10 Burst results for "National Academy Of Sciences"

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

"That's listening. I'm not a parent i know you have been apparent. And there's a so much in our modern times especially big social experiment of parents raising kids on their own not with the help of other people right and then on top of that you throw a pandemic where a lot of bowl were sort of a loan so i know a lot of parents just trying to get by and then you hear another thing you think like man. This is something else that have to do. And really the way that i would say if we zoom out and look at this conversation is that this is just part of being aware of different insults. If in the fifties somebody told you hey look like even if you don't smoke if you're around the smoke that people are doing on the planes in restaurants other things it could have serious impact on your health and actually make you more likely to develop cancers later on you would want to know about it right. You'd wanna know and it doesn't mean that if you ever smell secondhand smoke immediately going to get cancer. It's just reducing the total exposure and total risk and especially being protective of kids. Now one of the things you've been super About a super advocate of is that our body can handle a lot of different stressors. One version of stress is emf. Non ionizing radiation. That's a stress on the body. Now as we get older our skull gets thicker. So it's more protective over our brain but kids brains are very thin and valuable. So can you chat about that. On how exposure to kids is different than exposure to adults. I'm so glad you raised the issue of smoke because when i worked at the national academy sciences in the early nineteen eighties. We did the first study that recommended a ban on smoking on airplanes and at that time when we looked at the data we saw information about children and we saw the children were much more vulnerable. A child of smoking had four times. The chance of being hospitalized with bronchitis and even dying of an asthma attack and that evidence drove us in the eighties to recommend that children should not be exposed to smoke precisely because as you just said their brains are more vulnerable. Their bodies are growing rapidly and their brains are not as protected. their skulls are thinner. Other brains contain more fluid now to go to radiation. We know that the radiation from a cell phone or from other devices gets through a thinner skull. Much more studies done by industry and by my colleague claudia. Fernandez and alvarado solace in brazil with us at environmental healthtrust have shown when you model the brain of a child that you can get. The absorption goes were deeply into the brain and ten times. More exposure gets into the bone marrow of the skull of six-year-old than an adult. Now by the time they get older as you write a thicker. Skull is protective. There's no protection for the abdomen. There's no protection for the colon and the rectum with the phones in the pockets of so many young people all over the world today. And that's why we're so concerned about this increase in rectal cancer that we're seeing in people under the age of forty. We'd never seen that before. The the numbers are small but the increase is gone. Fourfold since twenty ten and that's publications from data from the national cancer institute and the seer program in the united states and iran. I've learned that subsequently similar increases in rectal cancer are showing up in brazil and uk. An egypt and again there are multiple factors including pesticides and sugar. The be playing a role here but the fourfold increase in rectal cancer. We you talked before about chat with bozeman and the terrible tragedy of the loss of such a talented artist at such a young age and he's an example where there were probably multiple factors..

national academy sciences cancer rectal cancer alvarado solace environmental healthtrust asthma attack bronchitis Fernandez brazil claudia national cancer institute iran united states egypt uk bozeman
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Again of the importance of this and there's some that are just not gonna do it what we do. Yeah i'm still trying But you know when you look at the numbers. They're they're pretty depressing. So you know. Fewer than twenty percent of adolescents. In tennessee and alabama and mississippi sienna are vaccinated probably similar numbers and the rural counties up in up in east texas and young adults. Not much better maybe. Thirty forty percent so the vast majority are are unvaccinated. And you know. Unfortunately we've got a very aggressive. Anti vaccine machine out there that has now been adopted by conservative elements. I mean if you watch fox news or newsmax at night You're just seeing these regular anti vaccine rants and you saw that the cpac Conference a week or so ago. elected numbers of the us congress going against vaccines coming from the ultra conservative groups. So countering that it's tough because there it's there there's they're not tuning into other sources of information so i'm doing but i can't reach out to conservative groups. It doesn't have to be this way. I i don't know quite how all this happened. How you know the as. I often say the republican party was never an anti-science party Abraham lincoln started the national academy sciences. Eisenhower started nasa. George w bush started pep far. This is something kind of new and bizarre and hopefully we can Undea link it fairly soon of course when it comes to adolescence. This is more the purview of their parents determining whether or not they get vaccinated but as you said young adults so we're talking twenty and thirty. Somethings i imagine Their high percentage that are not of those there may be some that may not be anti vaccines in in any in any dramatic way. But who may say to themselves. I'm young and healthy. So i can. Just you know if i get covered. I'll probably be fine. What do you say that. But but there actually are linked because that is part of the disinformation has content and the content that's used and it's called weaponized. Health communication is the statement that. Hey if you're young and healthy go to the gym. You don't need to get the cove in nineteen backs and look at the death rates among young people like you. They're really low what they don't tell you is that you can still be hospitalized. And they don't tell you about the long-term neurologic effects From from long-haul covert and so there's deliberate omission in that in that information. So that's that's where we have to really hit home and get people to understand that. There's still quite risk. dr peter. Hotels is the dean of the national school of tropical medicine at baylor college of medicine. Dr houghton says thanks for the.

