18 Burst results for "National Academy Of Sciences"

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

04:23 min | 2 weeks ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Again of the importance of this and there's some that are just not gonna do it what we do. Yeah i'm still trying But you know when you look at the numbers. They're they're pretty depressing. So you know. Fewer than twenty percent of adolescents. In tennessee and alabama and mississippi sienna are vaccinated probably similar numbers and the rural counties up in up in east texas and young adults. Not much better maybe. Thirty forty percent so the vast majority are are unvaccinated. And you know. Unfortunately we've got a very aggressive. Anti vaccine machine out there that has now been adopted by conservative elements. I mean if you watch fox news or newsmax at night You're just seeing these regular anti vaccine rants and you saw that the cpac Conference a week or so ago. elected numbers of the us congress going against vaccines coming from the ultra conservative groups. So countering that it's tough because there it's there there's they're not tuning into other sources of information so i'm doing but i can't reach out to conservative groups. It doesn't have to be this way. I i don't know quite how all this happened. How you know the as. I often say the republican party was never an anti-science party Abraham lincoln started the national academy sciences. Eisenhower started nasa. George w bush started pep far. This is something kind of new and bizarre and hopefully we can Undea link it fairly soon of course when it comes to adolescence. This is more the purview of their parents determining whether or not they get vaccinated but as you said young adults so we're talking twenty and thirty. Somethings i imagine Their high percentage that are not of those there may be some that may not be anti vaccines in in any in any dramatic way. But who may say to themselves. I'm young and healthy. So i can. Just you know if i get covered. I'll probably be fine. What do you say that. But but there actually are linked because that is part of the disinformation has content and the content that's used and it's called weaponized. Health communication is the statement that. Hey if you're young and healthy go to the gym. You don't need to get the cove in nineteen backs and look at the death rates among young people like you. They're really low what they don't tell you is that you can still be hospitalized. And they don't tell you about the long-term neurologic effects From from long-haul covert and so there's deliberate omission in that in that information. So that's that's where we have to really hit home and get people to understand that. There's still quite risk. dr peter. Hotels is the dean of the national school of tropical medicine at baylor college of medicine. Dr houghton says thanks for the.

national academy sciences Undea sienna cpac mississippi fox news alabama tennessee George w bush Abraham lincoln texas Eisenhower republican party congress nasa us dr peter national school of tropical me
"national academy sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:05 min | 4 months ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

"South america somewhere anyway. They found evidence of genetic astro astro astro asian influence in more parts of south america. If you weren't aware that they had discovered any genetic early astro asian influence in south america. Apparently there was. I didn't even know about this study. Somehow i missed it as well back in two thousand fifteen researchers found with described as australasian influence in native people. Living in the amazon that would be people with genetic markers associated with the early populations of south asia australia and melanesia papers published in the proceedings. National academy sciences group now describes studying the next round. Study of genomic data set from multiple south american populations across the continent that are also showing this sign so theories that explain how the signal could have been introduced in the people living in south. America are tough considering. It has not been found in any early people. Living in north america current population theory is that north american and south america and north american south america populated by people migrating over from asia via siberia to alaska than waiting for glacial event to melt and it continuing down. And then populating. North america and south america although they might have kind of headed to south america coast quicker served top because while this is upheld by most of the evidence we have is perfect Human activity that we've seen in the americas is now this cave in mexico. That's thirty thousand years old. Our number of south american sites that are likely somewhere between thirty thousand year old age and then the oldest stuff in north america. So if you were just going to go off of no other information but the age of the site you would say started in. Mexico headed to south america and then moved to north america. Now the genetic information still is backing up. The transition from siberia to the americas. That's that's still the correct overriding but this experiment. That that they just involved collecting blood samples from native peoples. All across the mid section of south american continent connected the genetic analysis and all they studied samples from three hundred eighty three people including four hundred and thirty eight thousand plus markers than the genome that they were looking for. Research found the australasian marker and native people living their brazilian plateau in the center of the country and also those living in the western part of the country. The also found the signal from took tuna people in peru finding suggests migrations of people were far more widespread in south america than were thought. The findings also suggest that there were a couple of waves of such migration. This is led satistics scrutiny. Previous theories about how people got to south america. Some suggest though that this may be a problem because many lineages north america were wiped out by european colonial genocide. So we may not have a full picture of north american genome. And i don't know how much access we have to ancient genome because of some brady issues. That have taken place where we're not really allowed to do. A lot of analysis without a lot of express permission and that permission has been begrudging overtime. Look at ancient ovulation but it's for the most part We don't have a very good map of north american Yeah closer study though. They also think there's another says if we look at north american population the data that we do have. We should eventually find the signal there as well. Most enticing possibility is of course. The population of early people from australasia's somehow made their way all the way across civic directly to the shores of south america. Which is not supported by any other evidence at this point. Aside from the facts as genetic the genetic marker. Yeah that's a pretty good signal but it can't be ruled out because of that genetic marker so so yeah like. There's a lot of a lot of interesting questions that arrive. Arise for this. People have road across the indian ocean. Fake can mean. That's the other thing about it to riches wouldn't need to be that big of a.

