18 Burst results for "National Academies Of Sciences"

"national academies sciences" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

04:23 min | 2 months ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Again of the importance of this and there's some that are just not gonna do it what we do. Yeah i'm still trying But you know when you look at the numbers. They're they're pretty depressing. So you know. Fewer than twenty percent of adolescents. In tennessee and alabama and mississippi sienna are vaccinated probably similar numbers and the rural counties up in up in east texas and young adults. Not much better maybe. Thirty forty percent so the vast majority are are unvaccinated. And you know. Unfortunately we've got a very aggressive. Anti vaccine machine out there that has now been adopted by conservative elements. I mean if you watch fox news or newsmax at night You're just seeing these regular anti vaccine rants and you saw that the cpac Conference a week or so ago. elected numbers of the us congress going against vaccines coming from the ultra conservative groups. So countering that it's tough because there it's there there's they're not tuning into other sources of information so i'm doing but i can't reach out to conservative groups. It doesn't have to be this way. I i don't know quite how all this happened. How you know the as. I often say the republican party was never an anti-science party Abraham lincoln started the national academy sciences. Eisenhower started nasa. George w bush started pep far. This is something kind of new and bizarre and hopefully we can Undea link it fairly soon of course when it comes to adolescence. This is more the purview of their parents determining whether or not they get vaccinated but as you said young adults so we're talking twenty and thirty. Somethings i imagine Their high percentage that are not of those there may be some that may not be anti vaccines in in any in any dramatic way. But who may say to themselves. I'm young and healthy. So i can. Just you know if i get covered. I'll probably be fine. What do you say that. But but there actually are linked because that is part of the disinformation has content and the content that's used and it's called weaponized. Health communication is the statement that. Hey if you're young and healthy go to the gym. You don't need to get the cove in nineteen backs and look at the death rates among young people like you. They're really low what they don't tell you is that you can still be hospitalized. And they don't tell you about the long-term neurologic effects From from long-haul covert and so there's deliberate omission in that in that information. So that's that's where we have to really hit home and get people to understand that. There's still quite risk. dr peter. Hotels is the dean of the national school of tropical medicine at baylor college of medicine. Dr houghton says thanks for the.

national academy sciences Undea sienna cpac mississippi fox news alabama tennessee George w bush Abraham lincoln texas Eisenhower republican party congress nasa us dr peter national school of tropical me
"national academies sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:05 min | 6 months ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

"South america somewhere anyway. They found evidence of genetic astro astro astro asian influence in more parts of south america. If you weren't aware that they had discovered any genetic early astro asian influence in south america. Apparently there was. I didn't even know about this study. Somehow i missed it as well back in two thousand fifteen researchers found with described as australasian influence in native people. Living in the amazon that would be people with genetic markers associated with the early populations of south asia australia and melanesia papers published in the proceedings. National academy sciences group now describes studying the next round. Study of genomic data set from multiple south american populations across the continent that are also showing this sign so theories that explain how the signal could have been introduced in the people living in south. America are tough considering. It has not been found in any early people. Living in north america current population theory is that north american and south america and north american south america populated by people migrating over from asia via siberia to alaska than waiting for glacial event to melt and it continuing down. And then populating. North america and south america although they might have kind of headed to south america coast quicker served top because while this is upheld by most of the evidence we have is perfect Human activity that we've seen in the americas is now this cave in mexico. That's thirty thousand years old. Our number of south american sites that are likely somewhere between thirty thousand year old age and then the oldest stuff in north america. So if you were just going to go off of no other information but the age of the site you would say started in. Mexico headed to south america and then moved to north america. Now the genetic information still is backing up. The transition from siberia to the americas. That's that's still the correct overriding but this experiment. That that they just involved collecting blood samples from native peoples. All across the mid section of south american continent connected the genetic analysis and all they studied samples from three hundred eighty three people including four hundred and thirty eight thousand plus markers than the genome that they were looking for. Research found the australasian marker and native people living their brazilian plateau in the center of the country and also those living in the western part of the country. The also found the signal from took tuna people in peru finding suggests migrations of people were far more widespread in south america than were thought. The findings also suggest that there were a couple of waves of such migration. This is led satistics scrutiny. Previous theories about how people got to south america. Some suggest though that this may be a problem because many lineages north america were wiped out by european colonial genocide. So we may not have a full picture of north american genome. And i don't know how much access we have to ancient genome because of some brady issues. That have taken place where we're not really allowed to do. A lot of analysis without a lot of express permission and that permission has been begrudging overtime. Look at ancient ovulation but it's for the most part We don't have a very good map of north american Yeah closer study though. They also think there's another says if we look at north american population the data that we do have. We should eventually find the signal there as well. Most enticing possibility is of course. The population of early people from australasia's somehow made their way all the way across civic directly to the shores of south america. Which is not supported by any other evidence at this point. Aside from the facts as genetic the genetic marker. Yeah that's a pretty good signal but it can't be ruled out because of that genetic marker so so yeah like. There's a lot of a lot of interesting questions that arrive. Arise for this. People have road across the indian ocean. Fake can mean. That's the other thing about it to riches wouldn't need to be that big of a.

North america australasia South america south america asia north america alaska north american Mexico mexico peru indian ocean America thirty thousand year siberia south asia australia four hundred and thirty eight two thousand fifteen researche thirty thousand years old americas
"national academies sciences" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"So this is the punchline. Why was the medical director at Boston Public Health Commission and? A. Brooklyn sponsored events we are off the public health preparedness works very closely with partners within Boston. Metro by scenario including Brookline as well as state and federal partners on these preparedness activities. Sue it is important to note that The City of Boston have addressed vaccine preparedness in subscription. I think that the primary reason I was invited to speak about this is thinking about from a public health perspective when a scene is available, how be distributed? So this is something that on a HP thinks about honore on a regular basis, we create a flu season operations plan every year with a key objects which are two main such maintain ongoing, similar elation awareness for our city healthcare partners, the general public, and our and our the Metro Boston in statement in federal partners we also develop and implement an equal accede plan in order to reduce disease transmission. We provide timely inaccurate public health information on the flu and we coordinate incident command across the region that I mentioned so I recognize that I keep on talking about the flu. And Covert Nineteen pandemic is clearly the ramifications of. Pandemic and the flu or very different different that a typical flu season. But I wanted to mention all that background because city of certain. Again, a regional partners strong foundation an adjusting concerns of equity and prioritization when it comes to accede distribution in efforts to reduce the spread of infectious disease. So this includes strong partnerships and communication chains within our community again, with our state and regional partners, and so you know as we think about of vaccine development and how covid nineteen back seen. Will be distributed. We have to recognize that we do have an existing infrastructure in place. In which we could. Build, the foundation of a vaccine distribution. So when it comes specifically to go nineteen vaccine on, there are a couple of key points I wanted to mention So Dr Cy said it very eloquently, but just to repeat this vaccine is just one fool at our disposal through the spread of the disease face coverings social distancing frequent testing handwashing. These are all critical when it comes any respiratory illness there is no silver bullet that's gonNA solve our problem. So even when we do have a vaccine available, it is imperative that we utilize all the tools that we have. To Stop the spread of the disease including the vaccine is just one piece of a very large puzzle. And the second point I wanted to make about Kobe nineteen specifically that many of organizations including Center for Disease Control in the National Academies Science Medicine.

