35 Burst results for "National Academy"

Archaeologist Steven Collins on the Event That Took Civilization Offline for 7 Centuries

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Archaeologist Steven Collins on the Event That Took Civilization Offline for 7 Centuries

"Was talking to my wife about this yesterday. dot coms. I said you know it's a funny thing because you're just the archaeologist. You find this stuff and then you have to turn over your findings to every kind of scientists many hostile to the fundamental idea. Evidently they seem to think what you and. I seem to think which is maybe the biggest headline of all. Yeah early in the dig when we started discovering all this kind of anomalous melted material stuff that looks like it had been exposed to rather high heat index. What do i do with that. I'm an archaeologist. I know how to dig dirt. I know how to recognize strata. I'm an expert on ancient pottery. All of that stuff. That goes with archaeology. But i'm not a physicist. I'm not an astrophysicist. I'm not kim. Mr a geologist so all that stuff had to be turned over to scientists who know what they're doing with that sort of thing and it actually wind wound up in the hands of a team of scientists. Call the the comment. Research group r. g. who has their well published in all kinds of scientific journals including the proceedings of the national academy of sciences. And now of course. Nature scientific reports on this particular paper that they wrote but they've been involved six or seven years in this analytical phase of the destruction layer for the middle bronze age at tall hamam which associates with the time of abraham and this particular layer had all kinds of indicators that they call them proxies of what's called media riddick or cosmic bowling airburst event that exploded over. Just the the side of a mom but exploded over the entire plane of the jordan were the cities of the plain. The cities of the car in genesis are located and it absolutely took civilization off line in that area for about seven centuries

KIM National Academy Of Sciences MR Abraham Bowling Jordan
How to Cultivate a Strategic Mindset to Accomplish Anything

The $100 MBA Show

02:09 min | Last month

How to Cultivate a Strategic Mindset to Accomplish Anything

"Today's guest teacher. Hanukkah antonelli was born in south africa and has become an accomplished author and award winning life coach with her sixteen years of experience. She's been helping people up level their lives so much so she launched a new book called the up level project. But guess what she's here today to teach you how to change your mindset. How to think more strategically so that you can cut through the fluff in the fog in your head and actually accomplish the things you set out to do. I'm gonna pass that onto hanukkah. But i'll be back to wrap up today's episode. Give my takeaways but for now. Take away hanukkah. Hi there everyone. I am hanukkah and thank you so much for joining me today. I am going to be teaching you how to cultivate a strategic mindset to achieve success and accomplish anything. You want and. I'm going to be doing that today by teaching you. An easy and scientifically backed formula. That will help you to step into a more strategic mindset. So let's get down to business so first off. You may be going to yourself okay. So why is it so important for me to step into a strategic mindset. Well this science now proves according to articles that were published on science daily dot com and proceedings of the national academy of sciences that the reason why successful people are so exit successful is because they are more strategic these sources also go on to mention that it's possible for anyone to shift into a strategic mindset and i know this to be true through my work in my business. Coaching practice where i work with multiple six to seven figure entrepreneurs to help them to step into that strategic mindset. And so now you're gonna go okay. So how do you do that. Hanukkah and the way i do that is by helping entrepreneurs to understand how their mind works

Hanukkah Antonelli South Africa National Academy Of Sciences
Former CIA Officer Details "Havana Syndrome" He Suffered Overseas

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:07 min | 4 months ago

Former CIA Officer Details "Havana Syndrome" He Suffered Overseas

"News has learned. The U. S government is now fast tracking sensor technology to detect the cause of a mysterious illness, known as Havana syndrome, sometimes debilitating condition has affected American diplomats and other personnel overseas. CBS chief investigative correspondent Catherine Herridge spoke with former CIA officer Mark Parliament. Uh uh, Palamar opus who came down with the symptoms while living in a Moscow hotel. Venus syndrome is the name given to a mysterious neurological condition, first reported by State Department personnel in Cuba five years ago who experienced a similar set of symptoms. Pressure in the head. Yes, Loss of balance. Yes, ringing In the years. I've had a headache for three years. It feels like a vise clamp down here And then there's pressure that comes over the top of my head. Mark says. It took three years to get help. At the Walter Reed military Hospital. They diagnosed me with a traumatic brain injury. The national Academies of Sciences recently found the most plausible explanation was post radio frequency energy.

U. S Government Catherine Herridge Mark Parliament Havana CBS CIA Moscow State Department Cuba Walter Reed Military Hospital Headache National Academies Of Sciences Mark
"national academy" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:56 min | 4 months ago

"national academy" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"The barbara starr field wrote about so extensively in terms of continuity in longitude analogy There's attention that having teams in having relationship but but there are good models for managing both. Let me let me stay with us. team based launched to know relational. And that's that gets at this issue of the therapeutic relationship and while that has a long history Or recognizing the benefit of the therapy has a long history. I'm sure while aware that healthcare is really gone retail It's transactional in fact. I think you actually say use the word transactional somewhere in the reported. Though i i'd be hard pressed report just to notice about three hundred and fifty plus pages what. What's your hope that we could try to fight the tide here on a in the healthcare industry becoming again more and more of a retail mall a transactional model and try to restore or try to reestablish these relationships where there is a therapeutic genuine therapeutic relationship. I think there's good evidence that patients wanted relationship. Therapeutic relationship is central to trust and there's good evidence from more than twenty years ago about that and trust in itself is is so important for helping patients change behaviors except treatments A variety of things so fighting tied it could be Or we choose to differently and move back in that direction. I think some of the transactional Movement has partly been spurred by patients have given up. They've given up on finding those kinds of relationships for younger people. It's not giving up its Realized how valuable they are yet but even in my even in my own practice i have. I have patients who. When i see the first time that often the first question is are you going to be around for awhile and will you be my doctor right Because there have there they struggled to find it right and you do. The volume does make mention of and we see this through through these these various termed minute clinics these kiosks. Sort of care models So that's where it's it's most obvious. Let me. I would like to spend some time on on a quality. This is obviously a critical issue in an all healthcare. This chapter every primary care measures and use powerful simple accessible or countable rather Let me just ask you generally to explain where the committee came out and what its recommendations were relative to measuring.

both first question barbara starr field more than twenty years ago first time about three hundred and fifty
EcoHealth Alliance's Peter Daszak Linked to Dual Research Creating Potential Bioweapons

The Dan Bongino Show

01:36 min | 4 months ago

EcoHealth Alliance's Peter Daszak Linked to Dual Research Creating Potential Bioweapons

"We covered on Friday, but we have to recover again. What if I told you that entities within the United States government responsible for developing intelligence seems ironic at this point, some of them That they were taking advice and were being briefed by people who had what appears to be a vested interest in making the potential lab leak potential bioweapon theory go away. Wouldn't that sound like a conflict of interest conflict of interest? From the New York Post piece. Looks like the National Academy of Sciences had a meeting in February of 2020. Right around the same time the Chinese appear to be developing a vaccine for the coronavirus. They claim they didn't know anything about. Hey, it came from a pangolin. We were just doing research there. In this meeting. The detainee was there. The FBI Along with our in our H and HHS. Who was invited to brief them. Our intelligence community as they're trying to find out the origins of this Eco Health Alliance President Peter Dash AC who has worked with that woman, Chinese virologist Zhang Lei for more than 15 years. Eco health has funded projects at the Wuhan Institute of Virology, which with cash from the U. S government agencies. So just to be clear. We have a guy Peter Dash Act with this eco health alliance who we already know the ego Health Alliance been giving money to this Wuhan Institute that we believe now may have been involved in dual research, creating potential bio weapons to wipe us out and our intelligence community is getting briefings from one of the guys involved with this eco health alliance that sounds like that's a

Peter Dash United States Government Eco Health Alliance New York Post National Academy Of Sciences Zhang Lei Wuhan Institute Of Virology U. S Government HHS FBI Ego Health Alliance Wuhan Institute
Companies Can Make Employees Take COVID-19 Vaccine

Purity Products

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Companies Can Make Employees Take COVID-19 Vaccine

"Employment Commission is confirming the legality of businesses requiring employees to be vaccinated since there's no federal law, specifically addressing the issue. U. S companies may require their employees get the cove in 19 shot, workers can opt out of the vaccine and still keep their jobs by claiming medical or religious exemptions. The National Academy for State Health Policy, says state lawmakers have introduced dozens of proposals, making it harder for employees to require vaccination from employees with more than

Employment Commission National Academy For State Hea
Cyber Influence and Misinformation  a Growing Threat in Cyber Space

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

02:06 min | 5 months ago

Cyber Influence and Misinformation a Growing Threat in Cyber Space

"Stop. The lynn is a senior research fellow at the center for international security and operation and the hanke j. colin fellow in cyber policy and security hoover institute and also a fellow of the american association for the advancement of flying's he's also the scientists america. This computer science and communications bought national research council of the national academy so lynn. Thank you so much for your time today. Bigger telling you know when we talk about cybersecurity and cyber threats and we touch on the white range of topics we talk about heke data breaches privacy breaches and we also talk about cyberbullying social engineering and information operations in cyberspace so it's quite ranging so. We're very glad that you can spend thirty minute with us today. To give us your perspectives from one angle given your experience in the technical area as whereas decades of advising on type of policy for two so far today. I thought we can talk about you. Want to nominate on that is increasing attracting much attention which is misinformation is inflammation. So the first question about misinformation is. It's not new. Right is something that we have seen throughout history. We know about you. Sections distractions misdirections and many of us in cybersecurity also know about trojans and which cost based on the famous story of deception. So what really is new with information because we think the be that is getting so much attention and escalating into some sort of information warfare. Is it because events like the pandemic election providing for the ground foucault mistrust. All we just playing catch up. There's many questions to ask so. Let me just unpack a little bit to aggregate some. What you said one thing is that there's what's new the you're quite correct that what's going on with information warfare on has been going on for a very very long time thousands of years.

