25 Burst results for "National Alliance"

"national alliance" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

09:09 min | Last month

"national alliance" Discussed on KGO 810

"Us right now is Peter Fisk. He is the executive director of the National Alliance for Water Innovation at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory this morning, Brief secretary of Energy on Desalinization, which is one of the things we want to talk to him, Peter, I'm sorry you had to wait so long. We have to, uh, play all those commercials. Thank you for being here. Appreciate it. Don't worry, Chip. Good to talk to you. Um, you know it is. It's always fascinated me. I remember as a kid. We had a neighbor. That was a real Piece of work and he was pouring oil that he changed his oil into the sewer. And my sister. My sister was in his face and he goes like the ocean is big enough. You can handle it. And she said, Yeah, at the time, just like There's six billion people. What if they all did that? There's to me the fact that we don't address water every day of our lives at every level shows me how rich irony can be. Where are we? Right now? In the national water crisis or the what we face here in the West. Is it a crisis? Absolutely chip. You don't need to even get out of bed. Just look at the window and look at the fires. Creating smoke. Yeah, turn on the radio and listen to the stories of farmers who have now got to dig up trees. And then you even hear stories of communities here in California in the Central Valley, who have to shut off their well because the water itself is not safe to drink. Water is a serious issue, and we've been kicking the can. Long enough Now, Now we've got to deal with it. I mean, you know, you look at it, and And I guess the question is is have we run through the water that is available to us, conventionally, just because of population and because of Of our actions. Everything from fracking to, uh, yeah, You know, I guess climate change. Um And you know is it is it Is this an opportunity for us to finally figure out the science behind desalinization at least The economic science behind it. There's two questions are, I guess? Yeah, I know there's two questions. And first of all, you know, where do we stand right now, with a traditional way that we make water? Well, the traditional way we make water as we first find fresh water somewhere in California that's in the Sierra. So we transport that freshwater long distances to centralized treatment and then we use the water. We use it once, and then we throw it away. And that's a real shame. Is that that system that one way system that you know we we relied on has worked well for the last century. But now we simply do not have enough water to use it once and throw it away. And you know, you make the point that We have all these other new uses of water and we have more people and and frankly, water is life and so we need to figure out more efficient ways of using the water with God and you know, desalination is one of those tools that we can make a more resilient water supply. If you have to, Um, if you put one in one hand and the other and the other, which has more weight conservation or desalinization right now. Well, you know, Chip. I don't think that anyone solution as a silver bullet, just like you know, if you the strongest branch is actually a bundle of twigs since you lashed together So each of these tools, conservation, water reuse desalination. You know a lot of people and probably a lot of your listeners. Think well, desalination. He's talking about ocean water, and there's certainly you know, we have very effective desalination plants on the coast. Here in California, the largest is in Carlsbad. It's the largest detailed facility in the Western Hemisphere. It makes 7% of all the drinking water for San Diego County, but that's really only useful for our coastal communities, and it could be a very valuable way. To stabilize water supply in coastal communities. But inside California we don't have ocean water close by and the more important thing is once we desalinate the water, you create fresh water on one side. But you create this more concentrated blind on the other. And when you end the interior part of California you have a hard time getting rid of this, Brian. So one of the key things in our research plane. What? Brian is the people, Please, Peter. Yeah, So, so again, Desalination is the process of pulling fresh water out of salt water. But you leave behind all the salt and some of the water, so the remainder is even saltier, And that's what we call Brian and Brian. You've got to be very careful with it because it's got a lot of salt. And so when you discharge it back into the ocean, you have to mix it very thoroughly. Just like mixing the cream in your coffee so that you don't have a slug of salt water, you know, stuck on the bottom. And so the detail plants in California discharge that Brian back in these very elaborate um, you know, sort of tubes that spread the Brian around to make sure it's thoroughly mixed. When you're inside, like in the Central Valley, you know you have this big pond of super salty water and you can't get rid of it. Wow. Um, we're talking to Peter Fisk Right now again, Executive director of the National Alliance for Water Innovation. Um to me, uh, it's again. People like you who can nuance these things. Unfortunately, suspect the last five years with an administration that had none of that ability and, you know, so you're right. It's not a silver bullet, but there are for for populists. That's the only thing they can get. People all riled up, You know, right? So we're gonna we're gonna do see desalinization that's going to solve everything. But obviously you have a bullet approach. Yeah, and it doesn't work. Um and I I worry about two things. Number one is that, um, that we are You know, we can reach a point Critical mass here where the need for water will, uh, way out. Outperform are neat. Or how about what's the word I'm looking for? Well, the need for water will be so great that we're not going to be the demand will, uh, totally exceed our ability to supply And are we close to that now? And what? What does that mean? If we get to that point Well, so in some respects, you talked to a farmer in the southern San Joaquin and she'll say we're already at that point. You know, I'm shutting down my farm. I am losing crops, permanent crops. So in some parts of the state were already there We have. We have small communities in the Central Valley that the well has become contaminated with nitrate and other other pollutants, and they literally have no water supply. They got to bring it down a truck but chip one of the things that sort of ironic is everybody. When we talk about desalination to think about ocean water, it turns out there's lots of other salty water around the state of California and around the nation that could also be desalinated. Like all the waste water that we produce often contains salts, and that's one of the reasons why we throw it away. We could instead reprocess and desalinate that water. And return it right back into the system when we have, um, you know, um hotels and buildings with cooling towers, those cooling towers produced salty wastewater. That water could be reused and desalinated right inside the building. And so one of the things we don't have is a good technologies to locally desalinating reuse water. I mean, we need a little better marketing on a lot of this because that toilet to tap is the worst way to call that right? I mean, I know what? Yeah, exactly Like most the time. Yeah, I'm not a big fan of that either. But you know, most of the other waste waters aren't anything to come from A toilet like, you know, agricultural runoff are AG sector uses and irrigates. And then when that water rinses over the field Sometimes it picks up so much salt that they can't use it again. So that's basically good water. We just need to take the salt out. Jeffrey, that book Salt. It was about the history of salt. I had no idea number one that salt is the one thing our body doesn't produce on its own that we need. It will die without And it's been part of centuries of wars and to fight to get access to it, and I didn't realize how important it was in our lives and how President was in some places and how baronet was and others brackish water and estuaries. Climate change is creating more and more of that. Now, as you know, in areas like the Chesapeake Bay and in Florida and in inland areas as sea levels rise, that's gonna be that's gonna even present a greater issue for this to find a way to do this. Yeah. Let me let me tell you one example that so the city of Antioch, California, you know, has water treatment and they took their water from the San Joaquin River. But because of climate change, and because the salinity is creeping in from the ocean into the delta, they saw that the salinity even that, far up in the river was getting high enough. Gay need to build a desalination facility. So the city of Antioch place I'd never you know, You don't think of that as close to the coast. They're actually building a diesel plant because of the salt problem. I don't I don't want to get super down. You know, It's very easy Chip for us to kind of go. Oh, my God. It's so terrible. What can we do? The answer is we can do a lot. Um, we are throwing away a lot of perfectly good water. If we just have better technologies to desalinated and reuse it, And that's really the heart of the research program..

Peter Fisk Carlsbad San Joaquin River Chesapeake Bay Brian San Diego County Jeffrey California Peter Florida 7% two questions National Alliance for Water In Antioch Central Valley southern San Joaquin Western Hemisphere six billion people one this morning
"national alliance" Discussed on Dancing with Bipolar

