going to come forth. I'M GONNA. Speak my truth right now to it. I can't stand when people don't give me back change at like restaurants. Yeah, I. Bet I'm like. Do you know how important these Nichols are? This is my life. I same! Way Way, because I have to pay for laundry still and I'm always like. Laundry Monday right I need this. Won't take this. And it happened a lot when I was in. La Oh yeah La. La, what's going on cheapskates? Let me, not spend any LA. Listen as well no listeners from L.. A. Hey, just have the money to give those nichols away. If Pride with your experience with the nickel situation in La, please we. We need to know. These do I would love to. We have some more about all of these. I share with you listeners but I. we have a quick break for word from our sponsor. Okay so a recent study found that a great hair day. Make you happier and more confident, but that same study also revealed that ninety five percent of women don't feel great about their hair I can definitely relate to you. The confidence part because my hair is doing something. A little weird something. I don't want it to do then. I can't stop thinking about it the rest of the day Alma Guy we've all been there. 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Star and executive produced the eight Episode Limited Series Only on Hulu, the show follows the intertwined fates of the picture perfect Richardson family and the enigmatic mother daughter duo, who, up in their lives in Shaker Heights. A wealthy progressive suburb of Cleveland everything is meticulously planned from the layout of the winding roads, so the colors of the houses to the successful wise, it's residents will go on to lead, and no one embodies the spirit more than the Matriarch Elena Richardson, who's guiding? Guiding principle is playing by the Rules Inter Mia Warren an artist and single mother who arrives in this idyllic double with her teenage daughter, pearl and house from the Richardson's soon, Mia and Pearl become more than just tenants. All four Richardson children are drawn to the ollery mother daughter pair, but MIA carries with her mysterious past, and a disregard for the rules that threatens to end this carefully ordered community little fires everywhere now streaming checkout new episodes every Wednesday only on Hulu. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. So by the end of the first day of the bank's business, after the opened it ahead over nine thousand dollars in deposits and By January of Nineteen six savings deposits were one hundred seventy thousand dollars, so that provide opportunities for home and business loans. Anti nineteen twenty. The bank financed over six hundred home loans, allowing for significant real estate holdings among the black community enrichment so. It was just a a snowball of things that were able to happen after she opens his bank basically. And most of the female account holders domestic workers. As well, so her Maggie's vision for the bank was like she wanted. Multiple branches in Virginia and a Briton DC. It didn't really work out like that. In the beginning only there was only a branch in Hampton Virginia, but it was successful over the years, and it continue to grow especially in the beginning, and it helped really. Ensure the existence and longevity of the middle class of by people in Virginia or in Richmond. And, so in Nineteen, twenty nine, there was a stock market crash which would have affected the bank it as it did a lot of banks and other businesses. so Maggie had the foresight. She was smart woman. She was this woman and she merged the Saint Luke Bank with two other black banks in the area, which were the Commercial Bank and Trust Company and the Second Street Savings Bank and in nineteen thirty, the bank became the consolidated bank and trust. Company and Maggie was Chairman Archer per. Se nothing share. He was the chairperson. Okay. The bank continued to operate as a black institution until two thousand five. Oh when yeah, like a long time when it was purchased, thank you for recognizing how amazing that is. When it was purchased by the Abigail Adams Corporation and then the Premier Bank bought it in two thousand eleven. So at that time it was the longest operating black owned bank in the states. and. That brings us to contemporary, times. During her lifetime, a bank wasn't the only thing that she was involved in like. She was also politically active. She was socially active as we mentioned at the top of the episode. These were eighty days in in the United States and there was a lot to fight for. so in one thousand, nine four. She's an organizer of the boycott that protested the Virginia passenger in power companies policy of segregated seating on streetcars, Richmond and we talked about the department stores. She opened that in nineteen o five, and she also so here's what the organizations come in For the order of Saint Luke she