26 Burst results for "Nathan Rott"

"nathan rott" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:26 min | Last month

"nathan rott" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"People who came here we need to feed them People who came from hardship and big cities of Ukraine they needed food We bring you scenes from the now largely empty Ukrainian capital key It's Tuesday April 5th and this is all things considered I also Chang And I'm Scott detro will take you into a bakery that's offered jobs to displace Ukrainians Also we're nearing the end of what will be the third school year disrupted by COVID and teachers say their jobs feel tougher than ever We have teachers that have combined classrooms taught over their own planned periods especially as things were trickling up during the omicron variant And Tiger Woods says he will play in this year's masters golf tournament just one year after he suffered a near fatal car crash Well as of right now I feel like I am going to play As of right now Now news Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack spear More horrifying images are emerging from areas north of the Ukrainian capital in areas recently left by Russian forces and Nathan rott reports there are claims of possible war crimes Ukraine's prosecutor general released more photos that it says shows evidence of possible torture and execution of civilians in bucha a suburb north of Kyiv Russia has claimed that the photos videos and reports coming from areas recently retaken by Ukrainian troops are fake Ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky says he expects more atrocities will be found as more areas emptied by the Russian withdrawal are cleared In Kyiv and oversees the images and reports are eliciting anger from politicians and civilians who are demanding an investigation into possible war crimes Nathan rott NPR news Keith Congress is expected to vote this week on a $10 billion package of COVID preparedness funds Explains it's just half of what The White House had wanted There is money to boost at home testing $5 billion for Therapeutics to treat COVID and funds for vaccines and boosters But a big item that was left out was funding to vaccinate the world White House press secretary Jen Psaki says this goes beyond supplying and shipping There are countries around the world who are refusing our vaccine doses because they don't have the mechanisms the know how and the capacity to be able to distribute those doses So that funding that we've been requesting will continue to press for would be accounting for that as well Psaki says it's in the U.S. national interest to vaccinate the world to protect against future variants Tamara Keith and PR news Reports the Biden administration intends to again extend a freeze on federal student loan payments current moratorium on loan payments would set to expire next month but will now reportedly be extended through August 31st Billionaire Elon Musk is joining Twitter's board of directors NPR Shannon Bond reports the announcement comes a day after Musk revealed he is the social media company's largest shareholder Elon Musk is one of Twitter's most outspoken and opinionated users recently he criticized the company for in his view not upholding free speech principles Now the Tesla CEO will be able to make his case from an even more powerful perch inside Twitter's boardroom Twitter CEO agarwal tweeted that Musk is quote both a passionate believer and intense critic of the service and said that's exactly what the company needs Musk replied he hopes to make significant improvements to the platform And he's already taking suggestions on Monday night he pulled his followers about whether they want an edit button That's something lots of people on Twitter have long been asking for Shannon bond and PR news On Wall Street the Dow was down 280 points the NASDAQ fell 328 points today This is NPR From WAB E News in Atlanta good afternoon I'm Jim burris for time now is 5 O four The average price for a gallon of gas in Atlanta continues to trickle downward Alex Helmut has more Initially gas prices surged after Russia's violent invasion of Ukraine but as demand started to slow and a new COVID outbreak in China caused lockdowns price comparison site gas buddy says a gallon of regular unleaded here fell to $3 and 85 cents down 8 cents a gallon and Georgia's state gas tax may also have been having an impact as the national average is at $4 17 cents Gas buddy says expect prices to dip again over the next week as long as there's no further escalation in Ukraine The first time home buyers and metro Atlanta faced some serious headwinds including rising mortgage rates and double digit price increases But as the Atlanta business chronicles crystal edmondson reports they're still hope for those who want to buy a home on a budget While first time home buyers are mostly being priced out of Atlanta's in town housing market outside eye to 85 there are about 20 areas in the region where conditions are more favorable In cities such as douglasville lithia springs Riverdale and conyers median home prices are below $300,000 With a 10% down payment annual mortgage payments would be less than a third.

Nathan rott Scott detro COVID Ukraine NPR news Jack spear Kyiv bucha volodymyr zelensky Keith Congress NPR Jen Psaki Musk Twitter Elon Musk Psaki Tamara Keith Biden administration
"nathan rott" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:50 min | Last month

"nathan rott" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Was the hardest day of his life That grim reality of what has happened in Kyiv suburbs particularly in bucha weighs heavily on the city just as it weighs heavily on people around the world NPR's Nathan rott was in bucha today and he joins us now to tell us what he saw We should warn listeners a lot of what we are about to discuss will be very disturbing Hey Nate Hey Scott And it reminds us why just about every western leader is talking so much about booch of this week Yes Abuja is his place It was recently left by Russian forces and it's a place that you know some of the most horrifying accounts of the war are coming from Dead civilians lending streets next to bikes or was spilled groceries deceased men who appear to have their hands tied It's those images that are raising the most serious questions about war crimes to this point in the conflict and that those images that are causing the United Nations Security Council to meet today You were there today tell us what you saw Yeah so I went on a press tour arranged by Ukrainian officials It was a very large group of journalists well over a hundred who were all being escorted by police into this area that's still being swept from mines One of the places we stopped is one that you've probably seen if you've been looking at the images from bucha It's a narrow residential street that's clogged with destroyed and burnt military vehicles The street is littered with bullet casings torn camouflage jackets and craters from artillery rounds In places are so much ash on the ground it actually feels like you're walking on black sand A small dark dog barks beside its owner his home destroyed All of the homes on this street have been damaged Voldemort abdomens is one of the worst.

Nathan rott Nate Hey Scott Kyiv NPR Abuja United Nations Security Counci
Biden Nominates First Native American to Lead National Parks Service

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 9 months ago

Biden Nominates First Native American to Lead National Parks Service

"Park Service could be led by a native American. NPR's Nathan Rott reports. The Biden administration has nominated Charles Sam's a member of the Confederated Tribes of the U. Mattila Indian Reservation in the Pacific Northwest. The National Park Service hasn't had a full time director since the Obama administration. Biden's nomination of Charles Sam's who's worked on conservation issues for decades could soon change that. The nomination comes at a crucial time for the park service. Despite some recent injections of funding, the park system is running a massive deferred maintenance deficit. At the same time, it's struggling with overcrowding and some of its most popular parks. A rapidly changing climate and long standing criticism for a lack of diversity within its ranks. The nomination of Sam's is subject to Senate confirmation. Nathan

Charles Sam Park Service Nathan Rott Biden Administration U. Mattila Indian Reservation Obama Administration NPR National Park Service Pacific Northwest Biden SAM Senate Nathan
Study Finds Wildfire Smoke More Harmful To Humans Than Pollution From Cars

Morning Edition

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Study Finds Wildfire Smoke More Harmful To Humans Than Pollution From Cars

"From wildfire smoke is up to 10 times more harmful than other sources for humans. NPR's Nathan Rott reports. That's bad news that stems from a warming global climate. Wildfire smoking car exhaust are similar in that they both released tiny particles a fraction the diameter of a hair into the air. The particles are bad for you wherever they come from. But new research from the scripts Institution of Oceanography finds that the particles from smoke may lead to more hospital visits. Making matters worse, says Tom Courting him. One of the study's co authors is the fact that there's little we can do about smoke pollution were not able to stop the wildfires. And if anything, they're going to be getting worse, which is why, he says more people need to know the risks. Nathan Rott. NPR

