18 Burst results for "National Apartment Association"

"national apartment association" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:36 min | Last month

"national apartment association" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Tenants rents have spiked across the country with the biggest jumps in places like Phoenix or Boise or prices are up more than 20% From a year ago apartment list says rent prices have gone up in all of the biggest 100 metros in the country Real page says occupancy rates of risen about 97% for the first time in the company's history housing advocates including Deanna Watson and Boise say her organization has had to turn away most people asking for rental assistance The national apartment association says renters spent more than 30% of their incomes on housing in 6 states in the nation and a little less in many of the rest but the report also says that's about the same level as last year Redfin says as long as so many buyers are shut out of the market rents will also continue to rise and that's your Bloomberg real estate report I'm dedic Pellegrini I spend a lot of time in the garage but even more time in The Rain Sleet and mud In 95 I helped toe you're moving trailer In O 5 I helped you get out of a ditch Yeah I know I'm a bit rusty and sadly in O 9 It was sparks from me Your handy chains Dragon behind your truck that accidentally started a wildfire.

Boise Deanna Watson national apartment association Phoenix dedic Pellegrini Redfin Bloomberg
"national apartment association" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:52 min | 6 months ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kramer would give public housing authorities $500 million to provide incentives such a signing bonuses and help with security deposits. The measure has the support of housing advocacy groups as well as the National Apartment Association. Pam Fessler. NPR NEWS The White House will be hosting the president of South Korea, who's hoping uses first summit with President Biden to discuss their shared security concerns on the Korean Peninsula. NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports. It's Dae Moon Jae in is visiting Arlington National Cemetery in Capitol Hill. President Moon Jae in is paying tribute to US service members who died in the 1952 1953 Korean war. He's also meeting with congressional leaders on Friday after a meeting with Vice President Harris, President Moon and President Biden will work on a plan to deal with North Korea and its nuclear weapons. The South Korean leader will also seek to cooperate with the U. S. On Corona virus vaccines to speed up his own country's rollout. Korean executives Air accompanying mon. They're expected to invest billions of dollars in U. S based factories. To make high tech products such as semiconductors, an electric vehicle batteries. Anthony Kuhn, NPR NEWS, Seoul This is NPR Knees live from KQED News. I'm Brian what California utility regulators are expected to approve an order today to ensure the state's biggest electricity providers carry out wild fire safety power shut offs. Only as a last resort. KQ BDs Dan Brekke, he explains. PG. Any Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas and Electric turned off the lights for millions of people in 2019 as a measure to prevent wildfires. Ah, later California Public Utilities Commission report found the company's largely disregarded a requirement to impose the shut offs on Lee. After carefully weighing the safety hazards, the blackouts themselves might create. Now the CPUC is set to adopted decision directing the companies to prove they've assessed those risks and considered alternatives before imposing future outages. The decision also bars utilities from charging customers for power not delivered during prevent of blackouts. I'm damn Bracke KQED news. Vanishes City Council voted this week to authorize the purchase of 45 automated license plate reader cameras. Council members agreed that only beneath the police would have access to data from the cameras, but the department could also grant permission to other law enforcement agencies. Police chief Mike Green on whether the department would turn over information to federal immigration authorities. No, I mean, I would certainly look at that request, but if it had anything to do with immigration, immigration enforcement Or immigration in general. I would not support that request. Crews are expected to start installing the cameras in August. There's more Bay Area news at KQED, Dad or G'kar. I'm Brian. What in Oakland. Support for NPR comes from little passports, offering activity kits to keep kids engage this summer. I'll explore France and Japan and build a volcano in submarine from the kitchen table, more of little passports, calm and by the listeners and members of KQED public radio. Greasy, gusty Northwest winds continue through today, along with well below normal temperatures. There's a slight chance for showers and thunderstorms over Napa and Contra Costa County's this afternoon. Gradual warming trainers forecast starting tomorrow through early next week. Look for highs in the Bay Area upper fifties to the low seventies inland. Today, Sacramento Valley High's from 67 to 72. This is forum. I mean a Kim Roe v. Wade. The landmark 1973 decision established.

Pam Fessler Anthony Kuhn $500 million France Kim Roe Napa Oakland California Public Utilities Co Today Contra Costa County 2019 August Dan Brekke Japan Bay Area U. S Friday National Apartment Association Dae Moon Jae 1973
"national apartment association" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:05 min | 7 months ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's 5 36. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Audie Cornish in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. A court ruling that overturned a federal moratorium on evictions is on hold that will come as a relief to millions of tenants behind on their rent during this pandemic. A federal judge said today that her own ruling is on pause because of the public health risks posed by lifting the eviction moratorium. But the outcome of this high stakes court case is still uncertain. We're joined now by NPR's Chris Arnold. Hi, Chris. Hey, Elsa. So just catch us up on this latest development. What did the judge say? Right, So the judge here is federal District Judge Dabney Friedrich, and she was appointed by former President Trump. And just last week, she ruled that the Centers for Disease Control Prevention did not have the power to tell landlords that they cannot evict their own tenants, even during a pandemic and a public health crisis. So last week, she put a short term stay in place after the Justice Department appealed. There was a lot of worry, though, that she might lift that stay and really opened the floodgates to a lot of evictions pretty quickly, But late today, she said, no, The stay will be in place longer as theater peel moves forward, and the judge wrote that the CDC quote Or that the CDC demonstrated that quote lifting the national moratorium will exacerbate the significant public health risks. Interesting. Okay, So what kind of reaction have you been hearing so far from housing groups and others were worried about the CDC is order getting thrown out? Well, Many are very happy about this. Emily bent for as been writing a court brief along with Yale Law School in support of the CDC. This is extraordinary news. People across the country are going to stay housed, at least throughout the next month, and hopefully throughout the entire CDC moratorium. They can apply for rental assistance and they can stay housed. Had it What she's saying. There is is that look, we don't know how long the case will ultimately take to turn out or or how it will turn out. But the appeals process could well take his long as the CDC moratorium is in place anyway. Well, I know that you've been talking to families facing eviction. While all of this litigation has been playing out. What have you been hearing from those tenants? Yeah, One person I've been checking in with during the pandemic is a single dad. He's got a 10 year old daughter. They live in Atlanta is names Miran Masa Dodd, and he just worries about this all the time. Then I put my daughter to bed. I lay down. I can't sleep. I think about these things I get directly on my heart races, my limbs going on it. I've been under distress for for this whole whole year. It's been really tough. And he drives uber for a living. So business was down and he's 59 years old. He was also afraid to work and he couldn't work. Alaska's He's got a 10 year old at home, and s so now he owes more than $15,000 in background. He's got that hanging over his head worrying about eviction. At the same time, they're like, like a lot of us. Some things were getting better. His his daughter had been struggling with remote school. She's back and in person school now and seeing friends. Now she's doing excellent. She's gone from the bottom of the class to summer On top of the crash, she come from smiling, telling me that she got the handed on all subjects that they On my biggest fear is live in paradise. And there still is that fear but But with this ruling people like my said Dodd now have more hope in me. He's applied for rental assistance. It hasn't come through yet. Now he gets more more weeks, maybe months more. Get that money avoided fiction, so he and his daughter can catch up on Renan. Don't end up being homeless. Yeah, well, what do landlords say about all of this? I imagine they hope courts will Eventually uphold the ruling and throw out the eviction moratorium. Yeah, many landlords say, Look, things are getting back to normal. They want control over their properties again. I talked to Bob Pinegar. He's the head of the National Apartment Association. We've been encouraging people to work with the resident but ultimately 90 cents of every rent dollar that has received has to pay for things like a mortgage. Property taxes, upkeep of the property. We end up in a situation that is not viable, sees his look. You know, let's get that rental assistance money to renters and landlords as soon as possible. That is NPR's Chris Arnold. Thank you, Chris. You're welcome. Firefighters across the country where some of the first to be offered the cove in 19 vaccine, But many don't want it in New York and Chicago. Only about half of firefighters have gotten vaccinated. Some places aren't even keeping track. You could Margolis from member station KPCC reports on how one Fire department has helped its crew overcome its hesitancy. Back in the fall. Talk of a covert 19 vaccine was ramping up science and technology looked like they could pull off the impossible. A ray of hope in the darkness as a cure appeared to be on the horizon. Not for everyone. Well when it first came out, I was definitely skeptical. Los Angeles County Firefighter Mickey Juarez wasn't so sure he wanted the vaccine for a number of reasons, the biggest of which was his worry that it could be worse for him than Cove it What is the long term effects? I have pre existing conditions. With our immune deficiency if you will, and I was skeptical whether it would affect me adversely or if it would make my condition worse. He wasn't alone on early survey done by the Los Angeles County Fire Department showed that about 45% of their employees weren't sold on getting the vaccine. Just about around where national trends were At the time. It was a big red flag for L, a county fires medical director Dr Clayton Kazan. He was hearing all sorts of vaccine conspiracy theories and misinformation coming in from his roughly 3000 firefighters, so the department had to figure out a way to change minds. We were all over them about explaining the science doing live Q and A's answering any questions People had trying to Compete against the noise of some of the social media rabbit holes and putting out regular informational videos. Hi, everybody. I'm coming to you from Kobe Bunker today, We're gonna talk a little bit about understanding the stars Cov two vaccine, but they didn't stop there. They decided that if a firefighter wanted to refuse the vaccine, they couldn't just take a box online saying No, thanks. Kazan says firefighters had actually go into a vaccination site and decline in person. If you're sitting on the station with five people who are all kind of grumpy and don't want to get it, it's a lot easier to say no that when you have to show up to an area where You see your friends stepping up and taking it. And now you have a chance to ask your questions, and maybe you'll just kind of roll your eyes and roll up your sleeve..