Center For International Secur Hoover Institute American Association For The A National Research Council Of T Lynn Colin America Trojans
Science panel: Consider air cooling tech as climate back-up

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 7 months ago

Science panel: Consider air cooling tech as climate back-up

"Scientists are saying the U. S. needs to consider a climate change emergency plan cooling the air with technology the National Academy of sciences report mentions three possibilities putting heat reflecting particles in the stratosphere changing the brightness of ocean clouds and finning high clouds he doesn't recommend using solar engineering but says the U. S. should study the much debated idea to find out if it works what the potential side effects might be and the ethics of it one of the report's authors says climate engineering is a really dumb idea but it might not be as dumb as doing nothing at this point we're continuing to do what we've been doing and Thomas Washington

National Academy Of Sciences U. Thomas Washington
Nothing to sneeze at: Global warming triggers earlier pollen

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 8 months ago

Nothing to sneeze at: Global warming triggers earlier pollen

"There is bad news for allergy sufferers a new study finds that pollen season is coming earlier and hitting harder and it's all due to global warming Monday's research is the first to use accepted scientific methods to attribute worsening allergies in the country directly to human caused climate change the big takeaway since nineteen ninety pollen season has started about twenty days earlier in the U. S. and Canada and pollen loads or twenty one percent higher doctor Stanley Feynman is an allergist in Atlanta years ago I would tell patients to start their preventive therapy around St Patrick's day so now I'm telling them to start and Valentine's day this study appeared in Monday's journal proceedings of the National Academy of sciences actually after

Allergy Sufferers Stanley Feynman U. Canada St Patrick Atlanta Valentine National Academy Of Sciences
It Turns Out Those 'Sonic' Attacks On U.S. Diplomats In 2017 Might've Been Microwave Attacks

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:59 min | 11 months ago

It Turns Out Those 'Sonic' Attacks On U.S. Diplomats In 2017 Might've Been Microwave Attacks

"You've been following the past few years about sonic attacks, making US diplomats sick and Cuba and China. A National Academy of Sciences report says the diplomats head injuries were likely caused by microwaves, something the intelligence community has long suspected on. While the report doesn't fix blame, wt up, national security correspondent J. J. Green tells us there's growing suspicion Russia was behind the attack for years, U. S. Intelligence officials have expressed almost certainty that the symptoms were caused. By a microwave type weapon. This is not, you know, individuals in these code words, making things up. Former CIA operative Mark Polly miraculously ought to know because he got sick with the same symptoms around the same time Just as we sat down for dinner at a fancy restaurant Moscow I started experiencing the same kind of dizziness and nausea that to him, and numerous other intelligence experts is the key. It was Moscow, not Cuba or China. Is this historic reporting and evidence that the Russians actually do have this weapon and they may have been using it for decades. JJ Green

J. J. Green National Academy Of Sciences Cuba Mark Polly China Russia CIA Moscow United States Dizziness Nausea Jj Green
Microwave Radiation 'Most Plausible' Cause Of Diplomats' Ailments, Report Says

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:50 sec | 11 months ago

Microwave Radiation 'Most Plausible' Cause Of Diplomats' Ailments, Report Says

"Study concludes illnesses suffered by dozens of U. S. Diplomats in Cuba and China in recent years was likely caused by microwave radiation. NPR's Greg Meyer E has details more than 40. American diplomats based in Cuba and China had reported ailments that include persistent migraines, dizziness and memory loss. The cause has been a mystery, the State Department said little but asked the national academies of Sciences to investigate. Dr David Relman, who led the study says some type of radio frequency energy such as microwave radiation is the most plausible explanation. What we can say is that something real And significant clinically happened to these people. The study did not address who is responsible or what the motive might have been.

Greg Meyer Cuba China National Academies Of Sciences Dr David Relman NPR Migraines State Department
Microwave Radiation 'Most Plausible' Cause Of Diplomats' Ailments, Report Says

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:47 sec | 11 months ago

Microwave Radiation 'Most Plausible' Cause Of Diplomats' Ailments, Report Says

"Radiation is thought to be the likeliest cause of illnesses suffered by dozens of U. S. Diplomats in Cuba and China in recent years. NPR's Greg Marie has more more than 40. American diplomats based in Cuba and China have reported ailments that include persistent migraines, dizziness and memory loss. The cause has been a mystery, the State Department said little but asked the national academies of Sciences to investigate. Dr David Relman, who led the study says some type of radio frequency energy such as microwave radiation is the most plausible explanation. What we can say is that something real And significant clinically happened to these people. The study did not address who is responsible for what the motive might have been.

Greg Marie Cuba National Academies Of Sciences China Dr David Relman NPR Migraines State Department
"national academy" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:30 min | 11 months ago

"national academy" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Prominence on the Senate races because they're never together on and this is something that's very important and you have to get out. You have to vote. You have to make sure you have every vote counted. Everybody has to come to the Georgia Senate runoff elections take place on Tuesday, January 5th 2020 One Democrat, said a nominee John also off stage to joint rally with fellow Democrats that nominee Raphael Warnock Saturday If Mitch McConnell still controls the Senate. He will try to do to Joe and Kamila, just like he tried to do to President Obama. It will be obstruction and gridlock and partisanship and government shutdowns. It will be paralysis at a moment of national crisis. When we need strong action they were in Conyers, Georgia. Don't say who or what caused it. But a report by the National Academy of Sciences finds directed microwave radiation is the likely cause of illnesses among American diplomats in Cuba and China. Late 2016. America is listening to Fox News. I knew from the Fox News Podcast Network, A look back at the 2000 election. I will work for you every day. And I will never let you down Historic campaign retold by the people working on the campaign, those covering it and on the ticket, he was gonna take the country in a different path. Invention is rockets. The networks said that we had one for Fox News presents Election Rewind 2000 give me the opportunity to lead this nation..

Senate Fox News Georgia Senate Mitch McConnell National Academy of Sciences Conyers Raphael Warnock President Obama Georgia Joe America Kamila Cuba John China
Study finds diplomats in Cuba likely targeted by microwave energy

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:29 sec | 11 months ago

Study finds diplomats in Cuba likely targeted by microwave energy

"A new report points to microwave energy as the probable cause of illnesses among some us diplomats and report finds microwave energy described as sonic attack was most likely that caused a mysterious head injuries that struck scores of us. Diplomats and spies and cuba and china the first cases appeared at the us embassy and cuba and twenty sixteen and later in china and other countries the national academy of sciences suggests that the attacks may have been deliberate and

Us Embassy Cuba China United States National Academy Of Sciences
Study finds diplomats in Cuba likely targeted by microwave energy

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 11 months ago

Study finds diplomats in Cuba likely targeted by microwave energy

"Government study finds the so called Havana syndrome was probably caused by directed microwave energy. The report on the neurological problems that American diplomats and CIA agents in China and Cuba suffered doesn't say that a weapon was used to deliver the energy intentionally. But NBC News, which obtained a copy of the report said it does raise that possibility. Scientists at the national Academies of Sciences say medical evidence shows the problems the 40 Americans reported are consistent. With the effects of microwave energy. That's what the American intelligence community has been saying all along.

Havana National Academies Of Sciences CIA Cuba NBC China American Intelligence Communit
Report finds microwave energy likely made US diplomats ill

Aaron Byrd

00:51 sec | 11 months ago

Report finds microwave energy likely made US diplomats ill

"A new report says microwave radiation is the most likely cause of illnesses suffered by dozens of U. S diplomats stationed in Cuba and China in recent years. The report was produced by the National Academy of Sciences. NPR's Greg Marie, has more more than 40. American diplomats based in Cuba and China have reported ailments that include persistent migraines, dizziness and memory loss. The cause has been a mystery, the State Department said little but asked the national academies of Sciences to investigate. Dr David Relman, who led the study says some type of radio frequency energy such as microwave radiation is the most plausible explanation. What we can say is that Something real and significant clinically happened to these people study did not address who is responsible or what the motive might have

Greg Marie National Academies Of Sciences Cuba China U. Dr David Relman NPR Migraines State Department
UK Higher Education News: The Chancellor's Spending Review

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

02:01 min | 11 months ago

UK Higher Education News: The Chancellor's Spending Review

"Stop this week with the spending review. You trialed financing on jobs and jabs helen. Richey cena deliver a shot in the arm for ha setup setup spending review for the next year and we probably already had a good idea about some highlights public sector pay infrastructure investments in the office overseas aid budget. But i mean the review outlines that ambition for the uk to become a scientific superpower and this fifteen billion to be invested in r. and d. next year lots of things around uplift for uk our national academies commitment to build a new science capability and also to establish a new unit for commercializing research. An and this is all really good news for universities in general and it will you know we it will really help us to play our parts in contrbuting to the post pandemic economy and also for an institution like kale. It's really important that we're involved in the level pagendam and this also welcome commitment to unspecified amounts funding to support the preparation for domestic alternative to rasmus. Plus if we need but but outside that focus on research really isn't much to say about higher education There's a lot of attention given to the jennifer skills and i'm further education and there's a tantalizing suggestion of something around a flexible loan entitlement which i'm looking forward to but no order if you know. Fa or h. e. white paper no mention of the pace review or taff and to be honest. I'm relieved know that there are versions of all of these things kicking around government. And there's no doubt in my mind that major disruptive changes is on is on its way to higher education and last week's office shoots consultation on quality and standards gives us a hint of of what might be about to happen. But i think we could probably all do with a short period of just adapting to what the pandemic dealt delta's before we have to start worrying combat. The next thing.