national academy sciences Undea sienna cpac mississippi fox news alabama tennessee George w bush Abraham lincoln texas Eisenhower republican party congress nasa us dr peter national school of tropical me
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"So this is the punchline. Why was the medical director at Boston Public Health Commission and? A. Brooklyn sponsored events we are off the public health preparedness works very closely with partners within Boston. Metro by scenario including Brookline as well as state and federal partners on these preparedness activities. Sue it is important to note that The City of Boston have addressed vaccine preparedness in subscription. I think that the primary reason I was invited to speak about this is thinking about from a public health perspective when a scene is available, how be distributed? So this is something that on a HP thinks about honore on a regular basis, we create a flu season operations plan every year with a key objects which are two main such maintain ongoing, similar elation awareness for our city healthcare partners, the general public, and our and our the Metro Boston in statement in federal partners we also develop and implement an equal accede plan in order to reduce disease transmission. We provide timely inaccurate public health information on the flu and we coordinate incident command across the region that I mentioned so I recognize that I keep on talking about the flu. And Covert Nineteen pandemic is clearly the ramifications of. Pandemic and the flu or very different different that a typical flu season. But I wanted to mention all that background because city of certain. Again, a regional partners strong foundation an adjusting concerns of equity and prioritization when it comes to accede distribution in efforts to reduce the spread of infectious disease. So this includes strong partnerships and communication chains within our community again, with our state and regional partners, and so you know as we think about of vaccine development and how covid nineteen back seen. Will be distributed. We have to recognize that we do have an existing infrastructure in place. In which we could. Build, the foundation of a vaccine distribution. So when it comes specifically to go nineteen vaccine on, there are a couple of key points I wanted to mention So Dr Cy said it very eloquently, but just to repeat this vaccine is just one fool at our disposal through the spread of the disease face coverings social distancing frequent testing handwashing. These are all critical when it comes any respiratory illness there is no silver bullet that's gonNA solve our problem. So even when we do have a vaccine available, it is imperative that we utilize all the tools that we have. To Stop the spread of the disease including the vaccine is just one piece of a very large puzzle. And the second point I wanted to make about Kobe nineteen specifically that many of organizations including Center for Disease Control in the National Academies Science Medicine.

flu Boston Public Health Commissio Boston Center for Disease Control medical director Brookline Brooklyn Pandemic HP Dr Cy honore Kobe National Academies Science Med
"national academy sciences" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