Bob Pinegar Miran Masa Dodd Chris Arnold Chris Elsa Elsa Chang Mickey Juarez New York Los Angeles Clayton Kazan Emily Atlanta Washington Yale Law School Chicago Centers for Disease Control Pr Audie Cornish Margolis National Apartment Association 90 cents
"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:25 min | 10 months ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

"Eviction. Homelessness is on the rise. Affordable housing is in short supply. Racial inequities, air getting wider. Fudge says if confirmed, her priority is making sure all Americans have a decent place to live. But I think about the enormity of the task ahead of us. I am reminded of the book of Matthew where it is written. Fox, his have homes. Birds have this for the son of man has no place to lay his head and as former mayor of Cleveland suburb Warren's Phil Heights, she knows some of the challenges Joncour lettuce, president of the Center for Community Solutions, nonpartisan Think tank in northeastern Ohio. She represents the city of Cleveland that has the highest child poverty rate of any large city in America. Half the Renner's livin unaffordable housing half are eligible for food bank assistance, So you know she definitely represents her district and our constituents. But Corlett says What will likely be more helpful in her new job is her ability to work across the aisle, something Fudge displayed recently, making sure school Children receive food aid during the pandemic really strives to build those personal relationships so that you considered disagree without being disagreeable. And indeed, her nomination has won praise from Ohio Republicans, Senator Rob Portman and Congressman Dave Joyce are rare sign of Collegiate Galati. Still, Fudge will likely need a lot more than goodwill. Greg Brown, senior vice president at the National Apartment Association, says there hasn't been a housing crisis this big since the great recession, There's 70 billion and unpaid rent. Just through 2020, and that's growing. You know, we've got owners with a lot of debt outstanding for their properties, housing providers, and we have a lot of renters with a lot of outstanding rental that themselves says that threatens to push many landlords, especially smaller ones out of the market on Lee, exacerbating the housing shortage. Getting Congress to fund more rental assistance will be tough. Diane Yin, tell of the National Low Income Housing coalition thinks Fudge has one asset that should help she's known as a fighter. One of the things that had his lacked over the last four years is somebody at the helm. Willing to make the case for and fight for really significant funding for its programs. And I do think Marsha fight. We'll fight for what had needs, she says. That will be a welcome change after the last administration's push to drastically cut government housing aid. Pam Fessler. NPR news Massachusetts, Many young, healthy medical researchers who work remotely have been rolling up their sleeves to get the covert vaccine. Meanwhile, seniors are waiting on the sidelines not yet eligible. Massachusetts has one of the nation's largest hospital workforces, and officials there have decided to put all of them at the front of the line. Gabriella Emanuel of member station GBH in Boston, reports. Carol Helber set is 82. She's been in her apartment just outside Boston. Since the beginning of the pandemic. Nobody comes in. Nobody goes out. I become more and more despairing and lonely. Cut off from human contact. Helper Stat has a long list of complex medical issues. The most urgent one. She's going blind, She says. She's desperate for ice surgery. But in order to safely be in the hospital, she needs a vaccine. The vaccine would change my life. It would give me the future for weeks. She's been desperately trying to figure out how to get a shot. I am still Totally Totally in the dark. She's watched with jealousy as seniors in many other states have started receiving vaccines. She studied data from the CDC finding Massachusetts in the bottom half of states in per capita vaccinations. But perhaps most baffling is seeing healthy young people get inoculated before the elderly and the sick. We're seeing just a huge number of people get vaccinated. Who I think you know, should frankly be way down the line. Michael Mina is at Harvard School of Public Health, the other people who have nothing to do at all with coded or with Patient care. We're really with the hospitals. They just happen to be employed by a hospital, and thus they can get the vaccine. Ah, few things are happening here. First, the federal level Nationally, vaccines are being distributed to states based on their total population, But the federal government has told states to prioritize certain groups like health care workers. With lots of hospitals. Massachusetts has lots of health care professionals at the front of the line effectively means that the elderly and vulnerable people who might need the vaccine first will generally be pushed back. The second factor state and hospital level decisions here. The health care worker category has been defined to include all hospital employees. It was in research labs and telemedicine in HR, including people working remotely Paul, bidding her overseas the vaccine rollout at the Mass General Brigham, He says his hospital network needed to bring in some of those working from home. During the first surge. They called up researchers and administrators and others in the intensive care unit. Listening for the alarms of ventilators because the federal surge ventilators that we had wouldn't plug into our alarm systems. Now a third issue, individuals have been flaky. Dana Farber Cancer Institute sent out a mass email saying quote we have had far too many researchers not show up for covert 19 vaccinations over the past week. The result of the email says, is vaccines that may have been wasted. These challenges have been compounded by communication missteps and technical glitches, and Massachusetts has admitted hundreds of thousands of doses are sitting unused in hospital and pharmacy freezers. Governor Charlie Baker has announced. Those over 75 will be eligible on the first of February, and he's hoping they'll have enough vaccines to meet all the pent up demand. For NPR News and Gabriella Emanuel. On tomorrow's morning edition. Recent protests in Russia expose a generational divide. President Putin rejects smartphone culture while his opponent Alexey Navalny rallies, supporters online,.