Richey Cena UK Helen Rasmus FA
Pfizer seeking emergency use of its COVID-19 vaccine in US

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 11 months ago

Pfizer seeking emergency use of its COVID-19 vaccine in US

"Going to the FDA today to ask for emergency use of its covert 19 vaccine. The company says it's early trials show that it is 95% effective. It's the start of what could bring the first shots in two weeks. Visors filing sets off a chain of events is the Food and Drug Administration and its independent advisers debate if the shots already, if so, another group will have to decide how the initial limited supplies air ration. Doubt Initial supplies will be scarce. According to information given to the National Academy of Medicine about 25 million doses of the Fizer vaccine will be available in December. 30 million in January and another 35 million in February and March. People getting the shots will need two doses three weeks apart. My company. Once a vaccine is

Food And Drug Administration National Academy Of Medicine
Early data shows Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine is 94.5% effective

NBC Nightly News

03:40 min | 11 months ago

Early data shows Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine is 94.5% effective

"Is. The country appears headed into a dark winter overwhelmed by growing new wave of covert infections. Another hopeful ray of light appeared on the horizon today. A second co vaccine candidate. It's makers say appears to be more successful than imagine madeira announcing. Today it's vaccine is nearly ninety five percent effective and with last week's upbeat announcement from pfizer about shot. There is building optimism about a way out of this pandemic but one that experts warn sadly won't come before we face what may be the worst days of this crisis. Miguel almaguer begins our reporting announcing today. It's potential co vaccine is ninety four point five percent effective drugmaker moderna says if granted emergency authorization by the fda it could roll out doses as early as december. It's clinical trial with thirty thousand participants. Finding no significant safety concerns for americans at home. It means hope that we are going to be thing and we're going to beat it sooner rather than later. Modern now joins pfizer. Who just last week reported their vaccine is ninety percent effective. We have enough vaccine. Those between these two vaccines immune is about twenty million people. During the month of december states will decide how to roll out vaccines but the national academy of medicine makes this recommendation covering just five percent of the population phase. One includes high risk. Americans like healthcare workers in first responders. And there's currently not enough doses for them. Phase one b covers those. With underlying medical conditions and seniors living in congregate settings like nursing homes face to covers thirty thirty five percent of the population and includes critical workers like those in the food supply system teachers and those over sixty five phase three forty to forty five percent of the population includes most young adults and children face four protects. Everyone else our goal would be by the second quarter to have enough vaccine for every american that would like to get vaccinated with the hope of vaccinating. Most americans by the end of spring details dates unclear. Maderna's vaccine for example did not study children who it will test next questions. Also remain over vaccinating pregnant women and infants. The us government hopes to provide the vaccine free of charge. There's also optimism. It could be distributed at drugstores where americans have easy access to it. Laster right. miguel almaguer. Thanks for joining me now. Is dr john torres dr john. The good news obviously is these covid. Vaccines appear to work quite well. But how safe are they less. They're both drug companies announced that they're vaccines had minimal side effects but they have to show the fda two months of safety data before requesting emergency use authorization. Now i've been told by experts. The fda won't approve any cova vaccine unless they have all the data on trials and they're sure it's effective and equally important safe and since pregnant women and young children were not tested. They'll have to wait for further trial. All right let me ask you this more than one vaccine coming to market. How will we know which one to choose. Well there will be multiple vaccines available but the ones available to you will depend on where you live. And what groupie fall into but most experts. Tell me and i agree. The vaccine is the one you get so. Don't wait for one vaccine over the other

"national academy" Discussed on Qualified Tutor Podcast

Qualified Tutor Podcast

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"national academy" Discussed on Qualified Tutor Podcast

"That challenge is a huge amount of work to go around the big difference between more commend and blackpool police. More fortunate as to launch nuclear power stations nearby. An a big university In lancaster down the road which means are there are more jobs and for really struggles. Because it doesn't have a huge amount of industry or jobs as a seasonal tourist industry which is is hurting moment and that means it does not he's not like wealthy affluent areas. And i grew up in not wealthy family in what we call the west. End of morgan It's not like the west end in london. I promise you definitely come visit Vs across the bay beautiful. And when i was eleven years old i got a golden ticket and i got golden ticket to go to the local grammar school. The grammar schools in stab boys girls school and those schools have incredibly in my view like damaging and distorting impact on the provision is available to all pupils across the area. And of course right you can take the story as i am of the free school meals kids. Who got into the grammar school. And he's here on this podcast with you. Having a conversation about this thing that we've done all the opportunities that i've had. I get lots of choices in my life which is great and i get those choices because i did have a great education teachers in my school where superb. The provisions in the school was superb. But nobody tells the story about the kids. The over schools. The school where i am now. Chair of governors. Eddie and i used to work. I'm which is a day facto second mountain if you look at the intake of that school leather the starting point for those people's each way below the equivalent starting point for the people at the grammar school not because of anything. The school has done that because we have sorted the people's through this magical tasks at when they're eleven years old and bluntly the wealthy parents said that people's ascent that kids to the local grammar schools if they don't get into the grammar school. Does this selective. Church of england academy nearby selective on religion. And it's amazing. How many people Signed gardenias in year. Six knowledge hunt and their intake as wonderful as they are. Conway's lots of disadvantages and for every warm..

local grammar school blackpool lancaster london Conway Eddie Church of england academy
"national academy" Discussed on Qualified Tutor Podcast

Qualified Tutor Podcast

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"national academy" Discussed on Qualified Tutor Podcast

"Heads back into a second lockdown. We are delighted to be speaking to a real leader in the area of virtual classrooms and online learning during the first lock down started in march of this year. The oak national academy was launched to ensure that all students and teachers were able to continue the lessons that they conducting class on an online environment. We are today joined by matthew hood principle of the national academy and the real driver of this incredible project the kind of numbers that the national has achieved are really quite outstanding since the inception in spring of this year they have delivered twenty million lessons online and fifteen million hours of video have been created and published on the platform bringing hours and hours of high quality professional level classroom teaching to thousands of students around the uk in research conducted by national academy teaches. It was found that reduced workload and improved quality of teaching and learning were found to be two of the biggest factors of the platforms. Growth in this podcast. We'll be discussing these two points as well as the future for the national academy and how we create the best conditions for students to be learning this year. Listen in as matt's incredible enthusiasm and passion for this area shines through. We also joined by julius silver founder of qualified shooter and adrian conway director of neil learning qualified. Cheetahs own lead. Facilitator about about lockdown is how it's accelerated allow arrests and his tongue adults learn again which is such fun and everybody to be able to have the opportunity to bring their expertise to the table tech people and the educators and principal to bring our expertise to get to the table and create something new. You know the scale that which will about here. Is johnston amazing. But but the thing that we were flaking on earlier is you've been thinking about online. Learning the full lockdown hadn't you because you have a background in it and you notice that it's just that the progress was accelerated. Tell us about.

oak national academy matthew hood julius silver adrian conway uk matt johnston principal neil founder director
"national academy" Discussed on Qualified Tutor Podcast

Qualified Tutor Podcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"national academy" Discussed on Qualified Tutor Podcast

"The lessons from this summer had.

Time-keeping brain protein influences memory

All Things Considered

02:53 min | 1 year ago

Time-keeping brain protein influences memory

"Air like short movies. If you fall off a bike, your brain will probably record the entire sequence of events that put you in pain that's known as an episodic memory. And now, scientists say they have identified cells in the human brain that makes this sort of memory possible. NPR's John Hamilton has more. They're known as time cells, and they were discovered in rodents years ago, but a team of researchers wanted to see if these cells also exist in humans. So they studied the brains of 27 people attempting a difficult memory task. This type of memory task is not one that like a rodent would be able to do that's Dr Brad Lega, a neurosurgeon at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Legacy's participants were asked to study sequences of words on a laptop computer. The words appear on the screen went after the other about 12 to 15 items at a clip. They're separated by a couple of seconds. Then, after a break, people were asked to remember the words. Meanwhile, scientists were measuring the activity of individual cells in the hippocampus and another brain area involved in the perception of time. This was possible because the people in the study already had electrodes in their brains as part of a treatment for severe epilepsy. Leggo says the team discovered certain cells that would fire at specific times during each sequence of words, the time cells that we found They're marking out discreet segments of time within this, like approximately 32nd window time stamps that helped people recall when they had seen each word And in what order? Legacy says The findings suggest that the brain uses the same approach. When we're reliving an experience, like falling off a bike, we remember the wind in our hair, then seeing the pebble on the road than the pain. So by having time cells create this indexing across time, you can put everything together in a way that Nixon's the time Self study appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Euribor, jockey of New York University, says it's important even though the result was predicted by experiments in animals. The final arbitrator is always the human brain. Jackie says The study helps explain the memory limitations found in people who have damage to the hippocampus. In one experiment, he says, scientists compared the memories of a group of people who had just Just a tour of a university, he says. The people without hippocampal damage all told, pretty much the same story first, because we have seen the fountain. And then there was a little girl who fell off the bike, Physical and so on. And these sequences are completely and absolutely gun in people Cos is probably because their brains don't have time cells to re create a sequence of events. But Jackie says time cells aren't like clocks. Their pace is constantly changing. Depending on factors like mood. You have to wait for the elections. Then every day is a long day. The same thing is gonna be asking, you know when it's covered over is very, very slow, but when you having a good time time flies, Jackie says. As a result, our perception of time isn't very reliable. John