flu Boston Public Health Commissio Boston Center for Disease Control medical director Brookline Brooklyn Pandemic HP Dr Cy honore Kobe National Academies Science Med
"national academies sciences" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"But really I I'd say also of courses. Try to broaden the conversation. And I hope I've done that. However imperfectly or at least in part over hundred interviews. Until after the sociologist or the social anthropologist. Who Studies the healthcare industry. Amongst others someday I'll get to them. So that's that's largely it I will say when I looked into this and twenty ten twenty eleven. There are few podcasts on healthcare policy falsely now there are a lot more. My view is the more the Merrier, and in fact, any listener who wants to start their own, I'm happy to tell them what I know about how to do this. But that's largely, we'll say more focused on the content I could do a better job of social media broadcasting this, but fortunately I've stayed at long enough and I think. A, good number of people are least aware that I'm at this If I didn't make no I, should that the reason I spent a lot of time on the environment is of course. It's almost insane to say this, but we interact with the environment constantly, whenever never not interacting with the environment. important to note, but it is important moreover probably to note that according to Reputable National Academy Sciences. The environment accounts for thirty percent of premature mortality. So. It's substantially responsible for early death. Healthcare interestingly enough only counts ten percent to put in perspective. so. My tension in the environment and the climate crisis I. Think is well founded. for that reason, and of course, because we are truly getting very close, if not, and some portions of the world have arrived. At tipping points where we have uncontrolled release of methane gas, much more powerful greenhouse gas. And it should be sobering that last November. Of course eleven, thousand scientists from one hundred fifty three nations said the earth is facing today climate emergency that was published that letter in bioscience, but that of course went completely ignored. if we don't get on top of that subject. Really else's, is siphoning. David I wanna go back to something. You mentioned before about the Paris Agreement! less a mistake. That's completely voluntary right? I mean there's no penalty for a country, not meeting its self set goals. That's correct so by pulling out. We're basically just saying.

Reputable National Academy Sci Paris David
"national academies sciences" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

08:32 min | 2 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on KTOK

"Yes, Dr Claes's the one that tracks Santa for me on my. Christmas. Absolutely. And that will be here before we know it, but we've got some some weather to get through unfortunately between now, and then, and we have guess we have weather, and we have documentaries and one of the things I loved about the the spirit of the documentary that people can see about the Oklahoma. Isn't it is the fact that there's no bedlam in this? It's you know issue and a lot of other people working together. Give us the cliff notes. If you will what is the Oklahoma resonant sure, the Oklahoma measurement is our states weather network of a hundred twenty stations. There's at least one in every county, and it reports all of the important weather conditions that forecasters need the note to keep everybody safe. Does that every five minutes around the clock twenty four seven three sixty five and it's been doing that for twenty five years with over five billion observations now in the arc. Five. Five billion observations. What does that mean? So it means that we now have this really long term record. You know, twenty five years is pretty good good time chunk to be able to study how Oklahoma's climate might be changing. But more importantly, putting information into the hands of public safety officials weather forecasters emergency managers to help keep people safe every time you look at the six or ten o'clock news on TV and see all those numbers all over the map of those are from the Oklahoma as an from the Oklahoma mezzanine it. So I would say you all created the Oklahoma standard, and we're talking whether what is the back story where to where did the idea come from. So the the backstory has all of these convergent tracks of which some of it was serendipitous. But then the the other half of it was visionary. It was scientists at Oklahoma state university who really needed to have better weather in. Mation associated with their agriculture programs, which are absolutely world renown at the same time of the weather folks in Norman were also looking especially coming on the heels of the Tulsa floods that if we had better rain information around the state that we would do a better job with flood forecasting. So it just so happened that the oh, you folks that were looking at the weather side and the folks that we're looking at the eggs, I'd kinda got wind of one another and everybody was talking about whether and so those two groups put their heads together. And like you said it wasn't bedlam. It was collaboration at that point. And are scientists in Norman and the scientists and Stillwater have had this amazing partnership for twenty five years, and we hope it continues forever and has this amazing partnership funded. So we have several pots of money that we have to sort of cobbled together to keep everything. Running for us to be the gold standard. Which is what the national academies sciences called us. We run the premier network on the planet. And we have a lot of folks around the world that are trying to emulate us to do that. It's about a two million dollar operation each year. But from that two million dollars in investment, we've been saving hundreds of millions of dollars for agriculture uses protection of life and property at cetera. So the return on the investment here is huge about half of it is funded by the state of Oklahoma and the other half is grants and federal dollars and user fees from our TV stations and private sector companies that use the information. So it's about a million million split. So about one million from the state and one million from these other sources, well, I was tenting a few weeks ago with my co host of the garden show, which we call the garden party his name. Is Jamie Ashmore? He's the curator special gardens et a wish he okay, see save the enter saved them as a knit save the business because he had heard that the mezzanine it was in jeopardy. So we hope that is never in jeopardy, but boy funding every year, especially in the the funding climate that we're in. We're you know, we've just had this, you know, several years of downstate budgets and cuts and things like that. While at the same time, I guess what the information the individual hurt is the fact that the budget that arrived at the president's office of the president's budget didn't have any funds for Mezin at in it. So the federal funding would be taken away. That would in fact be a huge hit for us. Because like I said the state funds about half of it. And then our ability to fund the other half of it comes from that federal sources, well as grants and things like that. So yes, if that's funding were to go away. It would do away with the as it. But boy, it would make it really really hard for us to continue to operate at the gold standard excellent level that we do today. So at the risk of being. Incorrect or politically incorrect is this something we need to contact our two senators contact all of our. Right. I think any any opportunity for us to tell our story. And again that was one of the reasons for the documentary was not only celebratory, but also to just get the word out of what the Mezin it is what it does I will say this. We got one of the nicest letters I've ever seen from Senator Inhofe celebrating our twenty fifth and his office was fantastic and recognizing when you watch the documentary that's coming up on Thursday at seven thirty on OAT a you'll see Frank Lucas. So congressman Lucas has been a huge supporter of ours. And you'll you'll see him as part of that documentary as well. He was actually in the state house when governor Bellman way back in the day, actually sort of put us in into legislation and got us going. So so we do have great friends in the Oklahoma congressional district. But a another word of hey, we would love to say Byzantine. It is. Always appreciated. It's necessary. Because we've really haven't said what the mezzanine it tells us. I mean, I do not have a canola crop out there. I do not have. I'm just your classic weather fan. I love you know, what's going on love to know how much rain. There was all of the state. I like to know how much rain there was three days ago. I like to know what the do point is. I like to know all this. So everybody can use the mizzen it for their own reasons and purpose, and it's very scientific mean, why don't I let you talk about it. Instead, I think you've hit on something really key here. Right. It's something for everybody. That's one of the mazing visions of the mezzanine. It was that when the scientists from the two universities got together. It wasn't just for a single purpose. Right. It was for everyone. I'm so anybody in the state, whether you're an amateur sort of weather hobby. I just want to know what's going on whether you're a gardener. Whether you are doing landscaping here Gatien, whether you're doing firefighting emergency management the way as an is constructed is that there is valuable information there for everyone just recently like last year when we had the wildfires in twenty eight teen we estimate approximately ninety five million dollars of property with save because people were aware of a wind shift which was coming in which was going to change the direction of the fire ended allowed people to pre deploy resources and actually get a handle on the fact that that fire was going to change behavior before it did. And so it's a proactive tool that allows people across the state to manage their crops to manage production, planting spraying emergency management everything. Because I I know that our weather people, you know, issue the. The flash flood watches and all that stuff. But it's so nice.