Massachusetts Fudge Gabriella Emanuel Boston Cleveland Ohio National Low Income Housing co President Putin Dana Farber Cancer Institute NPR NPR News Governor Charlie Baker Matthew Fox Russia National Apartment Association federal government president Pam Fessler Senator Rob Portman
"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

"During a rally before the group marched on the city, Stevens warned that a civil war is coming in your back yard right now. Ground. Unlike black lives matter demonstrations throughout the summer Louisville police officers were not present during the militia gathering. In a statement, Louisville Metro police said that there re sources were focused on Churchill Downs where black lives matter. Demonstration was set to take place during the Kentucky Derby for NPR News. I'm Ryland Barton in Louisville. Health officials warn that if the past is any indication, this holiday weekend could bring a spike in Corona virus cases. This is Johns Hopkins University data show 6.2 million cases with more than 188,000 deaths in the United States, NPR's Joe and Paris has more typically, Labour Day marks the end of summer vacation season and his calls for celebration and travel. 2020, however, has been anything but typical. And this holiday weekend is no different. Earlier this week, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned that Americans should be cautious to avoid another surge in Corona virus infection rates. He told NBC's the Today Show. You don't have to look that far back to detect the pattern we've seen after the Fourth of July we saw after Memorial Day a surge in cases, health officials suggest congregating primarily outdoors. While wearing a mask and practicing social distancing as much as possible to help avoiding a significant spike in new cases. Javelin PARIS NPR news. A nationwide evictions. Ban is now in effect through the end of the year ordered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But as NPR's Kris Arnold reports, it's not automatic, and there's no money behind it. To be protected. Rennes need to sign a declaration and send it to their landlord. You can search for the details at CDC dot gov. Getting help from a legal aid attorney is a good idea. Also, landlord said the ban isn't fair because it doesn't provide any money to cover the lost rent. Greg Brown is with the National apartment Association. This is an incomplete solution. And my members worry greatly about what the damage that they're going to sustain and what damage that industry will sustain from this housing advocates to want Congress to come up with money for a rental assistance plan. Otherwise, when the temporary ban is over, they.

NPR Louisville Centers for Disease Control an Dr. Anthony Fauci National Institute of Allergy Louisville Metro Ryland Barton Churchill Downs Johns Hopkins University National apartment Association Stevens Kentucky Derby Rennes Paris Greg Brown NBC United States
"national apartment association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. I'm child. Snyder. Demonstrations continued in Rochester, New York last night, with police firing tear gas to break of crowds. NPR's Brian ran reports on the protest that broke out this week over the death of Daniel proved in police custody. Daniel proved a black man died in March after being arrested by police. Video made public this week showed his body naked in the street had covered outraged people March for hours again Friday night, police first described prudes death was a drug overdose, prompting accusations of a cover up. Justin Moore has joined the protest. We demand answers and we demand justice. Our demands are that the police be removed and also that the mayor and all parties involved step down, effective immediately. Seven officers have been suspended. Police used tear gas again last night to break up the peaceful March. Brian Man, NPR News, Rochester, New York police and Rochester declared unlawful assembly last night. They did the same in Portland, Oregon, which is marking 100 straight nights of protests this weekend. A nationwide eviction ban is now in place through the end of the year order by the Centers for Disease Control. But NPR's Kris Arnold reports. It's not automatic, and there's no money behind it to be protected. Rennes need to sign a declaration and send it to their landlord. You can search for the details at CDC dot gov. Getting help from a legal aid attorney is a good idea. Also, landlord say the ban isn't fair because it doesn't provide any money to cover the lost rent. Greg Brown is with the National apartment Association. This is an incomplete solution. And my members worry greatly about what the damage that they're going to sustain and what damage that industry will sustain from this housing advocates to want Congress to come up with money for a rental assistance plan. Otherwise, when the temporary ban is over, they say millions of people will be evicted anyway, because they can't afford all the missed rent payments. Chris Arnold. NPR News Everyday marks a traditional beginning of the campaign season and in this anything but typical campaign, NPR's Mara Liasson reports that we should still start seeing a lot more of the candidates. With less than two months to go. The presidential race is still remarkably stable in an average of polls. Joe Biden still has a lead nationally and in the battleground states that will determine the winner. Neither buy nor President Trump got much of a bounce from their conventions. Biden is focusing on the pandemic and what he says is. Trump's failure to lead polls show a consistent advantage for Biden on that issue. Trump, on the other hand, is betting the voters will care more about law and order and that their concerns are shifting from racial justice to the riots and cities like Portland, Oregon, and Kenosha, Wisconsin. But polls show that although support for the black lives matter movement has softened its not a zero sum game. In other words, Trump isn't getting an equivalent boost when voters are asked to rate his response to the unrest. Mara Liasson. NPR NEWS. This is NPR news and it says W C in New York. I'm David first. The empty says it will continue disinfecting the transit system, even though the federal government plans to stop covering most of the cost. W When my CI's Stephen Nessen reports since March, PMT has been cleaning every subway car and bus multiple times a day, as well as shutting down overnight service for deep cleanings. It's also been outfitting workers with P P E and taking their temperatures. The cost of everything is expected to be half a billion dollars this year. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will pay the empty for 75 per cent of the costs, but only through mid September. The empty A is already facing a $12 billion budget shortfall. This only adds to its woes empty Chairman Pat Foy, quoting an infamous daily news headline. Has concluded that Washington is again telling New York to drop dead. FEMA did not respond to a request for comment. City Councilman is sounding the alarm about poor ventilation at a school campus in Manhattan that includes several high schools. The Martin Luther King Jr campus is located near Lincoln Center. Mark Trager, who chairs the council's education committee, says classrooms inside this campus have no windows. And air vents don't circulate enough air. It's not just one classroom, numerous classrooms. This has been an ongoing issue for a long time, and I don't see any realistic scenario where they could fix the issues by the 21st. Students who choose a mix of remote and in person learning or expected back at school on the 21st Traeger is asking the city to relocate the schools before then. The mayor's office says a report on the completed school inspections.

NPR NEWS President Trump Joe Biden New York Rochester Mara Liasson Brian Man Daniel Federal Emergency Management A Oregon Portland drug overdose Snyder Chris Arnold Martin Luther King Jr Rennes Centers for Disease Control CDC
"national apartment association" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KTOK

