20 Episode results for "Nathan Law"

Amanpour: James Clyburn, Nathan Law, Alan Hoo and Zerlina Maxwell

Amanpour

57:52 min | 4 months ago

Amanpour: James Clyburn, Nathan Law, Alan Hoo and Zerlina Maxwell

"Hello everyone and welcome to our report. Here's what's coming up. Outcry is them. Protesters face a federal crackdown, Democratic Congressman and House majority with Jim. Clyburn joins us as he also mourns the loss of his friend and civil rights. Giant John Lewis also ahead I would just say this. The United Kingdom is watching. And the whole world is watching. The West moves to sanction China over the new Hong Kong security measures. We speak to both sides. Nathan Law, the pro democracy activist who's now fled to London plus lawyer Alan new, the Pro Beijing Hong Kong politician then I want other black women to politics as a career also Obama and Hillary Clinton campaign. Maxwell tells Michelle Malkin why Democrats must engage with black women. Welcome to the program. Everyone I'm Christiane. Poor working from home in London. The backlash is well and truly underway against camouflage, federal agents of snatching protesters from the street, shoving them into on Maude, Fans Destination Unknown. This is what's been happening in the city of Portland in the United States of America as president. Trump deploy forces to quash black lives matter protests. Protests against racial injustice, the mayor of Portland and the governor of the state, a demanding these federal agents leave the city, and these shocking images from there are in stark contrast to the bipartisan outpouring of praise and grief for John Lewis. The House held a moment of silence to honor the veterans. Civil Rights leader and emblem of freedom. Longtime congressman died aged. Aged eighty on Friday after a six month battle with cancer, and a lifetime spent battling and fighting for Equality Lewis was the youngest to speak the nine hundred and sixty three march on Washington for jobs and freedom, and in nine, hundred sixty five. He had his skull smashed by State troopers when he joined the March over the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, to demand equal voting rights, joining us now from Washington DC is the Democratic Congressman Jim Clyburn the House majority whip a close friend of the late. John Lewis Congressman Clyburn Welcome back to program. You know I want to start by asking you. Perhaps you think John Lewis would have made of this almost uncanny. Repeat of the imagery federal agents. Essentially grabbing and shoving and detaining peaceful protesters this time in Portland in twenty twenty. I. For having it, you know I can only imagine the John would be beside himself. I remember his reaction. To what happened here? The in Washington DC is several weeks ago. When the president ordered, marshalls are. SIMP- people on Horseback. declared a pad that for him to go out in front of Saint John's Church and know that Bible up. Was So incensed by that a he went. Out of his. His home that he's. was really not been out and early in the morning with the mayor of Washington. To stand at Black Lives Matter Plaza. To Express. His concern about whether it just happened so John would be very upset with that. It would be reminded him as it was to so many of us. Of, what happened on the Edmund? pettus bridge that day. We still see the film. A troopers beating them with batons that arrived running over them with horses. HUSTLES and protons. That's exactly what we've seen in these two incidents, so he would be very very upset. And of course, even those famous black and white pictures from from back in nine, hundred and sixty five in Selma. Even when John Lewis tried to rise, he was he was beaten again, and he had his skull cracked, and he said you know. He spent his entire life fighting for human rights for freedom for voting rights for democracy. He said it seems like it was his whole life fighting. What did he say to you as sixty was? When he saw the protests after, will I need the killing of Jewish Floyd? But the protests that then encompassed such a wide diversity of American, people even even a bigger demographic than back in the nineteen sixties, even when whites did go to the south to try to help that. Were sitting on the floor one day. not long after. This whole incident we saw this breakthrough. Black lives matter found a brick and through. You saw the support coming forward. And John said to me it feels different this time. And we were so concerned couple of days later. All of a sudden, we heard at this cry. Of defunding police. We both reminisced about what burn baby. Burn that slogan did. For us back in the nineteen sixties, so John was very concerned. We talked about not allowing. This movement this momentum. To be dissipated over sloganeering, and that's why both of us spoke out so strongly. against. defunding police, we didn't want to see another headline. Destroy another movement. Headlines. Often get in the way of headway. And that's what we wanted to see. Headway, not headlines. Well. Let me ask you then. Do you think you are making enough headway and not generating