Oklahoma Oklahoma state university Norman Mezin Dr Claes Santa president Senator Inhofe Tulsa Jamie Ashmore congressman Lucas Frank Lucas Gatien governor Bellman OAT twenty five years ninety five million dollars two million dollars two million dollar
"national academies sciences" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

13:56 min | 2 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Some pathology how early should be on so much. Much. I think usually. Somewhere between five and six. There are some parents that elect to start them a little bit earlier. And I think that's fine. As long as the blood test is done to see what the levels are because your body is hyper metabolic, and you're growing from a child to an adult. So your body's making cells in the most spectacular rate. I looked online to see what the average rate of cell division is, you know, how many cells are dividing every second just as a, you know, trivia comment, and I think the number was twenty nine with thirty zeroes after it. So twenty nine with thirty zero. I don't even know what that number would be divide every second when you're about fifteen. So when you get older, though, cells are not dividing in that number, and we see changes in all of our tissues because we're losing new cells, and we can't replace those. And as telomeres are snippet, you know, genetically we divide cells when we snip off the tips, the ends of our telomeres than we h faster as well. And of course, everybody knows if you smoke or drink too much alcohol, you do all the bad things. Then your body will age faster. Might offer suggestions one of your distinctions that you're an osteopathic physician. Yup. Explain to the public included. Jackie what osteopath osteopathic physicians and allopathic, MD physicians. Have the same exact licensed to practice in New York? It doesn't say Chris Calloway DO on my medical licenses says, Chris Kelsey, I'm licensed to practice medicine surgery. The state of New York, so every state has that when you like the idea of osteopathic medicine, which is the original holistic approach where doctors in this country, looking at the whole person, we're looking at underlying causes as opposed to trying to change or treat symptoms. We also invented the idea of using manipulation to help to correct dysfunction within your back in positioning, a rotation of your vertebrae. So there's a great deal of physical medicine and therapy that we do, and we learn, you know, even starting the first day of medical school. So for many osteopathic doctors we go into different types of residency. I'm going to medicine some going to practice some gun to Pedes OBGYN surgery, neurosurgery, Ortho. You can go into any residency you want because the entire country sees us both as equals we just have a little bit more of the knowledge in terms of hands on doing the manipulation. And we typically lean towards going into family medicine as opposed to going into surgical specialties. So if you look at all the deals in the country, they're the overwhelming number of deals the largest percent, go into family medicine, internal medicine has opposed to going into specially because we want to be more effective to more people in a variety of ways instead of becoming an ultra high specialized. Searchable field or even research. A lot of us. Don't really go into research because you know, our enjoyment is with patient interaction. You know day to day shaking your hand. Hi, how are you? Let's talk, you know. So I I always liked the idea. And that's why I went to osteopathic school. Hi, Dr Kalpana gift. Thank you, sir. Thank you so much once again, you've kind Burton always great to talk to you. Okay. Next. Caller, what eight hundred eight four eight WABC you can call in now. One eight hundred eighty eight nine to two Victor in freehold. How are you? Doc macaque say thank you very much for taking my call. Sure. I actually talked to you last week. It's me it gets me once again. Okay. Well, thank you for other cold. I got a question for you. I kinda horrify baby the other day 'cause I'm the one that has a chronic gastritis. Yeah. But also, I have I had dry and and dryness of the mouth. So right away. I you know, how we go on the computer. Yeah. For a lot of people. It's a dangerous thing because they think they have a hundred diseases that they probably don't have but dry dry mouth could be Shogren. It could be not immune mechanism. I imagine the gas tries for probably be slightly separate from that. Because the patients I've seen that have show grins when we test them don't necessarily have to have. The issues. With the stomach. Right. Right. I went to my primary physician day did a blood test. They did a shark grins anti called SS a essay Rohan. Yeah. Why nothing was like normal range. You know, it was normal. Does that specifically mean to I don't have it? Well, it means you're not showing antibodies for it. So not every disease when you present to the doctor, and he reviews your tests will be, you know, textbook opened the book. Here are all the normal blood tests, and they're all positive here all the symptoms and the role there. So the reason why for autoimmune disorders it takes a while to be able to. Make a diagnosis, and that could be a mess. You know, lupus rheumatoid variety of these things is because they don't show up with all the blood test positive anyone given point a person can have it, and it may take a while before those blood test markers or the auto immune markers are buddies start to show, and there are some people for example that have rheumatoid, but they're bloods negative. So the doctor obviously has to make his decision as always. Not based just on the blood test. But on the clinical presentation with the patient saying what they can see what they can feel they examine you. And of course, the testing I mean that holds true for a variety of different medical problems. And of course, lime disease is probably one of the most tricky because there are a lot of people have lime disease, but the blood test doesn't show it because the creature can be inside your cells and evade your antibodies. So. There has to be evaluated very very specific way. So what is there is there? Any other type, of course of adventure and done other causes for what the dryer the stomach. Dry and the dry mouth. Could be some people have issues with fillings near tea, or they have heavy metal exposure that can that can create the symptoms. Sometimes allergies will do that. Because your body is tired of trying to make some of those natural liquidity tears to help to flush away things that you might be allergic to. So there are a variety of other underlying causes and again for the stomach and kids would be food allergy it could be bacteria, virus, fungus, parasite, etc. Did you take the carves out of your diet to try to improve your stomach? Yeah. Yeah. I start definitely last week. Checking the cars and start try take take the carbs, the grains completely out. And then let us know what happens. Thank you so much for your call. Okay. Phone lines are open if you'd like to call in do. So now, let's go to Perry in Brooklyn. How are you? Great. It's another Bopper knowing your air palm. Vitamin C. And all these other accounting. Rubies are not what a scam. Well, no, well, I just told you guys before and you could look this up online, and you can prove him to be wrong. He obviously clearly has no experience in doing any of this. And he clearly hasn't taken courses, you know, from the American college of advancement in medicine or the American. Academy of anti-aging medicine. The proceedings of the National Academy of sciences, you could write this down. The preceding of the National Academy of sciences has terrific study on intravenous vitamin c helping to selectively kill cancer cells. So you could look that up online. He obviously has the scene that because he doesn't get online to look at those things if you even look at intravenous vitamin c studies and you put that into scholar dot Google. Okay. Which is all the medical research exists. There are there are four hundred nine thousand results of studies on high dose vitamin C IV coming from facilities all over the world. Now, I don't understand how a person who. And this is a doctor is actually a doctor. No because it's not fair. Home on the radio gone all the stages. Yeah. I mean, I still don't know who that is. And I don't know what his his experience or his training is. But you know, you anybody else can go to scholar dot Google dot com and just plugging introverted intravenous vitamin c and you'll see four hundred thousand nine results new insights to vitamin c from college review of high dose vitamin seen travec as an anticancer agent. You know, four hundred thousand four hundred thousand it's not something that well, maybe. Linus Pauling who had two unshared Nobel prizes was one of the most brilliant men of our time and certainly of all time, and he was a huge proponent of vitamin c he and you and Cameron started doing vitamin c research years and years ago, probably forty fifty sixty years ago. But you have to look at this information. And this is not just you know somewhere. Forgive me for people that might live in Timbuktu someone in Timbuktu said. Yeah, vitamin C is good. There are studies from the national health studies from the preceding the National Academy sciences. So, you know, I think realistically you have to look at a large body of information instead of just a small amount of information. This. Dr obviously does not do nutritional medicine. A cancer doctor or no. Can I bit therapy uses radio thirty while? Yeah. That's because he wants people to come in and spend twenty to thirty or forty thousand dollars on his treatment. So I I know who you're talking about. But he's the one anything to get into way of his radiotherapy. And poor pines never ever ever seen any of a work. It's not all I can tell you you can go and look at four hundred nine thousand articles studies four nine thousand. So he's protecting his ability to charge more money for treatment. So that's basically it. That's my opinion, you know, but I can show you and you could look online go online now, go to scholar dot Google dot com. And look at those studies on intravenous vitamin c. Nine thousand articles. I'm not gonna continue to go on and talk about what he says. He doesn't say you could read the info and make your mind up on your own. There are a lot of doctors that are traditional doctors who don't believe in anything beyond what they do. And in many cases, I think it's just wrong like the doctors who prescribed weight loss pills like doctors who might use drugs that have bad side effects. So, you know, I just believe in being dramatically safer. I believe in getting results. So and that individual doesn't have stage four cancer patients still alive after years after years as does Dr foresight than I've seen it. Years ago when I went to his first course there were seven hundred people that had spectacular survival with stage, four cancer, and he used a variety of things, including a blood test sent out to Greece to look at. What has the most effect on killing the cancer vitamin C IV's three times a week? And then the intravenous twice a week with a little bit of insulin to lower the blood sugar opened up cancer cells and put an either vitamins some of the lowest dose of chemo. It's called instantly temptation therapy. And he's got the greatest cancer results in the world. So no one's better than Forsyth. Okay. Let's go to our next caller. Let's go to Gerald in Cleveland. Hi, how are you? Great. Yeah. I'm looking in my catalog about vitamin d. Doctorate one Packers track. Fifteen thousand dollars once. Sure. Would probably be allowed to take at once. I mean, most of our patients when we check their blood and even ones who are low in vitamin c we give them five thousand units and reject him to make sure they're in the right ranges, obviously, it's d three. Okay. So ideally, you know, the vitamin d three is the one you want to have, you know, in your body at good levels throughout the course of the entire day. So that's why we'll test will put people on recommendations and retested adjust accordingly because some big studies in Europe that have been running for twelve years or more talk about vitamin d decreasing the risk of cancers by a great deal by seventy seven percent. So for me three. Three d three's. The best..