Dancing with Bipolar

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on Dancing with Bipolar

"It was like <Speech_Male> a wonderful <Speech_Female> God <Speech_Female> that I'm going to shoot <Speech_Female> you up. Like, <Silence> you know, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> it's like, oh my God, <Speech_Female> and on top of it I had lost <Speech_Female> my debit card. <Speech_Female> I'm pretty sure at the <Speech_Female> bus stop but I never went <Speech_Male> back to look for it cuz I just <Speech_Female> came back and it would <Speech_Female> have been so upsetting <Speech_Female> to me to <Speech_Female> go back there and find <Speech_Female> that that it hadn't been touched <Speech_Female> after having canceled <Speech_Female> it <Speech_Female> so I just kind of let it <Speech_Female> lie. Anyway, <Speech_Female> I had this meeting <Speech_Male> with this guy from <Speech_Male> our local <Speech_Male> the way out in <Speech_Male> Miami, which is <Speech_Male> National Alliance <Speech_Male> for the mentally ill <Silence> and <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm <Speech_Male> not going to get into it too much <Speech_Male> right now because it's late <Speech_Male> and I don't want to start taking all <Speech_Male> my notes out, <Speech_Male> but needless to say <Speech_Female> I somehow <Speech_Female> off. Consider myself <Speech_Female> to become a <Speech_Female> peer-to-peer speaker <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> or something like that <Speech_Female> where you go around the high <Speech_Female> schools and you <SpeakerChange> talk to the kids <Speech_Male> about not <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> dying <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and I knew <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> damn well that I was going <Speech_Male> to wind up cheering for <Speech_Male> something on this one. I <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> booked this interview with <Speech_Male> this gentleman <Silence> and <Speech_Male> you know, his <Speech_Female> family too has a history <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> mental illness a son <Speech_Male> that committed suicide <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> a mother or mother-in-law. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> They got <Speech_Female> ECT back in the <Speech_Female> sixties when it <Speech_Female> was still brutal <Speech_Male> thing to do <Speech_Male> to people <Speech_Male> but I'm <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> not going to get into it too much <Speech_Male> because I'm going to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a meeting with him next <Speech_Male> Thursday <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and then <Speech_Female> I plan to do a podcast <Speech_Male> about this meeting <Speech_Male> that we're going to in <Speech_Male> the morning which is <Speech_Male> like a <Speech_Female> general conference <Speech_Female> kind of <Speech_Female> thing if I understood <Speech_Female> what he said, right <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> that's introduced <Silence> me to everybody and <Speech_Male> who knows <Speech_Male> maybe want to become a <Speech_Male> keynote speaker from Miami. <Speech_Male> Maybe <Speech_Male> that's what this whole trip is <Speech_Female> really about. I don't <Speech_Female> know. I really <Speech_Female> honestly don't know what this trip <Speech_Male> is about right now. <Speech_Female> I know it's confusing. <Speech_Male> I know it's <Speech_Male> exciting <Speech_Male> and I know that <Speech_Male> I can do better <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I know that I'm scared <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and I know that I'm <Silence> hurt, <Speech_Female> you know, <Speech_Female> it is what it is. <Speech_Male> I guess that's life. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> all of these emotions are <Speech_Male> hitting at the same time. So <Speech_Male> I guess what I'm feeling most <Speech_Male> literally is <Silence> overwhelmed <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> that <Silence> it. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> I'll get through it <Speech_Female> and I'm <Speech_Female> actually feeling a little bit <Speech_Female> more tired now after <Speech_Male> like, you know, just <Speech_Female> giving my confession <Speech_Female> to you guys, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so I might be <Speech_Female> able to sleep if <Silence> you listen <Speech_Female> really carefully. <Speech_Male> He just stopped. <Silence> <Speech_Male> You can <Silence> hear doc. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> He's going to have a good <Silence> dreams. <Speech_Female> All right, <Speech_Female> so I'm going to sign it off <Speech_Female> for now. And <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> who knows when I'll be back. <Speech_Male> I mean it'll be soon <Speech_Male> enough, but <Speech_Male> I don't <Speech_Male> know whenever I'm going <Speech_Male> to do this. So you <Speech_Female> guys just always remain <Speech_Female> surprised. <Speech_Female> Anyway, this is <Speech_Female> not streaming. This is my <Speech_Female> podcast dance with bipolar <Speech_Female> and you all have a good <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> one. Later. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> home <Music>

Miami National Alliance
The U.S. coronavirus death toll tops 200,000

WBZ Midday News

01:00 min | 1 year ago

The U.S. coronavirus death toll tops 200,000

"200,000 Americans dead since March due to Corona virus Today near the Washington Memorial. 20,000 flags laid visually represent lives lost. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was there splats are indicative not only of the lives lost That the families left behind and suffering the lingering effects of the pandemic. Also taking a toll for many less than a month ago, this Dallas area 15 year old posted a video. Oh, my name is hands and saying, And this is my Mandela. He seemed fine. But days later he took his own life for teens. It's a pandemic within a pandemic. They're not saying there appears they're not saying their friend, pediatrician Anisha Abraham says teens are suffering justice. Their parents are more young people are feeling that sense of Helplessness and uncertainty in isolation. The National Alliance on Metal Health Illness Help line has seen a 65% increase in calls and emails since March. Jim Ryan ABC News September is National Suicide prevention Month, Michelle France and ABC News staggering statistics

Mandela House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Abc News National Alliance Anisha Abraham Washington Memorial. Jim Ryan Michelle France Dallas
"national alliance" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"He did this excellent well, and and again, you certainly are in a position to know when folks are searching for something where they truly need some assistance in their desperately seeking appropriate information you're able to say we got you. And we've got that information for you, and here's what we can do to help, and that is so critically important, and then at some point I'm assuming part of what you do. You will then recommend that they see a medical professional at that point that they see someone who can assist them with any. That they are dealing with. Partnership. So it may be here's what male clinic says here's what the National Alliance the mentally ill says seats they're the ones who would be saying, yes this is the right kind of treatment. We just want to help organize that information, make it accessible make it useful of the we need to be very careful that care takes place between the doctor and the patient and that made the online but we are not providing the diagnosis, the actual medical intervention, and that makes perfect sense you can't really do that. Especially Online, we talk all the time about folks going to web md or something else and diagnosing themselves if it's for information that's terrific. But make sure you seek the appropriate assistance. If you really have an issue that understandably you'd be concerned about and and health dot Google is a certainly certainly great place to start with a lot of this as well. what are some of the tips doctor that that you can provide to us at folks can use to make sure that they are getting the best information. Check the sources so we really try to bring up the authoritative sources so it's easy to find them, but you WANNA. Look for you know your trusted health local health providers for the State Department of Public, health, the CDC, the brands like Mayo to give great information. That's really important. The other tips that were giving you out for it. By we want everybody to be at this time to be kind to their mind because we've seen. So much of the mental health questions come to us. So the tips we have air and this was in partnership with the see was we want everyone to pause and take a breath. We want everyone to take a break that could be a from the news. We need to make sure your sleep and your exercise they can have. If you're overwhelmed or unsafe to seek out and get help and what a great mantra to be kind to your mind and at I think a lot of us don't stop and think about that. You know we're concerned about the the health issues and wearing a mask and do we need gloves and and how do we then deal with things in washing our hands correctly, all the things that we hear a lot about but then obviously it can get to us, and in fact, it does get to us. So be kind to our. Mind is something that we also need to take into consideration perhaps more. So than a lot of other issues, we think we're dealing with you know you're your, you should have to Google because it started with the five and that was around wash your hands coughing elbow don't touch your face they home sixteen and that was our first public of fans in that. Then more into the be kind of your mind because we saw the questions coming in. So we tried to do both and they came in that order but I.

Google National Alliance CDC State Department of Public
"national alliance" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Center on December 12 and it's called our Array Parody Project. And again. This is another awareness project just to bust through stick my round mental illness, So we're going to be there with food and drinks and celebrity artists, artists who have created works of art. For us that we're emblazon ing on sweatshirts and T shirts on DH. We hope it will have just the kind of impact that below the surface campaign has had, ultimately breaking through. Stigma with beautiful artwork. Clever words. And so we hope people will join us at evening. Yes. And you can find that on your Facebook page is their event for I love that National Alliance on mental illness. This is NAMI. You can find that on the Facebook page the event And then of course, we saved the best for last. You are part of the gift campaign. I know you're a big fan favorite. I saw your magical We've got some work to do. Don't weigh, do have some work to do if we have a goal of hitting at least 50,000 If we match what we've He raised in matching grants. We will hit 52,000 plus. So we had an incredible run with give this is our 10th year. I would say that it has put NAMI on the map. I mean, it changed us from being Just a very, very small, very grassroots, volunteer driven organization. In 2011 I volunteered to run the gift campaign. So I started with NAMI with give as a volunteer in 2011 so Our budget has grown tenfold, and so is the need. So we're just very grateful for this campaign and what it's done for our little organization. Yes, the little organisation that could and it could help a lot of people and you never know it could be you mental illness construct it. Anytime you go from having a great day to a panic attack, and you don't know what happened. Your brain is just now confused and you need the help and you need to reach out to people that understand you so you can go give the league for the give campaign for people to.