wins in a ton of or other organizations including. She was the vice president of the Richmond chapter of the N. double. ACP later in life, but here's other roles she held. Are you ready for this so ready luckily in? The National Association of Color Women Okay. She was in the National Association of wage earners. The Council of Colored Women. Interracial Commission. International Council of Women of the darker races. National Negro Business League. And the Negro Organization society. That's pretty solid. She had a lot going on for sure. And I'm just. She didn't have Google cal probably but. If she. If she off the hook right. Many notification all the time. So in nineteen twenty one, she also ran for public office on the what they call Lily Black Republican ticket, and the ticket didn't do so well was running for Superintendent of Public Instruction, so she lost like everybody else ticket. But you know it is what it is worth. And but that was a venture of hers will. She tried to go into office. Also she also lived in a really nice house in a really nice part of town in Virginia from Nineteen Zero five to nineteen, thirty four. She lived in a Victorian townhouse in an elite black neighborhood in Richmond and it was pretty fancy like it was kind of fancy, and she has some cool people over like. She had some cool friends Oh. WBZ. Mary McLeod Thune and Langston Hughes. But her house was. Like? I'm just trying to imagine this when I think about families like who has so many children's who are so huge, which doesn't happen that much anymore, but she had I. Think I think it was like I want. At one point like does in rooms in the house like she had more added onto the townhouse, he got up to twenty or thirty two rooms or Or something like that because there was a lot of family that was living in the house at one time like families have their own like part of the House so I think is really cool, and I think that's another conversation that has a longer conversation to be had when it comes to continuing to nurture generations of the family with Dan Black communities specifically. Another conversation to be had there. You know having time for right now. But yeah, she had a huge. Family and House that she lived in, and she lived well like she was successful. So later in her life, she did a lot more things. He fought for women's suffrage in the nineteenth amendment. Which prohibits the government from denying the right to vote on the basis of sex and she just. Kept doing things after the bank was growing so. She's a first. She is yeah. Yeah. Her story is really cool and I love. That! She did do so much stuff to empower people in her community like that was a big push for her. so. Inspiring I sure yeah and I think that the thing she is also really good to look back on. Because you know a lot of like talk when it comes to the black community and financial education, financial literacy, economic power, and the black dollar, staying in the black community is still conversation that happens a lot right now, and for good reasons that we're also talking about reparations a lot right now because nobody got paid for the work that they did while they slaved but the things that. Maggie did I. Think People. It's easy to be able to look to her as an inspiration or as a leader of what to do to economically empower people, and to keep that goal, one's mind and to try new things you know, and to continue to educate people and she was just so. Determined in so headstrong at a time when it probably was easy not to be. Like it's probably easy to lose faith. I mean by that. So. Yeah I just. I think she's really cool and. Yeah so. Do you. WanNa wine to our next, I. Yeah I like this I. Feel like we're. We're reviewing like two thumbs up. Right, Maggie Walker. You. Look what we think about, you is very important. Okay and all other stuff. You've done your accolades. Matter! When I? Say Your call your call. Gives you the cool stamp and you set. Set. But yeah, let's let's move on to your other I. Who as? Not So. Pointed out is another woman whose name starts with N.. She's got other things going for her. It was so cool any down yourself like those Eve's gives me the cool thumbs up all right guys. My life is made. Any and I were talking about earlier. Is that the similarities between these two people Maggie? Walker and Marie Taty, which is about to talk about and Maria tall chief like Maggie. The first woman! To do thing, but she was also the first native American woman to do things she. Ethnicity notwithstanding she was the first, the first woman and she was the first. Major Prima Ballerina in America and she was the first because she was native American. She was also the first native American to that thing. She was a pioneer in the field in general Does. She was a Prima Ballerina for the New York City Ballet. That's how she got that I. Is Okay So. I have taken valet but Prima Ballerina. For