National Academy of sciences gastritis Chris Calloway freehold New York Chris Kelsey Europe Packers WABC Forsyth Burton Shogren Cleveland Linus Pauling
"national academies sciences" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Not supported by any scientific evidence. They just guess why is the topic Jeffrey so hot in heated? That's a perfect question. It is very hot in heated because what's happening. You know, as we opened up in the beginning is you've got to conversations you've got one in front of the curtain and one behind the curtain in front of the curtain is what students here in the classroom and in the the high school classroom the university classroom. The other is what's going on behind the curtain. I just found and I didn't put this in my book on the internet. You can find a petition scientific dissent from Darwinism. And it's on you can find on the internet. And it says we are skeptical of claims for the ability of random mutation and natural selection to account for the complexity of life. Careful examination of the evidence of Darwinian theory should be encouraged and over. Five hundred scientists have Stein this thing, it's at descent from Darwin dot ORG. I don't have anything to do with this organization. I just found. In fact, I wish founded earlier I would have put it in my book. But so what you've got is, you know, behind the curtain. You got a lot of scientists that are saying we don't really think this thing adds up and in chapter after chapter in my book, I lay out what these people what they're publishing I've got all kinds of evidence to share and it comes from scientists. And that it's really it's really in bad shape. Am I right in assuming Jeffrey that if you believe in evolution, you don't believe in the creator type theory, and if you believe in God, then you don't believe in evolution. Why can't there be a mix of both? Well, there there are there's a continue. Him out there. And there there is a group of people who are pushing it theory calls theistic evolution. And so those would be people in the faith community who believe that you can resolve evolution as being true. And and also that the bible is true, for example. But then they're highly criticized by by others in the faith community, they say, well, you're just saying that God was a dummy created something and then he walked away. So I don't really get in the middle of that argument. But I certainly do shine a light on science scientists themselves arguing with each other 'cause that's a huge issue. And here's here's another example, National Academy sciences. They wrote a book in two thousand eight I got it in front of me. You can you can download for free as a PDF it's called science evolution and creationism. And in this book, basically, they're just pushing. They're saying evolution is a fact. Evolution is a fact and what will be true though, that Darwin also believed in God. You know? That's that's a good question. Darwin was kind of. He was accused sort of ambivalent about guy. He really said as little as possible. I mean, he wasn't religious. No. But, but I think he believed in some kind of, you know, ultimate creator. Well, well, he did. And what's interesting is I've got a copy of Darwin's book reading my hand here on the origin of species, you can just walk into the bookstore and buy it and towards the back of the book Darwin's says to my mind it accords better with what we know. The laws impressed on matter by the creator the production and extinction of past and president inhabitants of the world should have been dude secondary causes. So he refers to the creator. And then he does it again. He doesn't in the very last sentence of on the origin species. It just turn to the last page, and he says, dares a grandparent. This view of life with several powers having been originally breathed by the creator in a few forms or into one. So I mean, if Darwin stood in the university classroom and said, it'd be fired. Jeffrey, stay with us..