Jackie John Hamilton NPR Dr Brad Lega University Of Texas Southweste New York University Leggo Dallas National Academy Of Sciences John Nixon Proceedings Of
"national academy" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"national academy" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Reminder schools are able to respond to you and roll with things at an extraordinary pace which has justly privileged watching C. schools. Hey you know setup free voucher systems way before because the position to be able to do that actually really annoyed now. They've got the government system not on the they've created. You know I've got I've resources online. Who found ways of keeping in touch with all of that blue people's I just incredible resilience and nimble their Straw school system that I think has really come to the fore and should be celebrated school focused walk and my knee focused one On this stuff taps McRae. Who's been on your podcast before he and I like our miss quite the law and so we we love half king all routine so we will thinking really carefully about how we structure our day and like playing around with different bits of the day to see if you can be productive here like being happier. Hair Nag. Got a bit more free time. What happens if you gather this time and mix it with this combination of activities in the morning this combination activities in the afternoon like? How'd you do that? It's really sad. We talk about it. Way To push one of the basic things about lockdown. Is You basically get control? The environment there are far fewer variables to knock you off your routine with them so you get like a good clear week of testing out. Different variables times eating times. What you can we all of those sorts of things so I have made some. I'm excited to talk to him. Next I am. I've made some really good improvements. T my hacking my daily routine. And I'm I'm thrilled with them and the saddest thing you've probably never heard well it isn't it isn't no not not for me anyway. You've got to give us an example. There was one hockey made to be paying off so one thing I think is really important is doing the exact same thing for the first hour of every morning. I if you are trying to have a routine through the week I find if I change at all. Why do the first hour in the day? I almost certainly have a negative knock-on effect of all of the other things that I need to do today. That's been a bit Lewis theory knocking. This just made all the data points being out and seeing if I can You know what happens if I only Thursday. Do something different to a Wednesday and I'm not wholly convinced now so it's my day is going to be successful. We'll have to get up exactly the same time and do exactly the same thing for the first hour. And if I do that the day's GonNa go well. If I don't do that I didn't do it yesterday morning. Not through any randomized plumbing. Just a slight inability to bed quite at the time. When I'd hope to my day yesterday was good. I'm on I'm on form today because the routine was back in place so yeah yeah do the exact same thing every for the first hour every morning if you possibly can. I appreciate that. Make that mortality. So there's a little bonus for me that wow fantastic. Yeah I would love to pull up into into insignia test out Michelle. He's probably not going to fly your morning in quite the way the I i. May I say that with all except the humility is fantastic? Well this is absolutely incredible. Incredible conversation certainly from my perspective anyway because as I say the bill. I'd I'd miss when I was thinking about national academy. Was the the teacher side of things. The fact that the there are some exemplar lessons and again. You're not saying these lessons of perfect. No one signed on these other ways. You have to teach but it's it's so we all know is teachers. Watching lessons is one of the most useful things that you can do to improve your practice and as teachers get very limited time to do that to watch actual lessons and here is an unprecedented kind of opportunity. Possibly teachers have got some time to focus on this to watch hundreds of lessons. 'em sequence thought through and then come to their conclusions about them so that is yeah on top of the benefits to students that is that is a massive massive bonus. So thank you to you and all you've done setting this up and on an all your team. It's absolutely fantastic resource. Thank you so much for your time today. Principle of Oak National Academy..

McRae Oak National Academy Michelle hockey Lewis
"national academy" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

13:37 min | 1 year ago

"national academy" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"I suppose advice from Oslo for me about how to do that but what I can certainly do. Share SOME REFLECTIONS FROM PEOPLE. Who told us how they're using it because one of the things. That's fascinating Harry's like you put these things out into the world and the general public is far more creative and figuring out how to use them than you could ever imagine when you stop. Sign an office trying to cook it up yourself so so so teachers. I think we're probably seeing three things. Three approaches. I've tried to name them so that they easily remember memorable so I saw picnics. So schools are looking at the curriculum ahead. Blending all content with Enron pupils. And then get your timetable for the week which includes some soft Iraqi from the school and then some stuff from us and sometimes essentially of those as well. You know there's a bite size Nasib. Was this Green Bay road. Mix It together into a timetable that works and then sites that picnics. We're seeing a second approach which I'm calling streaming support and so what these schools are doing is they are using all as the backbone of the curriculum if you like methane vacate. You do the math lesson every day. But then they're following up with a combination of one to one or small group support to check for understanding address misconceptions at like set point the week so they have shifted their teaching staff. Time there's also is into the bit that they're those teachers more uniquely placed to do. Which is the last foot between the teacher? And the pupil right. Like what is this kid thinking? Have they have they got it? How can I guess misconception? Rather than them having to worry about doing the recording of lessons or doing lessons live and then his using those at to do that that is replicable. And then focusing all of IRA on the kind of small group or even some cases on addressing misconceptions and the third group is revise and consolidate great. Which is that. These schools already their own curriculum which is fantastic. They using but then they're saying okay and then there's a revision session that you can do for an hour. Fractions he up. Your homework is to do that. So those are the three things that we're hearing from teachers. I'm sure there are always more. We love to hear about them for for families and the the message. I think he's really important again as I said with teachers because teachers are families to a is trying to do at home like you have to just work it out in a way. That's right for you like nobody's going to be able to tell you. This is the exactly what you should do each day. Because there's so many dependents single context that that means that will change the things I think we do know in schools that can be helpful at home We know in schools for example about whole school behavior policies are more effective than classroom by classroom ones. I think you can stretch the evidence if the F. will allow me to say like whole household routines are probably better than that kid by kid or day-by-day routines and so thinking about like the structure of the week drawing out sticking on the fridge by structure. I mean. Yeah. There's some time in math lessons but there's also timing left some weeding to maybe cooking for smacks us is doing those other things. I think the parents like creating structure and doing everything you possibly. I know it's really hard to stick to that structure Earth and you try to motivate pupils using sometimes some extrinsic things rewards and sanctions to make sure that they stick to the structure. The more that Monday to Friday feels like it's got a rhythm to it. I think the easier life at home typically for some families who are in the situation but maybe don't have a garden that they can just put the kids all like today whether it is tweet this morning about basically the biggest challenge for parents today that except I experience of wet play solidarity with parents across the country he would dealing with wet play. Every teacher knows your pain so I think the families it's about trying to create a structure that works for you and don't let anybody tell you what your structure should be like. That's for you to decide but just tried to have one. I think that's probably the top tip to how to build more smoother. That's super good advice ally where we got well. He's fifteen months now. And a fifty year old home Isaac and Yeah. We check the weather forecast every day. We've been dreading. This cloud appeared on the APP. A few days are going to be and so formed. Let's just lease on many coats things on and then just like just brave just say under full moon like the next. I every windy days. Full moons is like the witching hour so brace yourself for that parents have the UK US. We spoke before about Whatever new initiative any kind of new initiative certainly something is big and his public as this comes out. There's always going to be criticism. Difficult questions asked and what I really enjoyed and appreciated was Thomas. His blog. That came out. I think either the day or the day after the national academy went live and in that blogging made four points and I just wondered if we could just go through each of those maps and just kind of get your take on this. I thought they were really interested in and sign of good organization willing to kind of confront. The things that don't work are aren't perfect so the first one. The first point David made was there are mainstream. Curriculum isn't broad enough. Can you just talk to me a little bit about that Matt and maybe some of the things that you put in place to address that show and David? Right here he he. He's brilliant and is the driving force behind all of that work. That teachers are able to use day in day out You know we we think of ourselves like a school and we all believe in API good-quality acres and balanced curriculum. And if we were a school the curriculum that we currently have on author like would not be acceptable. We wouldn't we wouldn't expect. There are some subjects that really important currently missing at different stages. We we did our best to make it as borders possible under the second center is but we want to do. We want to do better. And we've got a plan in place now to start to fill some of those gaps over the next couple of weeks. We know that it's frustrating for teachers of subjects. That are not mass for example. I missed the Boston economist by by training right People just call those applied mass. Which is unfair from one of subjects. That doesn't get the high profile that gets lessons taken off in the curriculum and I appreciate all those people out there who teach subjects. It's frustrating when they see this object isn't included I. There was no conspiracy theory behind that we just we just couldn't offer all of the things only Mongo and we try to prioritize with where we have the resources immediately available. There are few things that we try to consider when adding in these new subjects. So what is this again with all curriculum is this breadth versus depth point? We did quality of work to think. About how many hours a day we thought primary school pupils in sexual people's could reasonably cover and that amount of time is less than they would in a normal school week when they were in school. And we want to be really careful about saying the expectation is five or six hours a day for second. Excuse me secondary school people's like that all the evidence that we have from the schools and school trustee workmates estimates too much. So I'm every time we add a subject at the moment that means there is a lesson taken from another subject and we've just gotta get balance right and the second thing and this applies sometimes more some of the most practical creative subjects. We want to think really hard to make sure all of our lessons really inclusive we call a scene that you've got materials or instruments all of the things at home and what's been great about those subjects. They've all come back with really creative ways of getting around that we've managed it with art. All of Allison's basically required to have a pencil and piece of paper last week and we send children off outside on my daily. Walk TO PICK UP. Bits of leaves and stones and make southport traits which is amazing but we just have to think Kathleen as well about making sure. Everything is accessible to everybody. It's really really fall into the trap of the sheeting that everybody can participate in that lesson and it would be awful if a people home not able to participate because they don't have some of the resources available so we've got to think really hard about that but we're hoping to particularly expand what we're doing in year ten toward GTC options. There's a couple of subjects kaycee she'll Yankee. Sage to sage one and say we try to expand that offer. You come across anything that you just think isn't going to work. It's all muscle. I'm thinking like design in tech or whatever it's called our not GonNa let not what we we have pitched that challenge straight back at the design tech teachers who. I'm sure come back with something that works classic problem of like lack of domain specific knowledge in my head. You know you need a sword fish eggs and they're gonNA come back and tell me I'm not saying that's not what design tax about and you definitely do some really good quality design work without needing those resources. You are going to be in so much trouble of design technology online lobby. Who are very well organized. I didn't even know how well organized this thing. So credit to them for advocating for their subjects. That point about my school was doing this like where the kids we do. Have in school every day spending time making personal protective equipment. Which is Kurt? You being shipped to my mom who runs a care home so I can understand why it was not a very disrespectful subject and King to work to expand offering fantastic fantastic and the second of David's points is there our specialist curriculum. Isn't open running yet. So tell us a bit about Matt's yes there are. There are two things here. The first is that we don't have good enough access to the existing curriculum for those with additional needs. So for example. We're on track at the moment to have lessened either. Signed or subtitled sport or pupils who've by hearing attachments are brand annoyingly. Has this line green color in it which doesn't pass the necessary tests to be inclusive of peoples who are visually payments. So we're going to change some features on our brand to make the Colo's work those right so there's something about access and inclusion into the main stream curriculum. It's available. There is also any for us and again we're working on getting resources available for teachers whose pupils I From specialists setting so that's a broad range of different types of especially if things so special schools people unit will tend to envision the for variety different types of special schools. And we have a crack team of incredible. Md inclusion specialist Pressures who are working with us to improve the work that we do in that space but again will teaches. We care a lot about making sure that people is included. I'm we don't do anything to exacerbate existing gaps that exist and that means we needed to do more work in space and its top list. Got Fantastic and this fascinates me this mount so this is Aku was maybe the tenth one of these teaching from home and in episode that I've done now on one thing that's really come through from from most of the gases that that would of wellbeing is is really kind of topping their less even above kind of teaching the subject in and getting the stints knowledgeable and so on teaches spoke about how that missing the daily interactions with students. And they're trying to find novel ways to get round this either using the chat function on teams or zoom and so on and so forth and so the third of points is that we don't have anything on wellbeing and just just tell us a bit about that Martin. Is that challenge? That is right for you to take on. And and if so how can you do it? And so yeah..