Nathan Rott Institution Of Oceanography NPR TOM
"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

"Is the United States undercounting covert cases. Everyday health officials share the number of new infections, not the number of all people with the virus. A research team has a fix, and it's morning edition from NPR News. Hi. I was governor says all schools in the state must open for in person classes. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well, King. Educators say they'll do it, but they can't guarantee they'll be able to keep kids safe. Voting technology companies. Smartmatic is suing Fox News. Some of its biggest stars and two of Donald Trump's legal advisers alleging lies they told after the election hurt the company and President Biden offers US diplomatic support to end the war in Yemen. It's Friday, February 5th Darren Criss is 34. And the news is next. Live from NPR News on Corvin Coleman. Early this morning, the Senate passed a budget measure that will allow Democrats to move forward on president finds massive coronavirus relief package without Republican support. The Senate was divided equally on party lines. So Vice President Harris broke the tie on this vote. The ayes are 50. The nays are 50. The Senate being equally divided. The vice president votes in the affirmative, and the concurrent resolution as amended is adopted Biden's packages worth nearly $2 trillion and Republicans object, saying it's too expensive. House approved a similar budget measure Wednesday, but it must now vote on the Senate's version of the bill. That House vote could come as early as today. Forecasters expect to see a modest rebound in hiring this morning when the Labor Department releases its figures on the January job market. NPR's Scott Horsley reports that would follow a slump in December. Today's report is expected to show some resilience in the U. S job market even during one of the deadliest months of the pandemic. So far, forecasters expect to see some jobs added in January after a loss of 140,000 jobs the month before. In person services, like restaurants have struggled against a winter wave of infections. But many other industries have continued to add jobs. While any job gains would be an improvement. There are still almost 10 million fewer workers on payrolls now than there were before the pandemic. Congressional forecasters warned this week that without additional federal help full jobs, recovery might not come for three more years. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington Ah House panel her testimony Thursday about the deadly Ryan at the U. S Capitol last month carried out by pro Trump extremists. NPR's Brian Naylor reports, lawmakers discussed legislation to combat domestic terrorism. At a hearing called to examine the threat of domestic terrorism. Witnesses warned what happened on January 6th will resonate for years to come. Elizabeth Newman, a former homeland security official in the Trump administration, says right wing extremist groups see January 6th as a victory and an inspiration. I do believe we'll be fighting domestic terrorism that has its roots and inspiration, points from January 6 for the next 10 to 20 years. The chairman of the House Homeland Security panel, Mississippi Democrat Bennie Thompson, says he expects there will be agreement on legislation to combat domestic terrorism, but the panel did not get into specific proposals. Brian Naylor. NPR NEWS The House has voted to strip Georgia representative Marjorie Taylor green of her committee assignments. This comes after offensive social media post by her surfaced, some indicated support for deadly violence against Democratic leaders. Green said that she did not support these views, but she did not apologize for the posts. You're listening to NPR news. Drugmaker Johnson and Johnson is asking the federal government for emergency authorization for its coded 19 vaccine. It's about 66% effective, but it requires only one injection not to like other covert vaccines. Biden administration is putting a hold on a controversial trump era rule limiting protections for migratory birds. NPR's Nathan Rott reports, the administration is likely to reinstate protections for more than 1000 bird species. The Trump Administration brought a new interpretation toe one of the country's oldest environmental laws, and that interpretation promptly got sued The long standing law. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act makes it illegal to kill certain birds. Trump administration argued it should on Lee be illegal if the killing was intentional, so accidental bird deaths, whether from wind turbines or waste water ponds. Could no longer be punished. The Interior Department's own analysis founded that change would likely result in far more deaths of migratory birds. President Biden's interior is putting a hold on that change to give it time for a review. Nathan Rott NPR NEWS Ah federal judge held a hearing Thursday on the issue of homelessness in Los Angeles. Judge David Carter ordered city officials to come to the hearing at a homeless shelter. Carter previously ruled that a devastating storm last week created extraordinarily harsh conditions for homeless people. He says Los Angeles officials are failing to fully address the situation. On Corvin Coleman NPR.

NPR NPR News President Biden Senate Trump Administration Corvin Coleman NPR Donald Trump Scott Horsley United States Brian Naylor Los Angeles Steve Inskeep Vice President Harris Judge David Carter Nathan Rott vice president Darren Criss Corvin Coleman Interior Department president
"nathan rott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Those in South Africa. Vaccine was 85% effective in preventing severe disease. This vaccine has the advantage of requiring only one dose and does not require special cold storage. FDA is expected to make a decision whether to authorize the vaccine in the coming weeks. Joe Palka. NPR NEWS Stocks closed higher today. Midsomer positive Weekly jobs numbers The Dow gained 332 points to 31,055 the NASDAQ was up 167 points. This is NPR. Syria's of recent storms brought much needed water to the West Coast in California prison peers Nathan Rott reports new research shows The rainy season is starting in California much later than normal. Winter is rainy season in California, the time when Snow pack is supposed to accumulate and reservoirs fill in recent years, though the rainy season has been starting later than normal, extending the state's destructive fire season. New research published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters finds it The onset of California's rainy season now occurs a month later than it did 60 years ago, and the expectation is that with a warming climate That trend will continue creating a larger overlap of hot dry conditions and strong Santa Ana wind events, which can cause fires to explode Insides. Nathan Rott. NPR news officials will abide administration say they've delayed a rule finalized in the last days of the Trump administration that would have drastically.

Nathan Rott NPR NEWS California NPR Geophysical Research Letters Joe Palka South Africa FDA Santa Ana Syria West Coast
"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