Jeffrey National Academy sciences Stein president
"national academies sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"It's not supported by any scientific evidence. They just guess why is the topic Jeffrey so hot in heated? That's a perfect question. It is very hot in heated because what's happening. You know, as we open up in the beginning is you've got to conversations you've got one in front of the curtain one behind the curtain in front of the curtain is what students here in the classroom and in the the high school classrooms the university classroom. The other is what's going on behind the curtain. I just found and I didn't put this in my book on the internet. You can find a petition a scientific dissent from Darwinism. And it's on if you can find it on the internet, and it says we are skeptical of claims for the ability of random mutation and natural selection to account for the complexity of life. Careful examination of the evidence for Darwinian theory should be encouraged and over five. Five hundred scientists have signed this thing it's at dissent from Darwin dot ORG. I don't have anything to do with this organization. Founded in fact, I wish I found it earlier. I would have put it in my book. But so what you've got is, you know, behind the curtain. You got a lot of scientists that are saying we don't really think this thing adds up and in chapter after chapter in my book, I lay out what these people what they're publishing I've got all kinds of evidence to share it comes from scientists. And that it's really it's really in bad shape in my right in a show me Jeffrey that if you believe in of Aleutian, you don't believe in the creator type theory, and if you believe in God, then you don't believe in evolution. Why can't there be a mix of both? Well, there there are. There's a continuing out there. And there there is a group of people who are pushing a theory called DS stick evolution. And so those would be people in the faith community who believe that you can resolve evolution. As being true. And and also that the bible is true, for example. But then they're highly criticized by by others in the faith community that they say, wow, you're just saying that God was a dummy created something then any walked away. So I don't really get in the middle of that argument. But I certainly do shine a light on science scientists themselves arguing with each other. 'cause that's a huge issue. And here's a here's another example, National Academy sciences. They wrote a book in two thousand eight I got it in front of me. You can you can download this for free as a PDF it's called science evolution and creationism. And in this book, basically, they're just pushing. Nursing evolution. As a fact Evelyn is a fact and will be true though, that Darwin also believed in God. That's a good question. Darwin was kind of. He was accused sort of Bev about guy. He really said as little as possible. I mean, he wasn't religious. No. But but I think he believed in some kind of alternate creator. Well, he did. And what's interesting is I've got a copy of Darwin's book right in my hand here on the origin of species, you can just walk into the bookstore and buy it and towards the back of the book Darwin's says to my mind it accords better with what we know. The laws impressed on matter by the creator the production and extinction of past and president inhabitants of the world should have been dude secondary causes. So he refers to the creator. And then he does it again. He does in the very last sentence of on the origin species. It just turn it last page, and he says, dares a grandparent. This view of life with its several powers having been originally breathed by the creator in a few forms or into one. So I mean, if Darwin stood in the university classroom and said. It'd be fired Jeffrey stay with.

Jeffrey Aleutian National Academy sciences Bev Evelyn president
"national academies sciences" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"And it says we are skeptical of claims for the ability of random mutation and natural selection to account for the complexity of life. Careful examination of the evidence of Darwinian theory should be encouraged and over five. Five hundred scientists have signed this thing it's at dissent from Darwin dot ORG. I don't have anything to do with this organization. I just found. In fact, I wish founded earlier I would have put it in my book. But so what you've got is, you know, behind the curtain. You got a lot of scientists city saying we don't really think this thing adds up and in chapter after chapter in my book, I lay out what these people what they're publishing I've I've got all kinds of evidence to share and it comes from scientists. And that it's really it's really in bad shape in my right in a Suming Jeffrey that if you believe in of Aleutian, you don't believe in the creator type theory, and if you believe in God, then you don't believe in evolution. Why can't there be a mix of both? Well, there there are I continue. Doing out there. And there there is a group of people who are pushing it theory calls the stick evolution. And so those would be people in the faith community who believe that you can resolve evolution as being true. And and also that the bible is true, for example. But then they're highly criticized by by others in the faith community, they say, well, you just saying that God was a dummy created something and then he walked away. So I don't really get in the middle of that argument. But I certainly do shine a light on science scientists themselves arguing with each other 'cause that's a huge issue. And here's here's another example, National Academy sciences. They wrote a book in two thousand eight I got it in front of me. You can you can download this for free as a PDF it's called saints evolution and creationism. And in this book, basically, they're just pushing. They're saying evolution as a fact. Evolution is a fact and will be it's an a true though that Darwin also believed in God. You know? That's that's a good question. Darwin was kind of. He was accused sort of ambivalent about guy. He he really said as little as possible. I mean, he wasn't religious. No. But, but I think he believed in some kind of, you know, ultimate creator. Well, well, he he did. And what's interesting is I've got a copy of Darwin's book right in my hand here on the origin of species, you can just walk into the bookstore and bias and towards the back of the book Darwin's says to my mind it accords better with what we know. The laws impressed on matter. By the creator that the production and extinction of past and president inhabitants of the world should have been dude secondary causes. So he refers to the creator. And then he does it again. He doesn't in the very last sentence of on the origin of species just turn to the last page, and he says dares a grander. This view of life winning several powers having been originally breathed by the creator in a few forms or into one. So I mean, if Darwin's stood in the university classroom and said this he'll be fired. Jeffrey, stay with us. We're coming back to talk more on coast to coast. The coast website is now streamline for mobile.

Jeffrey Aleutian National Academy sciences president
"national academies sciences" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