NAMI Facebook National Alliance
What it means to defund police

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 1 year ago

What it means to defund police

"Conversation that we're having in this country right now about systemic economic racism. Turns today on three words, De Fund, the police. In Minneapolis where George Floyd was killed by police. A Super Majority of the city council there says it wants to dismantle its police force, and in part because that defined the police has become kind of a catch phrase for a really complicated problem, so marketplace's Kimberly. Adams spent her day today, talking to people about what it might mean, concepts like defunding or dismantling or even abolishing the police are a bit more nuance to then may come across a protest. Chant Christy Lopez is co director of the innovative policing program at Georgetown Law and used to work at the Department of Justice Investigating police departments. She says when people talk about defunding police. It doesn't mean that you route budgets for public safety. It may mean that you decrease. Get rid of the police department per se, but you might still have something like an office of public safety. So, what would it do? Ron Surpass spent thirty years in law. Enforcement Police chief in New Orleans in Nashville, chief of the Washington State Patrol, and in all that time about ninety percent of all the police department calls that I've looked at in my life. have nothing to do with a major uniform crime. Crime has nothing to do right murder robbery burglary assault theft auto, nothing surpass now teaches at Loyola University in New Orleans. He says cop spend most of their time. Responding to auto accidents, noise complaints, lots of calls about people dealing with substance abuse. And when someone is having a mental health crisis, we often are sending out the police. Sue Abdur Holden runs the Minnesota branch of the National Alliance on mental illness she. She says the state has mobile mental health crisis teams that can respond. Unfortunately, they're not fully funded so that they can respond twenty four seven to every call that comes in which means the police legally have to says Jim Birch President of the National Police Foundation. The bottom line is who else would you call on a Saturday afternoon or in the middle of the night on a Friday night to come and respond. Respond to help address a dispute or disagreement. There literally is no one else to

National Police Foundation Enforcement Police Sue Abdur Holden Christy Lopez Georgetown Law Ron Surpass New Orleans De Fund George Floyd Minneapolis Jim Birch Washington State Patrol Department Of Justice Adams Loyola University President Trump Director National Alliance Nashville Murder
"national alliance" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"National Alliance of mental illness website or you can call two one one is a starting point for services a researcher at Harvard psychologist says with people spending more time at home they're sleeping more and having crazy dreams deedrick Barrett launched an international survey about pandemic related dream she says more than eight thousand people have responded in addition to dreams that exaggerate loneliness and stress about work she found the most common nightmares were about bugs speaking of bugs mosquito season is upon us mosquitoes can spread some diseases but the World Health Organization says it's pretty unlikely mosquitoes can spread covered nineteen the organization says there's no information or evidence to suggest the new corona virus could be transmitted through mosquito bites the corona viruses a respiratory virus the main mode of transmission are viral droplets released into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes for a mosquito to become infected with the virus it must be present in the blood the mosquito feeds on for more go to clover dot com keyword virus Maryland Haidar cocoa news because the roads are dying Jacob is proposing changes to the county wide level first of all I understand that people are upset people are very angry and I get it I read listen I've heard them but that's not enough the outrage while it's justified there is a path forward that we all need to work together on just saying to the peaceful protesters we support you to those who come into town and wanted to violence and destroy we say we will put the force of law behind it and throw it at you and to do everything we can to stop those that are coming in to do harm to our communities now having said that there's a problem and we all are a part of the problem it will almost be a part of the solution people want solutions and whether we like it or not there's a systemic issue here that underlies these protests and its institutional racism and there is bigotry that exists in our community and I'm sorry to see it and I'm sorry to hear it but unfortunately it still exists so in order to solve the problem in my mind we need to get the right people at the table and it started with a colleague of mine supervisor Fletcher when he brought before the board to reestablish the human relations commission now the commission in and of itself is not going to solve the problem but if you put the right people on the commission which will represent people of all races ethnicity religion all across the board you get him in a room at the table roll up the sleeves and look at some long lasting solutions that are gonna make a difference has to happen within our criminal justice system and we all need to be on board and this time really mean business not just a photo op not just looking out in stating that we all need to work together but people want action and people deserve action I expect that the human relations commission that the county just form will be a focal point of coming up with some meaningful solutions that will address the issues of the people who are doing the protesting those are doing peaceful protest thank you both so law enforcement today have a really tough job and most of them are live by the motto to protect and serve and I applaud all of those in law enforcement that are doing just that it's tough out there but I also want to thank all of those peaceful protesters that are making a point and they need to know I'm listening the board of supervisors is listening you have our attention and now we need to find that path forward with some meaningful solutions to the problems that have been X. pressed to a supervisor Dianne Jacob coming up here at the bottom of the hour here from the mayor and police chief the change being made the San Diego police department's coming outs of the week Google.

National Alliance
Mental health problems increase amid covid-19 pandemic

Kentuckiana's Morning News

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Mental health problems increase amid covid-19 pandemic

"There has been an increase in the number of requests for assistance when it comes to mental health in the Commonwealth Nancy Brooks is executive director of the National Alliance on mental illness in Louisville the crisis call lines are up sixty percent Nash nationwide suicides are up you know this is really impacted people from a mental health perspective no doubt she says people are suffering from depression anxiety and even PTSD because of isolation or the loss of a loved one or a job mental health experts have some advice for people who are struggling during the pandemic don't self medicate with drugs or alcohol don't watch too much TV or social media and seek help from a professional if

Nancy Brooks Executive Director National Alliance Louisville Ptsd
"national alliance" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"And a car the National Alliance that is what Americans right it is been a puzzle for some time and it's not just to me but to the country of Italy the various states in the United States and people who go to church regularly all the time that the churches have been closed are you writing about governor of Virginia Ralph Northam who is often in the news for publication stands is now being reviewed by the justice department being looked upon by the justice department because he's keeping the churches of Virginia club because I was the other governors are doing the same thing the department of justice is moving to re open the churches that would be good news where are they in the sandy well there are different restrictions John that have been imposed in the name of social distancing in different states and municipalities around the country the role that Virginia has been applying is that it forbids gatherings ten or more people I think you could have ten but but no more than that and the justice department has pointed out that whatever the way federal jurisprudence that has developed over the years because we're dealing with the fundamental right religious liberty whatever restrictions the government tries to put on it if it has a compelling reason to retract and let's admit that you know preventing the spread of infectious disease has a legitimate interest of government they have to be the least restrictive burdens that the government can put under the circumstances on religious liberty and they can't be discriminatory or capricious so if the government allows commercial arrangements which on the social distancing that involves people gathering in transacting in closer quarters than you would have in a church and they should not be able to put more burden on the church then they would put on the commercial activity and I think that's been the justice department's main objection in these cases that is we're also has to be at least a modicum of a rational basis in the models that they've been using it all over the map the stats and figures they've been using all over the map all of which undermines the argument that these measures are necessary even though many of us will follow them because that's what was arguably that's the best course of action in the final analysis handy don't they have to show that their decision making is based upon a rational set of data and then is conveyed to the people to show that it is in fact the most least rich a least restrictive measures to infringe upon a constitutional right for a set period of time yeah I said yes I think that that is one significant way of trying to litigate that this now from the justice department's perspective I think Attorney General Barr is a believer that the courts should decide as little as possible in American life and that most decision should be left to the political representatives who answer to the people who are affected by these policies and also by it and always look can be checked by the ballot box so I think the reason the justice department's relying so heavily on whether these measures are discriminatory rather than whether they're rational is that the justice department wants to give a wide berth to say that the courts do not have it's not the place of the courts to second guess the political determinations by the political actors of the people the people elect yes but if I if I can drop yeah I'm going to be happy we have in Michigan now is a U. S. representative Paul Mitchell is now suing the state of Michigan for having his constitutional rights and others being infringed including the right to you know to go to church so what happens is we have a governor who is extending an order and the legislature refusing to extend that order saying she doesn't have the authority so this is like if it is an instance where on like what you're talking about this isn't a case of the political people deciding if there's already a potential infringement without a legal basis for that thirty seconds we're going to have to decide thirty seconds yes just to be clear I agree with that yes what I'm saying is the justice department has a philosophy of trying not to second guess the political represents probably because it doesn't want the administration the the the trump administration second guessed but I believe that even if there is no discrimination if you are trying to impose a burden that is less than the least restrictive that that is constitutionally infirm and seven cars a National Review online that is my collar American greatness I'm John bass.

National Alliance
Yurok Tribe and seven tribal governments file lawsuit over COVID-19 aid