"After sailing 24,000 miles nonstop in a nearly three month long journey, competitors in and around the world solo yacht race were expected to finish it a French port today We'll talk more about that state local news at 4 32, including how L. A county's public health director says. County plans to vaccinate in disadvantaged communities and 44 after the hour. One of the executive orders President Biden is due to sign denounces the discrimination that's been directed at the Asian American and Pacific Islander community will be joined by the executive director of Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council, who also leads an anti hate organization coming up Live from NPR news. I'm toe Wayne Brown. President Biden is laying out the most ambitious effort yet to cut America's oil, gas and coal emissions to curb the worst effects of climate change. Biden issued new executive orders targeting federal subsidies for those industries while stopping new oil and gas leases on federal lands and waters. NPR's Nathan Rott tells us The conservation plan will have a big impact on Western states. This leasing banded Ian out today does nothing on private land, and it does nothing on fracking. You know, Biden has repeatedly said that he would not ban fracking. He has not banned fracking, and there's even questions about whether he could legally if he wanted to the states that are most likely to be impacted by today's executive orders. Are states that have a lot of public lands federal land, So we're talking New. Mexico, Wyoming, Alaska, Colorado, Mostly Western states. NPR's Nathan Rott, the president approach elevates climate change to a national security priority. Meanwhile, Republicans say the plan is a job killer. As new, more contagious variants of the Corona virus or spreading across the U. S. And Public health experts recommend that people wear double masks NPR's Maria Godoy reports. One of the easiest ways to improve the masks we wear is to layer to mass on top of each other. One strategy is to wear a surgical mask as the base layer because they're made of a material that's very effective. It filtering particles, but a lot of surgical mask fit loosely, so wearing a cloth mask, on top of it can give it a tighter fit. As well as at an extra layer of filtration. Mask works best if it's sales tightly to your face. That's true, regardless of what it's made of aimed to create a tight seal so that air isn't escaping out of the sides and remember Don't let your nose hang over the top of the mask that defeats the purpose. Maria Godoy. NPR news stocks finished significantly lower on Wall Street drag down today by tech and bank shares. You're listening to NPR news. And on a Wednesday, January 27th assist Casey are gonna be Ewan. Larry Peral. Here's what's happening at 4 32 L. A County's vaccine rollout continues to lag behind demand the county Is expected to receive roughly 188,000 doses next week, but many of those will be designated as second shots. Two people who've already received the first dose and growing racial inequity in Ella's vaccine rollout is raising some alarms. County officials note that there are low vaccination numbers among health care workers in south L. A and other communities of color of these areas have also seen hire new case hospitalization and death rates. Public health director Barbara Ferrer says they are planning on getting doses out to those communities with lower vaccination rates. We do that by expanding the provider network and making sure that we're allocating enough doses. In those hearted communities where there have not been a significant numbers of people yet vaccinated at latest count, more than 660,000 doses have been administered County wine. Orange County's top health official, is defending the Athena at being used to coordinate the county's vaccine rollout. Dr. Clayton Child, the county's chief medical officer, acknowledged that there have been glitches but said the sign up process for vaccines has been improving. Supervisors Don Wagner and Andrew does say they received several complaints, including the lack of a Spanish were Vietnamese version. Child says a foreign language version of of Athena is expected to debut later this week. IOC officials reported just over 1000 new cases of Copan 19 today, along with 71 more deaths. Pandemic will likely keep many California's public school students out of the classroom for the remainder of the academic year. A fair amount of them may never go back to campus as KCRW star Autry on reports K through 12 enrollment in public schools has plummeted to record blanket breaking levels, a record breaking 155,000 K through 12 students did not enroll back in California's public school systems this year. According to the latest projections from the state. That drop off is roughly five times greater than the usual enrollment declines the state has seen in recent years. L A. U. S D Superintendent Austin Buechner said California's largest school district saw a decline of about 6000 kindergarten students. That's a 14% drop over previous years. Advocates say the falling numbers are due to a mix of factors. Family's holding off on kindergarten a higher than normal dropout rate and some parents opting for home schooling or private school this year. His case here will be star a country on reporting. Support for NPR comes from work Day committed to delivering quick insights to help finance team's plan for what's next workday. The finance, HR and planning system for a.

NPR Biden executive President Maria Godoy Nathan Rott director California Asian Pacific Policy and Plann Orange County executive director Wayne Brown Pacific Islander Mexico America Larry Peral
"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Public health and the pandemic and the economic crisis at the same time now is the moment for that kind of decisive action. Congress has already approved trillions in pandemic aid, including $90 billion just last month, and some Republicans are already bunking at the new $1.9 trillion plan. Would deliver bigger stimulus checks, rental assistance and support for small businesses. It also calls for a federal minimum wage increase to $15 an hour a longstanding liberal priority. Amy held NPR news The Kremlin is dismissing yesterday's anti government protests across Russia as insignificant, saying President Vladimir Putin enjoys the support of most Russians. Activists say nearly 3600 people were arrested for turning out to support opposition leader Alexei Navalny. MPR's Lucy and Kim has more from Moscow. Saturday's protest swept across Russian cities, large and small. Demonstrators demanding Alexey Navalny be released from jail. He was arrested a week ago after returning from Germany, where he was recovering from a poisoning he blames on President Putin. Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov spoke on state TV. No good deed goes, for example. He said few protesters turned out and that many people have voted for Putin. Peskov also accused the United States of interfering in Russian politics after the American Embassy in Moscow tweeted it support. For Russians right to free expression and peaceful assembly. Lucy and Kim NPR NEWS Moscow President Biden took steps last week to address climate change, including rejoining the Paris climate accord. It's not yet clear what strategies the Biden administration will employ toe actually cut greenhouse gas emissions in the long run. But NPR's Nathan Rott says there are shorter term consequences. Earlier this week, Biden follow through with one of his boldest campaign promises, which was to stop all new oil and gas leasing and permitting on federal waters and land. So in Texas, it doesn't have as much of an impact, but let's say, Wyoming, New Mexico, Colorado States with a lot of federal land. There's a really big impact. NPR's Nathan Rott, This is NPR. Live from KQED News. I'm queen IQ him A new study out of the University of California. San Francisco, shows some essential workers died at a disproportionate rate in 2020 kq. Edie's Julie Chang reports doctor He Hung 10 is an epidemiologist at UCSF after hearing about workplace outbreaks of covert 19. China wanted to see how many more workers died as a result of the pandemic, So he and his team as the state Health Department for a list of adults aged 18 to 65, who've died since 2016 with that data, they projected how many people should have died in 2020 and compared it to how many people actually did. Found unusually high rates of mortality for people who couldn't work from home. For example, you can see among the new agricultural workers that 1000 more people died. Then we would have expected transportation logistics were saying about 1500 more deaths and we would have expected are dependent upon a great chance says that's a 39% increase in deaths for food and agricultural workers. And a 29% increase in transportation and logistics workers. Chen's team hopes the study will bring about more workplace protections and that essential workers who can't work from home will be prioritized for vaccines..