North america australasia South america south america asia north america alaska north american Mexico mexico peru indian ocean America thirty thousand year siberia south asia australia four hundred and thirty eight two thousand fifteen researche thirty thousand years old americas
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

07:42 min | 9 months ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Or other conservative politicians? The trump administration is similar in many ways to the George W Bush administration. The George W Bush administration was also very aggressive in trying to control scientists trying to stack scientific. Panels with individuals who they thought held agendas that were similar to their own in other words, not drawing on the best scientific experts but trying on scientific experts who had shown an interest in being pro business or in George W Bush's case folks who were more socially conservative. So this is something that has certainly happened in the past, but I think that it is happening to a greater degree under the trump administration. And Philip notes, it's what is fueled. The previous partisan divides over climate science Republicans for the better part of a decade now has been as a party resistant to some of the science behind climate change in part because. So many of the industries that are responsible for some of the pollution turned to Republicans for their help in legislation and regulations in. In making it easier for them to do their energy and natural gas type work, and so the sort of anti climate science attitude has been pervasive in the Republican Party before trump but it seems to have been exacerbated during the trump presidency in part because the president has been so explicit about what he believes or or rather what he does not believe. Democrats by contrast have historically accepted climate change as a significant threat that's often meant regulations on industries and businesses which Republicans argue harms the economy and American workers. Despite trump's attitude towards science today, this administration is facing a real need for science and scientists specifically when it comes to developing a covid nineteen vaccine at unprecedented speed. The president continues to tout progress towards vaccine seemingly hanging some of his reelection bid on his ability to deliver one quickly. So has that scientific need tempered the administration's approach to D- staffing scientific organizations now that they need more scientists, are they reversing course? So to some extent. Yes. As the pandemic worsen, the trump administration has tried to play some catch up with respect to the status of science and his administration after an early period of ignoring scientists pleased to take over hundred seriously trump began whole public briefings on the topic reference that sometimes included public health experts like Dr Burks and Dr Fat Shape. And more important the trump administration launched the multibillion dollar operation warp speed, which is a public private partnership focused primarily on creating manufacturing and distributing covid vaccine by January twenty, twenty one trump even began to occasionally complement scientists in his public remarks, for example, one event said. Something like we have the best scientists in the world racing to develop a safe seen that will end this pandemic, and so this seems very different from the trump. I've described US where in this conversation given the public health disaster through trump has maybe realized how crucial scientists can be and is giving them a bit more credit. The said his interest in science at the moment is probably driven more by his. Reelection goals than improving public health. We've noticed that trump's praise for scientists turns to criticism if they expressed doubt that safe axiom can be made by the year's end and trump has pressured not only is FDA, but also drug companies CEOS to have vaccine available on a potentially unsafe timeline. So in the end that argue that this is not precise behavior, but rather further evidence of trump's constant Tennessee to politicize science. In other words to use it. Or to dismiss it when it suits his political purposes. Trump has embraced scientists in his support for a vaccine, but he's also repeatedly offered highly unlikely vaccine timelines and put pressure on federal regulators and pharmaceutical executives. Trump has touted unproven drugs and suggested questionable ways to treat covid nineteen and political appointees in the trump administration have even tried to change delay and prevent the release of CDC reports because they were viewed as undermining president trump's message that pandemic is under control I. Ask Liz, whether we've seen any areas where the trump administration has been good for Science So, we do see some advances the National Institutes of health their budget has actually increased. Thanks to Congress during the trump administration I know that there are certain efforts underway in some cases outside governments. That's kind of a backlash effect to the trump administration. So there's actually an effort going on between the National Academy Sciences and the National Science Foundation called Sean. So that stands for societal experts action network, and that is a really innovative new group that came about during the covert era that is basically trying to broker information between policymakers including policy makers at the state level and outside experts I think where we see Some advances actually is almost a backlash effect of experts who are so concerned about what's going on and are taken some initiatives sometimes within government often without and to hopefully those effects will yield benefits now and in the future. But at the end of the day, we really need to work on rebuilding the scientific capacity of our government. I think on the whole the trump administration has really hampered science within government, and that's not just my view over half of the members of the National Academy of Sciences have signed onto a letter that rebukes Donald Trump's denigration quote unquote denigration of scientific expertise. So there are lot of. Experts more broadly who think that he has unbalance. Really reduce the government scientific capacity. So where does this reduced government scientific capacity and an absence of shared reality about global pandemic? Where do all of these pieces leave the American People Philip says, it's contributing to the country's overall sense of polarization. The pandemic is interesting right? Because it's not a political issue necessarily and it's not something where there's like A. Red Side and a blue side to it. It's a virus that affects every American and all of our communities and it doesn't distinguish between Republicans, and Democrats in there's not sort of an ideological component here and yet trump has made it a partisan issue because of his rejection of the science and rejection of the expertise within the government, and you know that has put sort of a partisan political. Polarizing Lens on an issue that otherwise should be something that that all Americans have the same vantage point on and you have a sense of whether this is what trump voters want to see in a potential second term from the president, a continuation of this rejection specifically, climate science and this doubt cast on public health expertise is that what trump voters would expect or want in his second term? I think trump voters care about other issues much more for his second term they're motivated by his economic record and look he says and promises he will do for communities around the country in terms of jobs they're more motivated by this sort of general ethos of fighting against the machine against the establishment against the swamp in Washington, they're more motivated by what he has said about trying to. Restore a kind of nineteen fifties style, America, the climate science, and the pandemic scientists certainly part of.

Donald Trump George W Bush administration president George W Bush National Science Foundation National Academy of Sciences Republican Party National Institutes of health US Philip A. Red Side FDA Washington America Dr Burks National Academy Sciences
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

05:21 min | 11 months ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"So this is the punchline. Why was the medical director at Boston Public Health Commission and? A. Brooklyn sponsored events we are off the public health preparedness works very closely with partners within Boston. Metro by scenario including Brookline as well as state and federal partners on these preparedness activities. Sue it is important to note that The City of Boston have addressed vaccine preparedness in subscription. I think that the primary reason I was invited to speak about this is thinking about from a public health perspective when a scene is available, how be distributed? So this is something that on a HP thinks about honore on a regular basis, we create a flu season operations plan every year with a key objects which are two main such maintain ongoing, similar elation awareness for our city healthcare partners, the general public, and our and our the Metro Boston in statement in federal partners we also develop and implement an equal accede plan in order to reduce disease transmission. We provide timely inaccurate public health information on the flu and we coordinate incident command across the region that I mentioned so I recognize that I keep on talking about the flu. And Covert Nineteen pandemic is clearly the ramifications of. Pandemic and the flu or very different different that a typical flu season. But I wanted to mention all that background because city of certain. Again, a regional partners strong foundation an adjusting concerns of equity and prioritization when it comes to accede distribution in efforts to reduce the spread of infectious disease. So this includes strong partnerships and communication chains within our community again, with our state and regional partners, and so you know as we think about of vaccine development and how covid nineteen back seen. Will be distributed. We have to recognize that we do have an existing infrastructure in place. In which we could. Build, the foundation of a vaccine distribution. So when it comes specifically to go nineteen vaccine on, there are a couple of key points I wanted to mention So Dr Cy said it very eloquently, but just to repeat this vaccine is just one fool at our disposal through the spread of the disease face coverings social distancing frequent testing handwashing. These are all critical when it comes any respiratory illness there is no silver bullet that's gonNA solve our problem. So even when we do have a vaccine available, it is imperative that we utilize all the tools that we have. To Stop the spread of the disease including the vaccine is just one piece of a very large puzzle. And the second point I wanted to make about Kobe nineteen specifically that many of organizations including Center for Disease Control in the National Academies Science Medicine.