the kind of headlines that you don't want to generate? I think the people now. What John was talking about, and I have noticed. That the purpose. For, all of these activities seem to be talked about now. People are rattling around a new vote. Rights Have Supreme Court. Got It the nineteen sixty five one rights act. John Losses Life. Back in nineteen, sixty five, and as a result of goes activities on the Edmund Pettus Bridge. We got the Voting Rights Act in August, not justified. Now Supreme Court seven years ago, cut the heart out of that John Smith last seven years trying to follow the supreme. Court's roadmap. To reauthorize the Voting Rights Act, and so I would think that we would do John's justice if we were to pass. The Jar are Lewis. Voting Rights Act them twenty twenty. And restore the efficacy of the voting rights. Act of nineteen sixty five. So, Congressman James. How would that work I think the House has passed its version of it. What what what next needs to happen to make this a reality and you think it actually will happen. A figure what should happen is. Mitch McConnell. Should put the bill on the floor. Should allow it to be amended. and named we sent it over there as HR four. He ought to send it back to us. Pass it and send it back to us with. John Lewis name on it I. Think you ought to take the opportunity it put some amendments on a fully funded Il took about four billion dollars for us to fully fund. Athletes have a secure. Fair election this coming November, this pandemic is making it impossible for people to cast their vote in person, and they say so. We ought to do it now. Pass this bill and that would be a great way. To? Honor John Lewis. Russia have federal elections say not talking to third and culminated on November third to give us ample time to have social distancing in such a way that everybody will get a chance. The cast an unfettered vote. In a words, can I just ask you. What is your Bet Will Mitch Mcconnell here you? Have you talked to him yet about it? No I have not talked to Mitch McConnell about it and I wouldn't bet that he would do this. I'm just saying what he should do. He's issued a tweet. how Great John? Lewis was the fact of the matter is? Show US your deeds, your words or good. Ud's would be much better. Okay so now congressman I wanted to ask you about words and deeds the president of the United States in response to the the peaceful protests that have been going on in Portland. Has said the following. We're trying to help Portland, not hurt it. Their leadership has for months lost control of the AMICUS and agitators. They're missing in action. We must protect federal property and people. These are not merely protesters. These are the real deal, so the president seems to describe most of these protests illegitimate run by thugs and amicus agitators. Are. You concerned that that might have a spillover effect. When you see what's going on the attempt to maybe have armed. Sort of I don't know some kind of president. Trump likes sort of militia to so called voting. Polling stations on election day and all the things you're seeing happening in in the press right now. President is trying to find an excuse. To suppress voters. Trying to find an excuse. All of this. Is just a trial run for him. The Lincoln Project. All Republicans members of the same product that he is a member of has got a new ad out today, saying this how it all starts. This is how you begin to lose your democracy. When you allow the president of the United States to ignore the governor of Oregon and the mayor of. And he decides. What should be done in all the cheap local order? We've never had that before. This is the beginning of the end of this democracy if people do not. Respon-. In a way that I think. Would make sense. We can't let this guy. Continued the run. Rush sock of our Constitution. Ask You. What makes sense in a minute? But first I want to play you. You mentioned the mayor of Portland his what he said about the result on the streets of deploying these federal federal federal agents. The president has complete misunderstanding of cause and effect. What's happening here? Is We have dozens? If not hundreds of federal troops descending upon our city and what they're doing is, they are sharply escalating the situation. Their presence here is actually leading to more violence and more vandalism, and it's not helping the situation at all. They're not wanted here. We haven't asked them here. In fact, we want them to leave. So. You've just said. There's danger if people don't react the right way to what's going on, the governor and the mayor have just said we want them to leave. What's going to make that happen congressman? Know, what would make that happen? There are a lot of questions being raised about this democracy of is now. I heard Jon Meacham a very renowned and well respected historian. Asked in the question this morning. What. How do we enforce? Electoral College. BA got a president who is refusing to say? Peaceful and give up the office if he loses the election. That's the way he set up. These kind of -tarian governments. We