"Up 80%. Stock split at no value to a company. It just makes the price more accessible in the minds of retail investors, and it's illustrative that on ly people who don't know what they're doing with investing would engage in that, and that's the worrisome part. So it's a fascinating scenario. Let me ask you this. You mentioned earlier that your organization and its early days found correlations between the study of stock market cycles and the study of other cycles. You mentioned sunspots. You know, it's so funny that you mentioned sunspots. We just received an email this week from our satellite operator because, of course, you know, as we produce a radio show, it is transmitted via satellite, and we just got an email that said Son outage season is approaching and will occur in early to mid October. The Sun outage event occurs twice per year during the spring and fall equinox, the sun aligns directly behind the satellite. In reference to your downlink antenna, creating a brief outage by overwhelming the satellite signal with the tremendous amount of radio frequency noise generated by the sun. There's a cycle for you. Can you elaborate on the nature of cycles? And why this is something that a lot of fortune 500 companies pay you a lot of money to provide data on Well, I should say the foundation for the study of cycles is a not for profit organization. So we are studying the cycles, economic cycles and cycles in nature as well. So yes, there are correlations between sunspot cycles and stock market cycles. And we're going into a kind of low area of sunspot cycles right now. But let's talk about the presidential cycle year pattern so every four years the stock market follows a fairly predictable pattern. And that pattern predicts that will probably be a certainly a sideways action is not a significant correction in September and October of presidential election years. So that's a common type of cycle that the foundation ah has documented and that we bring to the attention of the public. And if people want to learn Maura about the research that you produce, where should they go? Ah, it's pretty simple cycles dot org's cycles dot org. Well, that's really fascinating information, and I really appreciate your taking the time to share all of that with us. That is Dr Richard Smith, the CEO of the foundation for the study of Cycles. You're on the rig cattleman show. So that was my interview with Dr Richard Smith that I recorded with him on Wednesday. J. I hate it when I'm right. The very next day before we had a chance to air that interview, the market tanked. Yep. On Thursday and Friday, the Dow fell 3.3% the worst two days since June. The S and P. 500 lost 4.3, also the worst since June on the NASDAQ fell 6.2% the worst since March. This isn't a surprise that I'm not the only one who's been expressing concern. E trade released a survey this week of investment advisors before the market fell and 52% the majority said they were now barrish. Tiger 21, which is a club of more than 800, multimillionaire investors again before the market fell, said their members had raised their cash holdings to 19% of the total assets. In the futures market Hedging hit an all time high before Thursday's decline. It had a higher level than it did before the Obama McCain election even higher than it was during the Clinton Trump election. Volatilities in the dollar yen futures market also hit its highest peak since 1999 now I'm not trying to scare you, but the market fell Over 6% in the last two days, So I have to ask you Are you scared? Well, I have two messages for you. First. You get no sympathy from May I've been warning you for months that there's been a huge disconnect between the economy and the stock market. I wrote a 62 page report on covert and your money two months ago. I've let you downloaded for free. You still can, by the way at Ric Edelman dot com So I'm sorry. I don't mean to sound mean. But your mommy told you if you eat too much candy, you'll get a tummy ache. So My second message is this If you're scared now, do something about it. Talk to your financial adviser now about making changes to your portfolio, because if you can't even handle a four or five or a 6% decline, imagine how you'll panic if the market drops 35% like it did last spring. Now, if you're not scared, good for you. I'm proud of you. You know that 10 years from now, This will be old news. So if you're not panicking, and you're sure you won't panic, no matter what comes next, you're good. Stay with your long term portfolio strategy. In the midst of all this. We have big news from the CDC 43 million U. S households are renters on the CDC has just band evictions for the rest of the year for everyone who earns less than $99,000 a year. Housing advocates are thrilled, but this is a short term victory because on January 1st, you're goingto all that back rent, and if you can't pay, you'll get evicted them and it's going to be cold outside. So while this is good news for renters today, it's horrible news for landlords. The National apartment Association represents landlords, and they're deeply concerned, they say, quote. Property owners face a financial crisis of their own. They're not going to be able to maintain properties pay their mortgages or property taxes. The CDC is action creates risk of a cascade that will further harm the economy, amplify the housing affordability crisis and destroy the rental housing industry. This global housing crisis cannot be blamed on the rental housing industry. Nor can the industry bear the brunt of the pandemic alone, unquote And even though residential tenants are not getting evicted retail tenants are Saks Fifth Avenue in Miami is getting.

CDC Dr Richard Smith National apartment Association Ric Edelman Maura CEO Obama Miami Clinton McCain
"national apartment association" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. Millions of Americans have been a real risk of eviction over the past few months. Many of those people have now been given a lifeline. In a dramatic move, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is ordering a halt on evictions across the country through the end of this year. NPR's Kris Arnold is reporting on this and joins us now, Chris. Good morning, so that I mean, that's a huge move by the CDC. It doesn't though, seem on its face like something the agency would have the power to do. Hey, Richard. Yes. So, I mean, you might think that because especially so far during this pandemic we've seen Nothing very forceful from the CDC has been criticized for having voluntary guidance that lets states and business is kind of do whatever they want. If that's the CDC, sort of, you know, walking on little Kitty Cat feed that this, though, is the CDC booming its feet like Paul Bunyan or something and doing something much more. Dramatic, and the CDC says it does have the authority under the Public Health Service Act in 1940, for that gives the government broad power to stem the spread of communicable diseases. And look I mean, the basic idea, of course, is that forcing people out into homeless shelters or cram together living with relatives? That is very likely to get a lot more people sick. So who does this eviction ban apply to specifically alright, we'll quickly to qualify. Renters have decided declaration, saying that they tried to get unemployment benefits or other kinds of Port that they'll make partial payments as much as they can afford to their landlord. They can make more than about $100,000 a year or twice that if you file jointly and that if you're evicted, you have no other option than homelessness or Living with more people in close proximity, which would increase the risk, which is exactly what they're trying to avoid. So how many people are we talking about? How many people with this? We're talking about a lot of people when one estimate from the National Low Income Housing Coalition is 30 to 40 million people in 17 million households or families were at risk of losing their home at the end of the year of something like this wasn't done. Dannion tell is the CEO of the group and I spoke to her last night. Well, my reaction is a feeling of tremendous relief. I mean, it's a pretty extraordinary and unprecedented measure that the White House is taking that will save lives and prevent tens of millions of people from losing their homes in the middle of a pandemic. But, she says also Congress of the White House should have done this months ago. And instead we've had this crazy quilt patchwork of federal state local moratoriums. Lots of people weren't covered in thousands of people have already been infected. What are you hearing from landlords about this, Chris? Well, In short, the landlords are saying, Well, who's supposed to pay for this? You know, Democrats in Congress had plans for a moratorium. But along with that was $100 billion of assistance to renters and landlords to pay for that. That is not a part of this order. I spoke to Greg Brownies with the National Apartment Association. We're really concerned about this, because if the moratorium is put in place, rents were not paid. But the owners continue to have to meet their financial obligations. And how are they supposed to do that? Who's goingto help them pay their bills? And it's not just landlords who want the rental assistance. Dannion tell who we heard from, She too, says Look there. This needs to be coupled with federal money. To pay for Miss Trant. It's a half measure eviction moratoriums on their own, create a financial cliff for renters to fall off of when those moratoriums eventually expire and back rent is due and renters air no more able to pay it then. Then they were at the beginning of the pandemic, And we should say all this puts pressure on lawmakers to make a deal and come up with some money to pay and help people struggling during during the pandemic. NPR's Kris Arnold, thank you. You're welcome. This fall's election may be decided in the suburbs, which elected a lot of Democrats to the house in 2018. Now is he seeks reelection. President Trump is warning quote suburban housewives that he will protect them from low income housing. Traditionally, that is racist language for people of color. But there are different kinds of suburbs. Inner ring suburbs tend to be more diverse and are voting more and more like cities farther out. The ex Urbs as they're called, have stayed more conservative. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Gonzalez asked what voters thinking the ex Urbs outside Charlotte in Union County, North Carolina, the historic district in the town of Wax on North Carolina, is marked by lines of traditional shops and the sounds of the train that runs through it. 69 year old Alan Kronk is visiting a used book store. He's a Republican voter. And while the Marine Corps veteran is worried about the current state of his retirement benefits, like Social Security and help from the Department of Veterans Affairs, he's sticking with Trump. He ain't my greatest thought of president. He does a lot of good things. Does someone are but Biden. He just does it all wrong wax eyes in Union County, a GOP stronghold. But not all Republicans here are sticking with Trump resident Stephen Sharon Smith were lifelong Republicans until a new political force took over the party. Trump Trump is president. I'm embarrassed now they're voting for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. Part of a worrisome trend for the GOP party members who don't think Trump is what Republicanism is supposed to be. I mean, I tell people if you ask, I'll say, Well, I'm a Republican, never vote Republican again. I mean, this current virus has got me so worried. That's the Smiths at their home in wax, all, which is surrounded by lush green ways and new developments. It's also one of the fastest growing communities in the Charlotte metropolitan region..