flu Boston Public Health Commissio Boston Center for Disease Control medical director Brookline Brooklyn Pandemic HP Dr Cy honore Kobe National Academies Science Med
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

06:07 min | 2 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Amanpour

"And next guest dr siddhartha mukherjee is a pulitzer prize winning author and an oncologist. He joined our walter isaacson to discuss the complicated complicated landscape of cancer care antibiotic revenue said welcome to the show. Thank you pam. You have a great piece in the new yorker and more scientific piece in the proceedings of the national academy science. Recently talking about modifying are white blood cells are immune system so that they can hunt down around kanter. Look correctly is a big new way of looking at cantor. It is a it's a profound new way of looking at cancer and the basis assists for this really dates back really almost a century so the centerpiece of all of this is that for a long time. We've been focused on the cancer so what's wrong with cancer. Genes are wrong with the cancer cell. Why does the cancer so proliferated divide etc etc but over a century ago. A second group of scientists are group researchers have group of doctors began to wonder well why not just worry about the cancer so why not why also about the environment government the home that the cancer about the patient the person the person in fact the tissue of the person because cancer is what's interesting about a cancer. Is i mean there's some some very basic questions. Why do some cancers only metastasized to some organs and not to other organs. Why does the breast cancer or lung cancer have a propensity to go to the bone. Why does myeloma which could live anywhere love to live inside the bone and the bone marrow why does leukemia living the bone unabomber so they're reasons and the reason has to do with interactions between the cancer and its micro environment the tissue or the home that the cancer bills around itself so what you're saying is you take our own immune system. That's right and it's called immunotherapy sometimes but now it's gone beyond that cause your gene editing our immune system system to actually hunt down the exact can't exactly so our work and other people's work involves using gene editing to change the micro environment of the host i either to activate the immune system and thereby kill the cancer or change the immune system of the host or the blood system of the host such as the cancer becomes visible is a boost the immune system so all of these fall under under large family of ideas which has to do with us whatever technology gene editing antibodies etc but concentrated not just on the cancer cell but on the home that it builds on itself on the tissues that occupies and asked the question. What is it about the host. What is it about the patient that is allowing the cancer to flourish you just talked about gene editing and they're really really two types of gene editing those that edit early stage embryo so that it's and inherited change in the gene and those that just try to do the body of the patient and a particular tissue which ones are using now so we are using exclusively gene editing hanging in cells that will never be transmitted to the next generation schaefer so donald safer. It's actually ethically permissible. We're working on an international national framework to figure out whether or not to and to what extent to make changes in sperm and egg cells and embryos those so-called germline cells that cells that will transmit information not just into you but in two generations to come you say that ethically problematic why after death logically problematic to change our genes so that our children will be healthier well. The question is whether that that is really the biggest biggest this question. Can you change jeeze. What circumstances can you change gene so that so that your children will be healthier well why not one idea which has become. I'm very clear is that there has to be disease. Extraordinary suffering involved but these arguments are going on right now. There are other ways that you can decide it due to treat some children so there other alternatives. The question of extraordinary suffering is is very important and perhaps the most important is that we don't know all the side effects the changing genes in the germline. We don't know exactly how accurate is it seems to be pretty accurate in pretty safe but we need lot experiments. We really need to kind of international agreement to figure out whether this is going to be permissible for missile and what should be in next case in china china have won robe doctor doing last november. It's right in russia right now. Career a doctor about to do three different cases just to cure congenital deafness in the germline. Why are you talking about creating this whole consensus when doctors have just go ahead and do it in some places well doctors are going to do it in some places they would do it in ways that are not that are not technically safe often and that will set back the field. I'd remind you of of what happened with gene therapy so in the one thousand nine hundred ninety s there was an attempt to do gene therapy on a young boy named jesse gal l. singer yeah in philadelphia in philadelphia right so and this seemed the experiments seemed relatively technically feasible it was moved through various various boards authorities to make sure that it was safe in fact what turned out was that the child died as a consequence of gene therapy but it set the the whole feedback by about ten years say it should only be used in cases of extraordinary suffering meaning editing of our genes our children and children's children why why not do it so that you could be taller or blonde or whatever you might wanna be blue eyed. I think the question of enhancement first of all is technically easy. It's a vast technical problem. People underestimate it's not as if i can insert or take gene away or editor jean from genome.

cancer dr siddhartha mukherjee walter isaacson pulitzer prize congenital deafness cantor kanter jesse gal editor philadelphia russia donald china ten years
"national academy sciences" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