cannot allow this government to become a banana republic. And that's what this guy is trying to do. And that's what the mayor is speaking out against. He didn't ask him. bring in any kind of a force. The Governor Varga did not ask him to do it. And we already see. The governor of Georgia today. Is demanding that the mayor of Atlanta. Shut up. Stop talking publicly. What the heck is this? This is crazy stuff. And that's what these guys or doing. There are running roughshod over the Constitution as They feel. That they have the right. To Do to this country. What was done? To terminate. And Italy. Back, in the Nineteen Thirties I've been warning now for about three years. That this president! There's lot plan to give up the office. He does not plan to buy by the Constitution of the United States. He does not plan for other. Be a fair on fellate election taking place on November third. That is what I'm wondering about and I'm not just started that. I think he looked at your own files, and you see I said on CNN. Two years ago after his State of the Union. That this case. Now people are beginning to see what I felt. Way Back then. I just want to ask you I mean it may sound like his coming out of nowhere a bit, but it altogether just seems as some troubling things as you mentioned first of all these reports that we just talked about I, mean headline say. That, president trump wants to create his own paramilitary domestic security force, calling them stormtroopers, according to headlines to use it the voting booth that on top of this other report about boo-boys had ever heard of these boo glue boys. This boo movement, apparently an extremist movement. Heavily armed men. You know united by the idea. They're fighting against government tyranny. Have you have you heard about them? A have. Heard about, and how worried should we be about it? All of us would be extremely worried about that. And I think that that's why the United States Senate. needs to step up. Mitch McConnell the leadership of the Senate. Republican leadership at the Senate need step up. They need to go over the White House. Have a sit down with this president and let him know. That, they're not gonNA be his puppets. And they are not going to undermine what this country spent. All of this time become in a beacon for the rest of the world. This man will have us on the back. Of History. He would have US repeat stuff that all of us was behind gus. What about the state of the nation? Right? Now? I think Congress has just started a new three week session, and there's a whole new bill that needs to be paused. I think that passing a new relief package. How challenging you of course, what I'm talking about his Co. Vid of all the people who've who've lost so much in this, what do you expect? And how do you expect that to go? Well, it's not the house pass heroes. Act is about a three hour program by one point. One trillion dollars of it dedicated to state and local governments trying to keep people who are unemployed at with unemployment insurance. Through the I am next year a trying to de. Politicize this entire Ephraim. This president. Will love. The have this issue. As a political issue going into this election so I think it's very important. For the Senate. The tick that bill we said to them one month ago. Thursday ethnic. Thurs were be exactly one month. that. Over in the Senate and they need to take it up. They need to pass it and they did to do. What is necessary the underground economy so that we can. Have a country worth leaving to our children and our grandchildren. And finally because we've been talking about the legacy of John Lewis, will he get to lie? In state. The capitol will the conditions permit that? How do you think the? The respects are going to be paid to him. Where we're going to do everything we possibly can that we can do safely. We believe the John is deserving. Lying in state here at the Capitol. We believe that we have a duty and responsibility the American people to keep them safe. And, so what we're going to do is as much as we possibly can do for Lewis and not put the health and welfare of the American people at Jeopardy so yes. Everything we possibly can for him, but we do it in a safe and secure with. Congressman James Clyburn. Thank you so much for joining us. Now, human rights are at the center of a decision by the U K to turn on China today suspending his extradition treaty with Hong Kong, and banning the export of any riot control equipment to the territory, despite the trump administration's deepening cold war with Beijing, today's rapid about face is from one of the West most China friendly nations, and it comes because Beijing. Beijing has imposed a new national security law, which criminalizes most political dissent in the territory that once belonged to Britain democracy activists are afraid, and our next guest has fled his home Nathan. Law is one of Hong Kong's leading pro-democracy protestors. He's come here to London and he's joining me now. Nathan Law Welcome to the program first. Your reaction to what just happened. Today with the UK announcing. Suspending