President Vladimir Putin NPR Alexei Navalny Nathan Rott Dmitry Peskov Moscow Kim NPR Biden Lucy Russia Biden administration Congress KQED News President San Francisco state Health Department
"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"News. I'm Jack's fear. Dr. Anthony Fauci says the rise in new cases of coronavirus maybe Platt towing, but he also warns the public will need to remain vigilant and take precautions. NPR's East, Roscoe has more on what found she had to say. After President Biden unveiled his administration's national strategy for getting the virus under control. Anthony Fauci is now President Biden's chief medical advisor. He says the previous administration had some good ideas for boosting vaccinations that Biden's team can build on. But he acknowledged that at times he felt constrained by the trump White House. I can tell you, I I take no pleasure at all in being in a situation of contradicting the president, so it was really something that you didn't feel that you could actually say something and there wouldn't be any repercussions. Trump criticized Dr Fauci publicly and eventually silent them. The nation's top expert in infectious diseases, says he now feels more liberated to speak on the science behind the pandemic. Aisha Roscoe. NPR NEWS White House Press secretary Jen Psaki says that President Joe Biden has confidence in FBI director Chris Wray and plans to keep him on the job. FBI directors have given 10 year terms in part to ensure they are unaffected by changes in presidential administrations. Sake was notably noncommittal when asked her first press briefing yesterday about whether by Nick Confidence and Ray, where she put out a message on Twitter today, saying she caused quote an unintentional ripple wouldn't make clear the president has confidence in Ray. Abide administration is putting a temporary moratorium on new oil and gas operations on public lands. NPR's Nathan Rott reports, the move could have a huge impact on some Western states. Cutting climate warming greenhouse gas emissions is a top priority for the new administration and public lands provide a good opportunity. Nearly a quarter of the country's total greenhouse gas emissions come from the extraction and consumption of fossil fuels from public lands. Temporary ban will stop new development for at least the next 60 days, though there are concerns in the oil and gas industry and in fossil fuel rich states like Wyoming that the band could become permanent. Wyoming like New Mexico, when Alaska and some other Western states heavily depend on royalties from fossil fuel extraction for their state budgets. Nathan Rott NPR NEWS US housing market remains one area of the economy. There's not been slowed as much as other sectors by the Corona virus Pandemic Commerce Department reporting today. Housing starts jumped by 5.8% of December. Having the best year for the housing market since 2006 because expected rise last month. I was even bigger bump up in housing starts in November. Record low mortgage interest rates have helped fuel the housing boom. Makes close on Wall Street Today the Dow was down 12 points to 1 31,076. The NASDAQ closed up 73 points. The S and P 500 gained a point today. This is NPR. Live from KQED News. I'm terrorist Siler State legislators are raising concerns over Governor Gavin Newsom's plan to restart in person learning in California public schools. KQED politics reporter Guy Marja Roddy says the plan came under fire at an informational hearing the state Senate today San Jose Senator Dave Courts has, he says, despite the fanfare around Newsome's gold to start reopening next month. The fact the matter is we're really saying is most schools won't open. That's because plenty of disagreement Remain, including over a plan to test students every week for Corona virus. That would be an expensive and complicated lift for superintendent, says Shelley Vera Montas of the Campbell Union School district. The requirement for the student testing really made no sense to me. Meanwhile, teachers unions say the viruses to widespread to bring kids back Newsome administration argues school outbreaks are rare and fast action is needed to return before the year ends. Guy of ours, Roddy can cure any news. The number of Californians filing first time claims for unemployment took a sharp drop last week. 123,000 initial claims for unemployment in a week is still a lot. But it's nearly a third fewer than the week before. It's also the lowest weekly number the state has seen since last March, when big job cuts started due to the pandemic. The country also saw a decrease in first time claims last week, but it wasn't as big as California's..

President Biden NPR Dr. Anthony Fauci president Aisha Roscoe Nathan Rott Guy Marja Roddy director California Shelley Vera Montas Newsome Pandemic Commerce Department Ray Jack Governor Gavin Newsom Nick Confidence KQED News medical advisor
"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:06 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

"And two of his nominees to lead his environmental agenda appear to support that promise. Michael Regan would be the first black man to lead the Environmental Protection Agency. If confirmed by the Senate, and New Mexico. Congresswoman Deb Holland is Biden's pick for the Interior Department. She would be the first Native American to serve as a Cabinet secretary. NPR's Nathan Rott reports. Holland's nomination is especially symbolic. The Department of the Interior is a massive agency responsible for about 1/5 of all the land in the United States. It deals with natural resource is and wildlife recreation in national parks, But it's also responsible for the relationship between the federal government and the people. Those lands were taken from There are a number of scholars who have done really great work to show how the creation of national parts was predicated on the removal of Native peoples. Katrina Phillips is a history professor at McAllister College in Minnesota, and she's a member of the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior, Ojibwe. She says. It's fair to say that for most of its history, the Interior Department has been used as a tool to oppress indigenous people in the U. S. Which is why, she says she's still in shock that Deb Holland, a member of the Laguna Pueblo in New Mexico. Has been nominated to lead it to have someone who understands this history and indigenous sovereignty and land rights and treaty rights. Is just I mean, I'm just I'm so happy right now. It's just hard to believe that this nomination came through a large coalition of Native American tribes, along with environmental groups and progressive leaders pushed for Holland to get the post. Not just because of the symbolism but because of her experience. She's a two term congresswoman who served on a committee with oversight of interior, and she comes from New Mexico, a fossil fuel dependent state that is trying to transition to renewable energies. In an interview with NPR before her nomination, Holland made clear she'd want the country as a whole to try to do the same. Climate change is the challenge of our lifetime, and it's imperative that we invested an equitable renewable energy economy. President elect Joe Biden has said he wants the country to be carbon neutral by the year 2050. And his interior secretary, Holland would have a big role in shaping that future. Roughly one quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions in the U. S come from public lands. She also said she'd restore trust with the interior 70,000. Some employees prioritize conserving 30% of all U. S land in water and undo some of the damage that this Trump administration has done to our environment. Native Americans and other minorities are disproportionately affected by climate change in pollution. And Dallas gold to founder of the Indigenous Environmental Network says it would be invaluable to have someone in charge of interior who understands that, But he says the fight is not over. We're not stopping here like you celebrate this victory. We as a climate justice movement as an indigenous rights movement are going to continue to push the by the administration to live up to its promises and to do so in an equitable way. Nathan Rott NPR news Thistles. NPR news and I'm Cherry Glaser with this KCRW news Update. Next time you're driving in downtown L A. You'll have a chance to drive on a road made of trash. Well, sort of. City officials announced yesterday that the stretch of first Street between Grand and Hope has been repaid with what's called recycled plastic asphalt. KCRW's Kelly Wells has the breakdown. Normally when repairing city streets. Old asphalt is ripped up and shipped out and the new asphalt is shipped in and paved. This stuff is made by ripping up the old asphalt, crushing it and mixing it with plastics on site and laying it right back down. It also means the road is closed for hours instead of days or weeks. Good news for the planet. Since the recycled plastic asphalt uses about 150,000 plastic water bottles per lane mile. That means creating less virgin petroleum, less waste and less pollution from transporting materials. It's also good news for our pocketbooks, since the roads are built to last five times longer than regular asphalt cutting repaving costs in half recycled plastic isn't being used to fill Ella potholes for now, But if the re paved road in downtown L a performs, there could be a lot more on the way. The New ST is part of L. A Mayor Eric Garcetti is green new deal. You're listening to KCRW. KCRW sponsors include HBO, Max presenting Let them ALL Talk, starring Meryl.