12:54 min | 2 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"Primary ways thumbs down is it's spreading. Yes more counties all the time I mean. There's there's more testing revealing more spread. Yes how else is it thumbs down the unwillingness of most politicians to accept the real issue deal with. Why are they not scared shitless about what this would mean for egg? They ought to be so everybody some guys like me. You're like what if how horrible would it be. What if a human see? WD But why why is the livestock industry not considering what's going to happen if cw spreads into sheep or cattle even like an. It'd be like an egg apocalypse. Well let's take another step further. Let's say Norway already. Banning the import agricultural products from CW positive areas because this trying to control cw outbreak break in reindeer and Norway. So you know how long has it until the EU bans agricultural imports from CW deposit various and as twenty six days. Right now have it. That's a lot of C-. WD positive areas NAG country. And you know they aren't. They're not paying attention. So I mean listen to me is is improving. They were we. Did I think three hearings this year in the House on. Cw De so. We're definitely making some progress in the sense of getting people be aware of this mark. VISI EASY WHO's a congressman from Texas. Ran that Fort Worth area. Who's going to get our big award this spring? You know he went to the floor and the during the appropriate are big award honors honors. One Democrat one Republican from the private sector every year and it's big fundraiser. In April Steve got the private sector a few years ago this year. You know the U A congressional are a mark easy From Texas and Garett Graves Republican from Louisiana but mark Visi went to the floor during the appropriations nations bill and offered amendment to add fifteen million dollars to go to state fishing game agencies to help with surveillance testing. Which is the first thing you need to do to get on top? Cw and that was unanimously adopted. Girl that comes over to the Senate just great and then you know the Senate Egg. Appropriations Committee cuts that down to five five million of which half went to state state agriculture departments for the captive services industry. So them to do testing. Who knows maybe do testing? I don't know we have no control over to try to breed yet a bigger buck. Well this year. Who knows what it's going to be? Maybe maybe it's going to be used for good things but given our scepticism says may USDA and how they've dealt with CD. We have very little if you told me that. They'll say there's two boxes amount of game show and there's two boxes and and behind each box like a behind one box of the car brand new truck in one box says CW D- Spreads leads to livestock and one box says CWC spreads to humans. And if I got the answer right I'd get the truck you tracking me. Yeah I would absolutely be the livestock one. Yeah no as much more than four legs eating the same grass all the rest. I don't know why so. That's one of these messes me about. CW D. is I look I'm like what am I missing. I'm scared shitless. Those people aren't scared. Maybe I'm wrong. Well I mean mainland. I mean there is a cottage industry out there folks who are disobeying this hoax. Not Be believed and I understand that part I get I I listen I try. I try not to be grouping dude on this stuff. How is it a hoax? Dear dies is laying there dead and it's got the symptomology you like. Where's the hoax? Always been around jumped to humans nothing to worry about did not come out of the cabinet served industry captive deer farms. have nothing to do with the spread. Had you yeah I agree with you. That's what I tell everybody. I'm like man I'd Yeah I. I hope I'm wrong on a lot of things every day. But the disease transmission stuff your research it's funded by the USDA like it all comes down like Iowa Ohio all these eggs schools. USDA is paying for a lot of that research and it's bizarre to me are. I'm trying to what's what's the late okay taxes how long one to Texas I get. Cw I don't know it was a while ago but it's done a much better job than other states controlling it Texas. The there was a recent case. I think in December. But I'm saying I'm trying to. I'm trying to better understand and I got a pretty like wd denier used to be sown on. Who didn't think it was a thing? Yes now see. WD denier is someone like this kind of stuff changes like being. I mentioned as being a Republican us. Be Free Trade now doesn't cw denier used to be that. You didn't think it was a thing now. It's morphed I into the thing but it doesn't matter it's like what it means to deny it has moved up. The current thing are peop- are there are people who are saying that a new state. CW So are they saying that if you went to Texas twenty years ago and did all the monitoring thank you would have found it like. It's always been there like what exactly. Yeah I don't want to try to get inside these guys heads but I think that's probably going to say yeah there's been around the neighborhood of you could have gone out and if you did all this testing now doing nobody was looking for it then you you know I think about you. Hear like Montana's first case a year or two ago and all of a sudden you look at like twenty some cases. We'll make yeah. We'll all of a sudden they're monitoring every deer that comes out of certain areas so you see a big increase and then now you have a baseline but if you go from zero. Testing testing that launch is going to give you an increase. What matters is after five years of testing? What happens if you talk to the you know the beautiful lovely Doug dern who's really out there in his area he's trying to be impactful about this and he's able to point to one task okay? We were doing exhaustive testing so we have multiple exhaustive testing to look at to see increase. But I just don't understand arguing that that was always there. 'cause I'm like where right now. If it was always there would be everywhere. Yeah so the. It's pretty clear and you can look at the maps that show this spread and this thing it doesn't it spreads like how shit spreads yes what it spreads faster shit spreads because he can throw a captive deer in the back of a truck and zip it across the country and you know on a Greyhound plus and all of a sudden mixing with other deer and getting dropped off here and getting one picked up there so yeah but when I was when you have a new infection infection you find a new infection. It spreads like in a way you would imagine it would spread. Yes like it's it's a circle that grows and grows and grows exactly and you you may pop up other places which you know you scratch your head about. But if that's the truck in listen it's not just cap guys could be me throwing a truck near deer in the back of my pick-up in driving a few states it's and addressing it and dumping it there. Well if you listen to the guys that are really. I don't WanNA use the word. The the people who are sounding the greatest alarm Why is it not that you move to hail prions are in the Hay Bale there in the dirt and he's he's taught you can't kill him? Why is it not moving? Hey Bill I mean you're exactly right. The frustrating part is an apple. I heard that recently members of Congress have staff and they ought to be better informed on this. I mean I had a member say to me while the end of the cooking meat longer than I've ever hundred degree Seventy done yeah. I think we should be throwing you know what if you're if you're a denier whatever that means these days God bless you. I feel like if you're a denial saying I feel like we should throw a lot of money at it so I could be proven right right dude I I would when I have an argument with someone I would spend money to prove. I'm right so prove you're right on a lot of money at it because this is like a hugh mangas deal and isn't that a hunting deal as does he already. That's my avenue into it but I will absolutely but if you care about even if you care about the livestock industry and I do. I'm like you know house ago. Save a cow stop condo. was that bumper sticker. Yeah like DOT COM does whatever. Yeah Dude Yeah so anyway. That's that's been really frustrating. Because we thought we had that fifteen million than the Senate cut it down to two and a half million and you divide two and a half million up between fifty states. Yeah just meaning practically ehlers think about We talk about these amounts of money than to think about like the wealth held by person Like Pippen Pittman Robertson morning. Jeff bezos could Jeff bezos could give that amount of money every year and not in not notice it. Yeah I was working with those guys in Sacramento and the One guy turned to me. And he's like yeah. You know this issue. It's just not you know. There's not not enough private money to fix this and I was like. Didn't you say the dude who owns this ranch owns three sports franchises Mike. I'm I think he just doesn't you want to pay for it all so we got to do is we got to get Congress to really step up in this issue. Now they did kick forward one point seven two million going to USGS US GS for additional research to see wd and that's good. There's also national academy science study is going to be going in to look at transmission vectors. Look at the. USDA USDA heard certification program. Which is joke and other things? So there's GonNa be some positive comes out of this year but just given the threat and how fastest thing spreading the notion in that we're GONNA kick out two and a half million dollars to state fish and wildlife ages. Expect that to make a difference is just incredibly frustrating. It is when you wake up in a few years. And you're watching. News footage of people using heavy equipment to dig bass of trenches that are burning millions of sheep and cattle like you did from Ireland when mad cow and scrapie down. Yeah then you'd be like don't PR modernisation this is. I'm a little cow. I'm a little I like if I'm a little skeptical. Skeptical down so thumbs thumbs up. You love it. Cal- he's like thumbs even now. Mainly I originally had the same reaction you guys did not. I don't I don't know I'm just sceptical. That's so let me give you a little background here. So folks over talking about so Pittman Robertson programs the excise tax that hunters pay on guns ammo archery equipment. They basically funds goes up to the states and funds conservation. There's an equivalent on the fish side. which was the dingle? We'll Johnson program name got changed. The name ingle Johns Dingle. John's names and that's the taxi. Pippen Roberson passed. I think in nineteen thirty six thirty thirty seven. Dingle Johnson passed in nineteen fifty. I think and so which kicks off more efficient one or the fishing tackle one of the hunt equipment one. I think they're more or less. Even there are a lot more fishermen but the hunters by a lot more especially am. Yeah but the fishermen man when they buy boat gas they by boat gas it goes at him by gas. That's it by an excise tax exactly so but in the fish side they can use a states can use a small percentage that for marketing marketing. Essentially to for our three as we call it to recruit retain reactivate anglers. So that's why you see things like the take me fishing program They've done a similar one reaching out Hispanic community the almost scar program. My Spanish is terrible. I apologize but those have really changed the decline in Fishing Branchville Bill. Two thumbs down Spanish. I two years of French. So yeah three thumbs down if I could dip so anyway so that the take me. Fishing campaign has really reversed the decline in fishing numbers. And it's going back up and he had a pretty aggressive rate nece reaching a lot of his. You know communities the Spanish community that typically get left in the cracks you know by our hunting and fishing community so but because of the nineteen thirties. Nobody could envision the need need to advertise and recruit hunters because everybody was hunting at that point either because of during the depression they needed food or post World War One going into World War Two the at large like a quarter as many Americans.

USDA Texas Senate CW Norway Congress EU Fort Worth Dingle Johnson Jeff bezos WD Appropriations Committee congressman Sacramento Senate Egg CWC Steve
"national academy sciences" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