Native America Calling

03:53 min | 1 year ago

Yurok Tribe and seven tribal governments file lawsuit over COVID-19 aid

"This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the LEMME nation in Washington state has extended a shelter in place mandate through may thirtieth which also includes a nightly curfew on Friday. The LemMe Public Health Department reported sixteen New Positive Cases of cove nineteen between Wednesday and Friday and on Saturday reported two more cases bringing the total to forty in the community. Tribal and health officials are urging people to stay home and follow social distancing orders as the cluster is traced to families visiting other households public health memos to the community from the health department at age demographics to show infection rate for people under forty. The most state families and children are not following shelter in place or social distancing. LemMe Business Council Chair Lawrence. Solomon in a video message. Friday said he's deeply concerned. The measures were changing. Turn you and your once. I understand that it's against their culture to stay away from our sisters brothers. Mothers fathers grandparents ran shoulder aunties uncles and cousins. Birth in the same household refrained from visiting shorter period of time. The LemMe Public Health Department had not reported new positive cases in weeks. The Euro tribe and seven other tribal governments have filed a federal lawsuit against the US Treasury Department to Release Covert Nineteen Relief Aid to tribes and the cares act. The Billion Dollars set aside for tribes was to be distributed by April twenty six according to the tribe a separate lawsuit involving the inclusion of Alaska native corporations held up funding but tribal leaders are calling for the quick release of the money to help respond to the corona virus. Your Chairman Joseph James and a statement said the Treasury needs to honor its obligation to tribes adding the health and Wellness of native citizens depend on it tribal plaintiffs in California Arizona. Wyoming Oklahoma and Washington state filed the lawsuit last week seeking disbursement of funds new interactive series features. Native artists combining creativity and company to help promote wellness during the pandemic China. Lock it house. More about a dozen people from across the state tune into a video. Chat as Michael Gives instructions grabbed objects from their house. It could be anything salt Shaker. An apple asks everyone to draw object with whatever medium? They have pencil pen krantz and he joins in after fifteen minutes to both sets down his tools and asks her. This prompt is what makes the class unique. It's not about learning to draw. It's about bringing people together and doing something fun. And during the pandemic goal Nassau. Xiaoli facilitates the class. She reads off some answers from participants as feeling accomplished thank you. That was a very chill fifteen minutes. Thankyou says I shake all you works with the Racing Magpie Art Gallery. She also works with South Dakota's branch of the National Alliance on mental health or Nami. It's an organization that provides education and support to people with mental illness. Both organizations are teaming up for the virtual wellness workshop. Creating whether it's writing or drawing or painting like is an opportunity to tap into oneself and to be able to do that safely because you have control like you have your foot on the gas and the brake and you can decide how deep you go when you need to pull back. How you want to engage. Especially if workshops are being facilitated safely unconsciously the wellness workshops are open to the public. Three more artists are scheduled through me. I'm trying to lock it in rapid city and demand. Tony Gonzalez

Lemme Public Health Department Xiaoli Us Treasury Department Washington Solomon Antonio Gonzales Me Business Council Alaska Treasury Tony Gonzalez Racing Magpie Art Gallery Nassau Apple Chairman Wyoming Michael South Dakota Joseph James California
Minnesota offering free online mental health help amid COVID-19

Glenn Beck

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Minnesota offering free online mental health help amid COVID-19

"The National Alliance on mental illness Minnesota or nami is offering a variety of free online mental health classes for me we have classes about infighting in older adults and we also have one on the importance of family education on court and off another one actually in understanding early up the Pacific coast for professional non executive director sue after Holden says the classes are designed for family members caregivers persons living with a mental illness and the general

National Alliance Holden Minnesota Executive Director
"national alliance" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Some of the individuals who would have made you won't hello this is a boost from long distance I can decide since since Swansea city or something else who sported in the pictures yes Sir this the inquisition this is usually a source for some the three on the the flag yeah alone at last open my eyes once again I could see prison officials from the National Alliance joined together a wireless office left a message so I can and this please all solicitors physical colors on the walls the figures even think of going to suggest that color yes coach uses owning and full success until my last hi yes let's bring you face to face with the king of consciousness hello let's have a security zone along resembling the surgical stainless steel the only exception since the from the floor space he seems no one some strong nine hello.

National Alliance Swansea
"national alliance" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"This is usually a source for some the three on the please right yeah hello I know opened my eyes this is the most logical states falls from the National Alliance joined together for a while so first let's start with the faces of the dungeon and the results the figures of colors on the walls the figures even think of going as he has said Collins yes Saloni and full success in my life hi yes this is for your face to face with the king of consciousness I'm a little let's have a security zone along resembling the surgical stainless the only my head in my left on much exertion since the show the floor space no one what you'll see is your voice telephone right now I'm single really that's when one's physical hi this is mills since why why this is see this is who we see.

National Alliance Collins
"national alliance" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on 710 WOR

"I heart radio dot com slash talk for tips on how to start the conversation this is brought to you by nami the National Alliance on mental illness and I heart media all right in the forecast for tonight clearing skies forty four FOR the low it's going to be mainly sunny tomorrow about fifty four degrees and then on Thursday plenty of sun about fifty two live from the headquarters of Ramsey solutions broadcasting from the dollar car rental studios it's the Dave Ramsey show cash is king in the Moore has taken the place of the BMW does the status symbol of choice thank you to all of you that have sent your prayers by Twitter and buy Instagram and by many other ways of gotten emails from friends all over the world about the tornadoes that we had in Nashville last night sadly we had some folks lost their lives in a lot of folks lost their homes a lot of people lost businesses was a pretty rough night around here and courses in tornadoes not ever something you can see coming perfectly at one thirty in the morning bada lot you know out of our thousand team members no one was hurt thank goodness we have three people that lost their homes and are quite a few of us lost items here are there things but stuff is stuff and stuff can be replaced and that's what insurance is for and that's just stuff.

National Alliance Ramsey solutions Dave Ramsey Moore BMW Twitter Nashville
"national alliance" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on WTVN

"Tips on how to start the conversation this is about to buy nami the National Alliance on mental illness and I heart media layers are needed as you head out for your Friday night those temperatures in the teens for overnight lows but when you factor in the wind chill actually going to feel like the single digits at times there tonight we do keep clear skies overhead very few clouds that's actually hurting us because we're cooling down without that cloud cover keeping us warm good news is dry skies all the way through the night and we have a slow breeze going on on I'm AT C. six first warning forecaster Caroline Coen on your severe weather station news right and if you know do you it's not enough we got a deal to save our oceans legalizing sex work is something that we all looking at two hundred support our campaign text Joe two three I got to get this right Joan two three three three happy Valentine's day and remember only to sixty three days presidential cold from border to border see to shine the my clients with us two hundred and sixty three days you are the ultimate jury you.

National Alliance Caroline Coen Joe Joan Valentine forecaster
"national alliance" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"national alliance" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To go towards youth suicide prevention efforts the money is going to the National Alliance on mental illness New Hampshire for programs focused on awareness education and crisis support and possible bustle changes for cafeterias nationwide the tribe administration is now propose new rules regarding school nutrition A. B. C.'s mon Rivera has details the US agriculture department is moving to roll back nutrition standards put in place by Michelle Obama the former First Lady that required more fresh fruit and veggies in the school meals program critics say the change will mean a return to fattening foods ABC's chief medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton has this advice for parents try to send some healthy snacks with your kids and if also talk to your kids school and see if these changes are coming to your child's school the government says schools have complained that much of the so called healthier food goes to waste motor of Iraq ABC news five members of the Holy Cross rowing team and a culture remain hospitalized today in Florida after crash that took the life of one member of the team grace threat from Oxbridge was killed Wednesday morning and vero beach making Moriarty of old Lyme Connecticut was released from the hospital on Thursday the city of vero beach is wrapping purple ribbons around several light pulls on a bridge to show respect for the families of the team former city hall employee John Lynch was reportedly caught on camera taking a stack of cash as a bribe he plead guilty in September his sentencing date is on January twenty fourth eleven oh three time for traffic and weather together at the Super retailers doing when all wheel drive traffic on the three thank you Madison tough going out and about this report is sponsored by I'm bound dot org traveling route ninety five heading south bound in Mansfield a crash before route for ninety five because it is a pretty good delays wonder just getting to that point going to find a couple little spin out situation slow slowing things down reasonably well also on route twenty four heading a south bound getting into Brockton just by route twenty seven we're also seeing saw another a spin out that's causing some delays route three north bound in nor well we've got a crash that slowing things down also just a little bit I just up by route eighteen and the Weymouth area another crash now the slow down getting on the expressway north bound go to find heavy pockets from the furnace brook parkway right up into the downtown area same thing on the southbound side traveling right now up to the north we're seeing a crash on route one twenty eight heading north bound in Peabody at several cars involved including a a of snow plow traveling up the route ninety five heading north bound coming out of the the route three in the Burlington area we're seeing a little bit of a spent out slowing things down for ninety five adding southbound approaching the the local connector right now another spin out not a problem closer to downtown we are seeing on route sixteen at roadway had been closed at route one and the at Chelsea ever areas result of a car crash involving a tractor trailer truck and that's a re opening but they're seeing still seeing some heavy traffic mass pike forty miles an hour the entire length right now right now they're young people across the world facing tough choices continue their dreams of education or drop out to help their families put food on the table you can help change their futures on a single moment see how far your support can go what I'm bound dot org I'm jacquard WBZ twenty four hour traffic at work I now check at the four day WBZ accu weather forecast with Frank straight so can be heavy at times the first part of the night leading to produce visibility and slippery roads and sidewalks for the city and includes suburbs snow can mix with some sleet and rain before ending as temperatures rise to the mid to high thirties we expect three to six inches of snow once lead in these areas Cape south coast of south shore was the one to three inches of snow for turns to rain and temperatures rise to forty they're so when rain tapers off late tonight and tomorrow clouds of break for some sun.