Deb Holland Interior Department KCRW New Mexico NPR Nathan Rott Katrina Phillips Joe Biden secretary Environmental Protection Agenc Senate Eric Garcetti Cabinet federal government Michael Regan Indigenous Environmental Netwo United States Lake Superior
"nathan rott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Program is funded by the George Kaiser Family Foundation. It's aimed is to attract skilled motivated people to liven up the city and juice its economy. Ben Stewart is the interim director since inception two plus years ago. Program has brought nearly 500 members to Tulsa and interest has surged during the pandemic. We've seen applications over the course of the last six months increase Up to three fold. Other regions also see an opportunity in the shift to remote work like Northwest Arkansas. It's home to Walmart, the University of Arkansas and the surrounded by lakes and mountains, like in the TV show, Ozark The Northwest Arkansas pitch come live here and we'll give you $10,000 and a bicycle bicycle. Bentonville, one of the city's in northwest Arkansas, as proclaimed itself, the mountain biking capital of the world, and a lot of experts would not disagree with that. Nelson Peacock is the president and CEO of the Northwest Arkansas counsel. The region started its initiative after the pandemic started when Cho vid took place. We really saw people re evaluating their lifestyle and what they saw was important and we felt that we needed to take advantage of that. The effort is partially funded by the Walton Family Foundation of Financial supporter of NPR. For those pondering a move to Northwest Arkansas, Peacock says. It's not just the outdoors. There's culture atop Museum of American Art. And it's monumentally cheaper than, for example, San Francisco say you make 150,000 pretty good. It's comparable to $63,000 is what you would need to have the same lifestyle here. That's some pretty serious savings, but the same lifestyle moving from San Francisco to northwest Arkansas or Tulsa, Oklahoma. To Lisa Garland says her new neighborhood and Tulsa. It's progressive politically and doesn't feel that different from her old hometown, Berkeley to other parts of the city. Yeah, it's very, very, very different from Berkeley from San Francisco from the Bay Area, and so's much the rest of the state. Oklahoma is one of the reddest states in the country. Garland is a Democrat. And she's actually looking forward to meeting people with different views, especially in these challenging political times. You have to see what the other side and so I think that living in this city, it will give me an opportunity to kind of have a better understanding of The other side of things. And so I think it's actually very exciting where we Berliner NPR News, one of the most notable insects in North America is in trouble. Federal wildlife officials announced today that Monarch butterflies deserve protection under the Endangered Species Act. But they won't get it. Why not? NPR's Nathan Rott explains what the U. S Fish and Wildlife Service said today is that declines in monarch butterfly populations are so severe that they do warrant federal protections. But they're precluded from getting them because of limited resource is Be kind of like your dentist saying, Yeah, you need to get that cavity filled. But we've only got so many fillings so get in line and the line for monarchs is long. The Fish and Wildlife Service says 161 other species have priority nationally. Which makes today's announcement bittersweet for people like Serena Jepson. On one hand, I'm really happy to see that while they service recognizes that monarchs are threatened with extinction on the other, they're not doing much about it. Jepson is with the Tzar See Center for Invertebrate conservation, which helps count monarch populations every year, and the trend line, she says, is alarming. I really don't think that monarchs can wait indefinitely for protection. As recently as the 19 nineties, there were millions of monarch butterflies fluttering through backyards and across fields in the U. S. You've probably seen them and they're recognizable Rust Orange wings, But the eastern population of monarch butterflies has declined by 80% since the mid nineties, the western population which winters in Central California. Has dropped even further. Actually, just this year we're seeing potentially the collapse of the Western population. Federal wildlife officials are asking the public to help by planting milkweed and using less insecticide. Also review the monarch butterfly status every year. But the decision is still frustrating to Jake League who specializes an endangered species at the Environmental Policy Innovation Center. If you've already done like 90% of the work to make a wanted finding, we'll just do the remaining 10% and get it done by putting a listing awfully says it will not only cost more time but money. With the extinction crisis. Worsening money for biodiversity will be in short supply. Nathan Rott NPR news for college bound high school seniors. The pandemic has taken campus tours and even some admissions exams off the.

Arkansas Lisa Garland San Francisco Tulsa Nathan Rott NPR Northwest Arkansas Nelson Peacock Oklahoma Fish and Wildlife Service Serena Jepson Berkeley George Kaiser Family Foundatio Ben Stewart University of Arkansas U. S Fish and Wildlife Service Berliner NPR News Walmart interim director president and CEO
Los Angeles County Breaks Record For COVID-19 Hospitalizations, Single-Day Cases Again

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Los Angeles County Breaks Record For COVID-19 Hospitalizations, Single-Day Cases Again

"Of California leads all U. S states and territories in Corona virus cases with more than 1.4 million total infections. According to Johns Hopkins University. The Los Angeles area accounts for the majority of them. NPR's Nathan Rott reports on the county's new single day record. Los Angeles County confirmed nearly 13,000 new coronavirus cases Thursday. Nearly 2000 more than the previous daily record. The surgeon cases and hospitalizations is putting a massive strength on health care workers and facilities, which have been battling the virus for nine months now. Less than 8% of ICU beds are still available in all of Southern

Nathan Rott Corona U. Johns Hopkins University NPR California Los Angeles County Los Angeles
U.S. reaches new milestones for coronavirus deaths

BBC World Service

00:57 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. reaches new milestones for coronavirus deaths

"Virus vaccine US cases of the disease and deaths are hitting all time highs. NPR's Nathan Rott reports that Los Angeles County said a number of grim pandemic milestones on Thursday health officials in Los Angeles County have confirmed nearly 13,000 new coronavirus cases. Shattering the previous daily record. They also sadly reported the first death of a child from Cove in 19 in L. A county. News comes his hospitals are filling up regionally and around other parts of the country less than 8% of ICU beds in all of Southern California were still available as of Thursday afternoon. In the San Joaquin Valley less than 2%. State and local governments are implementing stayed home orders to try and slow the spread of cove in 19, and they're urging people to not travel this holiday season. Nathan Rott. NPR NEWS LOS Angeles Montana Governor Steve Bullock says his state is preparing for

Nathan Rott Los Angeles County NPR San Joaquin Valley United States Southern California Governor Steve Bullock Montana Los Angeles
"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"FDA advisory panel Voting 17 to 4 to recommend emergency use authorization of the vaccine jointly developed by Fizer and German company by on Tech haven't find took part in the initial trial for the vaccine and says he had no problems and believes it should be rolled out immediately. Nothing felt rushed, and I never felt like a guinea pig. The question that everyone asked me is well, what happened in the long term? Are there they long term side effects? And it's been more than five months now since my first shot, and I can happily report that there are no emergency use authorization by the FDA would allow the vaccine to be administered to frontline public health workers and nursing home patients. That's expected to happen quickly, clearing the way for vaccinations to begin in a matter of days. Coronavirus cases and deaths. Meanwhile, there sewing all time highs around the country. NPR's Nathan Rott reports Los Angeles County said a number of grim milestones Thursday Health officials in Los Angeles County have confirmed nearly 13,000 new coronavirus cases, shattering the previous daily record. They also sadly reported the first death of a child from Cove in 19 in L. A county. News comes his hospitals are filling up regionally and around other parts of the country less than 8% of ICU beds in all of Southern California were still available as of Thursday afternoon in the San Joaquin Valley, less than 2%. State. Local governments are implementing stayed home orders to try and slow the spread of cove in 19,.

Los Angeles County FDA Nathan Rott San Joaquin Valley Southern California NPR
"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Will shift away from fossil fuel development and move towards renewable energy sources. And she says it will act to protect Maura areas. Protecting humanity Down the road. Nathan Rott NPR news And you're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Stay with us for more. The program after we get an update on the traffic situation in San Jose and the rest of the Bay Area, here's Julie deficit. Dealing with a wreck on South and 85 Union Avenue. All that on the shoulder now pretty bad back up, though, to Basketball Avenue when Lookout for stall in San Francisco south and too weighty and ocean Geneva that's blocking the right lane. Better news and Hercules. They clear that four vehicle crash and the westbound Four connectors are westbound 80. Julie de Pish Working Q. E D traffic support comes from Lucky and Lucky California and Julie. We'll have another update in 10 Minutes. Support for KQED comes from Viacom, California a community of life science companies bringing vaccines, Therapeutics and diagnostics. The patients in need. And the innovative biotech solutions to address global challenges. Bio com dot org's and from the Institute on Aging, providing customized home care to allow older adults to age in the place they call home. Learn more at Io aging dot or Do Palestinians in the Israeli occupied West Bank live under apartheid. The latest on that debate is coming up next in this hour of all things considered next time on city arts and lectures, crosstalk and original.