14:36 min | 2 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Give me a call coming up tomorrow at ten troubleshooter. Tom Martino on six thirty. I also have a Hispanics should work harder. Symbolize that's one of the things I've been saying for a long time. That they ought not to be codified in their communities, but make sure that all of their kids are learning to speaking feel comfortable communities, and that's gonna take outreach on both sides. Frankly. Poor Tom Brokaw. Got a lot of blowback for that statement. We talked about it a little bit last night. In fact, that I guess I pointed out that, you know, new immigrants don't always speak English. Very well. But the next generation generally does that was the case in my family with my great grandparents coming from. What is now Ukraine back? Then it was it was Russia. They were German, and my great grandmother did not speak English. She she learned to speak it. Okay. By the time. She died, and she never learned to write it, my grandparents, however, could speak German and English and my dad could speak. I think he told me he could only do the swear words in German, and as for me, I can probably order a beer and German, and that's about it that seems to be the process with most was most immigrants, and I when people talk about Hispanic. Immigrants. It seems to me you're making a broad statement about a lot of different people, including Cuban-Americans, you know, south southwest Hispanics, many of whom their families predate nationhood there. There's also Puerto Ricans who are Americans, and there's a lot of different people groups, including recent Americans, or at least recent immigrants from Central America that are just in the process of assimilation. So I wanted to bring on some someone to talk about it. Because there were a number of comments that came up on our text line at five seven seven three nine also very thoughtful letter from David Peterson who said, hey, isn't the the the dropout rate for Hispanic kids and indicated that there might be a problem with simulation with that. I bring on David beer, he is an immigration analyst with the buyer. Okay. Sorry. I was thinking about German beer buyer. David buyer. And he's with the Cato Institute, you could take check him out at Kato. It's fabulous libertarian think. Tank in Washington DC sorry about the name David buyer. But welcome to the show. You had it. Right. The first time actually I did. It's beer Dutch. German name. So you had the pronunciation just right? Nice. Nice. Nice. That's a that's a that's a great. That's a great last name to have. Right. Because there is a good thing. Yes. It is. And the beer in German. It's Embiid Bitta, which is you know, a beer place. So David beer in this case. You wrote an interesting piece, and then you were quoted also this morning in a CNN dot com piece that perhaps what Tom Brokaw had to say about immigrants may not have been all that. Correct. Yeah. I mean, really the fundamental problem is that people look at the fact that we have so many recent immigrants in the United States, and here Spanish more as an indication that immigrants in general are not assimilating. And because of that that ultimately leads the false conclusion. Really distorts your perspective. When you have you see recent arrivals coming in? And yeah, they don't speak English and many of them have low levels of education. They're performing lower wage jobs, and that ultimately informs the perspective that well over time. People are not assimilating. But in reality, it's just the fact that you have so many people who are coming in from abroad that you are aware of people speaking, another language or performing certain types of jobs. From those countries. Do an interesting thing in your paper. I put your paper up at my Facebook page, which is Krista L K for the L stands for lucky. I'm kidding sense. For Lynn, but you can take it out there. Also at Christopher's my Twitter account. I've got got the piece up there as well. Do kind of an interesting comparison between I immigrants the people who who come here and their kids, and there really is a significant difference between those two generations is they're not. It's huge. I mean, it's it's really lighten day if you look at any measure of economic or social assimilation, you know. Of course, the first generation, you know, they're coming as adults. You know, they speak a certain language their education levels, really set for life. And that really determines their economic outcomes in many respects, the second generation is where you see the growth, and if you're looking in particular at central Americans who are now the largest group of people who are being apprehended at the border and really the focal point of so much of the political conversation is about what to do these people the second generation for central Americans shows, no difference between them and other natives when it comes to educational attainment poverty levels after childhood, of course, growing up in your parents home as the second generation person, you're likely to be more likely to grow up in poverty, but they're actually making larger games than other natives in adulthood in reducing their in poverty level. So a variety of different metrics, you can look at and all of them show huge game. For that. Second generation, you know, which is another example, of course, that's commonly referenced ninety seven percent of central Americans Central American ancestry who were born in the United States, speak English. Well, and or better, and you know that that's a monumental game. Between the first and second generation talking with David beer, he has an immigration analyst at the Cato Institute, and a listener also by the name of David wrote in saying that that perhaps the graduation rates of Hispanic Americans which are lower than Caucasian Americans. That is an indication that perhaps simulation is not taking place. How would you respond to that? Well, there's a couple of different things you can focus on here when it comes to Central American central Americans in particular. There isn't a difference in terms of the high school graduation rates for adults, you know, who were born here. So ten percent of natives have dropped out of high school. If they're over the age of twenty five ten percent of Central American natives have dropped out of high school, really when you look at the overall population, you know, immigrants and their kids it's higher because you have so many high school people without a high school degree coming over in the first place that it creates the perception that there are more dropouts if you do look at other, you know, the entire immigrant population as a whole there are more high school dropouts in that population. But not in the second generation know, I think some of the frustration. I I know talking to my mom's. Husband, and he said, I don't wanna have to press one for English. And I think there is a a an understandable frustration among Americans that so many businesses and government agencies. Not just those providing emergency services, which I think you could make a point that that having a Spanish language might be. You know might be a good idea if it's an emergency kind of thing. But you know, they don't want to have to to press one free Anderson when English to be the default and somebody who's traveled a fair amount. I I would say that you're doing a disservice to English language learners by providing Spanish, I say that as a traveler because when I am somewhere where I cannot use English. There is no English anywhere. I am forced to start using the language of the land. I I start to see words I start to recognize those words, and I learned that language faster. Are we not doing a disservice by allowing people to press two for Spanish? Well, I'm not I'm not one to tell private companies what they should do. Of course, they're going to provide options for people who don't speak English because that their economic motivation is to do that the question is whether that's having a significantly negative effect on language rates, particularly we're interested in the second generation, you mentioned no one really has a an expectation that people in adulthood are going to learn English. And and the reality is it's not because people assimilate from their peers, and you know, through the education system and so forth. The second generation of immigrants are learning English through the socialization process with other people born in in the United States. One of the things that I think that might be arguable is whether or not kids are getting enough English and squash. You've pointed out most kids do a merger with good language skills. But looking back on my grandmother's experience, she was actually they were forbidden to use German in school. She lived in a town where there were a lot of German immigrants. And so the result is she ended up being able to speak German from home reading right German with no accent, and speak and write English with no accent. So basically being perfectly fluent in two languages because of that. Do you think it's a possibility that some schools might want to encourage more English English language, use not just among second-generation? But also first generation kids that come over here with their parents that are learning English for the first time. You know, it's interesting. You mentioned the experiences of of, you know, banning German in schools, and and so forth in the early. Twentieth century. There's actually been a good amount of research done in that period and actually showed that backfired on assimilation interest because it really created some resentment in German communities in those states who felt like they were being singled out they were being treated as that. Maybe they're not loyal to be United States. And ultimately it had the effect of reducing the amount of simulation that occurred. So I think you you really need to be careful in this context of trying to sort of micromanage the socialization of immigrants and trying to plan out society from the top down. So I think people who are concerned about assimilation should recognize that really. The American society, that's so attracted the people over time. But it it does work on its own. And I don't think it really needs a boost from the federal government or or any level of government. Really? That's a great. That's a great answer. And I do know that it my grandmother resented it. That's for sure. So what you're saying is let kids learn English at school, and it learned with their peers learn from TV don't feel like you have to sort of force it on them because they're going to learn it anyway. That's right. And I think that's what we're seeing already happened, you know, in in immigrant communities across the United States. They're learning English. But really, they're they're learning what it means to be American. You know, you're seeing immigrants disproportionately enroll in the military or sign up for the military, and and and wants to serve this country that that their their parents came to the children of of immigrants really are, you know, patriotic Americans, they're not, you know, having some divided loyalties about this country. I also think it's interesting I and you're the expert on immigration, but what I have read is that as we have had waves of immigrants. There's always been prejudice against those immigrants as well as concerns about assimilation. Whether we're talking I rish immigrants Italian immigrants even German immigrants that this is a bit of a there's a kind of natural nee. Nativist if you will concern that seems to fade as as that wave crests and diminishes it in your studies is that what you find. Oh, absolutely. There was a major study done by the national academies sciences on immigrant assimilation in nine states. And how it's going and it found that really there's not a difference between what's going on today. What's going on then? And there's not a difference in the reaction by native born Americans to immigration either. We really have the same exact concerns, and and troops that come out every time you have a new wave. I think it's interesting that you focused on Catholic immigrants, for example. I mean, they were just a tremendous amount of concern about them, creating a parallel society for themselves apart apart from Protestant American society where they had their own schools. And you know, they were teaching things that were not align to the broader, you know, religious and cultural values, and perhaps they had divided. Loyalties and all of these things. And now today, you know, proprio schools are seen as you know, these places that are producing Ivy league level education. And and you know, we don't really see the divide between Protestants and Catholics in the United States. The way we did in the early twentieth century at all in fact, you know, you really have been working together in many respects, you know, on various issues, whether political or otherwise I've seen some of the editorial cartoons as the late nineteenth century that would be considered even scandalous by today's standards ridiculing Catholics. And so, yeah, you're right. That this this seems to be a response to waves of immigrants, and and and customs which seem foreign to to to the majority but over time it does diminish at David beer at.