National Alliance
"national alliance" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"national alliance" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"S. study the National Alliance for caregiving and that a a RP found that thirty four point two million Americans provided unpaid care to an adult age fifty or older so a lot of people are trying to balance working and caring for loved ones Jeez and how often do you see this with the people that you meet with that are helping to pull your help in the planning for retirement and now they're in the situation of being a care giver it happens more often than you think and you know you said that number and we go back to a thirty four million people in the U. S. are giving some sort of care nothing about that number the population in the US is how much three hundred and twenty million yeah about right so you're saying over ten percent of people are providing care for a loved one or somebody else at some point and ten percent and you know you this typically it's not gonna be you being the children that are doing it you know the the the grandchildren it's going to be the kids are the ones that are in the throes of really getting close to retirement maybe in their peak earning years and you know it it says that it six out of ten people that ARE care giving for somebody else it's affected their job to me it's affected them at the workplace it's made it so it's more difficult for them I would say I see it all too often where I have a client and they bring their daughter or their son with them to an appointment because they're they're not able to drive around anymore so there's some sort of care or help given it certainly is nice in one sense of family being together and its lower cost than you know essentially somebody that needs care to be institutionalized nobody likes that situation so the thoughts are nice well I'm just gonna stay at home but you just gotta recognize well I'm just gonna stay at home comes at a cost cost there and its financial it's emotional it's stressful so yeah it's a lot to a houseful yeah yesterday actually met with somebody who's has a mother that lives in their basement they've got a separate apartment there should there not necessarily caring for but it's under one roof and so I've got friends who've elderly parents that are living in the home with them so yeah it is something that that we see on a regular basis well and I think you you you know that there is that what we see is the for the first time in history we have somebody agenda new generation that's come upon us and we'll call you at the sandwich generation and that's where you might be taking care of a parent but at the same time you're still taking care of maybe your children who haven't left the home yet or maybe who have returned home this study also said six in ten care givers report having to make changes at work as a result of care give me just like what you were talking about Jews and hung ABS absolutely has an effect so this is it was similar to you know it's no different than someone with young kids you've got a responsibilities you got to be a parent teacher conference or in okay somebody the doctor it's certainly happens on both ends of the spectrum here so what can somebody do to ensure that they'll be financially okay if you have to cut back at work well David if you you're having cut hours of work and you want to try to make sure you're financially protected as much as possible you know it's doing the planning as soon as possible so if you can get a plan in place before you get into the situation where you might need to care for somebody else and that allows us to weather the storm is a little bit better so we have a portfolio that set up that you know if you have to cut back hours may we have a little bit of money set aside to help supplement your income during that time period that makes it so you know while you're going through this tough time with a loved one day at least you're not stressing as much about money even though can be a stressful time I do have some friends in a situation where one of them ended up retiring just a little early because of caring for a parent at home and then the other spouse worked a little longer in of order to compensate for the missing and calm and to to strategize and make that work so there are there things you need to do but obviously there earlier your plan for that the better but to also Jason what kind of impact can have on a retirement savings if you step away from a job during your peak earning years this could have a huge impact when we were in retirement plans for people here I always run scenarios for them just yesterday I had a client in my office who had a target retirement date of sixty five and then we started talking about what happens if his mom gets a little worse and he needs to take care of her so what we did is we actually play with the numbers to say okay let's see if we retire at sixty four at sixty three of sixty two this gentleman I was in a good position to be able to retire at sixty two and if you need to up the time that he was taking care of his is ailing mother he was gonna be able to now the other piece that we can do is that when we're looking at the financial plan is that if you need to retire earlier maybe we say you know we don't need that new truck every five years maybe it's every eight years or ten years and so it's looking at what the retirement lifestyle needs to be to make sure that we can make cuts were needed or just a plain to see he is a successful and do you actually still need to be working that's perfect idea if you have a certain target date but then recognize shoot for an earlier date if you work longer grated I mean nothing wrong with that but you have that option so whether you're caring for a parent or not you still need to create a retirement strategy for yourself so who will take care of them if something happens to you and what about your future you're tough questions I know but the team here at northwest financial and tax solutions are here to help we can help you build a retirement strategy that helps take into account all these things that you thought of and the things that you have when you give us a call will set up a time for you to come meet with us and we'll get to know each other once we have a good idea of your needs and goals we'll help you build your very own strategy that we call the northwest financial and tax solutions eight step retirement trail map it will be based entirely on you your family your goals and objectives for the future but you have to.

"national alliance" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"national alliance" Discussed on KGO 810

"You're listening shot National Alliance HL eight Jon Batchelor this is the John back right now AT T. mobile get an awesome iPhone ten are on us when you bring your family over and trade in your old device because whether you have mom dad or a friend on your mind it's a gift so bold and brilliant you'll want to keep it for yourself most importantly it's on us six vibrant colors plus with unlimited everything from T. mobile the possum iPhone ten are will help everyone snapping streaming and sharing to their heart's content all year long don't wait it's only for a limited time to visit the store or call one eight hundred T. mobile iPhone ten are on congested customers using more than fifty gigs per month three notice reduce speaks to the prioritization forty feet into twenty four monthly bill credits for well qualified customers plus tax qualifying trade important servicing finance agreement required contact us before canceling her credit stop raining balance do sixty four get zero down first thirty one twenty five per month for twenty four months for a great price seven forty nine ninety nine zero percent APR one offer per account youth fading as a serious problem one issue flavor vapor products that help adult smokers switch but may also appeal to youth to address it to last stop the sale of non tobacco and non menthol based favorite jewel pots to over ninety thousand traditional retail stores learn more about tool labs efforts to combat youth vaping at Jule dot com slash youth dash prevention to labs for adult smokers only paid for by jewel labs.

Jon Batchelor John National Alliance seven forty nine ninety nine z twenty four months forty feet
"national alliance" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"national alliance" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"And traffic this is retrospect the show in my guest today is he's executive director thanks for joining me today Eric I appreciate it lately we've been hearing more and more about increases in the number of people who are committing suicide and I know that nami has support for people and we'd like to talk about that and certainly outside of suicide as well nami of greater Orlando has so many options for people to get the kind of support they need so why don't we have you begin with that overview of what is nami well sure nami stands for the National Alliance on mental illness and we are the local affiliate we are affiliated with both the national office and the nami Florida office and we really start with education the number one killer of what we do is education so whether it's suicide prevention or families helping families or peers helping peers are number one tenant is education how can we get the word out on what people should be watching for what we can do at home all of those type of things that's that's number one we also then provide support so when we do a class that is let's say a family to family class where family members are helping family members will of course you're going to see people in my classes there saying oh well that happened to you that happened to me we need to get together we need to support each other and our final piece of what we do is is advocacy we we want to live in a world where mental health is talked about we wanna live in a world where we and we're ending the stigma we want to live in a world where the system works for all of us so in general nami great Orlando every day is working on education support and advocacy you know that example you gave makes it clear to like spam thing you know it's not like family comes in with an issue and then boom it's complete you're done well and when we talk about mental illness we we talk about that seeing that mental health is the same way we do physical health so in terms.

executive director Eric Orlando National Alliance nami Florida
"national alliance" Discussed on Living Healthy Podcast