Julie de Pish California Nathan Rott Institute on Aging NPR Maura San Jose San Francisco Bay Area Basketball West Bank KQED Viacom
"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly, president. Trump, Special advisor on the Corona virus is resigning from his position. Dr. Scott Atlas joined the White House over the summer. He came under criticism for resisting aggressive efforts to contain the Corona virus pandemic and for having no formal experience in public health or infectious diseases. Atlas clashed with scientists on the White House Coronavirus task force, including Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease. Expert. California Governor Gavin Newsom says hospitals in his state could run out of intensive care beds by mid December. If new Corona virus infections continue to rise at their current pace. NPR's Nathan Rott says that could mean a return to stricter lockdowns for Californians. California is seeing more people hospitalized with Cove in 19, then it any other time during the pandemic, And with the number of new cases soaring, Governor Newsome and State health officials are worried that hospitalizations could jump significantly in the coming weeks. Especially after Thanksgiving holiday travel. If these trends continue, we're gonna have to take much more dramatic. Arguably drastic action, including, he says the possibility of a statewide stay at home order. Nathan Rott NPR NEWS LOS Angeles health experts are continuing to express concerns about the number of Americans who traveled over the Thanksgiving holiday and how it might lead to higher numbers of new Corona virus infections. Nearly 1.2 million people passed through US airports on Sunday, the most since the pandemic began. The head of the World Health Organization, says he's concerned about the spread of the virus in Mexico. The country has recorded nearly 106,000 Cove in 19 deaths and more than a million infections. Mexico's death toll is the fourth highest in the world. The U. S still leads all other countries and covert 19 fatalities. With more than 268,000. There's a a congressional runoff election in Georgia today, voters are deciding which candidate will briefly fill the House seat of the late Democratic congressman John Lewis. Christopher Alston with member station W. A. B has more from Atlanta, Robert Franklin and Kwanza Hall. Both Democrats are competing to be Atlanta's congressman for just a few weeks, one of the shortest house 10 years in U. S history. Runoff as a burden toe already overworked metro Atlanta counties, which are also conducting a recount of the November election. Erica Hamilton, his election director for the cab county employees. This is what we live for. This is our job. We expect that we're ready for it. It gets it just adds that extra layer two are learning experience with his 2020 election. The winner of this runoff will not serve past January. Congresswoman.

Nathan Rott Dr. Scott Atlas Atlanta NPR California Mexico congressman Governor Gavin Newsom White House Dave Mattingly Dr Anthony Fauci 106,000 Cove Trump World Health Organization Governor Newsome Washington Special advisor
"nathan rott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Either confused or being a bit dismissive the pandemic and I hope that you know if leader start hammering kind of clear, concise, consistent messaging in the country that people will come around. NPR's Nathan Rott reporting Hurricane Iota slammed into Nicaragua last night as a Category four storm with wind speeds near 155 MPH. More than 25,000. People are in shelters. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports Iota weekend after making landfall, but it remains powerful enough to cause yet more damage and loss of life. Region barely recovering from the last hurricane two weeks ago. I only came ashore on Nicaragua's Caribbean coastline just 15 miles south of where Hurricane ADA hit on November 3rd Iota is projected to follow nearly the same path A Zeta through Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala, dumping heavy rains. The National Hurricane Center warns of potentially catastrophic flash flooding and mudslides across Central America for the next day or two. In Nicaragua. Roofs are ripped from homes, trees felled and power lines top of along the coastline, the under an air force reportedly evacuated more than 175,000 people from the flooded valley around the country's northern industrial city. San Pedro Sula in anticipation of iota expected to hit their late Tuesday. Carrie Kahn NPR NEWS Mexico CITY This is NPR. This is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm David First Mayor De Blasio's says New York City public schools will be opened tomorrow. The mayor had said he would close schools if the positivity rate for new Corona virus infections reached 3%. Today, he said the current seven day average remains just above 2.7%. We're below the threshold that we set regarding our schools. And that means that not only our schools open today in New York City schools will also be open tomorrow in New York City. Governor. Cuomo has urged to Blasio to consider the positivity rate in schools, which has been lower than the citywide average before making the decision to close them. New York's first in the nation tax on opioid manufacturers and district distributors may have backfired, leaving small pharmacies and patients stuck with the bill last year, lawmakers past attacks on pharmaceutical companies aimed at punishing them for their role in the opioid epidemic. Instead, many either passed the cost onto others were pulled out of the state altogether. And Estancia Glion coughs. Kia wrote about this for Kaiser Health News, she says, as a result of the tax pharmacies or patients in rural areas can't afford the drugs and they're usually not in stock. When those pharmacies can no longer carry their medication. They obviously struggle with pain or go into withdrawal and get hospitalized. She reports that the tax has so far raised about $30 million, about a third of what lawmakers expected. 50 degrees. Now. Mostly cloudy this afternoon with the possibility of some scattered showers tonight will have mostly clear skies with a low of 33 degrees and then tomorrow sunny, breezy. With a high of 41. This is W N. Y. C. Support for NPR comes from Bryant University for 156 years dedicated to educating and inspiring students to excel as they become innovative leaders of character prepared to make a difference around the world. Learn more at Bryant dot e. D u.

"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Western states are making as well as rising cove in 19 cases, stretch health care workers and facilities in some places to their limits. Nathan Rott NPR NEWS The National Hurricane Center, says Hurricane Iota is weakening fast as it moves inland over Central America. Top winds are now with 85 MPH. It hit the Nicaraguan coast yesterday with top winds of 155 MPH. It's made landfall in the same area as Hurricane Ada. That Category four storm hit less than two weeks ago. Matt Hackworth of the aid agency, Lutheran World Relief is in Honduras. Right now. The challenge is how do humanitarian organizations like mine attend to the immediate needs just to keep people safe and sheltered when they can't go home again, There are many families who have lost everything their homes swept away by hurricane data. And now they face the compounding disaster of Hurricane Iota. Iota is expected to drop is much as 30 inches of rain as it barrels and Lund This is NPR. NASA says that four astronauts have arrived safely at the international space station They docked late last night. The crew launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida on Sunday night and spent 27 hours rocketing toward the station. The crew will now spend the next six months in orbit. This crew includes three American astronauts and one Japanese astronaut. They will join three other crew mates who are currently aboard the space station. Census Bureau's internal watchdog group says it's looking into the quality of the results of the 2020 cents is as NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports..