CDC President Trump NPR NPR News Kris Arnold White House Charlotte Chris Steve Inskeep Union County Joe Biden Rachel Martin GOP National Low Income Housing Co Congress president Paul Bunyan Richard National Apartment Association Miss Trant
"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

"Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. Millions of Americans have been a real risk of eviction over the past few months. Many of those people have now been given a lifeline. In a dramatic move, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is ordering Ah, halt on evictions across the country through the end of this year. NPR's Kris Arnold is reporting on this and joins us now, Chris Good morning, so that I mean, that's a huge move by the CDC. It doesn't though, seem on its face like something the agency would have the power to do. Hey, Rachel. Yes. So, I mean, you might think that, because especially so far during this pandemic, we've seen nothing very forceful from the CDC has been criticized. We're having voluntary guidance that lets states and business is kind of do whatever they want. If that's the CDC, sort of, you know, walking on little Kitty Cat feet that this, though, is the CDC booming its feet like Paul Bunyan or something and doing something much more dramatic, and the CDC says it does have the authority under the Public Health Service Act in 1944. That gives the government broad power to stem the spread of communicable diseases. And look I mean, the basic idea, of course, is that forcing people out into homeless shelters or crammed together living with relatives? That is very likely to get a lot more people sick. So who does this eviction ban apply to specifically alright, we'll quickly to qualify. Renters have decided declaration, saying that they tried to get unemployment benefits or other kinds of support that they'll make partial payments as much as they can afford to their landlord. They can't make more than about $100,000 a year or twice that if you file jointly Me and that if you're evicted, you have no other option than homelessness or living with more people in close proximity, which would increase the risk, which is exactly what they're trying to avoid. So how many people are we talking about? How many people with this effect? We're talking about a lot of people. When one estimate from the National Low Income Housing coalition is 30 to 40 million people in 17 million households or families were at risk of losing their home at the end of the year of something like this wasn't done. Diana Intel is the CEO of the group, and I spoke to her last night. Well, my reaction is a feeling of tremendous relief. I mean, it's a pretty extraordinary and unprecedented measure that the White House is taking. That will save lives and prevent tens of millions of people from losing their homes in the middle of a pandemic. But, she says, also Congress in the White House should have done this months ago. And instead we've had this crazy quilt patchwork of federal state local moratoriums. Lots of people weren't covered and thousands of people have already been infected. What are you hearing from landlords about this Chris? Well, in short, the landlord's air saying, Well, who's supposed to pay for this? You know, Democrats in Congress had plans for a moratorium. But along with that was $100 billion of assistance to renters and landlords to pay for that. That is not a part of this order. I spoke to Greg Brownies with the National Apartment Association were really concerned about this because If the moratorium is put in place. Rents are not paid. But the owners continue to have to meet their financial obligations. And how are they supposed to do that? Who's goingto help them pay their bills? And it's not just landlords who want the rental assistance. Danyon tell who we heard from. She too, says Look there. This needs to be coupled with federal money to pay for Miss Trent. It's a half measure eviction moratoriums on their own. Create a financial cliff for renters to fall off of when those moratoriums eventually expire and back. Rent is due and renters air no more able to pay it then. And they were at the beginning of the pandemic. And we should say all this puts pressure on lawmakers to make a deal and come up with some money to pay and help people struggling during during the pandemic. NPR's Kris Arnold, thank you. You're welcome. This fall's election may be decided in the suburbs, which elected a lot of Democrats to the house in 2018. Now is he seeks reelection. President Trump is warning quote Suburban housewives That he will protect them from low income housing. Traditionally, that is racist language for people of color. But there are different kinds of suburbs. Inner ring suburbs tend to be more diverse and are voting more and more like cities farther out. The ex Urbs as they're called, have stayed more conservative NPR congressional reporter Claudia Great Solace asked what voters thinking the ex Urbs outside Charlotte in Union County, North Carolina. The historic district in the town of Wax on North Carolina is marked by lines of traditional shops and the sounds of the train that runs through it..

CDC NPR Kris Arnold Rachel Martin White House Chris Good Steve Inskeep Diana Intel Congress Danyon National Low Income Housing co President Trump North Carolina Paul Bunyan Miss Trent National Apartment Association Charlotte Greg Brownies CEO
"national apartment association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. Millions of Americans have been a real risk of eviction over the past few months. Many of those people have now been given a lifeline. In a dramatic move, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is ordering Ah, halt on evictions across the country through the end of this year. NPR's Kris Arnold is reporting on this and joins us now, Chris Good morning, so that I mean, that's a huge move by the CDC. It doesn't though, seem on its face like something the agency would have the power to do. Hey, Rachel. Yes. So, I mean, you might think that, because especially so far during this pandemic, we've seen nothing very forceful from the CDC has been criticized. We're having voluntary guidance that lets states and business is kind of do whatever they want. If that's the CDC, sort of, you know, walking on little Kitty Cat feet that this, though, is the CDC booming its feet like Paul Bunyan or something and doing something much more dramatic, and the CDC says it does have the authority under the Public Health Service Act in 1944. That gives the government broad power to stem the spread of communicable diseases. And look I mean, the basic idea, of course, is that forcing people out into homeless shelters or crammed together living with relatives? That is very likely to get a lot more people set. So who does this eviction ban apply to specifically alright, we'll quickly to qualify. Renters have decided declaration, saying that they tried to get unemployment benefits or other kinds of support. That they'll make partial payments as much as they can afford to their landlord. They can't make more than about $100,000 a year or twice that if you file jointly And that if you're evicted, you have no other option than homelessness or living with more people in in close proximity, which would increase the risk, which is exactly what they're trying to avoid. So how many people are we talking about? How many people with this effect? We're talking about a lot of people when one estimate from the National Low Income Housing coalition is 30 to 40 million people in 17 million households or families. We're at risk of losing their home at the end of the year of something like this wasn't done. Diana Intel is the CEO of the group, and I spoke to her last night. Well, my reaction is a feeling of tremendous relief. I mean, it's a pretty extraordinary and unprecedented measure that the White House is taking. That will save lives and prevent tens of millions of people from losing their homes in the middle of a pandemic. But, she says, also Congress in the White House should have done this months ago. And instead we've had this crazy quilt patchwork of federal state local moratoriums. Lots of people weren't covered and thousands of people have already been infected. What are you hearing from landlords about this, Chris? Well, In short, the landlords are saying, Well, who's supposed to pay for this? You know, Democrats in Congress had plans for a moratorium. But along with that was $100 billion of assistance to renters and landlords to pay for that. That is not a part of this order. I spoke to Greg Brownies with the National Apartment Association were really concerned about this because If the moratorium is put in place. Rents were not paid. But the owners continue to have to meet their financial obligations. And how are they supposed to do that? Who's goingto help them pay their bills? And it's not just landlords who want the rental assistance. Dannion tell who we heard from. She too, says Look there. This needs to be coupled with federal money to pay for Miss Trent. It's a half measure. Eviction moratoriums on their own, create a financial cliff for renters to fall off of when those moratoriums eventually expire and back rent is due and renters air no more able to pay it then. And they were at the beginning of the pandemic. And we should say all this puts pressure on lawmakers to make a deal and come up with some money to pay and help people struggling during during the pandemic. NPR's Kris Arnold, thank you. You're welcome. This fall's election may be decided in the suburbs, which elected a lot of Democrats to the house in 2018. Now is he seeks reelection. President Trump is warning quote Suburban housewives That he will protect them from low income housing. Traditionally, that is racist language for people of color. But there are different kinds of suburbs. Inner ring suburbs tend to be more diverse and are voting more and more like cities farther out. The ex Urbs as they're called, have stayed more conservative NPR congressional reporter Claudia Great Solace asked what voters thinking the ex Urbs outside Charlotte in Union County, North Carolina. The historic district in the town of Wax on North Carolina is marked by lines of traditional shops and the sounds of the train that runs through it..