Living Healthy Podcast

11:49 min | 2 years ago

"national alliance" Discussed on Living Healthy Podcast

"Welcome to another special edition of the living, healthy podcast. Presented by L A fitness, as we continue bringing awareness to mental health throughout the month of may. We're working with nam e the National Alliance on mental illness, Naomi works year round to de stigmatize mental illness, and educate the public on ways to seek help. Learn more about mental health and get involved with their movement. Our guest today, is Rachel Robbins, manager of PR and external relations at nanny, she's had a very busy month, but we're thrilled to have her on the phone. So please welcome. Rachel robbins. Thank you guys, so much for having me. We are thrilled to be working with LA fitness this month. So I am so happy that we were able to make time to chat. Yeah, thanks for calling in and speaking with us before we get started. Can you actually share a little bit about your background and maybe how fitness has helped impact your life? Sure. So I actually just moved to Washington DC where I'm calling you guys from today. Day from New York City. So I don't know anybody. And I really used fitness as a way to get out and meet people in the community. So that's kind of the way that I. Get for millions with my brain's on taking a walk going to class on going to the gym. Luckily my apartment building has one so so that's been a great way to meet some neighbors on that just really recently is how fitness has impacted my own life. That's really nice. So he's tells a little bit more about what Namiki is what it stands for sure. So mommy is the national lines mental illness as you guys mentioned. And we are the nation's largest grassroots mental Health Organization and our mission is to provide advocacy education support, and public awareness, so that everyone that's affected by a mental illness whether that's individually or if they're supporting a family. Brand or a loved one can get the support and resources that they need to get better. So a little bit of a sidetrack here. But how do you pronounce it? Is it Nambi? Is it now? It sounds like you're saying NAMI. So where do you guys fall on that? So we pronounce it, NAMI. Now me. Okay. Okay. That's official. That's official now. It's nami. Okay. Yeah. Right. Okay. So can you. Let's talk about mental health in general. What is mental health to NAMI and kind of wise it so important that one you wanted to get involved with them, and then also that the organization exists in general. Sure, so mental health can be defined as the way we think feel and how we relate to others on genetics. The way that my brain functions your brain functions. The environment and lifestyle all player role in our mental health and mental health conditions are sometimes referred to as mental illness, and so they're interchangeable, they are common, and they are treatable approximately one in five people in the US, which is forty six point six million adults. Experience a mental illness mcgibbon year. Wow. That's so I that number is always I feel like gotta be so shocking to someone. That's never like thought about it before. Because you're like one in five like just like walk, walk down the island, your office in, like someone there, probably affected by it. Yeah. Yeah. Well, so kind of. It's important because it affects a lot of people, right? But why do you think in recent years, it's kind of gotten more attention and kind of it seems like in the last few years, all of a sudden now, more athletes, and celebrities and people are talking about mental health than they were before it. Why do you think that is? I think that, that's a huge ry reason what you just brought up about celebrities and athletes, no coming out and telling their stories and more awareness. Definitely plays a role. Specially in the media, the more that our media reports on it. There were more TV shows movies songs, whatever the case may be that deal with mental health. The more people are going to be talking to up talking about it. And this is particularly with regards to depression and anxiety. What we found is that the more people that are open to sharing their stories, the less it becomes. And we know the power of personal stories and our NAMI stories, help us, he'll provide us opportunities to participate, and inspire our communities and really encourage people have hoped which relationship. Right. I think that's so great. Honestly, that more people are talking about it. Because then you don't feel alone. You're like, oh, I'm not the only person feel like that. Yeah. It's, it's great what you guys are doing. And that's that's always important to not feel alone. So, and so you guys are really about trying to help people tell their stories in a sense. Absolutely. And that also goes into what our campaign is this may for mental health month. We're doing why care and it goes that core of that storytelling. Why do you care about mental health because why I care may be different than why you care, and so really getting to that personal connection to the cause of making it feel offensive. How would you say that exercise and fitness, you know, plays a role in helping those with mental health conditions? Yes. So we actually have seen studies that have shown that exercise can reducing variety and the Prussian as well as improve mood, it is. However, I just want to be very clear. It is not a substitute for treatment from a mental healthcare professional, right? It's just an addition. Yeah, yeah. However, but as with other health issues, it is recognized as a complimentary form of treatment of overall health and wellness for all mental health conditions. So what we actually saw from a study by the net National Institute of health found that all takes is thirty minutes a few times a week to produce mental health benefits thirty minutes. Seven that's it? Yeah. It's something when you boil it down like that you're kind of, like, yeah, that's okay. I give up one episode of TV show or something for mental health. And if you're really like in a tough spot that really might be worth that, that, I guess, sacrifice so to speak to do that. Would you see me? You watch TV as you're on the right. Yeah. That's right. You gotta find gotta find a way to say that time. What do you say when we're talking about stigmatism to and de-stigmatising mental illness? So what are some of the most stigmatized thoughts people have in society? Like what do you see as the big hurdles with this kind of movement? Yeah. So I think that we get stuck in them and talapity and that separates and isolates individuals it's their problem. It's not my problem when we can change that. And say us we can really chip away at sigma and make a difference ways that we can change. That is just like what we're doing now is having a conversation that is inclusive aware. Onus education really are the key to keeping this movement going on language that is inclusive verse labelling on the wall. It's like that advice can can go so many like can just be like, crawl across the board, right? Yeah. Smart people, caring about others. How do you how do you kinda help change that? How do you guys go about trying to make it more inclusive language like including the us versus them? And they how do you kinda what do you actually do to try and make that happen? Sure. So we operate year round we have our programs that, you know, you can find on our website from January December, but we really amplify in p periods. One of which is may which were in mental health month, also July is minority mental health month in addition to mental illness awareness week, which is the first full week of October. Right. Yeah. Last week or last year we did a weeklong campaign that was the first time Elliott finished got involved with. Campaign and yeah, it did really well like on social media, especially, like we had a lot of positive feedback from our community about how much exercise has helped them and how much they appreciate it us talking about it. So that one. So there's, there's multiple events throughout the year pretty much that try and draw wariness to this cause, and as we speak about exercise, actually, one of the amazing things that NAMI does is we have a mental health walks per gram, which is the largest one in the country et called NAMI watts. It's an almost hundred cities this year for just at ninety nine so it's phenomenal. The way that this program has grown and this year, more than fifty thousand people will join us and walk together to raise awareness of mental illness, and raise funds for the local NAMI affiliate. Which is absolutely incredible. That's great. We actually did it some people from corporate, mental illness. It was great man. We ours was at a angel stadium. So we actually got to go inside the baseball stadium. Yeah. Yes. He really cool. Yeah. So it is fun. The New York one which is actually this Saturday is across the Brooklyn Bridge. So that would be awesome icon of places in bringing people together you to look up some flights. Andrew. Oppy awesome. I've never been to New York. So that would be cool. I have so Rachel where where can people go exactly for help say, like self help group help therapy? Do you have to be diagnosed? I in order to see a doctor. How does the whole process work? Sure. So I saw NAMI has a help line that I encourage anybody who has questions can definitely utilize the numbers. One eight hundred nine five zero six two six four that's one eight hundred nine five zero six two six four for systens and our health line team, can answer questions, specific to a person situation in also can tailor. Their answer is based on where they live soon NAMI has a variety of different programs. We have classes for not only people that have a mental health condition, but also families, and friends, and we have support groups as well and the these stem from support groups for adults for young adults between the ages of eighteen thirty for children and adults scence for families, and all of these support groups in classes. We. Provide at no cost, and there are available in a location by you. Go far from your house, and you can just visit our website, which is NAMI. And A M I dot org, and you can type in your zip

NAMI Rachel Robbins US net National Institute of heal New York City Washington National Alliance official Naomi Namiki angel stadium New York Andrew Brooklyn Bridge baseball stadium Elliott thirty minutes
NAMI is bringing awareness to mental health throughout May