13:56 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Some pathology how early should be on so much. Much. I think usually. Somewhere between five and six. There are some parents that elect to start them a little bit earlier. And I think that's fine. As long as the blood test is done to see what the levels are because your body is hyper metabolic, and you're growing from a child to an adult. So your body's making cells in the most spectacular rate. I looked online to see what the average rate of cell division is, you know, how many cells are dividing every second just as a, you know, trivia comment, and I think the number was twenty nine with thirty zeroes after it. So twenty nine with thirty zero. I don't even know what that number would be divide every second when you're about fifteen. So when you get older, though, cells are not dividing in that number, and we see changes in all of our tissues because we're losing new cells, and we can't replace those. And as telomeres are snippet, you know, genetically we divide cells when we snip off the tips, the ends of our telomeres than we h faster as well. And of course, everybody knows if you smoke or drink too much alcohol, you do all the bad things. Then your body will age faster. Might offer suggestions one of your distinctions that you're an osteopathic physician. Yup. Explain to the public included. Jackie what osteopath osteopathic physicians and allopathic, MD physicians. Have the same exact licensed to practice in New York? It doesn't say Chris Calloway DO on my medical licenses says, Chris Kelsey, I'm licensed to practice medicine surgery. The state of New York, so every state has that when you like the idea of osteopathic medicine, which is the original holistic approach where doctors in this country, looking at the whole person, we're looking at underlying causes as opposed to trying to change or treat symptoms. We also invented the idea of using manipulation to help to correct dysfunction within your back in positioning, a rotation of your vertebrae. So there's a great deal of physical medicine and therapy that we do, and we learn, you know, even starting the first day of medical school. So for many osteopathic doctors we go into different types of residency. I'm going to medicine some going to practice some gun to Pedes OBGYN surgery, neurosurgery, Ortho. You can go into any residency you want because the entire country sees us both as equals we just have a little bit more of the knowledge in terms of hands on doing the manipulation. And we typically lean towards going into family medicine as opposed to going into surgical specialties. So if you look at all the deals in the country, they're the overwhelming number of deals the largest percent, go into family medicine, internal medicine has opposed to going into specially because we want to be more effective to more people in a variety of ways instead of becoming an ultra high specialized. Searchable field or even research. A lot of us. Don't really go into research because you know, our enjoyment is with patient interaction. You know day to day shaking your hand. Hi, how are you? Let's talk, you know. So I I always liked the idea. And that's why I went to osteopathic school. Hi, Dr Kalpana gift. Thank you, sir. Thank you so much once again, you've kind Burton always great to talk to you. Okay. Next. Caller, what eight hundred eight four eight WABC you can call in now. One eight hundred eighty eight nine to two Victor in freehold. How are you? Doc macaque say thank you very much for taking my call. Sure. I actually talked to you last week. It's me it gets me once again. Okay. Well, thank you for other cold. I got a question for you. I kinda horrify baby the other day 'cause I'm the one that has a chronic gastritis. Yeah. But also, I have I had dry and and dryness of the mouth. So right away. I you know, how we go on the computer. Yeah. For a lot of people. It's a dangerous thing because they think they have a hundred diseases that they probably don't have but dry dry mouth could be Shogren. It could be not immune mechanism. I imagine the gas tries for probably be slightly separate from that. Because the patients I've seen that have show grins when we test them don't necessarily have to have. The issues. With the stomach. Right. Right. I went to my primary physician day did a blood test. They did a shark grins anti called SS a essay Rohan. Yeah. Why nothing was like normal range. You know, it was normal. Does that specifically mean to I don't have it? Well, it means you're not showing antibodies for it. So not every disease when you present to the doctor, and he reviews your tests will be, you know, textbook opened the book. Here are all the normal blood tests, and they're all positive here all the symptoms and the role there. So the reason why for autoimmune disorders it takes a while to be able to. Make a diagnosis, and that could be a mess. You know, lupus rheumatoid variety of these things is because they don't show up with all the blood test positive anyone given point a person can have it, and it may take a while before those blood test markers or the auto immune markers are buddies start to show, and there are some people for example that have rheumatoid, but they're bloods negative. So the doctor obviously has to make his decision as always. Not based just on the blood test. But on the clinical presentation with the patient saying what they can see what they can feel they examine you. And of course, the testing I mean that holds true for a variety of different medical problems. And of course, lime disease is probably one of the most tricky because there are a lot of people have lime disease, but the blood test doesn't show it because the creature can be inside your cells and evade your antibodies. So. There has to be evaluated very very specific way. So what is there is there? Any other type, of course of adventure and done other causes for what the dryer the stomach. Dry and the dry mouth. Could be some people have issues with fillings near tea, or they have heavy metal exposure that can that can create the symptoms. Sometimes allergies will do that. Because your body is tired of trying to make some of those natural liquidity tears to help to flush away things that you might be allergic to. So there are a variety of other underlying causes and again for the stomach and kids would be food allergy it could be bacteria, virus, fungus, parasite, etc. Did you take the carves out of your diet to try to improve your stomach? Yeah. Yeah. I start definitely last week. Checking the cars and start try take take the carbs, the grains completely out. And then let us know what happens. Thank you so much for your call. Okay. Phone lines are open if you'd like to call in do. So now, let's go to Perry in Brooklyn. How are you? Great. It's another Bopper knowing your air palm. Vitamin C. And all these other accounting. Rubies are not what a scam. Well, no, well, I just told you guys before and you could look this up online, and you can prove him to be wrong. He obviously clearly has no experience in doing any of this. And he clearly hasn't taken courses, you know, from the American college of advancement in medicine or the American. Academy of anti-aging medicine. The proceedings of the National Academy of sciences, you could write this down. The preceding of the National Academy of sciences has terrific study on intravenous vitamin c helping to selectively kill cancer cells. So you could look that up online. He obviously has the scene that because he doesn't get online to look at those things if you even look at intravenous vitamin c studies and you put that into scholar dot Google. Okay. Which is all the medical research exists. There are there are four hundred nine thousand results of studies on high dose vitamin C IV coming from facilities all over the world. Now, I don't understand how a person who. And this is a doctor is actually a doctor. No because it's not fair. Home on the radio gone all the stages. Yeah. I mean, I still don't know who that is. And I don't know what his his experience or his training is. But you know, you anybody else can go to scholar dot Google dot com and just plugging introverted intravenous vitamin c and you'll see four hundred thousand nine results new insights to vitamin c from college review of high dose vitamin seen travec as an anticancer agent. You know, four hundred thousand four hundred thousand it's not something that well, maybe. Linus Pauling who had two unshared Nobel prizes was one of the most brilliant men of our time and certainly of all time, and he was a huge proponent of vitamin c he and you and Cameron started doing vitamin c research years and years ago, probably forty fifty sixty years ago. But you have to look at this information. And this is not just you know somewhere. Forgive me for people that might live in Timbuktu someone in Timbuktu said. Yeah, vitamin C is good. There are studies from the national health studies from the preceding the National Academy sciences. So, you know, I think realistically you have to look at a large body of information instead of just a small amount of information. This. Dr obviously does not do nutritional medicine. A cancer doctor or no. Can I bit therapy uses radio thirty while? Yeah. That's because he wants people to come in and spend twenty to thirty or forty thousand dollars on his treatment. So I I know who you're talking about. But he's the one anything to get into way of his radiotherapy. And poor pines never ever ever seen any of a work. It's not all I can tell you you can go and look at four hundred nine thousand articles studies four nine thousand. So he's protecting his ability to charge more money for treatment. So that's basically it. That's my opinion, you know, but I can show you and you could look online go online now, go to scholar dot Google dot com. And look at those studies on intravenous vitamin c. Nine thousand articles. I'm not gonna continue to go on and talk about what he says. He doesn't say you could read the info and make your mind up on your own. There are a lot of doctors that are traditional doctors who don't believe in anything beyond what they do. And in many cases, I think it's just wrong like the doctors who prescribed weight loss pills like doctors who might use drugs that have bad side effects. So, you know, I just believe in being dramatically safer. I believe in getting results. So and that individual doesn't have stage four cancer patients still alive after years after years as does Dr foresight than I've seen it. Years ago when I went to his first course there were seven hundred people that had spectacular survival with stage, four cancer, and he used a variety of things, including a blood test sent out to Greece to look at. What has the most effect on killing the cancer vitamin C IV's three times a week? And then the intravenous twice a week with a little bit of insulin to lower the blood sugar opened up cancer cells and put an either vitamins some of the lowest dose of chemo. It's called instantly temptation therapy. And he's got the greatest cancer results in the world. So no one's better than Forsyth. Okay. Let's go to our next caller. Let's go to Gerald in Cleveland. Hi, how are you? Great. Yeah. I'm looking in my catalog about vitamin d. Doctorate one Packers track. Fifteen thousand dollars once. Sure. Would probably be allowed to take at once. I mean, most of our patients when we check their blood and even ones who are low in vitamin c we give them five thousand units and reject him to make sure they're in the right ranges, obviously, it's d three. Okay. So ideally, you know, the vitamin d three is the one you want to have, you know, in your body at good levels throughout the course of the entire day. So that's why we'll test will put people on recommendations and retested adjust accordingly because some big studies in Europe that have been running for twelve years or more talk about vitamin d decreasing the risk of cancers by a great deal by seventy seven percent. So for me three. Three d three's. The best..