13:56 min | 2 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Some pathology how early should be on so much. Much. I think usually. Somewhere between five and six. There are some parents that elect to start them a little bit earlier. And I think that's fine. As long as the blood test is done to see what the levels are because your body is hyper metabolic, and you're growing from a child to an adult. So your body's making cells in the most spectacular rate. I looked online to see what the average rate of cell division is, you know, how many cells are dividing every second just as a, you know, trivia comment, and I think the number was twenty nine with thirty zeroes after it. So twenty nine with thirty zero. I don't even know what that number would be divide every second when you're about fifteen. So when you get older, though, cells are not dividing in that number, and we see changes in all of our tissues because we're losing new cells, and we can't replace those. And as telomeres are snippet, you know, genetically we divide cells when we snip off the tips, the ends of our telomeres than we h faster as well. And of course, everybody knows if you smoke or drink too much alcohol, you do all the bad things. Then your body will age faster. Might offer suggestions one of your distinctions that you're an osteopathic physician. Yup. Explain to the public included. Jackie what osteopath osteopathic physicians and allopathic, MD physicians. Have the same exact licensed to practice in New York? It doesn't say Chris Calloway DO on my medical licenses says, Chris Kelsey, I'm licensed to practice medicine surgery. The state of New York, so every state has that when you like the idea of osteopathic medicine, which is the original holistic approach where doctors in this country, looking at the whole person, we're looking at underlying causes as opposed to trying to change or treat symptoms. We also invented the idea of using manipulation to help to correct dysfunction within your back in positioning, a rotation of your vertebrae. So there's a great deal of physical medicine and therapy that we do, and we learn, you know, even starting the first day of medical school. So for many osteopathic doctors we go into different types of residency. I'm going to medicine some going to practice some gun to Pedes OBGYN surgery, neurosurgery, Ortho. You can go into any residency you want because the entire country sees us both as equals we just have a little bit more of the knowledge in terms of hands on doing the manipulation. And we typically lean towards going into family medicine as opposed to going into surgical specialties. So if you look at all the deals in the country, they're the overwhelming number of deals the largest percent, go into family medicine, internal medicine has opposed to going into specially because we want to be more effective to more people in a variety of ways instead of becoming an ultra high specialized. Searchable field or even research. A lot of us. Don't really go into research because you know, our enjoyment is with patient interaction. You know day to day shaking your hand. Hi, how are you? Let's talk, you know. So I I always liked the idea. And that's why I went to osteopathic school. Hi, Dr Kalpana gift. Thank you, sir. Thank you so much once again, you've kind Burton always great to talk to you. Okay. Next. Caller, what eight hundred eight four eight WABC you can call in now. One eight hundred eighty eight nine to two Victor in freehold. How are you? Doc macaque say thank you very much for taking my call. Sure. I actually talked to you last week. It's me it gets me once again. Okay. Well, thank you for other cold. I got a question for you. I kinda horrify baby the other day 'cause I'm the one that has a chronic gastritis. Yeah. But also, I have I had dry and and dryness of the mouth. So right away. I you know, how we go on the computer. Yeah. For a lot of people. It's a dangerous thing because they think they have a hundred diseases that they probably don't have but dry dry mouth could be Shogren. It could be not immune mechanism. I imagine the gas tries for probably be slightly separate from that. Because the patients I've seen that have show grins when we test them don't necessarily have to have. The issues. With the stomach. Right. Right. I went to my primary physician day did a blood test. They did a shark grins anti called SS a essay Rohan. Yeah. Why nothing was like normal range. You know, it was normal. Does that specifically mean to I don't have it? Well, it means you're not showing antibodies for it. So not every disease when you present to the doctor, and he reviews your tests will be, you know, textbook opened the book. Here are all the normal blood tests, and they're all positive here all the symptoms and the role there. So the reason why for autoimmune disorders it takes a while to be able to. Make a diagnosis, and that could be a mess. You know, lupus rheumatoid variety of these things is because they don't show up with all the blood test positive anyone given point a person can have it, and it may take a while before those blood test markers or the auto immune markers are buddies start to show, and there are some people for example that have rheumatoid, but they're bloods negative. So the doctor obviously has to make his decision as always. Not based just on the blood test. But on the clinical presentation with the patient saying what they can see what they can feel they examine you. And of course, the testing I mean that holds true for a variety of different medical problems. And of course, lime disease is probably one of the most tricky because there are a lot of people have lime disease, but the blood test doesn't show it because the creature can be inside your cells and evade your antibodies. So. There has to be evaluated very very specific way. So what is there is there? Any other type, of course of adventure and done other causes for what the dryer the stomach. Dry and the dry mouth. Could be some people have issues with fillings near tea, or they have heavy metal exposure that can that can create the symptoms. Sometimes allergies will do that. Because your body is tired of trying to make some of those natural liquidity tears to help to flush away things that you might be allergic to. So there are a variety of other underlying causes and again for the stomach and kids would be food allergy it could be bacteria, virus, fungus, parasite, etc. Did you take the carves out of your diet to try to improve your stomach? Yeah. Yeah. I start definitely last week. Checking the cars and start try take take the carbs, the grains completely out. And then let us know what happens. Thank you so much for your call. Okay. Phone lines are open if you'd like to call in do. So now, let's go to Perry in Brooklyn. How are you? Great. It's another Bopper knowing your air palm. Vitamin C. And all these other accounting. Rubies are not what a scam. Well, no, well, I just told you guys before and you could look this up online, and you can prove him to be wrong. He obviously clearly has no experience in doing any of this. And he clearly hasn't taken courses, you know, from the American college of advancement in medicine or the American. Academy of anti-aging medicine. The proceedings of the National Academy of sciences, you could write this down. The preceding of the National Academy of sciences has terrific study on intravenous vitamin c helping to selectively kill cancer cells. So you could look that up online. He obviously has the scene that because he doesn't get online to look at those things if you even look at intravenous vitamin c studies and you put that into scholar dot Google. Okay. Which is all the medical research exists. There are there are four hundred nine thousand results of studies on high dose vitamin C IV coming from facilities all over the world. Now, I don't understand how a person who. And this is a doctor is actually a doctor. No because it's not fair. Home on the radio gone all the stages. Yeah. I mean, I still don't know who that is. And I don't know what his his experience or his training is. But you know, you anybody else can go to scholar dot Google dot com and just plugging introverted intravenous vitamin c and you'll see four hundred thousand nine results new insights to vitamin c from college review of high dose vitamin seen travec as an anticancer agent. You know, four hundred thousand four hundred thousand it's not something that well, maybe. Linus Pauling who had two unshared Nobel prizes was one of the most brilliant men of our time and certainly of all time, and he was a huge proponent of vitamin c he and you and Cameron started doing vitamin c research years and years ago, probably forty fifty sixty years ago. But you have to look at this information. And this is not just you know somewhere. Forgive me for people that might live in Timbuktu someone in Timbuktu said. Yeah, vitamin C is good. There are studies from the national health studies from the preceding the National Academy sciences. So, you know, I think realistically you have to look at a large body of information instead of just a small amount of information. This. Dr obviously does not do nutritional medicine. A cancer doctor or no. Can I bit therapy uses radio thirty while? Yeah. That's because he wants people to come in and spend twenty to thirty or forty thousand dollars on his treatment. So I I know who you're talking about. But he's the one anything to get into way of his radiotherapy. And poor pines never ever ever seen any of a work. It's not all I can tell you you can go and look at four hundred nine thousand articles studies four nine thousand. So he's protecting his ability to charge more money for treatment. So that's basically it. That's my opinion, you know, but I can show you and you could look online go online now, go to scholar dot Google dot com. And look at those studies on intravenous vitamin c. Nine thousand articles. I'm not gonna continue to go on and talk about what he says. He doesn't say you could read the info and make your mind up on your own. There are a lot of doctors that are traditional doctors who don't believe in anything beyond what they do. And in many cases, I think it's just wrong like the doctors who prescribed weight loss pills like doctors who might use drugs that have bad side effects. So, you know, I just believe in being dramatically safer. I believe in getting results. So and that individual doesn't have stage four cancer patients still alive after years after years as does Dr foresight than I've seen it. Years ago when I went to his first course there were seven hundred people that had spectacular survival with stage, four cancer, and he used a variety of things, including a blood test sent out to Greece to look at. What has the most effect on killing the cancer vitamin C IV's three times a week? And then the intravenous twice a week with a little bit of insulin to lower the blood sugar opened up cancer cells and put an either vitamins some of the lowest dose of chemo. It's called instantly temptation therapy. And he's got the greatest cancer results in the world. So no one's better than Forsyth. Okay. Let's go to our next caller. Let's go to Gerald in Cleveland. Hi, how are you? Great. Yeah. I'm looking in my catalog about vitamin d. Doctorate one Packers track. Fifteen thousand dollars once. Sure. Would probably be allowed to take at once. I mean, most of our patients when we check their blood and even ones who are low in vitamin c we give them five thousand units and reject him to make sure they're in the right ranges, obviously, it's d three. Okay. So ideally, you know, the vitamin d three is the one you want to have, you know, in your body at good levels throughout the course of the entire day. So that's why we'll test will put people on recommendations and retested adjust accordingly because some big studies in Europe that have been running for twelve years or more talk about vitamin d decreasing the risk of cancers by a great deal by seventy seven percent. So for me three. Three d three's. The best..