Living Healthy Podcast

11:49 min | 2 years ago

NAMI is bringing awareness to mental health throughout May

"Zip welcome to another special edition of the living, healthy podcast. Presented by L A fitness, as we continue bringing awareness to mental health throughout the month of may. We're working with nam e the National Alliance on mental illness, Naomi works year round to de stigmatize mental illness, and educate the public on ways to seek help. Learn more about mental health and get involved with their movement. Our guest today, is Rachel Robbins, manager of PR and external relations at nanny, she's had a very busy month, but we're thrilled to have her on the phone. So please welcome. Rachel robbins. Thank you guys, so much for having me. We are thrilled to be working with LA fitness this month. So I am so happy that we were able to make time to chat. Yeah, thanks for calling in and speaking with us before we get started. Can you actually share a little bit about your background and maybe how fitness has helped impact your life? Sure. So I actually just moved to Washington DC where I'm calling you guys from today. Day from New York City. So I don't know anybody. And I really used fitness as a way to get out and meet people in the community. So that's kind of the way that I. Get for millions with my brain's on taking a walk going to class on going to the gym. Luckily my apartment building has one so so that's been a great way to meet some neighbors on that just really recently is how fitness has impacted my own life. That's really nice. So he's tells a little bit more about what Namiki is what it stands for sure. So mommy is the national lines mental illness as you guys mentioned. And we are the nation's largest grassroots mental Health Organization and our mission is to provide advocacy education support, and public awareness, so that everyone that's affected by a mental illness whether that's individually or if they're supporting a family. Brand or a loved one can get the support and resources that they need to get better. So a little bit of a sidetrack here. But how do you pronounce it? Is it Nambi? Is it now? It sounds like you're saying NAMI. So where do you guys fall on that? So we pronounce it, NAMI. Now me. Okay. Okay. That's official. That's official now. It's nami. Okay. Yeah. Right. Okay. So can you. Let's talk about mental health in general. What is mental health to NAMI and kind of wise it so important that one you wanted to get involved with them, and then also that the organization exists in general. Sure, so mental health can be defined as the way we think feel and how we relate to others on genetics. The way that my brain functions your brain functions. The environment and lifestyle all player role in our mental health and mental health conditions are sometimes referred to as mental illness, and so they're interchangeable, they are common, and they are treatable approximately one in five people in the US, which is forty six point six million adults. Experience a mental illness mcgibbon year. Wow. That's so I that number is always I feel like gotta be so shocking to someone. That's never like thought about it before. Because you're like one in five like just like walk, walk down the island, your office in, like someone there, probably affected by it. Yeah. Yeah. Well, so kind of. It's important because it affects a lot of people, right? But why do you think in recent years, it's kind of gotten more attention and kind of it seems like in the last few years, all of a sudden now, more athletes, and celebrities and people are talking about mental health than they were before it. Why do you think that is? I think that, that's a huge ry reason what you just brought up about celebrities and athletes, no coming out and telling their stories and more awareness. Definitely plays a role. Specially in the media, the more that our media reports on it. There were more TV shows movies songs, whatever the case may be that deal with mental health. The more people are going to be talking to up talking about it. And this is particularly with regards to depression and anxiety. What we found is that the more people that are open to sharing their stories, the less it becomes. And we know the power of personal stories and our NAMI stories, help us, he'll provide us opportunities to participate, and inspire our communities and really encourage people have hoped which relationship. Right. I think that's so great. Honestly, that more people are talking about it. Because then you don't feel alone. You're like, oh, I'm not the only person feel like that. Yeah. It's, it's great what you guys are doing. And that's that's always important to not feel alone. So, and so you guys are really about trying to help people tell their stories in a sense. Absolutely. And that also goes into what our campaign is this may for mental health month. We're doing why care and it goes that core of that storytelling. Why do you care about mental health because why I care may be different than why you care, and so really getting to that personal connection to the cause of making it feel offensive. How would you say that exercise and fitness, you know, plays a role in helping those with mental health conditions? Yes. So we actually have seen studies that have shown that exercise can reducing variety and the Prussian as well as improve mood, it is. However, I just want to be very clear. It is not a substitute for treatment from a mental healthcare professional, right? It's just an addition. Yeah, yeah. However, but as with other health issues, it is recognized as a complimentary form of treatment of overall health and wellness for all mental health conditions. So what we actually saw from a study by the net National Institute of health found that all takes is thirty minutes a few times a week to produce mental health benefits thirty minutes. Seven that's it? Yeah. It's something when you boil it down like that you're kind of, like, yeah, that's okay. I give up one episode of TV show or something for mental health. And if you're really like in a tough spot that really might be worth that, that, I guess, sacrifice so to speak to do that. Would you see me? You watch TV as you're on the right. Yeah. That's right. You gotta find gotta find a way to say that time. What do you say when we're talking about stigmatism to and de-stigmatising mental illness? So what are some of the most stigmatized thoughts people have in society? Like what do you see as the big hurdles with this kind of movement? Yeah. So I think that we get stuck in them and talapity and that separates and isolates individuals it's their problem. It's not my problem when we can change that. And say us we can really chip away at sigma and make a difference ways that we can change. That is just like what we're doing now is having a conversation that is inclusive aware. Onus education really are the key to keeping this movement going on language that is inclusive verse labelling on the wall. It's like that advice can can go so many like can just be like, crawl across the board, right? Yeah. Smart people, caring about others. How do you how do you kinda help change that? How do you guys go about trying to make it more inclusive language like including the us versus them? And they how do you kinda what do you actually do to try and make that happen? Sure. So we operate year round we have our programs that, you know, you can find on our website from January December, but we really amplify in p periods. One of which is may which were in mental health month, also July is minority mental health month in addition to mental illness awareness week, which is the first full week of October. Right. Yeah. Last week or last year we did a weeklong campaign that was the first time Elliott finished got involved with. Campaign and yeah, it did really well like on social media, especially, like we had a lot of positive feedback from our community about how much exercise has helped them and how much they appreciate it us talking about it. So that one. So there's, there's multiple events throughout the year pretty much that try and draw wariness to this cause, and as we speak about exercise, actually, one of the amazing things that NAMI does is we have a mental health walks per gram, which is the largest one in the country et called NAMI watts. It's an almost hundred cities this year for just at ninety nine so it's phenomenal. The way that this program has grown and this year, more than fifty thousand people will join us and walk together to raise awareness of mental illness, and raise funds for the local NAMI affiliate. Which is absolutely incredible. That's great. We actually did it some people from corporate, mental illness. It was great man. We ours was at a angel stadium. So we actually got to go inside the baseball stadium. Yeah. Yes. He really cool. Yeah. So it is fun. The New York one which is actually this Saturday is across the Brooklyn Bridge. So that would be awesome icon of places in bringing people together you to look up some flights. Andrew. Oppy awesome. I've never been to New York. So that would be cool. I have so Rachel where where can people go exactly for help say, like self help group help therapy? Do you have to be diagnosed? I in order to see a doctor. How does the whole process work? Sure. So I saw NAMI has a help line that I encourage anybody who has questions can definitely utilize the numbers. One eight hundred nine five zero six two six four that's one eight hundred nine five zero six two six four for systens and our health line team, can answer questions, specific to a person situation in also can tailor. Their answer is based on where they live soon NAMI has a variety of different programs. We have classes for not only people that have a mental health condition, but also families, and friends, and we have support groups as well and the these stem from support groups for adults for young adults between the ages of eighteen thirty for children and adults scence for families, and all of these support groups in classes. We. Provide at no cost, and there are available in a location by you. Go far from your house, and you can just visit our website, which is NAMI. And A M I dot org, and you can type in your

Nami Rachel Robbins United States Net National Institute Of Heal New York City Washington National Alliance Official Naomi Namiki Angel Stadium New York Andrew Brooklyn Bridge Baseball Stadium Elliott Thirty Minutes
 Erdogan sees win in local votes, but loses Turkish capital

All Of It

02:51 min | 2 years ago

Erdogan sees win in local votes, but loses Turkish capital

"I was in Turkey have dealt a blow to president wretched top wound during local elections on Sunday as his AK party was soundly defeated in major cities often nearly two decades of political dominance, despite Mr. Adnan's tight control over Turkish media and his enduring popularity in rural tacky his party was edged out in the capital Ankara, and the country's largest city is Tom bull at a news conference. President Ataman said he accepted the vote results. Jim Davis niches, it all I believe. The only reason we couldn't get the results who wanted in some cities is that we could not express ourselves enough to the nation, and we felt when their heart solar. Henrik Tamil is from the BBC Turkish service, according to unofficial results. President adorns ruling people alliance lost local election in capital on cut. First time the race was neck and neck in country's biggest city Istanbul. Mr. Dylan's people alliance candidate, the former prime minister and the speaker of the parliament Bonani yielded him declared victory. However, the opposition National Alliance candidate Akram all the disputed the results and later claimed that he won the award prison doors ruling Caroline's won't the in more than fifty cities out of Eighty-one. However, the opposition won at least three of Turkey's biggest five cities and the result in Istanbul is still disputed. Now, these are local elections give us an idea of how significant these results might be the elections were very important for prisoner Doan because winning the elections in Istanbul and Ankara have always been something special for him. He's political rise began twenty five years ago when he was elected as the mayor of history bull and Istanbul and Ankara had been run by Islamist welfare party, and then prison add-ons, Justice and Development Party since one thousand nine hundred ninety four and Mr Radwan had almost twenty rallies Istanbul alone on Friday and Saturday, and he also described the local elections as a matter of survival for the country as you've indicated his party has dominated local elections for a very long time. What is happened to make so many Turkish voters change their minds? The main reason for this loss is surely economic was of Turkey. Turkish economy is in recession the inflation hit. A fifteen year high twenty five percent last year and is nineteen percent right now and Turkish leader lost almost thirty percent against the US dollar lussier and six percent in the first quarter of this year. Unemployment rate, the double figures and reached eleven percent on the eve of the elections. And all these economic woes of Turkey made these elections much more difficult for prisoner one and

Istanbul Turkey Ankara President Trump President Ataman Tom Bull Doan Bonani Jim Davis People Alliance Development Party Mr Radwan Henrik Tamil Mr. Adnan National Alliance BBC United States Prime Minister Mr. Dylan
How Can You Help a Friend with Depression?

BrainStuff

05:52 min | 2 years ago

How Can You Help a Friend with Depression?