CDC NPR Kris Arnold Rachel Martin NPR News Chris Good Steve Inskeep Diana Intel Congress National Low Income Housing co White House President Trump North Carolina Dannion Paul Bunyan Miss Trent National Apartment Association Charlotte Greg Brownies
CDC Issues Sweeping Temporary Halt On Evictions Nationwide Amid Pandemic

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:58 min | 1 year ago

CDC Issues Sweeping Temporary Halt On Evictions Nationwide Amid Pandemic

"Millions of Americans have been at real risk of eviction over the past few months. Many of those people have now been given a lifeline in a dramatic move. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is ordering a halt on vacations across the country through the end of this year NPR's Chris Arnold is reporting on this and joins us now Chris Good Morning. So this I mean, this is a huge move by the CDC. It doesn't those seem on its face like something agency would have the power to do. Hey Rachel. Yeah. So I mean you might think because especially so far during this pandemic, we've seen you know nothing very forceful from the CDC. It's been criticized for having voluntary guidance that let states and businesses can do whatever they want. You know I if that's the CDC SORTA walking on little. Kitty cat feed this though is the CDC you know booming it's feet like Paul Bunyan, or something. And doing something much more dramatic and the CDC says it does have the authority under the Public Health Service Act of nineteen, forty four that gives the government broad power to stem the spread of communicable diseases and look I mean the basic idea of course is that forcing people out into homeless shelters or crammed together living with relatives that that is very likely to get a lot more people sick. So, who does this eviction ban apply to specifically? All right. Well, quickly to qualify renters have decided declaration saying that they tried to get unemployment benefits or other kinds of support that they'll make partial payments as much as they can afford to their landlord day can't make more than about one hundred, thousand dollars a year or twice that if you file jointly. And that if you're a victim, you have no other option than homelessness or living with more people in in close proximity. which would increase the risk, which is exactly what they're trying to avoid. The rate of Krona virus here. So how many people are we talking about? How many people with this effect we're talking about a lot of people when when estimate from the national low income housing coalition is thirty to forty million people in seventeen million households or families were at risk of losing their home by the end of the year of something like this wasn't done Diana tells the CEO of the group and I spoke to her last night. Well, my reaction is a feeling of tremendous relief. I. Mean It's a pretty extraordinary. And bold and unprecedented measure that the White House is taking that will save lives and prevent tens of millions of people from losing their homes in the middle of pandemic. But she says also Congress or the White House should have done this months ago. Instead, we've had this crazy quilt patchwork of federal state local moratoriums. Lots of people weren't covered and thousands of people have already been affected. What are you hearing from landlords about this Chris? Well, insurance, the landlords are saying well, who's supposed to pay for this? You Know Democrats in Congress had plans for a moratorium but along with that was one hundred, billion dollars of assistance to renters and landlords to pay for that that is not a part of this order spoke to Greg Brown with the National Apartment Association. We're really concerned about this because the piece that's missing is the most important piece in this whole process, which is rental assistance because if the moratorium is put in place, rents are not paid, but the owners continue to have to meet their financial obligations and how are they supposed to do that? Who's going to help them pay their bills and it's not just landlords who rental assistance Intel who heard from she to says, look this needs to be coupled with federal money to pay for missed rent. It's a half-measure eviction moratoriums on their own. Create financial cliff for renters to fall off of when those moratoriums eventually expire and back rent is due and renters are no more able to pay then than they were at the beginning of the pandemic. And, we should say all this puts pressure on lawmakers to make a deal and come up with some money to to pay and and help people struggling during during the pandemic.

CDC Chris Arnold Congress White House Paul Bunyan Intel NPR Rachel National Apartment Association CEO Greg Brown Diana
"national apartment association" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yo Ho's disrespect on the floor of this house towards me on television, Acacia Cortez said the incident highlights pervasive misogyny and society. He gave permission. To use that language against his wife, his daughter's women in his community and I am here to stand up to say that is not acceptable. Yoho maintains he did not use profanity when speaking with her. House Minority leader, Kevin McCarthy told reporters he thought yahoos comments were sufficient. When someone apologizes, they should be forgiven. McCarthy said. It was time to move on. Barbara Sprint. NPR NEWS Washington Millions of people have lost their jobs during this pandemic, but many of them have been able to pay their rent. Because of an extra $600 a week and unemployment benefits well for most workers that ends today, and landlords and renters are worried. This could mean millions of people getting evicted unless Congress acts quickly. Here's NPR's Kris Arnold Mary Collins lost her job as a home health aide in Dallas after the outbreak hit and she says before she started getting that $600 a week she got behind on the rent. Her landlord took her to court to a victor. On on June 16th. They filed which was the first day the court's opened here in Dallas. Hold on so I can get a little winded. Um, that's when they followed for eviction, Collins says trouble breathing because she is covert 19 and she tested positive. She's a single mom caring for her disabled teenage son. He'd got the virus, too. And even though she says she told her landlord that and that now she is getting unemployment benefits that could work out a plan to catch up on the rent. She says her landlord has kept trying to a victor. Most of my houses, like 80% packed so in the middle of maybe in sick I'd get up and pack a box. And then collapse just packing one box of wear me out of the last two weeks and that I have to have everything ready, because if they show up and say, you have to go now I have to be ready. Her landlord, which in the eviction court documents is named his Overton apartments. It did not return e mails and calls requesting an interview. If that extra $600 a week was going to keep coming, though Collins could afford to rent some other apartment, But Congress hasn't worked out a plan to extend to replace that. So she and more than 25 million other unemployed people are losing that extra money after today or this weekend. Meanwhile, a federal moratorium that protects some runners in big apartment buildings from eviction is ending, too. I'm deeply worried. Diane Yan tell is the president of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. It's very clear that without sustained Federal intervention. There will be a wave of evictions and a spike and homelessness across the country, and in fact that wave has already begun and Congress needs to act. To prevent it from becoming a tsunami, and we are running out of time, she says. Even where the Corona virus is raging right now, Arizona, Texas We're seeing thousands of eviction filings, but we'd be seeing a lot. Mauritz hadn't been for that extra $600 a week. Priscilla Almodovar is the CEO of Enterprise Community Partners and affordable housing nonprofit. We have evidence that it's really it's been the federal stimulus money that has kept renter In their homes. And if Congress fails to act like with so many other parts of this crisis, she says, people of color will be disproportionately hurt, especially low income communities of black and Latino renters will lose their home and it will be more acute. In African American communities were very concerned. Of course, a tidal wave of missed rent payments and evictions would hurt landlords to Greg Brown is with the National Apartment Association. He says. Landlords do not like to see renters losing that extra $600 a week either when these benefits run outs going to be a very difficult environment for owners, who will be saying How do I keep paying the bills that I have to pay if my residents are unable to pay their rent, So it's it's the Cascade is very concerning makes people very nervous, so tenants and landlord groups or both lobbying Congress for additional help Beyond unemployment money targeted specifically at renters. Democrats in Congress want to set aside $100 billion for that in this next pandemic bill. Again, Housing advocates. Diane you tell $100 billion could help 10 million renter households. So that's nearly 30 million people in those households for her part, Mary Collins in Dallas who has Cove it and has been fighting the virus and eviction at the same time, she's so far been staving off eviction with the help of a pro bono lawyer. But she's worried that she could still be out in the street in just a few weeks. I'm scared. I'm really, um I'm scared. Chris Arnold NPR news. Let's look ahead to all things considered Later today, thousands of Corona virus cases have hit daycare centers how these outbreaks threaten vulnerable workforce of largely low paid women. Stay connected by asking your smart speaker to play NPR or your station. Tha this is NPR news. It is 19 minutes after eight o'clock, Joe McConnell says There's something going on in Antioch. What is it, Joe? Might be a crash.