Hurricane Iota National Hurricane Center Hurricane Ada NPR Nathan Rott Matt Hackworth Hansi Lo Wang Census Bureau Central America Cape Canaveral Honduras NASA Lutheran World Florida
"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

"Other Western states are making as well as rising cove in 19 cases, stretch health care workers and facilities in some places to their limits. Nathan Rott NPR NEWS The National Hurricane Center, says Hurricane Iota is weakening fast as it moves inland over Central America. Top winds are now in 85 MPH. It hit the Nicaraguan coast yesterday with top winds of 155 MPH. It's made landfall in the same area as Hurricane Ada. That Category four storm hit less than two weeks ago. Matt Hackworth of the aid agency, Lutheran World Relief is in Honduras. Right now. The challenge is how do Humanitarian organizations like mine attend to the immediate needs just to keep people safe and sheltered. When they can't go home again. There are many families who have lost everything their homes swept away by hurricane data. And now they face the compounding disaster of hurricane Iota. Iota is expected to drop as much as 30 inches of rain as it barrels and lend This is NPR. NASA says that four astronauts have arrived safely at the international space station They docked late last night. The crew launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida on Sunday night and spent 27 hours rocketing toward the station. The crew will now spend the next six months in orbit. This crew includes three American astronauts and one Japanese astronaut. They will join three other crew mates who are currently aboard the space station. The Census Bureau's internal watchdog group says it's looking into the quality of the results of the 2020 senses. As NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports.

hurricane Iota National Hurricane Center Hurricane Ada NPR Nathan Rott Census Bureau Matt Hackworth Hansi Lo Wang Central America Cape Canaveral Honduras NASA Lutheran World Florida
"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KCRW

"Examined. Lie from NPR News. I'm Barbara Klein. President. Trump has made his first public remarks since the election, Speaking yesterday in front of TV cameras outside the White House. The event focused on the Corona virus. But NPR's Tamara Keith reports Trump edged ever so slightly toward acknowledging that he didn't win reelection. President Trump was in the Rose Garden to announce positive developments on vaccines and distribution. He didn't take any questions and he didn't explicitly discussed the election. But when he was talking about whether there would be new restrictions to deal with this current surge in covert cases and hospitalizations, he slipped a little and he said, there won't be any lockdowns in this administration, acknowledging perhaps almost that he may not be president after January, 20th. Adding only time will tell NPR's Tamara Keith. All non essential businesses in New Mexico and Oregon, are being asked to stop in person service starting next week. Because of a surgeon coronavirus cases. MPR's Nathan Rott reports calling it a life or death situation. In the midst of a massive uptick in Cove in 19 cases New Mexico Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham is directing a two week reset as she puts it for the state. Nonessential businesses are being told to stop in person services and sales in Oregon, Jim's public places and some businesses are going to be on a similar to week freeze. The moves come as Corona virus cases have spiked in many parts of the country, stressing local and regional health centers. The entire West Coast issued travel advisories on Friday asking that if people do travel, especially with the holidays coming up A quarantine for 14 days after and limit when they can. Any interactions. Nathan Rott NPR news The federal government is allocating $12 million in emergency relief funds to begin repairs on a major interstate highway.

President Trump NPR NPR News Tamara Keith Nathan Rott Barbara Klein Governor Michelle Luhan Grisha New Mexico federal government White House Oregon Rose Garden Jim
California, Oregon and Washington issue Covid travel advisory urging 14-day quarantine

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

California, Oregon and Washington issue Covid travel advisory urging 14-day quarantine

"Travel advisories for anyone traveling to or from the West Coast. NPR's Nathan Rott reports. The region is responding to the Surgeon Cove in 19 cases. California has passed another sobering benchmark. More than a million total coronavirus cases have now been recorded in that state, and the number keeps climbing. Higher infection rates in some parts of California are higher than they've been since summer. Similar spikes or happening in Oregon, Washington and further inland, all of which is stressing hospital systems and causing worry, particularly with the Thanksgiving holiday just around the corner. To address that state leaders are urging anyone traveling to or from the West Coast to quarantine for 14 days after they arrive, and they're asking people to limit their interactions and activities toe on Lee, those that are necessary. If they do decide to travel. Nathan Rott. NPR NEWS just one day after

Nathan Rott NPR The West Coast California Oregon Washington West Coast LEE
Clashes continue for 5th night as anger boils over in dozens of cities across the US

Weekend Edition Sunday

08:11 min | 2 years ago

Clashes continue for 5th night as anger boils over in dozens of cities across the US

"In dozens of cities yesterday large mostly peaceful demonstrations devolved into chaos in Nashville Miami Seattle and Salt Lake City Pittsburgh Phoenix New York and frankly too many other places to name protesters expressed their rage at the death of George Floyd police brutality and racism there were violent confrontations with police and police crackdown also violently they're also mass arrests and injuries among demonstrators journalists and police at least a dozen major cities declared curfews others called on the National Guard which has been historically used in response to major civil unrest there were scenes of National Guard marching through some residential neighborhoods ordering people to stay inside we go now to Los Angeles where members of the National Guard were also deployed overnight and a curfew was put in place as a state of emergency was declared NPR's Nathan rott is in a Laney joins us now Nate walk us through what happened yesterday so there is a massive peaceful protesters started around noon yesterday was in the Fairfax district in west LA which is kind of a trendy neighborhood with high end retail in a big outdoor mall and people were protesting against police violence as they are all over the country they were memorializing George Floyd the black man who died after being pinned to the ground by Minneapolis police officers and you know by all accounts it was peaceful respectful until a little later in the afternoon when we started seeing reports of police cars being set on fire and just a total breakdown of the situation this often happens a protest right when things shift as things go into the night do we know what happened yeah that's the obviously that was a little surprising loop usually these like shift to happen and I distorted broad daylight mid afternoon which is I think very concerning to a lot of city officials so you know on social media people are blaming the police for escalating tensions for responding with tear gas in this sort of militarized riot gear that has become so comically become a place around the country city officials have so far blame bad eggs in the crowd for setting things off and that's something we've been hearing in a lot of places that it's a small group of people who are agitating the situations of course that's now been politicized even with the U. S. Attorney General blaming anarchists and leftists without you know providing any proof of that but it's really hard to say what makes the situation situation shift tensions are obviously very high so it doesn't take much to spark something now doesn't we saw videos of looting and fires in many cities around the country last night it was also the case another right yeah number of retail stores in that Fairfax area were broken into goods were stolen some were set on fire I know firefighters are dealing with those fires throughout the night that prompted Ellie's mayor Eric Garcetti to announce a city wide curfew which cut a lot of people off guard because he announced an hour before it went into effect but here he is explaining why they did it and alluding to a violent protests in nineteen ninety two for following Rodney king we've seen this before in Los Angeles when the violence escalate no one wins and so everybody has to be responsible for owning this moment what do you wear a badge or whether you hold a sign I'm asking all of Los Angeles to take a deep breath and a step back for a moment it doesn't seem like the curfew worked briefly yeah the crowd started to sent that out even before the curfew started I know in other parts of the state Sacramento San Diego other large can confrontations between crowds and police I think you know what it's going to be interesting to see what happens over the next couple of days that's NPR's Nate rott in LA thank you so much yeah I think you look so we've been hearing how the nation is pulsing with anger with demands for racial justice some of that anger has translated into literal fire and for some small business owners that means there is stab each man is a casualty of the unrest and partially the Fadhel followed one of Minneapolis family and sent the story on the south side of Minneapolis the feeling and her family walk up to the door of what was my Mississippi is kitchen volunteer neighborhood walks out sorry the first time we've seen the restaurant after days of inside the walls are charred black the kitchen reduced to rubble glass and water swimming in puddles as community members were to sweep away the destruction of the looks around stunned her daughter's side as with their very very I completely I don't know how they're going to recover this her mother a Somali immigrant opened the restaurant two years ago but her tire savings in the midst of the health pandemic she closed the restaurant and she had to choose between paying for insurance and paying staff system via chose her staff that means there are no funds to rebuild this weekend her mother had planned to re opened her restaurant as the city started easing stay at home orders she spent over four thousand dollars on preparation how would it not only me many obvious she says it's not only her it's the whole street the city around her community members are sweeping boarding up buildings and helping each other almost every business on this block is damaged she speaks to Molly as her daughter interprets everything that has happened and every even though I know that I'm not gonna be able to compact discs from this economically but what has happened to George's life is not so cannot be exchanged for lotus I hope that he gets adjusted the freezer at the oven the tables they can be replaced but George for its life she says that cannot be replaced please the African American man who died after a white police officer India's next to the ground with his that's now fired officer Derek shopping has been arrested and charged with death has prompted mass protests that have erupted across the country in a call for racial justice in the rebel side defines the sign she made for her mother when the restaurant first opened none of the fiscal she loves because she always cooks sided digs out a few morning next most artifacts here I got it from this comes from somebody she puts them into a tiny pile of what is salvageable outside is the power of all that is lost her sister beyond the locks in to help she looks around but the truth is things like this happen when people feel powerless and something has to change he said she hopes the protests translate into motivated voters because back to her is real power she and her sisters started the big difference together inside the kitchen in the back so we can assess the damage it's a tunnel black walls burned debris I'm sorry she is upset because the way I just I just want to see the dentist in the kitchen alone for a moment staring into that black tunnel and then joins her family outside where people are coming together to clear the rubble with everything unfolding the pandemic has slipped many people's minds I forgot have you seen you shake hands with people twenty twenty we hear you we see we went from one crisis to the next to the next sizes now she spends her nights both protesting but also trying to protect other people stores and restaurants from destruction like emotionally torn like you're in there I don't think this is right but at the same time people are crying for help seeing six overnight there were more clashes more cries for justice as protesters demanded that all four of the fired officers involved in the death of George Floyd be prosecuted Floyd is a symbol of the many deaths of black people in police custody sided says she hopes all of