David Matt Oslo Isaac Boston national academy Kurt trustee UK Aku Thomas Martin Allison Kathleen US King
"national academy" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

14:27 min | 1 year ago

"national academy" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"We've had technology focused episodes looking at just. How remote teaching works? But we've also had episodes focused on the practicalities of coping with setting students appropriate work whilst also having to look after your own children at home we've covered issues involving safeguarding differentiation. And both teacher and student wellbeing think we've heard from math teachers teachers of other subjects. I'm primary schoolteachers. We've heard from teachers from the UK and overseas hopefully has been something for everyone and have no idea how long this series will continue to go on for but Salang as people keep listening and hopefully find it useful. I shall continue this time around. I spoke to Matt. Hort Matt is the principle of Oak National Academy an online school setup over the Easter holidays sharing videos and resources for students from reception to year ten now. Seven schooldays launch over one million pupils have watched over two million lessons on the Oak National Academy website. So obviously I asked Matz how this project came about and crucially how teachers are using the resources. We also discussed something that hasn't yet. Komo in this series teaches see PD during school closures. Matt talks about research at home as well as the wonderful idea of teachers using the national academy videos essentially lesson observation tools to consider critique we even end with. Matt's own life hack about how to be productive during lockdown. I really hope you enjoyed this conversation as much as I did and find as useful as I did and as ever please okay. It gives me great pleasure to wealth of multiple. The podcast. So up to start off with Jesus tells a little bit about yourself and your background sure. And it's great to be here so I suppose I've got I saw a covert nineteen droppin profile and then a pre navy again post Kovic nineteen file so the moment of doing things. I am currently Principal Oak National Academy which is an online school making lessons available to anybody who needs them at fourteen fifteen year olds. And I'm also the convenor research at home so being smart people in to your home for teacher. Pd At eleven o'clock every day. So that might like to lockdown jobs at the moment and in normal times in normal times. My work is a combination of working on the front line in school. Who's a teacher? I'm an economics chip training. I'm currently chair governor's school in and Morecambe which is a glorious seaside town in the northwest of England that you should definitely visit once you're allowed policy wonkery so I'm an independent advisor to the Department for Education Professional Development and standards and then my joy and passion in teacher development so helping teachers to keep getting better motion the Founder Institute which is one of the law educated development provides the UK flipping. I'm growing increasingly annoyed and jealous of the of the people who are coming on this. Podcast is it's not very impressive. Nothing nothing possible without fantastic front. Mass teachers sorry equally impressive. I think well I'll tell you what before. We dive into National Academy. And I just want to talk a little bit is okay with you about research had home because this is a very exciting initiative this and this there is a danger that the focus and during this lockdown becomes onto the impact is going to have on students that learning and so on and so forth but of course the other side of this is is teaching and I know myself from somebody goes round giving talks and tried that literally all my events for for the rest of the academic year of obviously bid been counseled so research and research at home in particular as a key role to play in this. He used to talk. Talk US through a little bit about it now. Well like how does it work? What are some of the kind of sessions that they have already happened in the? How can people check these out? Yeah so a super simple as is really important. The map things going on so almost every day. I'm GONNA say almost because there are a couple of exceptions almost every day at eleven o'clock if you go onto the research at home twitter handle show at research at home you can find a link pin to the top latte in that link Google spreadsheet which gives you a list of all of the speakers coming up for that week you can click on a link to resume weapon are and follow along the presentation and ask questions at the end. Eleven o'clock every day. One seems if you missed that slot for whatever reason all of the presentations are recorded and again in that Google document you can go back see previous speakers and click on a link which will let you watch again so twice. Questions live but you will be able to listen to the discussion and debate. And they're all available on the back catalogue will remain available. We've got amazing array of people. We kicked off with Dan. Willingham yesterday was Dylan William the everybody from teachers in the front line to academics through to the people working in the education sector all of whom are talking about evidence informed approaches to making sure every kid gets a great education little plug. If this gets time I'M ON TOMORROW WITH TWITTER. Who is grilling me on? All things. Educate to expertise think Barney style newsnight grilling on on everything there. And Sammy's obviously the perfect. And Education's answer to to to do that. This may be a bit deep. Virtually all in the in the conversation here and there's been a lot of talk obviously about whether this this this school's closure is going to change. How learning happens long term and so on and so forth and you get any sense that it's going to have any long term impacts on how. Cpa's is deliberate. Because I know that's one of the most common things people ask about research at all like the local events and how come then filmed. Why can't we access them and so on? Did you get a sense that there's going to be some that this is GonNa be the way? Cds can be moved into more remote even one one schools reopen and. Everything's back to normal so I'M A and although although not politically at least educationally I've I'm relatively small key. See Conservative on some of these things and think we need to be careful about the whole world's GonNa Change some things. Don't change one of which is so of aspects of all biology cognitive and behavioral science points to some good bets and being with other people and not being. I think important and so you know it's the whole world going to get offended no although some things that I think we've been able to do quite quickly that might more widespread. Yeah probably an ambitious shoot with delivering about programs for about six thousand educators and you one time to obtain thing from teachers start that career right the way up to multi company trust for quite a few years. Those programs have been blended so they've involved sometime when people are coming together face to face and some time where things are done remotely and different methods of instruction just like in your classroom are well are better suited to different types of content. And you know what we found over the past years. Is things like you know one to one coaching or small group discussions and particularly when they're short period of time are actually probably just as good online as they are face to face. You know as we're all experiencing doing a full day's worth of content in front of your computer by yourself is really really difficult and every something powerful about building a network with the humans who are interested in the things that you're interested in because you spend time with them face to face that I think some online approaches comrade okay so maybe move towards more blended approach that took up window. No the thing I would say you know what I wanted to have. Potential uses of lessons that were developing Oak. Also available. You know through school trusts like green shore outward and we're building a bank of exemplifications which is quite interesting before if your trainee teacher and you're teaching Pythagoras for the first time it's quite hard to watch an example of somebody doing it by. It's quite hard to find an example of that exposition and that modeling to teach that concept. Really well I'm really succinctly I think what we're going to have the back of this is a big bigger. At Least Bank of exemplifications that are demane specific like down to the individuals of soap topic level. And allow you to see that in the sequence so if you go onto the oak website at the moment you can watch second rematch teacher. Teach everything about expanding brackets in sequence over three or four lessons and I think trainee teachers like seeing a old colleague a very good friend Vicki richly. Who's one of the leads at Shotton Hall Research School? She calls them goals. What a good one looks like a concept which I love and we're just GONNA have like hundred. We're producing one hundred eighty waigle's a week. Yes and that's subject specific that really relevant to the thing. That early create teacher is about to go into the classroom and teach that I think. Is You know how some wheel we elect them? Real power did you know. This is me being being completely deaf. They're not even considered that that. That's a spinoff kind of positive for him from this from the National Academy Project that we'll talk about in a second. The impact could have teachers in terms of watching those lessons. And and you're right. There's there's two sides to this. There's more experienced teacher watching get and picking up on those kind of subtle things and Ben possibly can of critiquing their purchasing and not do things slightly different but then also as you say novice teachers. Training teachers just walked one. Elsa Gold Mine of resources that that's going to be from far better than for example downloading. Gay a Bright Shiny sparkly resource from a blog from TAZAL. Something that the talks. We see the questioning. The modeling and so on an in action is is is absolutely priceless. That because what I was gonNA say just before we move onto national academy. This is a big fear isn't it particularly teaches doing that. Training gear now of how the sanctuary there if it's PG their second school placement Kinda wiped out and we'll be we'll be starting jobs in September as key ts having had very little classroom experience. It's a big issue isn't it? Yeah and go remember Trainings only people say you're a year. Well it's not really a game. It's nine months and the bit where you do. The most teaching is in this term. Yes because you bet you'll I have a bit more on that a bit more and so yet like schools and thinking about what they can do to support early career teachers when they start in September is really important and he's about my education policy. I most excited about which I think is also going to help. Here is the work that the government's doing on the early career framework and the rollout the training and support that comes with the APP because it says looking like this. This job of teaching is incredibly complex. What we're asking teachers to do is to think about the thinking of thirty small humans simultaneously for twenty hours a week. That's really really difficult and it takes a really long time to master. You certainly coster nine months. And let's put more support and development for the PG trading plus the two years afterwards and it's more robust than those trainings again to be in a better position to make a success out that long term career in this amazing profession support. What like him Mao. What in your your is is is is good support. The schools can put into place for foreign cuties. Particularly I'm thinking Sept- September twenty twenty. Five schools are open. Then yes show and the first thing to take a look at is the framework itself. It's a really evident informed pussy comprehensive view of the sorts of things that you would need to know and be able to do in order to speak with teacher a sketchy outline of what we call the mental model that you need to to be a teacher and so taking a look at that and using it to inform the induction program. That you've got in place for your schoo- I think he's a really really good start. The early Rowlatt actually starts in September. Should there were small number of areas at the moment that have access to a training program designed by one of four organizations ambitions shoot teach first education about materials the e? If you've not taken advantage of that support you can definitely get in touch with them and have a conversation with them about whether they might be able to do some of that training four..