National Academy of sciences gastritis Chris Calloway freehold New York Chris Kelsey Europe Packers WABC Forsyth Burton Shogren Cleveland Linus Pauling
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Federalist society also confirmed this week is poem Mattie who previously served as legal counsel to X New Jersey. Republican Governor Chris Christie he'll serve on the US third circuit court in Philadelphia. Their confirmations mean one out of every five appeals court. Judges have been nominated by President Trump. The American Civil Liberties Union's obtained documents showing how immigration and customs enforcement has gained access to a vast surveillance database of billions of records on vehicle locations, and is using the data to track down undocumented immigrants the data gathers license plate numbers from red light and speed limit cameras. Toll booths parking lot surveillance cameras and other sources in order to track drivers with little or no federal oversight. Democratic Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon has called the program, quote massive for profit location tracking database and about the worst. I have ever heard of when it comes to Americans privacy and security. He said the federal prosecutors have launched a criminal probe into whether Facebook illegally shared the personal data of hundreds of millions of people with some of the world's largest technology companies. The New York Times reports grand jury New York has subpoenaed information from at least two prominent makers of smartphones and other devices related to the alleged privacy breach. This comes as Facebook faces a number of ongoing federal investigations, including a criminal probe into how Facebook gave personal data from some eighty seven million users to the firm Cambridge on Linda without their knowledge or consent, data the company used to sway voters to support President Donald Trump during the two thousand sixteen campaign, California, governor Gavin Newsom as signed an executive order putting a moratorium plans to execute more than seven hundred persons on death row in California. This governor Newsom speaking and Sacramento Wednesday to line people up to execute minuted state-sponsored executions one awake for over fourteen years. That's we can make where we can make. I think a more enlightened choice. To advance Justice in different way. It was a National Academy. Science report that came out that estimates one out of every twenty five people death row was innocent. If that's the case. That means if we move forward executing seven hundred thirty seven people in California, we will have executed roughly thirty people that are innocent. I don't know about you can't sign my name to that. The order does not abolish the death penalty in California. But will bend the practice during newsome's tenure former Texas congress member better Rourke announced today he's running for president in twenty twenty. Joining a crowded field of candidates for the democratic nomination in November rock drew national headlines, when he nearly defeated Republican incumbent Senator Ted Cruz bet your work is headed to Iowa today. The state is home to the first caucus of the twenty twenty presidential primary season. But to a rock has not committed to support two major legislative priorities of progressive Democrats Medicare for all and the green new deal and in New York City activists rallied outside federal court in Manhattan Wednesday where judges overseeing Puerto Rico's municipal bankruptcy proceedings. The largest such case in US history. The protesters are demanding judge Laura Taylor Swain. Cancel Puerto Rico, seventy two billion dollar debt. This is activist Nicole Torres Bruna. You have people to populating the island because their pensions are cut nearly in half. I know civil service people that if they are to retire tomorrow. They're only received forty two percent of their pension and governmental workers in the legal are not eligible for so security. So where does that leave them? There's more than three hundred schools have been closed in. Geico. This is nothing short of Wall Street abuse and tactical steps towards extermination, and those are some of the headlines, this is democracy now democracy now dot org. Warren Patua port. I mean, he could. And I mean Shaef welcome to listen views around the country and around the world. Venezuelan officials are saying power will largely be restored by today after a long blackout across much of the country. The cause of the blackout remains in dispute, the United States blamed it on years of neglect of the Venezuelan energy system, but Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro accused the US military of launching a quote cyberattack against the electrical telecommunication and internet systems. The blackout comes amid growing political crisis in Venezuela as US-backed position groups attempt to complement doodles government. It's been nearly two months since position leader on though declared himself to be president with the backing of the United States on Monday. The United States announced its withdrawing remaining