National Academy of sciences gastritis Chris Calloway freehold New York Chris Kelsey Europe Packers WABC Forsyth Burton Shogren Cleveland Linus Pauling
"national academy sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

"It's going to be cheaper. It's become more efficient technology is overcoming the traditional mining and transport and refining operations. Well, I think part of the reason that infrastructure might get pushed forward is that companies want it, which is part of it. Right. Given. This is the loop. Right. So this is part of companies recognizing that resiliency in the market is about being carbon smart, if it's because it's cheaper that might be why that's kind of what this is talking about. So it's kind of circling around the same point here. And that is this article, we are this article is saying that it will be the smart business decision of the future to be more carbon-neutral period. I'm not saying that I'm saying that the only choice in the future will be carbon smart, and it will not be up to those who are using the energy at all. They'll just I mean that tomato will still come from Mexico, and it'll still be cheaper. But it will be on the come in here on a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, and that's the only difference and to the actual end price of that tomato. It will still be the difference than it is now. Then you have to move on. But I would argue. Mexico could become the SUV our economic hide and America could be doing all the labor for Mexico. What you'd be an end? We were like we build a wall that we can get over there and get the good jobs like this could happen to but. Just I think there's a there's a there's a there's a hump to get over on all of these things where the for a split amount of time for whatever it is. It will cost slightly more to do the greener thing for whoever it is. That's that was yesterday. I don't think we're not for all things. We're not yet. It's coming, but that's still a fiscal decision that somebody somebody has to make volumes. It's cheaper regardless. I don't think it because. It can't be it won't immediately. There's always a hump where you're changing infrastructure where things are more expensive. Well, okay. So so to that point, you're right. And to that point I think if you're an established large international trucking company, you may not make that jump just yet. So there is a mechanism of reinvents Harmon intensive company, but I don't think that I think it's a dollar intensive company. And I think it's the dollar that drives it, and it's not going to have. I mean, you will have companies come out and tell you, hey, for the love of carbon reduction, we did this completely transformative thing where we have all electric big rigs from tesla. Okay. We do this for the carbon footprint that sounds great to the public. But they also realize we don't have to do oil changes. We don't have articles about. Marvan's as everything to do dollars. And that I'm saying that's going to that's going to be the thing that does is cheaper better more fish, whether you believe it or not you're saying the same thing that the article said, okay moving on mechanism Yeston. What did you bring? Oh, it's. I have. This is I should have been ready for this transition better. Because now the awkward. Joe Joe monkeys life for me. DNA of an extinct monkey called zero three six as been sequenced revealing that it was most closely related to South America's team monkeys. But this monkey this. This zero three is no ordinary DT monkey first of all it was not found in South America. But it is rare primate of the Caribbean. This the Yoho go stuff in the beginning. Destroy thought to have taken to the seas in search of adventure eleven million years ago, or maybe washed out to sea doing some sort of terrible storm remain such monkeys onto floating vegetation long enough to land in Jamaica. Then the interesting morphological auditees. This. I'm like any other monkey in the world zero three was a slow moving tweed tree dweller relatively few teeth. It had leg bones that made it look closer to rodents leg boats. Unusual parents made it difficult for scientists to work out where it came from what it was related to how it might have evolved. Plus it's extinct, so they have or some bones. They found in a cave in Jamaica. So research published recently in the proceedings National Academy sciences carried out by experts from international conservation charity. That's these logical society of London and London's natural history museum as well. As the American Museum of natural history in New York pretty much everybody..