Matt Oak National Academy National Academy UK Google Principal Oak National Academy Komo Matz trainee Jesus Shotton Hall Research School twitter US Salang Cpa National Academy Project England Rowlatt Barney
"national academy" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

11:55 min | 2 years ago

"national academy" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"I just wanted to mention a couple of things that last caller was asking, what about the specific legislation on election? Security in one of the items is to require that a political campaign hearing on offer of help from a foreign government dirt on one's opponent, or any other form of help supposed to notify the proper authorities, including the FBI right off the bat that is Bill, the house of representatives passed in clearly in response to, to what was alleged to have happened in two thousand sixteen that, that resulted in that famous Trump Tower meeting and all of that. So there's one there's one specific that, that I didn't mention before the break just wanted to get that in there before we move along to our next topic, and our next guest and our next guest is Mark Nelson. He is a researcher. In a PHD at the university of monsoon Lerner. College of medicine, and he is a new inductee into the National Academy of sciences and honored to have him. Joining us on the program this morning and, and Mark Nelson. Thank you very much for doing. So Mike ledger date having. Yeah. And so how did, how does this process work when you are when you are gathering nominated and selected for inclusion in the net, National Academy of sciences, is this something that originates with, with you, or does somebody call you up as a working on a long project at one of my colleagues is in the National Academy said to make their natural kademi is good at many things, including keeping people out. Well, you're in so congratulations. Yeah. The process started for me with one of my colleagues some friend, Dave warshaw, contacted people. We knew that who are in the National Academy and then they started the ball rolling. So I was nominated by someone in the National Academy in section thirty one taught the science, sections, the National Academy just wants to the pharmacology, then they, they vote, you know, sort of like. All know all the details. Certainly when I get my member, log in, but they sort of like the freemasons. I'm not really sure what goes on. He vote vote and in the section, and if you rise, the top of that nominee pool and that section then go onto bigger ballot. I guess is placed in, you know, goes other innovations with other sections and at the annual meeting, they have a vote on the ballot. But basically, I guess, like the baseball hall of fame if you're high enough up the ballot you people know that you're gonna get in. And so, so this went on for about six years. Wow. Yeah, that's amazing in let me ask you surely brings. I mean I see the university of Vermont put out some a press release on it and seems to be quite proud of this development as an it brings prestige the university, and that's all great. I wondered also does it bring additional money to get any extra research, help, and that kind of thing. Probably help me I think what have I should say it's really Davis from these tremendous honor because that the section I was elected to only one person in a year. And so, and I think it's real an honor for my lab past and present. And also, I think it's a big honor for the state of law because we've had a lot of tremendous scientists state of lot, who haven't been recognized because they're not in the east or west coast. And I, I think this will open up. People is, of course, I'll be going, and I can nominate people and make get the ball rolling of other people here or desert other deserving people. So I think put the spotlight that on Vermont saying, this is a place where you can do competitive world class science. Now, do the science, we get, we have to get grants from the national institutes of health or other funding organizations. And so I was just award of seven year grant the million dollars. A year from the NIH. And so that's what the lab. And maybe it will give me a little bit, you know, little more of an edge of getting grants, but I haven't I don't know, the main thing I think will be, you know, attracting people here, and you know, and, and, you know being able to talk to people about what goes on at the National Academy. Yeah. I mean, it's the kind of thing that, that I'm sure just sort of builds on itself as in now yet, Vermont has one extra extra Chit that it can say, here's why, you know, the next real top-flight researcher should decide to come here versus you know, the university of Chicago, Cornell or something xactly. Exactly. So. That's great. You'll help us in recruiting new young faculty, hopefully will help development because, you know, it's not just, you know, I can tell you NIH grants or got this paper that sabre. But this is probably the biggest recognition one could have in the country short of getting a Nobel prize. Are you the first Vermonter to be selected for the National Academy? Yeah. Four as the first. Yeah. Well, you know, I mean somebody's gotta go first, and, and again, you know, kudos to you that's that is that is a tremendous honor. You keep in mind. It was chartered by ABRAHAM LINCOLN in eighteen sixty three. So it's been a lot of years. Yeah, I'm actually kinda surprised. I mean, I know there have been some serious scientists at the university of Vermont and and, and elsewhere in the state in just stir prizes. Me that nobody for Remond previously has been as been gotten into the National Academy of sciences. It's like, wow, really. Part of the thing, if you're down at, you know, in Boston at Harvard, for example, and at looked at jobs there. You'll have colleagues down the hall that are in the National Academy. Yeah. Though you got the lobby starring with, you know, and it's you have to be nominated and supported by people in the National Academy and, and then a building and sort of magnetism that it forms. I mean to me, it's almost like you might think is a little goofy, but I'm a basketball fan and, and, you know, Anthony Davis probably went to the LA Lakers. Just so we played with the Brian, you know. So I mean now we have now we have an all-star here and somebody else will come along and say, yeah, I wanna go play with that guy. So that's. Hopefully they'll help energize. We have a new dean was great drive from on, say. Okay. We're on where we can do it. We could leave and play with the big league. So let's, let's get, you know, hopefully, help development, you know or fee and recruiting top talent here. Then that's the fun part working with people. Yeah. Yeah, sure. Absolutely. Now I want I want to I'm a little worried because I think that when you start describing your research to be, which I hope you'll do in the next few minutes, I'm just going to be over my head pretty quickly. But, but, but. It sounds, it sounds actually quite interesting. You I was looking at the at the one of one of the items that the college of medicine put out, I think this is from probably Jennifer knock Breyer of your public relations shop and, and, and talks about original research into let's see a member of the faculty since nineteen Eighty-six Nelson, is internationally, recognized for his research on the molecular mechanisms and cellular communication involved in blood flow. And I saw an interview I think with you on W X in which you were talking about your you're really focused on blood flow to the brain. Correct. Right. And, and, and who knew layperson like me, probably never thought before that, there would be cellular communication going on here, as in the cells of blood in the blood that are flowing brain. What are they are? They talking to one another. What's happening here. Yeah it. Really, it's an amazing and under studied up to recently because people that look at the brain think about only the nerve cells in the brain. But you're the nerve cells don't have really there just in time machine. They, they don't have any energy reserves. So your brains thousand miles of blood vessels that are delivering blood on demand to the active neurons. So you're talking right now, net part of the brain that has involved in motor function speech is active, and it demands blood oxygen glucose and the neuro nerve cells, and signal to the blood vessels. It's to tell them not dilate liver blood. Now, though, if you think about it, we most people live decades, and they're redirecting blood moment. The moment that does parts of the rank all day long as they do different types of function. And this is a basis of imaging in the hostels look at brain. Function to really looking at changing the blood flow. On the fundamental question. How does that happen? How do how does this work where you can think of thousand miles of blood vessels? Delivering blood moment the moment in different parts of rain, depending on that kitty, this goes on for decades, most people without any problem and, and put another perspective. The brain is two percent of your body weight and the brain uses twenty percent of the energy that we consume. Wow mantis is logical from the tackle in the second thing is, of course, what happens as we age and the blood vessels, no longer deliver blood to right spot at the right time. Now, talking about if you do if you use Portland move your hand that part of the brain lights off and nerve cells are active processing information within one second more blood is delivered to that far the brain to meet the needs energetic needs that far the brain. So it's amazing system. The second is we worked on. It was called small vessel disease, brain. And this is a major cause of. Of dementia cognitive decline. And there are some genetic causes of what it's something that's really becoming a major issue as people age longer and have had the loss in, you know, have a higher risk of dementia causing decline. And then he was problems relate to deficits in how the blood vessels, auctioning in the brain. So that's also a major health issue. So, but if you think about it now, just matching your brain every time they're doing something open your eyes, closing depth different parts of the brain of lighting up with more blood, every moment that, that really is. That's a tremendous fax to know about the human body. And, and, and just, you know how you really makes you kind of step back on. And look at the way, we ought to get the may ten. And, and, and yeah, I can I can hear the wonderment in your voice, and I don't blame you in the least, that that is must be just a really cool thing say, I'm gonna this is my job. I go investigate this stuff every day. Oh, yeah. Yeah. And they'll become. The next health has become a priority dementia in the decline. And so I just as I said, I got this got one grant seven years. Outstanding investigator grant does look at this topic, and then I got another one from the ice five years to look at small vessel disease and deficits in blood flow control, which happened early in life. You know, think about a lot of the things that we look at in the brain. You look at the end of life. But many diseases like small vessel disease there early deficit in delivering blood, the right place, right time..