for people who don't perhaps no, please tell us no I. Don't know. I'm asking you Oh, isn't it? It's like. The Prime? The principal dancer okay. I haven't taken ballet either. Oh, you say you have I have have the okay, so you're on my way more important than I am about parenting that. What is that called the point. The point is a ballet pun that just happened, but it was physical, so it just fell flat on his face well the day that we're able to somehow translate sound into also. Feeling our vision Oh. Yeah, when people can see what's going on the podcast studio, then we're. That's what that is called. For now, disinherit it. Yeah I mean if you can imagine listening. To Watch something. We are visionaries listen. If you can imagine what it's like to watch. But also ahead of time Maria tell to. Talk to. You was a very hard time, so she was born on January. Twenty, four, th nineteen, twenty five, and she was born named Elizabeth, Marie Tall Chief and Fairfax Homa on the osage reservation. And, her father was Alexander Joseph Tall T who was a full blooded osage and a big time, real estate exotic, and her mother was ruth, tall chief, who had Irish Scottish and Dutch routes. And at that time, osage were the wealthiest tribe in the US since they had discovered oil on their land, and everyone held mental were whites, but You. Know Maria still had some stuff going on in her family. And her father had a drinking problem, which often lead to arguments with Marie his mother and Osage were obviously still subject to persecution like native. American tribes were in America at the time from the federal government so. In eighteen eighty four, the US officially banned what they called quote Pagan, ceremonies, and they began imprisoning, and even killing American Indians took part in tribal religious ceremonies. And so the throughout the late eighteen hundreds in the early nineteen hundreds, the government was enforcing laws that outlawed native American traditions and Rich like I don't WanNa. Say Rich because that's how positive, but there's a long history of. Of Native Americans practices being. Forcefully assimilated and being Christianized in so on and so forth. MARINA'S GRANDMOTHER Big Heart Tall chief still snuck Maria and her younger sister into secret tribal ceremonies when they were children, which is just really endearing me. I don't know it was really cute. But Maria was fascinated by the outfits. The dancing and the songs at the POW wows, and that really stuck with her throughout her childhood lifetime so when she was three, she went to her first ballet. Listen in the basement of the brought more in Colorado Springs and by the time she was five, her ballet teacher already had her dancing on point on the to- thing the tone thing, which is actually not great to start that early essentially. Yeah, we also started piano lessons when she was young. Her mother really wanted her to be a concert pianist, but Maria wanted to do ballet like that's where she really wanted. She did do piano lessons, but she really wants to. Was Ballet so. Her family called her Betty Marine. When she was eight years old, her family moved to Beverly Hills California so. Under the guidance of the famed dancer, and Choreographer Ernest Belcher Maria and her sister learned everything from La to acrobatics to tap dance and ruth was really. Excited to get her daughters out onto the stage so sometimes she made them do these cringe-worthy native American, dances that were really contrived To be called tribal so yeah. In nineteen, thirty, eight Marie and her sister began studying basically from here is just ballet ballet ballet like you know when you're something you're in something, and as we know with a lot of people who were passionate artists like. Their lives become that art. Yes, and they just really delve into it and that was. That was Meritas life from that point. She basically really got heavy into belly from here so in nineteen, thirty eight, she and her sister began studying under David Sheen and his wife was a Prima Ballerina Tatyana, vouching SCA and Rony Slava Nasiadka who was a notable ballot, teacher and choreographer. So, there was a really tough teacher who pushed her students to dancers at all time, but not just when they were like practicing and performing you make it a part of your life. And she really recognized Marie his talent, and they decided to cast her, or she decided to cast her in the Ballet Chopin Concerto, which was performed at the Hollywood bowl in nineteen forty. Wow. Yet, so Maria graduated from Beverly Hills High School in Nineteen forty two, and she hit the ground running after that she got a job as an extra in the film presenting Lily Mars which starred Judy Garland Oh. We know we all know. Yes. Well I'M NOT GONNA make any assumptions, but. Never. Yes? And soon after she earned a spot at Belarus de Monte Carlo, which was a major ballet company at