United States President Donald Trump California Senator Ron Wyden Senator Ted Cruz Facebook president governor Newsom New York American Civil Liberties Union President Nicolas Maduro Chris Christie federalist society Puerto Rico New Jersey Laura Taylor Swain Philadelphia Rourke legal counsel Mattie
"national academy sciences" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Supported by any scientific evidence. They just guess why is the topic Jeffrey so hot in heated? That's a perfect question. It is very hot in heated because what's happening. You know, as we open up in the beginning is you've got to conversations you've got one in front of the curtain and one behind the curtain in front of the curtain is what students here in the classroom and in the the high school classroom the university classroom. The other is what's going on behind the curtain. I just found and I didn't put this in my book with on the internet. You can find a petition scientific dissent from Darwinism. And it's on you can find on the internet. And it says we are skeptical of claims for the ability of random mutation and natural selection to account for the complexity of life. Careful examination of the evidence for Darwinian theory should be encouraged and over five. Five hundred scientists have signed this thing it's at dissent from Darwin dot ORG. I don't have anything to do with this organization. I just found. In fact, I wish I found that earlier I would've put in my book. But so what you've got is behind the curtain. You got a lotta scientists city saying we don't really think this thing adds up and in chapter after chapter in my book, I lay out what these people what they're publishing I've got all kinds of evidence to share it comes from scientists. And that it's really it's really in bad shape in my right in assuming Jeffrey that if you believe in of Aleutian, you don't believe in the creator type theory, and if you believe in God, then you don't believe in evolution. Why can't there be a mix of both? Well, there there are there's a continue. Him out there. And there there is a group of people who are pushing us theory calls theistic evolution. And so those would be people in the faith community who believe that you can resolve evolution as being true. And and also that the bible is true, for example. But then they're highly criticized by by others in the faith community that they say, well, you're just saying that God was a dummy created something and then he walked away. So I don't really get in the middle of that argument. But I certainly do shine a light on science scientists themselves arguing with each other 'cause that's a huge issue. And here's here's another example, National Academy sciences. They wrote a book in two thousand eight I got it in front of me. You can you can download this for free as a PDF it's called science evolution and creationism. And in this book, basically, they're just pushing. Saying evolution is a fact evolution as a fact and will be true though, that Darwin also believed in God. You know? That's that's a good question. Darwin was kind of. He was accused sort of ambivalent about guy. He really said as little as possible. I mean, he wasn't religious. No. But but I think he believed in some kind of, you know, alternate creator. Well, he did. And what's interesting is I've got a copy of diamonds book right in my hand here on the origin of species, you can just walk into the bookstore and buy it and towards the back of the book Darwin's says to my mind it accords better with what we know. The laws impressed on matter. By the creator that the production and extinction of past and president inhabitants of the world should have been dude secondary causes. So he refers to the creator. And then he does it again. He does in the very last sentence of on the origin species. It just turn the last page, and he says dares grander in. This view of life with its several powers having been originally breathed by the creator in a few forms are into one. So I mean, if Darwin's stood in the university classroom and.

Jeffrey Aleutian National Academy sciences president
"national academy sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:00 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"It's not supported by any scientific evidence. They just guess why is the topic Jeffrey so hot in heated? That's a perfect question. It is very hot in heated because what's happening. You know, as we open up in the beginning is you've got to conversations you've got one in front of the curtain one behind the curtain in front of the curtain is what students here in the classroom and in the the high school classrooms the university classroom. The other is what's going on behind the curtain. I just found and I didn't put this in my book on the internet. You can find a petition a scientific dissent from Darwinism. And it's on if you can find it on the internet, and it says we are skeptical of claims for the ability of random mutation and natural selection to account for the complexity of life. Careful examination of the evidence for Darwinian theory should be encouraged and over five. Five hundred scientists have signed this thing it's at dissent from Darwin dot ORG. I don't have anything to do with this organization. Founded in fact, I wish I found it earlier. I would have put it in my book. But so what you've got is, you know, behind the curtain. You got a lot of scientists that are saying we don't really think this thing adds up and in chapter after chapter in my book, I lay out what these people what they're publishing I've got all kinds of evidence to share it comes from scientists. And that it's really it's really in bad shape in my right in a show me Jeffrey that if you believe in of Aleutian, you don't believe in the creator type theory, and if you believe in God, then you don't believe in evolution. Why can't there be a mix of both? Well, there there are. There's a continuing out there. And there there is a group of people who are pushing a theory called DS stick evolution. And so those would be people in the faith community who believe that you can resolve evolution. As being true. And and also that the bible is true, for example. But then they're highly criticized by by others in the faith community that they say, wow, you're just saying that God was a dummy created something then any walked away. So I don't really get in the middle of that argument. But I certainly do shine a light on science scientists themselves arguing with each other. 'cause that's a huge issue. And here's a here's another example, National Academy sciences. They wrote a book in two thousand eight I got it in front of me. You can you can download this for free as a PDF it's called science evolution and creationism. And in this book, basically, they're just pushing. Nursing evolution. As a fact Evelyn is a fact and will be true though, that Darwin also believed in God. That's a good question. Darwin was kind of. He was accused sort of Bev about guy. He really said as little as possible. I mean, he wasn't religious. No. But but I think he believed in some kind of alternate creator. Well, he did. And what's interesting is I've got a copy of Darwin's book right in my hand here on the origin of species, you can just walk into the bookstore and buy it and towards the back of the book Darwin's says to my mind it accords better with what we know. The laws impressed on matter by the creator the production and extinction of past and president inhabitants of the world should have been dude secondary causes. So he refers to the creator. And then he does it again. He does in the very last sentence of on the origin species. It just turn it last page, and he says, dares a grandparent. This view of life with its several powers having been originally breathed by the creator in a few forms or into one. So I mean, if Darwin stood in the university classroom and said. It'd be fired Jeffrey stay with.