National Academy National Academy of sciences Mark Nelson university of Vermont NIH Vermont researcher Anthony Davis university of monsoon Lerner Trump Tower FBI College of medicine Mike ledger Dave warshaw basketball Bill Nobel prize Boston
"national academy" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"national academy" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"As Joe said, you have no idea how good it is to see the sky have not seen him in twenty five years. So. So Joe, what are you working on? Currently. Let's talk a little bit about your progress in the industry a lot's going on. I mean, as you know, I took over National Academy ninety seven I sold in two thousand eight I did some television work random, a planet, some radio stop from currently, grooming. Ambassador to Connor, Pat. I'm the CEO of integral which is as you know, big grooming, professional grooming event. And I'm one of the partners here at world expo. We're trying to do something a little bit different. We're trying to do a. So it's like a why so interactive sporting type show for the general public on steroids. That's the best way. I can explain we've carpeted we've tried to make it a liberal extravagant and a little more family friendly. That's what trying to do. It's a beautiful thing. And again, we've just watched the progress happened over the years, we've watched the industry unfold, Joe, did you ever think for one second that it would turn into what it has? You know, I'm going to be honest with you. I think I did. I mean because I couldn't understand when I got involved in one thousand nine hundred ninety four was nine years old for John Nash. And he had a grooming song called super dogs. And it was funny because we were almost treated as if it wasn't a trade in some of the picked up on right away. And I always wondered so everyone has pets. Nobody really knew. What was? But once I started doing you realize well all pets need this. I knew it was going to grow. I'll tell you one thing I'm disappointed that hasn't grown as quickly as they professional hair industry. Fuck what I am seeing. And I do like it. And some of the groomers are going to hate me for saying this I like to see some of the regulations that the state now what states are putting in place a wanting to put in place as long as they work with the professionals to develop something that's going to work to keep people's pet safe. And it'll gentleman is our industry and make us better professionals. Joe I couldn't agree with you more on that as a dog groomer myself over the past thirty four years, thanks to you and John Nash of National Academy and everybody that worked there at the time. John stats, go the names, go on Loretta. Void. Listen, I couldn't agree with you more. Because and I think that the industry the professionals like you said really need to be the ones to be contacted as opposed to having this overall government overseeing that doesn't know the industry like guys like you. And I and everyone else Suzanne echo who's been involved in this from day one. We really need to regulate ourselves, first and educate them. Do you agree? What nobody knows. Better than we do. I mean, the general public really does not know what goes on behind the scenes of the grooming salon. And I always tell everyone you have a dog. See what goes on in the groom is sugar coat. I mean dogs. Could buy a dog a steak dinner on a bottle of wine that doesn't mean that.

Joe I John Nash National Academy CEO Connor Suzanne Loretta thirty four years twenty five years nine years one second
"national academy" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"national academy" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Here what kind of courses, and how long are the courses? So the main foundation. In the meat and potatoes of our grooming school is the bay their program, and then the professional pet stylists program. So that whole program together is about six hundred fifty hours, you could probably do it in about six hundred. We do have additional programs to teach people how to become professional cat Vermeer's is. Well, we also focus quite a bit on alternative treatments and therapies for animals. So I do teach Rakia as well. No raking master as well as a raking practitioner, which we do in the shop. So there's there's a lot that goes into our grooming schools. It's not completely unlike other grooming schools today, which there's a there's such a huge need for it. There's the need for good training. And so we're trying to do that. Do you guys focus a lot on safety, safety and sanitation is number one. Besides making the pet our top priority. So those are the two main things the animal comes first and safety and sanitation number one. Absolutely. Exactly. Agreed. Yeah. How long have you guys been established? So just for pause pet spot in my fifteenth year. Now, I started in two thousand four. Yup. I Dixon the rat race. I used to be in marketing for a global software firm, which was great until you know, the corporate machine kind of really makes you tired and not want to do it anymore. So I decided I love animals. I am creative. What could I do? So I went to school. I went to the National Academy and studied under Giovanni as did you? We're both alumni, which is very nice. And unfortunately, the National Academy that once was in New Jersey. It's no longer really exists. You'd have to go to to Nash in Kentucky. There's really no good schools around. So that we just started this year. So here we are. At the world dog acts foul kind of you know, this is our place are launching pad. If you will for the academy. So fifteen years is a pet spa. And now we're just going to try to start changing the grooming industry one. I don't know one area in New Jersey at a time until hopefully more than that. So and teaching one student at a time and teaching them the right way. Get.

National Academy New Jersey Rakia Kentucky Nash Giovanni six hundred fifty hours fifteen years
"national academy" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

11:07 min | 2 years ago

"national academy" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Seven six fifty eight fifty eight twentieth. Thank matthew. Well, like like to weigh in on what Alex is saying. Like you start off by saying that I am a pretty far right conservatives in most aspects of my life other than the use of cannabis. You know, I can't really give you contradict any fact city sane. But I have been a user for probably over ten years. Now, I'm a successful person. I don't have any form of psychosis. I don't know. No. We should never ever be selling this to our children or promoting this to our children. I think least establishing a minimum age of twenty one. Older. But I I know that he's citing a lot of medical facts in his book. But there are at times where I think that some of these bigger pharmaceutical companies are pushing a lot of negative facts against cannabis use just because they don't have the foothold in that industry. This is this is usually what happens just what we've got here. So you've got your experience. And and there's no way I can speaking at your experience, you know, you, and you know, what you doing what you don't do and the success that you've raised. There's no way. I can I can debate that I've got my opinion on it and my position on it. And I think that's why we have to come down in the middle of say, all right? Let's look at the facts, let's look at the research. And that's where we need to go. And that's what I like about his book is that it it throws the facts out there. A and this is not from pharmaceutical. This is from the National Academy of medicine. In two thousand seventeen they said grow cannabis use is likely to increase the risk of developing schizophrenia and other psychosis the higher the use the greater the risk. Also that regular cannabis use is likely to increase the risk for developing social anxiety disorder now again, that's that's from the National Academy of medicine. I it's hard for me to to dispute that I don't have any research that would go against that. But it would be something. That would throw the red flag up and say me if that's true, maybe we met her stop and take a look at this. No, you're absolutely right. I mean, just with the use of anything whether it be alcohol cannabis or just about anything. There are some risk involved the nineteen those risk, and I believe that everybody should be educated about those risks. But like I said I've been involved with this for over ten years now, and I just I don't know anybody who suffer suffers from psychosis. And I haven't been involved in any crime related. The incidences involving marijuana whatsoever. Like, I said, I've been successful throughout my life. I've. Well, I'm glad for you. And I wouldn't wish any harm to come to you and definitely wouldn't want you to be involved in any type of of criminal activity. So you're a good citizen in that. I'm again, I'm just going back to these to the research. And if it says, this is what's happening where you may not be the one and thank God, you're not. But if they're saying this is happening, and they've got the stats to do it again, it just like, okay, we need to stop. And we need to take a look at it. Matthew, thanks for the thanks for the call. Let's go next to two one. Telephone number's four nine zero fifty eight fifty eight one your thoughts. Yes. So here's my opinion about this. Now, if they're gonna open up a medical store for. Marijuana one thing is I know they're gonna open up in the south part of Fresno. They're not gonna open it up in the north side of bread because the south part of Fresno. A liquor store and a smoke shop every corner. So the people were complaining about it. It you live in the north. We're going gonna open it up in the north side of bread. I don't see that ever happening. Another thing. If you drink alcohol. Alcohol and marijuana. You get people drinking driving killing people every minute. Every two minutes someone's in active because. Alcohol. If you see a lot of violence with alcohol. I don't see it with American with marijuana. I grew up all my life. All my family members. Everybody had done. I never seen. None of that mental issues. I even myself at one point I did smoke it. I don't anymore, but I never changed. My attitude about it. Well, again, wan I'm I'm just I'm just going by the research. I I appreciate your your story, and that it hadn't affected you that way. But when I see the National Academy of medicine say, no, this is what is happening, and they cite their studies that they're doing it on. They're not pulling that out of thin air. But now listening by this way now about what's he could be a drug you re with me be drug. Not anything would be a drug. But yeah, I I mean, I know where you're going. Okay. Let me food for example, look at how many thousands of people are overweight right now. Who is a drug. You're a Christian. You should not be crazy for food at all. Okay. Well, there's health risk in in overindulgence and everything I don't wanna get too far off the subject you talked about drunk driving. And so we have national campaigns. That warn people about the dangers of it, you know, driving buzz driving drunk, and we do everything we can to tell people of the risk of that. And the in what it can do on a highway. We do the same thing when it comes to tobacco the dangers that it does. And and the cancer that it can cause I'm not hearing any of that about cannabis when the research says that yes, it also has negative effects and impact with it. Give you last word one. Then I gotta move on. I just I just hold the goes through. I actually, you know, I I'm not a fan of marijuana. But you know, if the people who smoke it wherever and let him do it. We'll say in one here's my problem with that. I hope it goes through. I I've used it before and live and let live they wanna do it do it. Well, I just think as a society, we have a little bit more of a responsibility. And we've done that in so many other areas of drug use of opioids of prescription drugs of alcohol of tobacco. I'm just not hearing those warnings about cannabis. I'm not hearing anybody stand up as they would in any other of these drugs that I've mentioned and mentioned the dangers of it because they're touting it is just hey, it's okay. Nothing's wrong with it. I smoked a little bit. When I was a kid, and I use it every now and then, but when I hear again from people like the National Academy. For medicine and several other studies the American journal of psychiatry when I hear them talk about it. I'm saying, well where are these? Why are people talking about why in the city of Fresno looking at those types of studies before these look at how much revenue that we can get from this. Let's go next to Blake Blake. You're up next. Hey, jim. So. Pretty conservative guy. I just wanted to say, you know, we were talking about this. I don't wanna ask your age. But sounds like you're older, gentlemen. Maybe you know, how how old are you think? I am Blake. Let's just put you on the spot. How do you think? I am. Fifties. God bless you. God bless you Blake. I'll let's leave it there. Jim. So what might want to get to the point is as far as the Republican party conservative party? You're you're finding a lot more. Liberally minded people as far as social issues are there are. It is Blake. I understand what you're saying to cut you off. And I got a lot of callers. So here's where everybody goes with that. So they're going to go Republican party conservatives liberal moral issues, Christian non-christian, and they're going to go down that line. That's not that's not the path. I'm going down. I'm going to bound the line of medical evidence. I'm going down reputable organizations that say this there's there's a danger to this. So if I start putting in the category of my opinion, my use what I think everybody's got an opinion it's like their nose. So just pick your own. But you can't dispute unless you've got the facts and the background to do that this type of evidence. That's all I'm saying, I'm not coming to it from my age, or or my generation or my religion or my party. I'm just saying, wait a minute. If the doctors are telling us there is a danger to this. Why are we talking about that before we talk about how much? Money. We're gonna make from it. That's all I'm saying. Let's go next to to Jim Jim you're up next. Yes. I know UC San Diego did a study. I'm people going into kidney failure from marijuana use. It's still being random studies being done it with people not necessarily had Kimmy Andrew beforehand. Diabetics and other people. They already have Kenny injuries do medical condition going into active kidney failure, can you? All United States citizens. Millions of dollars. Searched. It you d. Goal has done a study on marijuana. So see these are the types of things that I'm sure when they look those individuals say excuse me, sorry, you Republican or democrat before we check your kidney. Are you a conservative? Are you a Christian non Christian? What's your age? No again. And and I appreciate you bring that up. Jim. These are the types of studies now that are surfacing they've been there. I think what Alex said was, you know, these doctors are treating these things they don't have time to write a bunch of stuff up and get it out there. But it would be who've us that before we create another monster here that we stop and look at the evidence again, the facts, ma'am, just the facts, let's see if I would I travel more car. No, okay. Well, Mike hang on. I'll come back to you. And we'll pick this conversation up.