Seattle New York Nashville Salt Lake City Pittsburgh
Flights Into The Stratosphere Study Changes To Atmospheric Rivers

Morning Edition

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Flights Into The Stratosphere Study Changes To Atmospheric Rivers

"That over the past six months scientists have been flying high over the Pacific Ocean into the stratosphere to study weather phenomena called atmospheric rivers these rivers in the sky can deliver huge amounts of rain and snow to the west coast and they may be getting more intense and here's Nathan rott join them for a flight confession I don't always pay attention to preflight briefing you know the whole insert buckled tighten seatbelt thing but most flights don't have emergency masks with compressed air pressure you'll need like we need a retaining says because if something goes wrong above forty thousand feet the air

Pacific Ocean Nathan Rott
US coronavirus deaths pass bleak 10,000 milestone

Morning Edition

01:01 min | 2 years ago

US coronavirus deaths pass bleak 10,000 milestone

"Coleman more than three hundred sixty eight thousand people have contracted the corona virus in the U. S. according to researchers from Johns Hopkins University nearly eleven thousand people have died a third of the U. S. deaths are in New York City alone there are clusters of cases in Detroit and New Orleans as well as in New Jersey health officials in Los Angeles are urging people in the region not to leave home at all this week in an effort to slow the virus NPR's Nathan rott reports the number of cases there continues to rise city and county officials in southern California have already closed hiking trails beaches and most public places to try to slow the spread of the corona virus but with the number of positive cases in Los Angeles county surpassing six thousand and health care workers warning that this could be a critical week officials are now asking people to temporarily skip shopping and avoid leaving home altogether if at all possible LA mayor Eric Garcetti says the social distancing appears to be working but that it's too soon for anyone to get

Johns Hopkins University New York City Detroit New Orleans Los Angeles Nathan Rott California Eric Garcetti Coleman New Jersey
"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"nathan rott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Dave Mattingly California is ordering people to stay home state wide because of the corona virus and P. R.'s Nathan rott says this is the first statewide ban on nonessential travel since the outbreak began this statewide stayed home order is the strongest action taken by any state in the country so far in the fight against a corona virus in California governor Gavin Newsom said the decision did not come easily but he says given projections of the viruses potential spread in the state it is the best thing to do it's time for all of us to recognize as individuals and as a community we need to do more to meet this moment Newsome says enforcement is gonna rely heavily on social pressure but that he's confident Californians will do the right thing Nathan rott NPR news Los Angeles new York's governor is ordering businesses in his state to have three quarters of their employees work from home in an effort to combat the virus the state has more than five thousand confirmed cases in New York City mayor bill de Blasio says hospitals there are likely to run out of the central medical supplies in two to three weeks in Pennsylvania the governor is or during the closure of all mom's life sustaining businesses in the state the exceptions are grocery stores pharmacies gas stations and takeout restaurants overseas Italy's death toll from the virus now tops China's for the first time this is NPR news live from KQED news I'm Brian what some bay area uber drivers say the company is ignoring a key new California labor law well they're facing dangerous conditions stemming from the corona virus outbreak a group of them gathered six feet apart in front of the uber headquarters in San Francisco yesterday KQED's Kathleen Quilliam reports eighty five allow certain California workers to be classified as employees rather than independent contractors which is important right now for drivers who want to file for unemployment allowed he has been driving for uber since two thousand thirteen he added he is even if you open the app and go to work right now there is a crisis nobody request ride this day is a lot he says he tried to apply for unemployment but was denied because he is still considered a contractor uber is supporting a measure on the November ballot that would repeal part of eighty five a spokesperson for that campaign.

China Los Angeles NPR Dave Mattingly Kathleen Quilliam KQED San Francisco Brian Washington Italy Pennsylvania bill de Blasio new York Newsome Gavin Newsom Nathan rott P. R. California
Coronavirus Updates: Californians Ordered to Stay Home

All Of It

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus Updates: Californians Ordered to Stay Home

"California has imposed the toughest measures of any US state so far to stem the spread of corona virus as NPR's Nathan rott purports the nation's most populous state is ordering its residents to stay home unless they need to go out saying the Californians need to meet the moment the state's governor Gavin Newsom ordered its forty million residents to stay home the restrictions are aimed to slow the rate of the corona virus because with out mitigation Newsome says more than half of the state's population could become infected enforcement will rely heavily on social pressure Newsome says an essential travel is still permitted the move follows similar lockdowns in the bay area and Los Angeles and will be in effect for the foreseeable

California NPR Nathan Rott Gavin Newsom Newsome Los Angeles United States