Mexico South America Jamaica London Harmon intensive company American Museum of natural National Academy sciences Joe Joe Caribbean tesla New York Marvan Yoho America eleven million years
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The things I was reading in in a in science daily, a more more Rama. They were going to call it wrong. But what they call that long fin or that long. Needle like asteroid, comet whatever it was. Scientists were tracking it President Trump was aware of it. And after hearing about the remote possibility of this elongated object being an alien spacecraft. He started pushing harder for the establishment of the space force. After we were informed that the Pentagon was investigated threat assessment, but identified flying objects a meeting was called by the National Academy sciences committee on Astro biology science strategy for the search of life in the universe. The meeting was held at the university of California Irvine. This citing prompted a meeting this all of this prompted a meeting. Okay. And it was this meeting. It was it was where Jill Tarter the woman who was interested in a more and more and it and it's moving through space. She's one of the world's best known leaders in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. She stated that SETI the search for extraterrestrial intelligence should change its name. And what tartar said she she explained that the search for extraterrestrial intelligence generates an incorrect. Perception of what scientists in this field of study, we're actually doing she said a more appropriate title for the field. She said would be the search for techno signatures or signs of technology created by intelligent alien civilizations. Now to me has been the secretly these scientists who scant space space singles Russian treachery civilizations may have some of the pawn something that may be a signal from an extraterrestrial technology rather than direct conversations between biological entities. Amoah sent a signal a more Moore was an alien spacecraft. They didn't tell us, but it was enough to prompt meetings. It was enough to get President Trump to consider the space force. It was enough to release the information about the threat assessment of UFO's. That one little sighting of his big one hundred foot long, whatever it was scientists.

tartar Trump President Jill Tarter university of California Irvin Pentagon National Academy sciences UFO Amoah Moore one hundred foot
"national academy sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Don't sexual harassment that's a topic we've been dealing with who's the last person they just got bounced the ceo which organization jen who was just bounced from major fortune five hundred company why because i love this because there was a consensual relation consensual sexual tryst if you will will over a course i think of months decades ago and they intel in the ceo of intel why because there was a frat fraternisation ban and they violated and he's out i mean the ceo of intel for stooping someone decades ago consensually man has it gotten crazy so obviously you have a whole bunch of people looking at what sexual harassment is in the workplace whose fault it is a major study just came out from the national academies science engineering medicine and stooping at work didn't know that you have that organization did you and looked at sexual harassment within organization and identified the strongest predictor of such behavior does it have to do with the harvey weinstein's of the world the matt lowers the bill cosby's who of course their their actions were grievous beyond agreement.

harassment ceo jen intel harvey weinstein bill cosby
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"Though you're saying you already had good reason to believe that there was something special about it other than it just being very far away we'll absolutely in the eighties nineties we discovered is an atmosphere that is complex surface composition that it has a it's a double planet with a giant moon half its own size in the two thousands we discovered pluto has additional satellites that its surface markings are changing with time meaning that the things are moving around on the surface we had a pretty good inkling going in this would be something special it turned out to be something spectacular so when the kuyper belt became apparent knife than now correct me if i'm wrong but that was a fairly recent discovery of all the world's in the kuyper belt did it make pluto seem like just one object among a flurry of similar objects no quite the contrary promoted in the is the planetary science community in in fact tire national academies sciences ranked the exploration of auto as the number one priority for funding in planetary exploration for the two thousands so this isn't just my opinion is opinion of of the national academy of science you compared it to the mission to pluto you compared to like conquering mount everest so what was it then that called you to pluto specifically i mean you personally because i know from the book that you had been thinking about it for decades before this actually got started was there like a single scientific question that you wanted answered or was it something more about the romance of going to this place well it was both those things you know i'm a i'm an explorer at heart but i'm also a science scientists by a by training in profession in pluto is a whole package you know it was a seductive scientifically in what it offered us still learn about this new class of planets and in addition being the farthest world that had never been explored the very frontier of our solar system.

kuyper belt national academy of science mount everest
"national academy sciences" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"All the questions in controversies that people have about nutrition i love that i cannot wait to read it and i love to talk a little bit about food politics too because i know you've done research here as well and i get a lot of comments from readers who essentially think that really the government has our best interests at heart and they're like no this is against the government's recommendations so how to our current food policies kind of support this confusion and this the system we have government the right head left hand's doing so they often making conflicting advice so a lot of our dietary policies are driven off of the dietary guidelines in there a little bit corrupt on the national academy sciences was mandated by congress to actually review how the guidelines were developed and they put a report out in i think this hock tober november which is online you can work it up type in national academy of sciences dietary guidelines and they basically when you sift through it all basically said look the committee members are in in cahoots with food industry they're getting paid by them they're not exactly independent sciencebased recommendations in the second they said was they ignored huge amounts of data on things that that contradict what their guidelines are for example on saturated fat they completely contradict themselves so it's very difficult for the average person to understand what to eat if even our own government is not providing science based guidelines the second thing is a lot of our policies are at odds with each other in one hand you know we tell people to cut back on sugar another hand where paying for commodities to be produced like corn syrup in we'd flour and soybean oil through our subsidies that are turned into junk food which then we pay for with food stamp programs which seven billion dollars worth is basically spent on soda that's twenty billion servings a year for the poor's that the government's paying for on the back end we're paying for medicare and medicaid so he literally tax payers pay three times to support the.