United States David beer Tom Brokaw Cato Institute David Tom Martino analyst Americans Ukraine Russia David Peterson David buyer Washington CNN Central America Facebook Puerto Ricans Embiid Bitta federal government
"national academies sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

This Week in Science

05:49 min | 3 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on This Week in Science

"It's going to be cheaper. It's become more efficient technology is overcoming the traditional mining and transport and refining operations. Well, I think part of the reason that infrastructure might get pushed forward is that companies want it, which is part of it. Right. Given. This is the loop. Right. So this is part of companies recognizing that resiliency in the market is about being carbon smart, if it's because it's cheaper that might be why that's kind of what this is talking about. So it's kind of circling around the same point here. And that is this article, we are this article is saying that it will be the smart business decision of the future to be more carbon-neutral period. I'm not saying that I'm saying that the only choice in the future will be carbon smart, and it will not be up to those who are using the energy at all. They'll just I mean that tomato will still come from Mexico, and it'll still be cheaper. But it will be on the come in here on a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle, and that's the only difference and to the actual end price of that tomato. It will still be the difference than it is now. Then you have to move on. But I would argue. Mexico could become the SUV our economic hide and America could be doing all the labor for Mexico. What you'd be an end? We were like we build a wall that we can get over there and get the good jobs like this could happen to but. Just I think there's a there's a there's a there's a hump to get over on all of these things where the for a split amount of time for whatever it is. It will cost slightly more to do the greener thing for whoever it is. That's that was yesterday. I don't think we're not for all things. We're not yet. It's coming, but that's still a fiscal decision that somebody somebody has to make volumes. It's cheaper regardless. I don't think it because. It can't be it won't immediately. There's always a hump where you're changing infrastructure where things are more expensive. Well, okay. So so to that point, you're right. And to that point I think if you're an established large international trucking company, you may not make that jump just yet. So there is a mechanism of reinvents Harmon intensive company, but I don't think that I think it's a dollar intensive company. And I think it's the dollar that drives it, and it's not going to have. I mean, you will have companies come out and tell you, hey, for the love of carbon reduction, we did this completely transformative thing where we have all electric big rigs from tesla. Okay. We do this for the carbon footprint that sounds great to the public. But they also realize we don't have to do oil changes. We don't have articles about. Marvan's as everything to do dollars. And that I'm saying that's going to that's going to be the thing that does is cheaper better more fish, whether you believe it or not you're saying the same thing that the article said, okay moving on mechanism Yeston. What did you bring? Oh, it's. I have. This is I should have been ready for this transition better. Because now the awkward. Joe Joe monkeys life for me. DNA of an extinct monkey called zero three six as been sequenced revealing that it was most closely related to South America's team monkeys. But this monkey this. This zero three is no ordinary DT monkey first of all it was not found in South America. But it is rare primate of the Caribbean. This the Yoho go stuff in the beginning. Destroy thought to have taken to the seas in search of adventure eleven million years ago, or maybe washed out to sea doing some sort of terrible storm remain such monkeys onto floating vegetation long enough to land in Jamaica. Then the interesting morphological auditees. This. I'm like any other monkey in the world zero three was a slow moving tweed tree dweller relatively few teeth. It had leg bones that made it look closer to rodents leg boats. Unusual parents made it difficult for scientists to work out where it came from what it was related to how it might have evolved. Plus it's extinct, so they have or some bones. They found in a cave in Jamaica. So research published recently in the proceedings National Academy sciences carried out by experts from international conservation charity. That's these logical society of London and London's natural history museum as well. As the American Museum of natural history in New York pretty much everybody..

Mexico South America Jamaica London Harmon intensive company American Museum of natural National Academy sciences Joe Joe Caribbean tesla New York Marvan Yoho America eleven million years
"national academies sciences" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

Point of Inquiry

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on Point of Inquiry

"Though you're saying you already had good reason to believe that there was something special about it other than it just being very far away we'll absolutely in the eighties nineties we discovered is an atmosphere that is complex surface composition that it has a it's a double planet with a giant moon half its own size in the two thousands we discovered pluto has additional satellites that its surface markings are changing with time meaning that the things are moving around on the surface we had a pretty good inkling going in this would be something special it turned out to be something spectacular so when the kuyper belt became apparent knife than now correct me if i'm wrong but that was a fairly recent discovery of all the world's in the kuyper belt did it make pluto seem like just one object among a flurry of similar objects no quite the contrary promoted in the is the planetary science community in in fact tire national academies sciences ranked the exploration of auto as the number one priority for funding in planetary exploration for the two thousands so this isn't just my opinion is opinion of of the national academy of science you compared it to the mission to pluto you compared to like conquering mount everest so what was it then that called you to pluto specifically i mean you personally because i know from the book that you had been thinking about it for decades before this actually got started was there like a single scientific question that you wanted answered or was it something more about the romance of going to this place well it was both those things you know i'm a i'm an explorer at heart but i'm also a science scientists by a by training in profession in pluto is a whole package you know it was a seductive scientifically in what it offered us still learn about this new class of planets and in addition being the farthest world that had never been explored the very frontier of our solar system.

kuyper belt national academy of science mount everest
"national academies sciences" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"All the questions in controversies that people have about nutrition i love that i cannot wait to read it and i love to talk a little bit about food politics too because i know you've done research here as well and i get a lot of comments from readers who essentially think that really the government has our best interests at heart and they're like no this is against the government's recommendations so how to our current food policies kind of support this confusion and this the system we have government the right head left hand's doing so they often making conflicting advice so a lot of our dietary policies are driven off of the dietary guidelines in there a little bit corrupt on the national academy sciences was mandated by congress to actually review how the guidelines were developed and they put a report out in i think this hock tober november which is online you can work it up type in national academy of sciences dietary guidelines and they basically when you sift through it all basically said look the committee members are in in cahoots with food industry they're getting paid by them they're not exactly independent sciencebased recommendations in the second they said was they ignored huge amounts of data on things that that contradict what their guidelines are for example on saturated fat they completely contradict themselves so it's very difficult for the average person to understand what to eat if even our own government is not providing science based guidelines the second thing is a lot of our policies are at odds with each other in one hand you know we tell people to cut back on sugar another hand where paying for commodities to be produced like corn syrup in we'd flour and soybean oil through our subsidies that are turned into junk food which then we pay for with food stamp programs which seven billion dollars worth is basically spent on soda that's twenty billion servings a year for the poor's that the government's paying for on the back end we're paying for medicare and medicaid so he literally tax payers pay three times to support the.

national academy sciences congress medicare national academy of sciences medicaid seven billion dollars one hand
Trump suggesting China will 'take down' its trade barriers

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:54 min | 3 years ago

Trump suggesting China will 'take down' its trade barriers

"Day wbz accuweather forecast with meteorologist dean devore is it april or is we still back in february these temperatures are not warming up anytime soon maybe a shower sponsor to this afternoon more prevalent as you go north and west of the city sunny breaks around the city more clouds and temperatures chilly this afternoon the high getting up to fifty down to thirty six tonight maybe in the evening shower along the coast tomorrow not as chilly breezy partly sunny fifty four and then cold and rainy on thursday back into the forties all day and we stay in the forties with a shower leftover friday we try to creep in the low fifties with some sun at times this weekend i'm accuweather meteorologist divorce wbz newsradio ten thirty right now in new bedford it's cloudy and forty eight degrees in hyannis we've got sunny and fifty in beverly cloudy and forty six and it looks like right now we've got cloudy skies and forty four in bedford in boston it is forty six and cloudy wbz news time eleven twenty five now time for the bloomberg green business report a new study says global warming you screwing up nature's intricately timed dinner hour making hungry critters in those on the menu show up at different times timing is everything in nature bees have to be around and flowers after bloom at the same time for pollination to work predators need to migrate at the same time as prey but a global study says warmer temperatures are interfering with that it looks at the timing of eightyeight independence species finding they are moving out of sync by about six days a decade it notes that some payers are actually moving closer together but in general the relative timing events between species is now on average off by about twenty one days changes in species timing are greater than they were before the nineteen eighty s migrating humming birds that have adapted for a specific flower for example now miss bloom seabirds used to rear their chicks when fish were most abundant not so anymore the study appears in the proceedings of the national academy sciences that's the bloomberg green business report i'm bob moon.