Congress Mary Collins NPR Dallas Kevin McCarthy Diane Yan Kris Arnold Mary Collins Joe McConnell Acacia Cortez Yo Ho Yoho Chris Arnold National Low Income Housing Co National Apartment Association Barbara Sprint Greg Brown Mauritz Enterprise Community Partners
"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

"Mr Yo Ho's disrespect on the floor of this house towards me on television, Cassio. Cortez said The incident highlights pervasive misogyny and society. He gave permission to use that language against his wife, his daughter's women in his community and I am here to stand up to say that Is not acceptable. Yoho maintains he did not use profanity when speaking with her. House Minority leader, Kevin McCarthy told reporters he thought yahoos comments were sufficient. When someone apologizes. They should be forgiven. McCarthy said. It was time to move on. Briber. Sprint. NPR NEWS Washington Millions of people have lost their jobs during this pandemic, but many of them have been able to pay their rent. Because of an extra $600 a week and unemployment benefits well for most workers that ends today, and landlords and renters air worried this could mean millions of people getting evicted unless Congress acts quickly. Here's NPR's Kris Arnold. Mary Collins lost her job as a home health aide in Dallas after the outbreak hit and she says before she started getting that $600 a week she got behind on the rent. Her landlord took her to court to a victor on June 16th. They filed which was the first day the court's opened Here in Dallas. Hold on, so I can get a little point it um that's when they followed for eviction, Collins says trouble breathing because she is covert 19 and she tested positive. She's a single mom caring for her disable teenage son. He got the virus, too. And even though she says she told her landlord that and that now she is getting unemployment benefits. It could work out a plan to catch up on the rent. She says her landlord has kept trying to a victor. Most of my houses, like 80% packed so in the middle of maybe, and sick I'd get up and pack a box. And then collapse just packing one box of wear me out for the last two weeks, and that I have to have everything ready, because if they show up and say, you have to go now I have to be ready. Her landlord, which in the eviction court documents is named his Overton apartments that did not return e mails and calls requesting an interview. If that extra $600 a week was going to keep coming, though Collins could afford to rent some other apartment, But Congress hasn't worked out a plan to extend to replace that. So she and more than 25 million other unemployed people are losing that extra money after today or this weekend. Meanwhile, a federal moratorium that protects some runners in big apartment buildings from eviction is ending, too. I'm deeply worried. Diane Yan tell is the president of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. It's very clear that without sustained Federal intervention. There will be a wave of evictions and a spike and homelessness across the country, and in fact that wave has already begun and Congress needs to act. To prevent it from becoming a tsunami, and we are running out of time, she says. Even where the Corona virus is raging right now, Arizona, Texas We're seeing thousands of eviction filings, but we'd be seeing a lot. Mauritz hadn't been for that extra $600 a week. Priscilla Almodovar is the CEO of Enterprise Community Partners and affordable housing nonprofit. We have evidence that it's really it's been the federal stimulus money that has kept renter In their homes. And if Congress fails to act like with so many other parts of this crisis that, she says people of color will be disproportionately hurt, especially low income communities of black and Latino renters will lose their home. And it'll be more acute. In African American communities were very concerned. Of course, a tidal wave of missed rent payments and evictions would hurt landlords to Greg Brown is with the National apartment Association. He says. Landlords do not like to see renters losing that extra $600 a week either. When these benefits run out, it's going to be a very difficult environment for owners who will be saying Well, how do I keep paying the bills that I have to pay if my residents are unable to pay their rent, So it's it's the Cascade is very concerning makes people very nervous, so tenants and landlord groups or both lobbying Congress for additional help Beyond unemployment money targeted specifically at renters. Democrats in Congress want to set aside $100 billion for that in this next pandemic bill. Again. Housing advocate Diane Yin tell $100 billion could help 10 million renter households. So that's nearly 30 million people in those households for her part, Mary Collins in Dallas who has Cove it and has been fighting the virus and eviction at the same time, she's so far been staving off eviction with the help of a pro bono lawyer. But she's worried that she could still be out in the street in just a few weeks..

Mary Collins Congress Dallas NPR Kevin McCarthy Diane Yan Mr Yo Ho Cortez Cassio Yoho National Low Income Housing Co Diane Yin National apartment Association Greg Brown Sprint Kris Arnold Overton Mauritz Enterprise Community Partners
"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on KCRW

"Here's NPR's Kris Arnold Mary Collins lost her job as a home health aide in Dallas after the outbreak hit and she says before she started getting that $600 a week she got behind on the rent. Her landlord took her to court to a victor. On on June 16th. They filed which was the first day the court's opened here in Dallas. Hold on so I can get a little behind it. Oh, that's when they followed for eviction, Collins says trouble breathing because she is covert 19. Um, she tested positive. She's a single mom caring for her disabled teenage son. He got the virus, too. And even though she says she told her landlord that and that now she is getting unemployment benefits that could work out a plan to catch up on the rent. She says her landlord has kept trying to a victor. Most of my houses, like 80% packed so in the middle of maybe, and sick I'd get up and pack a box. And then collapse just packing one box of wear me out of the last two weeks, and that I have to have everything ready, because if they show up and say, you have to go now I have to be ready. Her landlord, which in the eviction court documents is named his Overton apartments. It did not return e mails and calls requesting an interview. If that extra $600 a week was going to keep coming, though Collins could afford to rent some other apartment, But Congress hasn't worked out a plan to extend to replace that. So she and more than 25 million other unemployed people are losing that extra money after today or this weekend. Meanwhile, a federal moratorium that protects some runners in big apartment buildings from eviction is ending, too. I'm deeply worried. Diane Yan tell is the president of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. It's very clear that without sustained Federal intervention. There will be a wave of evictions and a spike and homelessness across the country, and in fact that wave has already begun and Congress needs to act. To prevent it from becoming a tsunami, and we are running out of time, she says. Even where the Corona virus is raging right now, Arizona, Texas We're seeing thousands of eviction filings, but we'd be seeing a lot. Mauritz hadn't been for that extra $600 a week. Priscilla Almodovar is the CEO of Enterprise Community Partners and affordable housing nonprofit. We have evidence that it's really it's been the federal stimulus money that has Kept renters in their homes. And if Congress fails to act like with so many other parts of this crisis, she says, people of color will be disproportionately hurt, especially low income communities of black and Latino renters will lose their home. And it will be more acute. In African American communities were very concerned. Of course, a tidal wave of missed rent payments and evictions would hurt landlords to Greg Brown is with the National Apartment Association. He says. Landlords do not like to see renters losing that extra $600 a week either when these benefits run outs going to be a very difficult environment for owners, who will be saying Well, how do I keep paying the bills that I have to pay if my residents are unable to pay their rent, So it's it's the Cascade is very concerning makes people very nervous, so tenants and landlord groups or both lobbying Congress for additional help Beyond unemployment money targeted specifically at renters. Democrats in Congress want to set aside $100 billion for that in this next pandemic bill. Again. Housing advocate Diane Yin tell $100 billion could help 10 million renter households. So that's nearly 30 million people in those households for her part, Mary Collins in Dallas who has Cove it and has been fighting the virus and eviction at the same time, she's so far been staving off eviction with the help of a pro bono lawyer. But she's worried that she could still be out in the street in just a few weeks. I'm scared. I'm really, um I'm.