Jeffrey Aleutian National Academy sciences Bev Evelyn president
"national academy sciences" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

14:36 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Give me a call coming up tomorrow at ten troubleshooter. Tom Martino on six thirty. I also have a Hispanics should work harder. Symbolize that's one of the things I've been saying for a long time. That they ought not to be codified in their communities, but make sure that all of their kids are learning to speaking feel comfortable communities, and that's gonna take outreach on both sides. Frankly. Poor Tom Brokaw. Got a lot of blowback for that statement. We talked about it a little bit last night. In fact, that I guess I pointed out that, you know, new immigrants don't always speak English. Very well. But the next generation generally does that was the case in my family with my great grandparents coming from. What is now Ukraine back? Then it was it was Russia. They were German, and my great grandmother did not speak English. She she learned to speak it. Okay. By the time. She died, and she never learned to write it, my grandparents, however, could speak German and English and my dad could speak. I think he told me he could only do the swear words in German, and as for me, I can probably order a beer and German, and that's about it that seems to be the process with most was most immigrants, and I when people talk about Hispanic. Immigrants. It seems to me you're making a broad statement about a lot of different people, including Cuban-Americans, you know, south southwest Hispanics, many of whom their families predate nationhood there. There's also Puerto Ricans who are Americans, and there's a lot of different people groups, including recent Americans, or at least recent immigrants from Central America that are just in the process of assimilation. So I wanted to bring on some someone to talk about it. Because there were a number of comments that came up on our text line at five seven seven three nine also very thoughtful letter from David Peterson who said, hey, isn't the the the dropout rate for Hispanic kids and indicated that there might be a problem with simulation with that. I bring on David beer, he is an immigration analyst with the buyer. Okay. Sorry. I was thinking about German beer buyer. David buyer. And he's with the Cato Institute, you could take check him out at Kato. It's fabulous libertarian think. Tank in Washington DC sorry about the name David buyer. But welcome to the show. You had it. Right. The first time actually I did. It's beer Dutch. German name. So you had the pronunciation just right? Nice. Nice. Nice. That's a that's a that's a great. That's a great last name to have. Right. Because there is a good thing. Yes. It is. And the beer in German. It's Embiid Bitta, which is you know, a beer place. So David beer in this case. You wrote an interesting piece, and then you were quoted also this morning in a CNN dot com piece that perhaps what Tom Brokaw had to say about immigrants may not have been all that. Correct. Yeah. I mean, really the fundamental problem is that people look at the fact that we have so many recent immigrants in the United States, and here Spanish more as an indication that immigrants in general are not assimilating. And because of that that ultimately leads the false conclusion. Really distorts your perspective. When you have you see recent arrivals coming in? And yeah, they don't speak English and many of them have low levels of education. They're performing lower wage jobs, and that ultimately informs the perspective that well over time. People are not assimilating. But in reality, it's just the fact that you have so many people who are coming in from abroad that you are aware of people speaking, another language or performing certain types of jobs. From those countries. Do an interesting thing in your paper. I put your paper up at my Facebook page, which is Krista L K for the L stands for lucky. I'm kidding sense. For Lynn, but you can take it out there. Also at Christopher's my Twitter account. I've got got the piece up there as well. Do kind of an interesting comparison between I immigrants the people who who come here and their kids, and there really is a significant difference between those two generations is they're not. It's huge. I mean, it's it's really lighten day if you look at any measure of economic or social assimilation, you know. Of course, the first generation, you know, they're coming as adults. You know, they speak a certain language their education levels, really set for life. And that really determines their economic outcomes in many respects, the second generation is where you see the growth, and if you're looking in particular at central Americans who are now the largest group of people who are being apprehended at the border and really the focal point of so much of the political conversation is about what to do these people the second generation for central Americans shows, no difference between them and other natives when it comes to educational attainment poverty levels after childhood, of course, growing up in your parents home as the second generation person, you're likely to be more likely to grow up in poverty, but they're actually making larger games than other natives in adulthood in reducing their in poverty level. So a variety of different metrics, you can look at and all of them show huge game. For that. Second generation, you know, which is another example, of course, that's commonly referenced ninety seven percent of central Americans Central American ancestry who were born in the United States, speak English. Well, and or better, and you know that that's a monumental game. Between the first and second generation talking with David beer, he has an immigration analyst at the Cato Institute, and a listener also by the name of David wrote in saying that that perhaps the graduation rates of Hispanic Americans which are lower than Caucasian Americans. That is an indication that perhaps simulation is not taking place. How would you respond to that? Well, there's a couple of different things you can focus on here when it comes to Central American central Americans in particular. There isn't a difference in terms of the high school graduation rates for adults, you know, who were born here. So ten percent of natives have dropped out of high school. If they're over the age of twenty five ten percent of Central American natives have dropped out of high school, really when you look at the overall population, you know, immigrants and their kids it's higher because you have so many high school people without a high school degree coming over in the first place that it creates the perception that there are more dropouts if you do look at other, you know, the entire immigrant population as a whole there are more high school dropouts in that population. But not in the second generation know, I think some of the frustration. I I know talking to my mom's. Husband, and he said, I don't wanna have to press one for English. And I think there is a a an understandable frustration among Americans that so many businesses and government agencies. Not just those providing emergency services, which I think you could make a point that that having a Spanish language might be. You know might be a good idea if it's an emergency kind of thing. But you know, they don't want to have to to press one free Anderson when English to be the default and somebody who's traveled a fair amount. I I would say that you're doing a disservice to English language learners by providing Spanish, I say that as a traveler because when I am somewhere where I cannot use English. There is no English anywhere. I am forced to start using the language of the land. I I start to see words I start to recognize those words, and I learned that language faster. Are we not doing a disservice by allowing people to press two for Spanish? Well, I'm not I'm not one to tell private companies what they should do. Of course, they're going to provide options for people who don't speak English because that their economic motivation is to do that the question is whether that's having a significantly negative effect on language rates, particularly we're interested in the second generation, you mentioned no one really has a an expectation that people in adulthood are going to learn English. And and the reality is it's not because people assimilate from their peers, and you know, through the education system and so forth. The second generation of immigrants are learning English through the socialization process with other people born in in the United States. One of the things that I think that might be arguable is whether or not kids are getting enough English and squash. You've pointed out most kids do a merger with good language skills. But looking back on my grandmother's experience, she was actually they were forbidden to use German in school. She lived in a town where there were a lot of German immigrants. And so the result is she ended up being able to speak German from home reading right German with no accent, and speak and write English with no accent. So basically being perfectly fluent in two languages because of that. Do you think it's a possibility that some schools might want to encourage more English English language, use not just among second-generation? But also first generation kids that come over here with their parents that are learning English for the first time. You know, it's interesting. You mentioned the experiences of of, you know, banning German in schools, and and so forth in the early. Twentieth century. There's actually been a good amount of research done in that period and actually showed that backfired on assimilation interest because it really created some resentment in German communities in those states who felt like they were being singled out they were being treated as that. Maybe they're not loyal to be United States. And ultimately it had the effect of reducing the amount of simulation that occurred. So I think you you really need to be careful in this context of trying to sort of micromanage the socialization of immigrants and trying to plan out society from the top down. So I think people who are concerned about assimilation should recognize that really. The American society, that's so attracted the people over time. But it it does work on its own. And I don't think it really needs a boost from the federal government or or any level of government. Really? That's a great. That's a great answer. And I do know that it my grandmother resented it. That's for sure. So what you're saying is let kids learn English at school, and it learned with their peers learn from TV don't feel like you have to sort of force it on them because they're going to learn it anyway. That's right. And I think that's what we're seeing already happened, you know, in in immigrant communities across the United States. They're learning English. But really, they're they're learning what it means to be American. You know, you're seeing immigrants disproportionately enroll in the military or sign up for the military, and and and wants to serve this country that that their their parents came to the children of of immigrants really are, you know, patriotic Americans, they're not, you know, having some divided loyalties about this country. I also think it's interesting I and you're the expert on immigration, but what I have read is that as we have had waves of immigrants. There's always been prejudice against those immigrants as well as concerns about assimilation. Whether we're talking I rish immigrants Italian immigrants even German immigrants that this is a bit of a there's a kind of natural nee. Nativist if you will concern that seems to fade as as that wave crests and diminishes it in your studies is that what you find. Oh, absolutely. There was a major study done by the national academies sciences on immigrant assimilation in nine states. And how it's going and it found that really there's not a difference between what's going on today. What's going on then? And there's not a difference in the reaction by native born Americans to immigration either. We really have the same exact concerns, and and troops that come out every time you have a new wave. I think it's interesting that you focused on Catholic immigrants, for example. I mean, they were just a tremendous amount of concern about them, creating a parallel society for themselves apart apart from Protestant American society where they had their own schools. And you know, they were teaching things that were not align to the broader, you know, religious and cultural values, and perhaps they had divided. Loyalties and all of these things. And now today, you know, proprio schools are seen as you know, these places that are producing Ivy league level education. And and you know, we don't really see the divide between Protestants and Catholics in the United States. The way we did in the early twentieth century at all in fact, you know, you really have been working together in many respects, you know, on various issues, whether political or otherwise I've seen some of the editorial cartoons as the late nineteenth century that would be considered even scandalous by today's standards ridiculing Catholics. And so, yeah, you're right. That this this seems to be a response to waves of immigrants, and and and customs which seem foreign to to to the majority but over time it does diminish at David beer at.