the time. And when she was performing with Ballet Russe. This is the time that she went from Betty. Marie as her family called her to Maria tall chief. One word originally in her name is tall chief is too, but she went, she was already using tall chief as one where, but she changed her first name to Maria because her colleagues said that. A more Russian sounding name help make her more appealing and palatable to people. Yeah. So she started rising in the ranks basically. Cement from the quarterback La to solo parts started being in the spotlight And the Russian choreographer George Balanchine. WHO's been called the father of American Ballet. Really helped her sharpen her belly skills I'm over the years, so he helped her on the turnout or when they when dancers like rotate their legs outwards, so the does point away from each other yeah. I'm trying to do my hand. De. During the thing again about this ballet. What am I talking about? Okay, so he changed her to become stronger, and he just really helped her embody the art of ballet, and she even wants to Maria. Even said that she didn't fully understand ballet until he came around. So that ballet relationship turned into a more romantic relationship in nineteen, forty, six, the two of them or you unbalancing got married when she was twenty one and he was forty two years old. So there's a big difference there, but that marriage didn't last too long. It only lasted six years. Yeah. So it was, it was a rough relationship they didn't really. The job or Mesh like that much, but. At least not romantically, but while there while they were together afterward, they collaborate a ton, so they went to France and Maria menounos debut appears opera ballet, nineteen, forty seven, and in one thousand, nine, hundred eighty eight Maria join, Ballard scenes new company the New York City Ballet. And she was Prima Ballerina, there until nineteen sixty five. Wow, yeah, longtime. Along I'm just thinking about and I'm always fascinated by athletes. By they're. Like, wow, what's the word for like how they're able to do these really intense things for so long. Yeah, like that seems like so much stress on the body. It does yeah. I remember when. Michael Phelps was like Phelps Mania and it was like this is what he eats every day, and this is work every day. What's Yeah? You have to have serious resolve to stay that dedicated to something that's so physical so intensely physical, and like you said it, it becomes your life. Yeah, like everything. Yeah, Really interesting. We have a little bit more for you, but first we're GONNA pause for one more quick break for word from our sponsor. Okay so a recent study found that a great hair day makes you happier more confident, but that same study also revealed ninety five percent of women don't feel great about their hair. I can definitely relate to the confidence part, because if my hair's doing something. A little weird something I don't want it to do. Then I can't stop thinking about it the rest of the day Alma Guy. We've all been there panting. 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Learn from leaders like Katie couric I wanted little boys and little girls to see that a woman could do that job confidently and confidently Tory burch women are great investments. That is something. I, Know Andrea. The concept of a network of women which can be smaller, it can be large is really one of the most powerful things I've had the opportunity to see many more. Listen to Seneca, women conversations on power and purpose. On the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts. and. We're back. Thank you sponsor. Maria rose to the top of the ballet world when she starred in the firebird at the New, York City ballet and her performance as this sugarplum fairy in version of Tchaikovsky's the nutcracker and a bunch of other roles that showed off her technical skill and her passion. So she toured Europe and Asia and she performed with other ballet companies and even play Russian Ballerina Anna Pavlova, in the nineteen fifty three film Million Dollar Mermaid. So, she was talented. A lot of things sounds like it by it. So during her life, she was always involved in the ballet world. In some way, she retired from dancing and sit down with her family in Chicago She went on to become the director of ballet at the lyric opera of Chicago and she founded the Chicago City Ballet and was is artistic director from eighty one until eighty seven. So a lifetime lifetime of achievements. So. It's time for us to give her lifetime achievement award like we did with Walker. We've got the thumbs up ready to go. You're cool. Yes, so that's that's. That's Maria tall chief. Assets Yeah that's also pretty amazing. I didn't know she was in. A film. So if you don't mind me asking, why did you pick these to these two women? So I was. Okay, so sometimes they selfish now. I want to know more about them. So