national academy sciences congress medicare national academy of sciences medicaid seven billion dollars one hand
"national academy sciences" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Day wbz accuweather forecast with meteorologist dean devore is it april or is we still back in february these temperatures are not warming up anytime soon maybe a shower sponsor to this afternoon more prevalent as you go north and west of the city sunny breaks around the city more clouds and temperatures chilly this afternoon the high getting up to fifty down to thirty six tonight maybe in the evening shower along the coast tomorrow not as chilly breezy partly sunny fifty four and then cold and rainy on thursday back into the forties all day and we stay in the forties with a shower leftover friday we try to creep in the low fifties with some sun at times this weekend i'm accuweather meteorologist divorce wbz newsradio ten thirty right now in new bedford it's cloudy and forty eight degrees in hyannis we've got sunny and fifty in beverly cloudy and forty six and it looks like right now we've got cloudy skies and forty four in bedford in boston it is forty six and cloudy wbz news time eleven twenty five now time for the bloomberg green business report a new study says global warming you screwing up nature's intricately timed dinner hour making hungry critters in those on the menu show up at different times timing is everything in nature bees have to be around and flowers after bloom at the same time for pollination to work predators need to migrate at the same time as prey but a global study says warmer temperatures are interfering with that it looks at the timing of eightyeight independence species finding they are moving out of sync by about six days a decade it notes that some payers are actually moving closer together but in general the relative timing events between species is now on average off by about twenty one days changes in species timing are greater than they were before the nineteen eighty s migrating humming birds that have adapted for a specific flower for example now miss bloom seabirds used to rear their chicks when fish were most abundant not so anymore the study appears in the proceedings of the national academy sciences that's the bloomberg green business report i'm bob moon.

dean devore hyannis beverly cloudy bedford boston bob moon accuweather bloomberg forty eight degrees twenty one days six days
Trump suggesting China will 'take down' its trade barriers

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:54 min | 3 years ago

Trump suggesting China will 'take down' its trade barriers

"Day wbz accuweather forecast with meteorologist dean devore is it april or is we still back in february these temperatures are not warming up anytime soon maybe a shower sponsor to this afternoon more prevalent as you go north and west of the city sunny breaks around the city more clouds and temperatures chilly this afternoon the high getting up to fifty down to thirty six tonight maybe in the evening shower along the coast tomorrow not as chilly breezy partly sunny fifty four and then cold and rainy on thursday back into the forties all day and we stay in the forties with a shower leftover friday we try to creep in the low fifties with some sun at times this weekend i'm accuweather meteorologist divorce wbz newsradio ten thirty right now in new bedford it's cloudy and forty eight degrees in hyannis we've got sunny and fifty in beverly cloudy and forty six and it looks like right now we've got cloudy skies and forty four in bedford in boston it is forty six and cloudy wbz news time eleven twenty five now time for the bloomberg green business report a new study says global warming you screwing up nature's intricately timed dinner hour making hungry critters in those on the menu show up at different times timing is everything in nature bees have to be around and flowers after bloom at the same time for pollination to work predators need to migrate at the same time as prey but a global study says warmer temperatures are interfering with that it looks at the timing of eightyeight independence species finding they are moving out of sync by about six days a decade it notes that some payers are actually moving closer together but in general the relative timing events between species is now on average off by about twenty one days changes in species timing are greater than they were before the nineteen eighty s migrating humming birds that have adapted for a specific flower for example now miss bloom seabirds used to rear their chicks when fish were most abundant not so anymore the study appears in the proceedings of the national academy sciences that's the bloomberg green business report i'm bob moon.

Dean Devore Hyannis Beverly Cloudy Bedford Boston Bob Moon Accuweather Bloomberg Forty Eight Degrees Twenty One Days Six Days
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Back to world the national headlines back to nathan hager in our bloomberg 991 newsroom in washington dc nathan ari carol thanks stole no time or place set for president trump's planned facetoface with north korean leader kim jong on but white house spokeswoman sarah sanders says there's no reason to think the meetings not going to happen we fully we expect that it will the offer was made and we've accepted north korea made several promises and if that we hope that they with stick to those promises and if so the meeting will go on as planned wrapping up his tour of africa today secretary of state rex tillerson said the us hasn't heard directly back from north korea about the invitation but he says he does expect to hear from them soon white house is also steering clear of criticizing china for removing term limits on president xi jinping sender says it's a determination for china to make not something for the us to weigh in on in the past presidential administrations have criticized china for its record on democratic suppression and human rights acting nasa administrator robert lightfoot plans to retire at the end of next month as his agency continues to try to pivot back to human space flight or that a half decade after retiring the space shuttle lightfoot has served as interim nasa director since january of last year when charles bolden resigned at the end of the obama administration president trump's nominee to head the space agency oklahoma congressman jim breitenstein has been locked in a partisan fight in the senate living through the great recession raised our collective brought blood pressure it's not me saying that it's the conclusion of a new study out today in the proceedings of the national academy science has looked at large data sets for before and after the economic meltdown and found significantly higher blood pressure and blood sugar levels among american adults global news powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries this is bloomberg thanks nathan now with.

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Malaysia then planet labs now planet planet is making satellites that look like loaves of bread and you launch them up into space we invest right before they did the first launch and then they did thirty one satellite sitting in the first launch now we've got about two hundred plus that are circulating there earth its largest constellation of earth imaging satellite in history and it's amazing so from this crazy idea in meta materials it leads to this company with bill gates which leads to an insight in a boardroom that sends us on a hunt to san francisco we fund the satellite guys and then we get the insight which exactly what you just said orbital insight which was an entrepreneur who said over time some of these images might become commodity and the real value is going to be doing the temporal analytical at analysis that you can say okay here's parking lots or here's the shadows cast on oil tankers as a proxy for their carryingcapacity or here's a caravan of trucks in china or are they going to a ghost town residential facility are they going to a productive chemical facility and that information was legal espionage that was valuable to corporations to governments her trousers and so we fund this guy jimmy crawford jimmy's amazing bill the ai for the morris rover brand google books went to climate corporate celta monsanto for billions so us and sequoia fund him bloomberg and will come in and none of that a priority was noble something that started literally reading scientific publication in proceedings the national academy science or science or nature that leads to bill gates that leads to planet labs at least orbital another example like that my partner chicane who is psychotically obsessed with cars i hate driving my wife we have a car she loves driving for me it's an anchor it's just the time right we talk about allocation of time in cash to spend attention on a road i cannot wait for yourself drug ha i mean this is the faster that it comes right the more time i have to read and talking of it so shahin is obsessed with cars and we're following all the stuff that's going on early in autonomous vehicles from gugel an uber and tesla and he finds these two guys and these two guys claim that they're gonna you know take on this market on we think the.