extradition and also no longer sending all suspending sales of that equipment to the region. Well I thank the foreign secretary made a decision for promptly two weeks ago. I issue an open that to. This country to end the tradition treaty the Hong Kong because under the national security. Law Home does not enjoy rule floor, and I'll countries committed to it and I'm glad that today the foreign secretary announced that policy change. I think in the long term future that will be more and more diplomacy from the UK government to China and Hong Kong. And let me just ask you know you're very young man. I think you're twenty seven years old and we've been talking about the Great Democracy Activists John. Lewis who put his life on the line for all those years you guys have done something similar in Hong Kong for several seasons now in terms of democracy protests. You'd be met by heavily militarized police. There's been a lot of scuffling. How do you put your battle for freedom and human rights in I guess the Civil Rights and the and the greater global battle for freedom. I I honestly not to compare myself to John. Lewis because it's been a really a figure of the whole movement, and he's legendary and well from these Ratko. Interested for like forty something times during his whole resistant, they resistant movement, and he's been committed to it and he's A. Total, our generations about him, so this is. Such a well honorable figurehead for me so I. Think it's important that we have someone to learn from, and it's important that spirit could be Momentum Force for a lot of younger generation with. That by justice. Nathan you know John Lewis Despite all the provocations in his own. Attacks against his own person and the arrests that you mentioned. He never stopped believing in nonviolent protest. Can you say that you all believe in that as well because many were sort of turned off by some of the violence. What is now? You'll strategy going forward given this new security law as well. Well I pay tribute to John Lewis well, my and issue statements on that I'm I'm also a true belief on long violent resistance. But in fact, well sometimes when the government reviews to listen. To the people then. When they resort to the use violence. Sometimes, we have to understand that there's a recent from it like What what does it came? riot is the voice of the hurt and I think this is something that we should really pounder, and to to understand the root of why people resort to violence, because if the voice of Long Island process though to be hurt, then they don't have. The live risk years of imprisonment to come into those following resistance so I think yes, indeed a true believer on long island resistant, but for me. I pay a lot of understanding and Empathy on those people will result in different ways. So let me just get to the heart of this new National Security Law and its impact on Hong Kong now apparently criminalizes quote, secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign forces to engender endanger other national security and hundreds of already been arrested under this law. What exactly does it mean for the people of Hong Kong? How different is it to what already existed? It means that at the end of freedom of expression. we could see people arrested just because they are in possession of the sickest of. That have the protests slogan on an issue a statement saying. Oh, you talk about these slogan. You have all eating the national security. It it is clearly harketting the freedom of expression of people, which none of the other national secrete low. The other countries especially in democratic ones do it. They say well serious spritual of our freedom, and it will create a strong powerful arbitrary tree legal weapon for the government prosecute anyone they like. So the leaders of this movement are very young. You and Joshua. Wong you both very very young man, and you've obviously come to a decision. One of you staying there, Joshua. You're coming to the UK. Can you explain the strategy? Of You leaving Hong Kong. Well well, you may have a third up my rival in the UK the Well, we've got from attitudes. Who was all way now? Suspending the extradition treaty with China and Shadow. Foreign Secretary has been. Really strong commenting on unconcern concerned by the of Pemba much to the election. You See that change is happening what? Online amounts we've seen a structural shift. indicate kate towards a more assertive policy when dealing with China and I take my assistant also take no a very strong message that that. Situation in Hong Kong, that crisis is rich to a very wearing level, so it really accelerate that trump's. Now hope that might. Really push only the trump tro, shift, indio cave, but also in Europe. I, just WANNA play a sound bite in response to criticism of this national. I want to play the sound bite. Which is from Carrie Lam? WHO's the Chief Executive of Hong Kong? The. Law Will Not Affect Hong Kong's renowned judicial independence. It will not affect legitimate rights and freedoms of individuals which are protected under the Basic Law and relevant