United States David beer Tom Brokaw Cato Institute David Tom Martino analyst Americans Ukraine Russia David Peterson David buyer Washington CNN Central America Facebook Puerto Ricans Embiid Bitta federal government
Trump suggesting China will 'take down' its trade barriers

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:54 min | 4 years ago

Trump suggesting China will 'take down' its trade barriers

"Day wbz accuweather forecast with meteorologist dean devore is it april or is we still back in february these temperatures are not warming up anytime soon maybe a shower sponsor to this afternoon more prevalent as you go north and west of the city sunny breaks around the city more clouds and temperatures chilly this afternoon the high getting up to fifty down to thirty six tonight maybe in the evening shower along the coast tomorrow not as chilly breezy partly sunny fifty four and then cold and rainy on thursday back into the forties all day and we stay in the forties with a shower leftover friday we try to creep in the low fifties with some sun at times this weekend i'm accuweather meteorologist divorce wbz newsradio ten thirty right now in new bedford it's cloudy and forty eight degrees in hyannis we've got sunny and fifty in beverly cloudy and forty six and it looks like right now we've got cloudy skies and forty four in bedford in boston it is forty six and cloudy wbz news time eleven twenty five now time for the bloomberg green business report a new study says global warming you screwing up nature's intricately timed dinner hour making hungry critters in those on the menu show up at different times timing is everything in nature bees have to be around and flowers after bloom at the same time for pollination to work predators need to migrate at the same time as prey but a global study says warmer temperatures are interfering with that it looks at the timing of eightyeight independence species finding they are moving out of sync by about six days a decade it notes that some payers are actually moving closer together but in general the relative timing events between species is now on average off by about twenty one days changes in species timing are greater than they were before the nineteen eighty s migrating humming birds that have adapted for a specific flower for example now miss bloom seabirds used to rear their chicks when fish were most abundant not so anymore the study appears in the proceedings of the national academy sciences that's the bloomberg green business report i'm bob moon.

Dean Devore Hyannis Beverly Cloudy Bedford Boston Bob Moon Accuweather Bloomberg Forty Eight Degrees Twenty One Days Six Days