china Malaysia san francisco jimmy crawford morris rover google sequoia bloomberg partner shahin tesla
"national academy sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Malaysia then planet labs now planet planet is making satellites that look like loaves of bread and you launch them up into space we invest right before they did the first launch and then they did thirty one satellite sitting in the first launch now we've got about two hundred plus that are circulating there earth its largest constellation of earth imaging satellite in history and it's amazing so from this crazy idea in meta materials it leads to this company with bill gates which leads to an insight in a boardroom that sends us on a hunt to san francisco we fund the satellite guys and then we get the insight which exactly what you just said orbital insight which was an entrepreneur who said over time some of these images might become commodity and the real value is going to be doing the temporal analytical at analysis that you can say okay here's parking lots or here's the shadows cast on oil tankers as a proxy for their carryingcapacity or here's a caravan of trucks in china or are they going to a ghost town residential facility are they going to a productive chemical facility and that information was legal espionage that was valuable to corporations to governments her trousers and so we fund this guy jimmy crawford jimmy's amazing bill the ai for the morris rover brand google books went to climate corporate celta monsanto for billions so us and sequoia fund him bloomberg and will come in and none of that a priority was noble something that started literally reading scientific publication in proceedings the national academy science or science or nature that leads to bill gates that leads to planet labs at least orbital another example like that my partner chicane who is psychotically obsessed with cars i hate driving my wife we have a car she loves driving for me it's an anchor it's just the time right we talk about allocation of time in cash to spend attention on a road i cannot wait for yourself drug ha i mean this is the faster that it comes right the more time i have to read and talking of it so shahin is obsessed with cars and we're following all the stuff that's going on early in autonomous vehicles from gugel an uber and tesla and he finds these two guys and these two guys claim that they're gonna you know take on this market on we think the.

china Malaysia san francisco jimmy crawford morris rover google sequoia bloomberg partner shahin tesla
"national academy sciences" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Issues paul raised earlier a bad agent orange and the fact that agent orange along with unexploded ordinance our lasting legacy of the war one of the question errors ask devout what happened then and what people are doing today and i just want to mention again we know that there are thousands of veterans who suffered the after effects of having been exposed to agent orange dioxin and that the veterans administration compensates them we also now through the work that paul on i do with our vietnamese colleagues that there has been relatively little recognition if anything spanned to heal the wounds of wounds of war on the part of the vietnamese either to recognize that they suffer from these continuing illness the war or they can their land continues to explode with the unexploded ordinance even forgive me i know that these are this has gone on for generations now i mean onto the unted the different generations beyond those who were in vietnam at the time as far as the agent orange catastrophe it has and there are young adults who paul and i work with from the children of vietnam veterans health alliance who have organiz because they're dad's served in vietnam in these young people were born with birth defects as the reason all their father's exposure so and again just young know just quickly to talk about agent orange there are eighteen hours that the parents document hurry there are maybe three or four sentences about agent orange and there is a statement in there that after decades of study they still can't show the correlation between the thanks freight by agent orange and health effects and i just wanna remind the listeners that dares institute of medicine the national academies science there are thousands of studies that have been done that identify the deleterious health effects both on the people who is freight directly as well as on their children it's important for us to understand dan that we have responsibilities both to take care of our veterans who have fought in the wars as well to take care of those who we have harmed this legacy continues fifty years after the end and i would just suggest that burns and novik put an addition on their ten th episode that says yes we have this response civility and people still remain hurt and devastated with their.

vietnam dan novik paul institute of medicine eighteen hours fifty years
"national academy sciences" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:52 min | 4 years ago

"national academy sciences" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Out after tilted lpd how many of you suffer from gains wallet says six hundred fifty billion dollar industry what to do and not to do to deal with the pain our regular contributor to the broadcast curt hendrix soho really big is occurred because nobody feels good whether a vein right the yeah the institute of medicine of which is a division of the national academy science that there are one hundred million americans suffer which chronic brain so you know whether you're esnard of marietta thing driving back eightyard elections cancer lurd ghannage why on earth an ords daily wrote the guy that people are taking eager prescription and overthecounter drugs drought them their look at paint because and art and you want to get rid of it but the opioid drug y bike the kotan a much there are no option jerebko so bad of nothing out as well but you know he argued that the paid nuclear active league controlled issued a state burglary of the version saying stop prescribed your crowds as frequently do the work of car greater than the benefits for most people and we need to take these steps to combat the epidemic of prescribing me painkillers so if you're on those painkillers but things retaliate today along with dr can help you get all of them took a shock me forty people day guy from those prescription painkillers along so information is so important and information are people who uh an open mine an wailing look at option and hopefully we present died kind of inflammation so some of your made me saying well chronic pain but i'd gone pay occupy goldiner opiates or but i get her about your live on one of the over the crowd preparing well i'm sorry they're not much better when you take them by other group they are associated with kidney damage grow art of sudden cardiac arrest they rigged maria meeting the rhythm of the art yet out of whack on things like atrial fibrillation or your atri of y'all gone nuts syria gave maria actual of court liver damage and bring us up to speed on some natural remedies kurt that one can take to alleviate some of the discomfort particularly as it relates to chronic conveys of paying a natural ingredients that have been shown to be helpful for reducing the ability to appeal pain and door reducing information blitz almost always accompany a the.

burglary painkillers kidney damage syria maria liver damage curt hendrix institute of medicine marietta kurt six hundred fifty billion doll