Dean Devore Hyannis Beverly Cloudy Bedford Boston Bob Moon Accuweather Bloomberg Forty Eight Degrees Twenty One Days Six Days
"national academies sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Malaysia then planet labs now planet planet is making satellites that look like loaves of bread and you launch them up into space we invest right before they did the first launch and then they did thirty one satellite sitting in the first launch now we've got about two hundred plus that are circulating there earth its largest constellation of earth imaging satellite in history and it's amazing so from this crazy idea in meta materials it leads to this company with bill gates which leads to an insight in a boardroom that sends us on a hunt to san francisco we fund the satellite guys and then we get the insight which exactly what you just said orbital insight which was an entrepreneur who said over time some of these images might become commodity and the real value is going to be doing the temporal analytical at analysis that you can say okay here's parking lots or here's the shadows cast on oil tankers as a proxy for their carryingcapacity or here's a caravan of trucks in china or are they going to a ghost town residential facility are they going to a productive chemical facility and that information was legal espionage that was valuable to corporations to governments her trousers and so we fund this guy jimmy crawford jimmy's amazing bill the ai for the morris rover brand google books went to climate corporate celta monsanto for billions so us and sequoia fund him bloomberg and will come in and none of that a priority was noble something that started literally reading scientific publication in proceedings the national academy science or science or nature that leads to bill gates that leads to planet labs at least orbital another example like that my partner chicane who is psychotically obsessed with cars i hate driving my wife we have a car she loves driving for me it's an anchor it's just the time right we talk about allocation of time in cash to spend attention on a road i cannot wait for yourself drug ha i mean this is the faster that it comes right the more time i have to read and talking of it so shahin is obsessed with cars and we're following all the stuff that's going on early in autonomous vehicles from gugel an uber and tesla and he finds these two guys and these two guys claim that they're gonna you know take on this market on we think the.

china Malaysia san francisco jimmy crawford morris rover google sequoia bloomberg partner shahin tesla
"national academies sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"Malaysia then planet labs now planet planet is making satellites that look like loaves of bread and you launch them up into space we invest right before they did the first launch and then they did thirty one satellite sitting in the first launch now we've got about two hundred plus that are circulating there earth its largest constellation of earth imaging satellite in history and it's amazing so from this crazy idea in meta materials it leads to this company with bill gates which leads to an insight in a boardroom that sends us on a hunt to san francisco we fund the satellite guys and then we get the insight which exactly what you just said orbital insight which was an entrepreneur who said over time some of these images might become commodity and the real value is going to be doing the temporal analytical at analysis that you can say okay here's parking lots or here's the shadows cast on oil tankers as a proxy for their carryingcapacity or here's a caravan of trucks in china or are they going to a ghost town residential facility are they going to a productive chemical facility and that information was legal espionage that was valuable to corporations to governments her trousers and so we fund this guy jimmy crawford jimmy's amazing bill the ai for the morris rover brand google books went to climate corporate celta monsanto for billions so us and sequoia fund him bloomberg and will come in and none of that a priority was noble something that started literally reading scientific publication in proceedings the national academy science or science or nature that leads to bill gates that leads to planet labs at least orbital another example like that my partner chicane who is psychotically obsessed with cars i hate driving my wife we have a car she loves driving for me it's an anchor it's just the time right we talk about allocation of time in cash to spend attention on a road i cannot wait for yourself drug ha i mean this is the faster that it comes right the more time i have to read and talking of it so shahin is obsessed with cars and we're following all the stuff that's going on early in autonomous vehicles from gugel an uber and tesla and he finds these two guys and these two guys claim that they're gonna you know take on this market on we think the.

china Malaysia san francisco jimmy crawford morris rover google sequoia bloomberg partner shahin tesla
"national academies sciences" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Oh yeah what's at a question you won't be react idea arts so abraham lincoln and 18th 63 when clearly he had other priorities in front of him um in that year he signed into law the creation of the national academy of sciences because he knew when you look at europe and what role science was playing in building the industrial becoming the foundation of the industrial revolution that created such economic prosperity in europe over the over the time that this was a celebrated uh activity of of all the nations he said i we need some of that here in america so the national academy science was established to advise congress and the president of all ways that the emergence scientific truth can influence sage policy okay by the way abraham lincoln was republican uh the first of such and so the national cami scientists been going strong ever since and this is the most respected scientist who repair who prepare reports in this yes of policy and these reports analyze all the research that has been conducted and come forth with scientific consensus not a consensus of opinion a consensus of observations and experiment and one of them is that humans are warming the earth now and and there's a whole report about this and the consequences and what have rated happening and what we need to do is an entire report so if you now work for the government and going to deny what the national academy of sciences tells you they go back to abraham lincoln say a beauty to know what the hell you were talking about and i do gobert go tell him that go ahead and and and ask yourself why are you in any position of power in this country if the health wealth insecurity of this country is a priority because without any understanding of how science works you were jeopardising our health our wealth and our security let's get bring in here from aitken's.

europe america congress president abraham lincoln scientist aitken national academy of sciences
"national academies sciences" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"national academies sciences" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Pruitt had this exchange here is what if you're wall look let me say to c o two contributes to of grass gas has grass gathered effect anglo warming as methane does and other types of gases the issue is how much we we contribute to from human activity perspective at neil aggressive hasn't oh yeah was a question you won't be react idea arts so abraham lincoln and eighteen sixty three when clearly he had other priorities in front of him in that year he signed into law the creation of the national academy of sciences because he knew when you look at europe and what role science was playing in building the industrial becoming the foundation of the industrial revolution that created such economic prosperity in europe over the over the time that this was a celebrated activity of of all the nations he said we need some of that here in america so the national academy science was established to advise congress in the president of all ways that the emergence scientific truth can influence sage policy okay by the way abraham lincoln was republican the first of such and so the national can be scientists been going strong ever since and this is the most respected scientist who repair who prepare reports in the service of policy and these reports analyze all the research that has been conducted and come forth with scientific consensus not a consensus of opinion a consensus of observations an experiment and one of them is that humans are warming the earth.

Pruitt neil europe america congress president abraham lincoln scientist national academy of sciences