"Just wanted to let you know this episode deals with the topics of depression and suicide so if you're not up for that today. Go ahead and skip it and hey, take care of yourself. Okay. During the publicity that attended the recent suicides of Anthony bourdain end Kate Spade. People were urged to reach out to loved ones. They suspect are coping with depression. There's good reason for this nudge, a more than sixteen million American adults experience major depression with only thirty five percent of those affected turning to a mental health professional for treatment effective treatment can lead to partial or complete remission and thus a vastly improved quality of life. But one of the tricky things about depression is that it can prevent people from getting help still despite these numbers a lot of people are confused are anxious about how to handle a potentially depressed loved one. How can you tell if someone is really depressed and how exactly should you approach the person? What if they get mad at you for asking? Although a lot of variables are at play. And it's impossible to predict a reaction experts insist that it's always better to make a true and carrying effort. We spoke with Matt Onarato director of social work and an adjunct clinical assistant, professor at the Ohio State University. Wet. Sner medical centers Harding hospital. He said a people who contemplate suicide are embitterment up to the end. They want the pain to end. And if there was some other way to end the pain than kill themselves. They would take that. There's always hope you make a small gesture of. Hey, I'm here if you need me, and that could stop someone a week later from trying to kill themselves, the small things we do make a huge impact. So how do you know, if someone is dealing with depression almost all of us get the blues at some point feeling down about our lives or selves, the difference with depression is that this feeling does not lift and has not improved by spending time with friends or taking part in fun activities some fairly well known symptoms of depression include sadness and loss of interest in hobbies enjoyed in the past weight gain or weight loss. Trouble sleeping or excessive sleep difficulty. Concentrating and suicidal thoughts or comments a general ability is a lesser known and often overlooked symptom. Verbal statements of feeling emptier. Worthless are also important to note as well as physical symptoms like pain fatigue, headaches or stomach aches, if any of these symptoms last more than two weeks and interfere with the person's life functioning in some way. It's probably not just the blues like any serious illness depression needs to be treated to get better. A lot of people are scared to approach left. What about depression or suicide a whether it's because they don't want to offend the person are afraid to make the situation to real or are worried that they'll get yelled at we also spoke with Dr Catherine brunette assistant, professor at the school of social work at Tulane university via Email, she said anytime sensitive issue was brought up the potential for defensiveness or anger is there. She also noted that you're not necessarily in for a fight though. Quote, everyone responds differently and many people may be relieved to talk about their struggles. Especially if a non judgmental insensitive approach is taken. In the event that the person does react unhappily. It can be helpful to be open and direct about your emotional response, therapists, suggest saying something like I understand you're going through a lot. But when you snap at me. It makes me feel sad. There's no guarantee that one talk will result in action. And that's okay, Burnett said sometimes they friend seems to blow you off you can affirm that you just care about them. And are there if they ever want to talk your friend may not respond immediately. But your care may have left an opening for future conversations. When you do initiate the conversation calmly expressed concern, then let them do a lot of the talking. Listen, I hold off on any problem solving or suggestions, it might sound silly. But just listening to a person's experience of depression can help them validate that experience for themselves. Once they've had their say, therapists recommend asking probing questions. Like how bad does the scat? A does it ever get worse than what you're telling me? Are you aware of having a lot of guilt or shame? Just void saying things. Like look on the bright side, or it's not that bad or even something like when I was depressed. Once I started walking every day. And I got better. Remember, the depression is a systemic illness. It can affect a person's whole body and being so it needs treatment tailored for every individual person. It may take time, but hopefully, they'll come to the conclusion that their depression can be treated there are lots of options, depending on how severe the situation is if the person is suicidal. There are services that offer twenty four hour access to trained professionals and other resources in the US. Try looking up the National Alliance on mental illness or mental health America. Or these suicide prevention lifeline or the substance abuse and mental health Services Administration some services are free. And there are federally funded outpatient and inpatient programs available to folks without insurance with payment based on sliding scale, according to income if the situation is less urge. Don't talk to your friend about what option they might be most comfortable with this could start with a trip to the family. Doctor a, particularly if your friends doesn't want to see a therapist after all primary care. Doctors are also able to rule out any other medical 'cause like Siread problems or Nimia they can screen for depression prescribed medications and refer patients to mental health professionals, many employee assistance programs offer free or reduced cost counseling sessions to staff and family members. So be sure to check your specific plan for counseling and other resources. Onarato said, I think culturally were becoming in America more comfortable talking about mental health, depression, and suicide people are being more open, and knowing that there is help out there that you won't be judged and are not

Depression Matt Onarato Anthony Bourdain Professor Kate Spade Sner Medical Centers Harding H Headaches National Alliance United States America Ohio State University Tulane University Burnett Director Email Dr Catherine Thirty Five Percent Twenty Four Hour Two Weeks
"national alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"national alliance" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Excruciating conditions for the kid who robbed him, and what we tell what we have been telling people for fifty years is that's the remedy. That's the redress. That's what victims rights, the that's what it means to to respond a crime, and the choices that or nothing will if you give anybody if you tell anybody, well, we're going to do nothing or we're going to give prison. Everybody's like well prison. Who's been especially there's been victimized and traumatized by a serious crime. But. If you start to talk to people about a separate set of responses, a more expensive set of responses in the organization, that's based here in the bay area. California's for safety injustice and National Alliance for safety, and is done amazing research on this and go go check out their website, and you can see their survey where they basically ask crime victims these questions and people don't want nothing. That's not okay for people. But if you give them a choice that excludes includes things like apology and real apology, and the one thing one of the many ways the story goes to restorative Justice. But it isn't full restorative Justice. Is that Dante didn't get a chance to face Mr Thomas and actually deliver that apology face to face, and he didn't really get a chance to hear from Mr Thomas. What felt like to be harmed that night? So you're right. It's moving towards it. But but it, but but the modern restorative dicara restorative Justice program programs, and again in the bay area organization impact Justice is doing great work on this here locally in the bay area and also nationally so please check out their website. If you want to learn more about restorative Justice in particular. So we had pieces of it. And Mr Thomas, that's really what he wanted. He wanted to know that Dante was sorry that he understood that what he did was harmful. And that there was a plan. To help him become the.

Mr Thomas Dante California National Alliance fifty years
"national alliance" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:30 min | 3 years ago

"national alliance" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"A buzz word, and they're all over it. I want to go back to the sandwich generation if I will because they highlight some statistics here that are quite troubling. Here's what they had to say. According to the two thousand fifteen National Center on caregiving, brief women and caregiving, facts and figures twenty percent of women are engaged in elder care. That doesn't sound like a lot. But for those twenty percent. One out of five at is one out of five when you put it that way. Okay. Maybe but then they went on and quoted the MetLife mature market institute, which I know you've quoted yourself on this program and the National Alliance for caregiving, and here's what they had to say. Thirty three percent of women working women decreased work hours with respect. Caregivers. Twenty nine percent passed up a job promotion training or an assignment. Twenty two percent. Took a leave of absence twenty percent switched from fold a part part-time employment in sixteen percent with their jobs entirely or retired early. That's. Pretty bad. I mean, that's when you start talking about the intact. Yeah. The financial impact is very troubling. Because how do you make up for that? I think I read somewhere that they're out of the workforce something like twelve years, hence, that's twelve years. They're putting money into a 4._0._1._K Welby s Lear years they very accumulating of the thirty five for social security benefits. Then the old man up and dies early on them because they outlive, the men by two three four five six seven years, and they enter the widowhood, and then they lose one of the social security benefits. This is a real challenge. Well. I'm just gonna sound like an insurance agent here for just a minute. But it's a reality. Typically, what will happen is people approaching retirement years start to look around and Seiichi the kids are gone. I don't need to continue my life insurance. So they solve a policy or they cancel the policy or whatever. And then you're right. He dies which means there's usually pay cut in the household some kind of pay-cut and at that point if she's been outta the workforce for a period of time. I mean, the resources are are reduced and having that life insurance can be the injection of capital that she needs to get past a lot of stuff. Like what about the mortgage? What about the shortage of income? What about having some cash available because she might end up at that point still in her life being a caregiver or needing care herself. You know, one out of two marriages, unfortunately end in divorce and many times they don't provide for life insurance, if they're doing, you know, divorce cheap way, they say, well, you go your way, I'll go mine, and I'll give you a couple of grand a month. And that'll be it. Then the guy turns into a deadbeat or ups and dies and the woman is left holding the bag. I have in a lot of cases where people are going through a divorce. I have helped women get the coverage on their husbands during that divorce period or make sure that that life insurance is kept in force because the attorneys just don't think like that. Usually it's better to have the woman in this case pay for own Everett. Exactly because if you leave it up to the guy to pay more. Can't cancel it. Can't do any. That's what they do either. Cancel it. Or change the beneficiary two or three years in the divorce settlement. Okay. This whole concept of having fewer years of earned income. Let me read what they had to say about that. According to the 2015 study, women and caregiving facts and figures by the National Center on caregiving on average, women spend twelve more years out of the paid workforce. Then men women typically care for their children, and or elderly parents, that's where the twelve years comes in. You have babies you take off and then later on in life early and later on in life when you're in your maximum earning potential years, you end up having to take care of mom and dad, you cut down work hours. You retire early at cetera et cetera. And therefore your incomes are really detailed. Yes. Absolutely. Not only that. But you put yourself in the risk of your own inability to care for yourself because you just Plum get worn out being a caregiver. Especially for. Or inlaws or husband where you're doing a lot of physical labor. Okay. When we come back from the break, we're gonna talk about solutions here because obviously it's an important thing for us to discuss the statistics and all that. But there are real people out there that are going to face this. And it's probably more than one out of five because there's twelve different risks that we just mentioned and my suspicion is that at some point in a woman's life. They will be faced with one or more of those risks. So I want you to put your thinking cap on as a woman as a financial adviser. And as someone who specializes in a lot of these areas, especially the risk management areas. I want you to give some good solid advice.

National Center MetLife National Alliance Everett Plum twenty percent twelve years two three four five six seven Thirty three percent Twenty nine percent Twenty two percent sixteen percent three years