Mary Collins Congress Dallas Kris Arnold Mary Collins Diane Yan Priscilla Almodovar National Low Income Housing Co National Apartment Association Diane Yin NPR Greg Brown Um Mauritz Enterprise Community Partners Arizona president CEO Texas
"national apartment association" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The region's adult inpatient beds and one hundred percent of pediatric beds calls itself health care but that's not what they stand for Trinity stands for three words greed greed and more free standing behind a sign that read Trinity has no mercy Donna stern with the mass nurses association said at a news conference there's only one reason they're shutting down because mental health does not make money stern called on governor Baker to step in this governor could step in at any point and put a moratorium on any closures in the state of Massachusetts Suzanne's Ausubel WBZ Boston news radio the hospital has now issued a statement saying the shortage of psychiatrists has reached a critical point preventing their ability to provide safe quality care for their patients we go now to Bloomberg business the next housing crisis is here right now it's about rentals bans on evictions in many states and rent strikes as the pandemic way is on the job market may help those renting the places where they live but it could push small investors out of the residential rental market when people don't pay rent a lot of these small landlords I don't have the resources necessarily to kind of withstand that hence Bloomberg's Prashanth Gopal if you have a J. five units and three of them are not paying that's a big percentage of your portfolio about half of the forty three million rental units in the country are owned by individuals or small businesses the national apartment association says many landlords operate on thin margins typically nine cents for every dollar and many of them still have mortgages and they have to pay property taxes so eventually they're gonna get in trouble they're gonna have to sell probably stressed prices I guess is waiting to snap up these rental properties big investors with deeper pockets who might reposition low income units to target wealthier occupants I'm Steve potus Bloomberg business on WBZ Boston news radio sports in three minutes I'm Aaron and I'm hardly in where the owners of window nation it sounds like we're together right but that's just the magic of editing because actually I'm in my house and I'm in my house.

mass nurses association Bloomberg Prashanth Gopal national apartment association Aaron Donna stern governor Baker Massachusetts Boston Steve potus
"national apartment association" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"And sure enough the president of the company that I was buying from which there was a couple of his people and we really just hit it off Bruce night just have one comment okay and he started introducing me around as the guy that was coming from taxes entering the market find a deal and that was just a great time and and funny that that would that we're part started to happen there is coming out of the due diligence third trip up there was for the lender visits after your walks of lease audits and from the due diligence I actually found myself area where I need to re trade these guys a little bit so would help the broker that should have been in the middle of this bank I went straight to their office and we were sitting at the conference room table in their office and I'm in the process of re trading now in my head I've also decided to I really like them the best of any of the companies that I've interviewed and as I was transitioning the conversation we got past the re trade to which you guys take back the records management all the steel I get a text from John rich way are you buying appeal in Cincinnati and my answer was yes why and he said because I'm sitting next to the CFO at national apartment association and he wants to know if you're for real in what you're doing and such so you have a small world in the network thing came back around and is these guys were telling me it all the reasons why they didn't do third party we actually came to an agreement that they would take to strike back so for me and they laid down their rules and I laid down find that we let the battle so it was quite an.

president Cincinnati CFO national apartment association Bruce John rich
"national apartment association" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"Every year for twenty nine years. It has gotten better on information better on coaching and mentoring every year we've gotten better and we've gotten larger so about twelve years ago, I decided to go into the apartment association and see what they knew to pick up the insider's view, the employees to you. How this business all working? I went there, and I was a disruptive because I was telling employees if you really know all this stuff, which I don't think he really knows. What did you think you do? Then why aren't you rich? And that was disruptive to them. So they agreed to allow me to create a system called IRO independent royalty owners, which is something they've had nationally. But it always falls apart because by the very nature of independent. Nobody wants to work together to make something happen because you're an independent entrepreneur. You don't wanna share your ideas, because they're your ideas, you competing against other entrepreneurs with, but it lifestyles, we share those ideas, and I brought that to the national apartment association kites up, and they wrote new classes and everything still nobody uses them because it's the nature of the independence of an entrepreneur to think that they know now the people that come through lifestyles first and then go to the national parks association are super well trained. And right out of the blocks the first apartment complex running almost ninety percent. I mean, they're really super trained. Give them a second or third project. Ninety five to one hundred percent back to miss the skills. Get still grow. So what does that mean? Well, the national apartment association has an independent owners award that is has forty four thousand independent owners that die forty chair. They're out there. Forty four thousand independent apartment owners and one person gets picked for the last twelve years at a row that one person was a lifestyles member not the same lifestyles member. That's the interesting thing. I don't need to beat you. With my best team. I can bring in my second. Best third best fourth desert this bit best operations team and still be you because you're not even in the top ten. We've won twelve years in a row..

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"national apartment association" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"national apartment association" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"I developed lifestyles twenty nine years ago every year for twenty nine years. It has gotten better on information better on coaching and mentoring every year we'd gotten better. And we've gotten larger so. About twelve years ago. I decided to go into the apartment association, see what they knew depict up, the insider's view, the employees you of how this business all work. And I went there, and I was disruptive because I was telling employees if you really know all this stuff, which I don't think he really knows. What would you think you do? Then why aren't you rich and that was disruptive to them? So they agreed to allow me to create a system called IRO independent owners, which is something they've had nationally. But it always falls apart because by the very nature of independent. Nobody wants to work together to make something happen because you're an independent entrepreneur. You don't wanna share your ideas, because they're your ideas, you competing against other entrepreneurs with but it lifestyles, we share those ideas, and I brought that to the national apartment association kites up. They wrote new classes and everything it still nobody uses them because it's the nature of the independence of an entrepreneur to think that they know it all. Now, the people that come through lifestyles, I and they'd go to the national association. Super well trained. Right out of the blocks of the first apartment complex running almost ninety percent. I mean, they're really super trained. Give them a second or third project up to ninety five one hundred percent. He documents. The skills got still grow. So what does that mean? Well, the national apartment association has an independent owners award that is has forty four thousand independent owners that by forty year they're out there. Forty four thousand independent apartment owners and one person gets picked up. Pepper the last twelve years in a row that one person was the lifestyles member not the same lifestyles member. That's the interesting thing. I don't need to beat you. With my best team. I can bring you my second. Best third. Best fourth Besser, piss bit operations team and still beat you. Because you not even in the top ten. We've won twelve years in a row..

national apartment association Besser twelve years twenty nine years ninety five one hundred percen ninety percent forty year