cannabis marijuana Jim Jim Blake Blake psychosis National Academy of medicine Fresno matthew Alex United States American journal of psychiatry Republican party National Academy San Diego Mike hang Kimmy Andrew Kenny conservative party ten years
"national academy" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"national academy" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"And that's true. I think both for people who believe in climate change and for people who deny it. Except maybe there are some scientists who do objective in who they objected working interpreted one way or the other. But for most of us. We believe in this. So we believe in that because we believe in people who have those beliefs. I happen to believe, you know, the consensus of National Academy of sciences went y no about Lima change. Right. And there's also this corollary. I mean, this is all connected with of the the religion of facts. Right. And you could say there were there were the journalistic religion of facts that if you just present the right facts, and if that facts, but I feel that in some ways also the crisis, we have facts and truth is also a reflection of this reality of us that you know, that you have articulated that is just kind of very much out there on the service of our life together in a new way that that a fact, however important facts are they are effect is not the same thing as a deep truth. Absolutely, absolutely. You know, what is happening in the United States in the last six months is, you know, it's really a testimony to that sort of process. You have people on the left in other probably possibly the majority of the country. Certainly, you know, the people that Donald Trump calls elites, and they cannot believe what they see in the polls every week, which is that behaviors that appeal to them to be crazy. And you know, worsen crazy have absolutely no effect on the Bob your larynx of the president among a group of his supporters. You read the New York Times..

Donald Trump National Academy of sciences New York Times Lima Bob United States president six months
"national academy" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"national academy" Discussed on KTRH

"Basically, and that trial last was stretched out over almost a year of of hearings. Although with breaks in between it wasn't like nonstop for a year. But it was a long trial and a lot of witnesses. And a lot of information for the jury to absorb. Public policy questions about you mentioned prosecutorial missed and and law enforcement misconduct as as being a lack of accountability. I agree that that has been a problem over time. Not in this particular, case the parks case. But in many other wrongful convictions. Honda CT by the authorities has been less than we would hope for a prosecutors duty is not to win their cases do constitutional duties to see the justices done, and I think the system loses sight of that sometimes in forensic testimony that kind of thing that tissue in parks case and in many other false convictions. There was an initiative underway. During the previous presidential administration that involved the Justice department law enforcement agencies academics, the defense bar and forensics experts themselves trying to to instill more scientific integrity into the use of of scientific and forensic testimony in courtroom, and it was a huge initiative. It'd been sparked by a report by the National Academy of sciences on how poor forensic scientists were in terms of having to research data to back them up that initiative was making progress, but it was scrapped by our. Presidential administration right now, there is no systematic review of at the national level of the poor quality of forensic sciences. So that is something that perhaps the states or professional organizations need to pick up that ball because they're all government has dropped that boss Edward and in her new trial that they're working on. They want to be able to point out. What evidence is not good? Yes. Well at centers around what we know about the behavior of fire today versus in nineteen eighty dollars eighty nine. And and that is that the we understand better. How flash over leaves a false trail that can appear suspicious. Explain flash over if you would rush over occurs in a very hot severe fire attacking a structure or room in a structure, and what happens is the temperatures become so high that everything that is combustible in that room were eventually.

National Academy of sciences Justice department Honda Edward nineteen eighty dollars
"national academy" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"national academy" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"And the one specifically that a new study focused on was what they call the second pandemic and the second pandemic is the pandemic that occurred in the middle ages from vote the 14th to the nineteenth centuries in that included the black deck death the blast at this on the we usually think of 'cause it's the one that wiped out twenty five million people a lot of people think and we it's sort of just common folk wisdom that the way people got it was that there were these rats in these rats carried the plague bacteria and then the fleas would bite the rats and then the fleas would get on people and that's how it would spread but these researchers who just publish this study in her pena if the proceedings of the national academy of sciences they did some really cool computer kind of rendering 's some schematic where they tried to look at the modeling the spread of the plague throughout europe the way that it actually happened based on records based on body counts based on things people wrote about and what they found was that if it were really the rats that were going into the communities and biting a lot of people or going into communities and giving felice to a lot of people and then moving on to another community it wouldn't have spread the way that it did and it's much more likely that the bontoc plague actually spread via fleas and ticks that were living on people so person to person transmission was much more likely than rat to person transmission now i don't think that that means that rats couldn't have been the initial vectors rats.

pena felice national academy of sciences europe
"national academy" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"national academy" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"Whom well we made it to our one hundred fifty th birthday and i have to say we don't look at day over a hundred and forty nine across the country canadians are marking are sesikwe centennial with celebrations that look back at our first century and a half and look ahead to what the future may bring so we decided to do something special ourselves to mark canada's one hundred and fifty is birthday we put in a call to the royal society of canada our national academy of arts humanities and sciences we asked them to invite their members to reflect on the last one hundred fifty years of science and canada taking a view from within their fields and so on today show we'll be bringing you the voices of some of canada's most accomplished researchers to talk about our nation's history and maybe a little about our future in science so let's start right in with reflections from canada's most recent nobel prize laureate i am aren't mcconnell professor emeritus at queen's university in kingston ontario and cowinner of the 2015 nobel prize in physics canada one fifty would like to illustrate some of the major contributions of canadians in the field of physics but describing the work the four canadian physics nobel prizewinners interestingly tour from alberda to from nova scotia an all were born in cities of fewer than forty thousand people the first is professor richard taylor from medicine hat alberta he is the most powerful electron microscope available at stanford university to show clearly that there were structures inside protons and neutrons called quarks.

canada nobel prize queen ontario alberda nova scotia professor richard taylor stanford university mark canada royal society of canada national academy of arts kingston one hundred fifty years
"national academy" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"national academy" Discussed on Latino USA

"In fact that hefty national academy of sciences report found that while immigrants might take the americanborn children of immigrants contribute more in federal state and local taxes than americans who have been here for multiple generations these children of immigrants straight up just earn more money and so they pay more taxes than other americans bottomline analysis that immigration is good for the country that is the bottom line when you read it you'll see very clearly yes when the national academy of sciences report added it all up that immigrants compete with some work is help out other workers lowest some wages boost i'll wages ultimately they found that quote immigration has an overall positive impact on longrun economic growth in the united states and quote conclusion overall immigrants do take an they take a lot but some of what they take is for the kids and over time those kiddo is boost the american economy and pay a whole lot of taxes okay wendy so when it comes down to immigrants in the economy how is race a factor are the folks who are competing for these lowskilled jobs other people of color or did you not see a trend there will then national academy of sciences report looked into this and the biggest losers of immigration worrying fact firstgeneration latinos and then soon after that it was africanamericans so white americans if you are a high school dropout you were still pot of what's considered is sort of the loses of immigration but the effect wasn't as strong on you as it was if you were a fast generation latino or african american and i guess wendy finally were you surprised.

united states wendy national academy of sciences