I was already familiar with Maria so. We had an episode on her for This Day in history class, but I wasn't as familiar with Maggie Walker and I wanted to or more about her, and then like I really I didn't realize the connection between the two of them. In terms of the whole ethnicity in women thing. GOING ON BUT! I figured that was the serendipitous occurrence. So! That's it was just I. Don't know you know. Sometimes you just don't know exactly. Why. But, they were the ones who jumped out to me and I. Think it was also like a even though they have their similarities. There also been very different feels like one artist and one's a financial. By in the financial area and the Business Development social justice, economic justice kind of area in artist, but they're both. Equally like they're both important, and they're both people that were able to look to when it comes to setting standards and setting goals. And just being inspirational in general, so yeah, that's probably part of it and also. Just think it's. Really good to highlight black women who were working in the financial area. Because, we do hear a lot about people are black women in history who? Dealt with social justice, but not necessarily from the financial and banking angle. Love it so I. Thought it would be really cool to highlight for that reason. Yeah, yeah, absolutely I agree. And I had never heard of either these women so I'm very glad to to have two more inspirational women to. Yeah I hope that a lot of people have either not because I. don't want them to know about people, but because they get to learn about somebody else. Out some some New People today, and hopefully people will continue looking into their stories because we've only talked for so long I. Don't know who's life. You could fit into what our so. I mean, yeah. These women right right, right? Yeah, there's definitely so much more that if you're listening to this. Wow, I want to know everything. There's so much out there for you. Yeah, yeah. But I think that this brings is about to the end of this. Our first first female I come up with something. I email I like four H, but forever forever. In imitable I feel like I'm making up words at this point. Maybe that's what we need to do. I mean we've learned from these women. You can't let barriers stuff you you need to we learning already see yeah. We'll do that. We'll work on that all podcast. But in the meantime, thank you so much for joining us Eve's. This has been really fun and educational. Yeah. Hopefully, this'll be a recurring first. Segment. Yes, thank you for having me. Yes, and back soon. Oh, I hope so and like we've mentioned you can hear Eve's on this day in history class, and it's like five episodes a week, right? It's seven. Every every day, so I complain about my like. It's still a lot of work. We were all swamped here, don't. Yeah. That is true, so yeah, you're going. Hear every day on this day in history, class and I highly recommend that you check it out. Thank you any. This brings us to the end of this our first episode of I I hope that you enjoyed it as much as I. enjoyed doing it with my good friend Eve's. If you would like to emails about I, you would love to hear about you. Can our email is mom stuff at how stuff works dot com, you can also find us on social media on twitter. We are at MOM's podcast and on instagram. We are at stuff on never told you things. It's always producer Andrew our and thanks to you. So here's something that some of you might find shocking. Ninety five percent of women don't feel good about their hair, but pantene is changing that pantene rosewater collection combat's bad hair days with an innovative formula that uses rosewater derived from puddles and buds of the Rosa plant with paintings rosewater collection. I can really feel how much more hydrated my hair is, and it's sulfate Paraben die and mineral oil free, which makes me feel good because you need all those additives experience, something new and discover. What's good with the pantene nutrient. Blends collection. Hey I'm Joe. Levy and I'm a latest episode of inside the studio. I sat down with one of the all-time. Great Singer songwriters games. We talked about his new album. Where is music comes from and how telling his life story through his songs has helped him music saved my life, but I was lucky also to survive. I did some very stupid some some years at were. Just really high risk unnecessarily so and a lot of people around us died. So join me. Joe Leib editor at large at billboard for this and other in-depth conversations with the biggest artists in music was an on the iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts or wherever you get cast.

Maggie United States Maggie Lena Walker Eve Ernest Belcher Maria Saint Luke Richmond Hulu Lena Walker America Paraben Anne Elena Richardson Richmond Virginia LA Reese Witherspoon Middle East president Prima Ballerina