international covenants applied to Hong Kong. They include among. The freedom of speech of the Press of Assembly of demonstration and of procession. In short, the legislation will not undermine one country, two systems and Hong Kong's high degree of autonomy. So Nathan Law she's basically saying it won't make any difference to all the democratic freedoms that you cherish so much and yet Joshua Wong. Your colleague said this will be the end of Hong Kong. We know it very briefly. What do you want? The US France the West the democratic world to do about this given. How dependent everyone is on China trade and economy? Well, WHAT CAROLINA! Is Life because the one come to some in fact when you talk about one country, two system, the two most important pillar while freedom and autonomy, and well that setup of the national security law destroyed them both. We don't have like freedom of expression now and Hong Kong Spain takeover by the the the secret agency find by China the Chinese A. Cryptic direct control in Hong Kong so this is basically the end of one country two. Regarding regarding the situation I think the international community is just fall. In A coherent front that could really hold China accountable. Do not own meet their immorality salvation Xinjiang in Hong. Kong and try after McKenna them to make them while pay when they come into these human rights violation by the end before the Western democracies or the Western countries I've always been protecting that. China opened up by themselves, but in in fact the. What this is proven. Wrong prediction now we should act. We should form alliance and to hope China accountable. Nathan Law thank you very much indeed for joining me with your perspective on this, and now we're going to have response from Allen. Who is a barrister is also vice chairman of Hong Kong's pro-beijing Liberal Party, and he's actually joining me from Hong Kong. So, Mr who welcome welcome to the program you heard what Nathan Lord just told me. In terms of how Carrie Lam chief executive defended the new situation. He says no way. No, how it's not going to be like she says as you heard. He called it a lie about what's going to happen to the future of Hong Kong. Can you guarantee not just two people Nathan Law, but to people all over the world who value democracy that will continue. I believe. It will continue and Did you saw? How T. We continue to be the envy and strong if given the child's. At the moment on Com, not no career. It's an open society. It's an. Twenty three years off. Softens. Be? Lost a of these national. You have. Everyone, Is. Also! Very Oversight Committee is. Not Before the legislation nestled. On. National. Over these national covenants in Hong, Kong Cheviot said. Yeah. The whole goal is sponsored or the coach. In Hong, Kong, the come little interpretation at the moment. There's no issues from Hong Kong. IS A. Demonization off the of of this morning on. Call at this, is now she? Just another mainland city, but The other. You know millions of people. Living under every day. I've been making. Every country nationals is station. Four National Mall it's an open society on. Justice is. What is being argue is Has Been Trust. Anything. you mentioned to Nathan is a global apple. But he didn't pick up on that, he said. Just. But. Well as you as you know, they really don't like the extradition law and they don't want to be. Treated as citizens of as you just mentioned and other people think. Chinese city Beijing Shanghai whatever. And also you just heard if if if they're carrying protest signs, or if they're demonstrating they don't you know? They say that it could be considered illegal, and that could be descent. I mean that's not what happens in other democracies. What can you say to assuage their fears particularly? I can see you shaking your head, but I I need to talk. What can you say because you know even? Carrie Lam didn't know the full details of the law until it came into effect on July first. Announced she may decision. Made any. He's four is in. Ashes Security And the sound doesn't. To. There's underneath. Your at each all. Offenses you compare them with America he goes okay Joe. Code and you look at that event, actress Finicky. As long as A subversion, this addition moving his treason. And the same except. Only. He turns. Now principles and the courts to interpret. What? Is. To win the. Super! Bowl yet. This is this. But there's A. Why don't you let it play out? Not. Well anyway finishes today. Function every day. Read off the. Dish they come out to support. Say the Hong Kong judges. I very very independent. Luck and That this will continue and who she goes there. Why not see as it goes? Why aren't we show determined the label unconscious you'll do. We wanted to take away for the charges and. Everyone's shopping on. Any knowledge physician. Trade Agreement before. On. We have a way to the. To people. Charged to get. To the point. To say monitoring their listen to move. Is Not. Demon is being made all. These national heritage it's. Always Been Schwann without an anti-china to. I mean. It really disappoint. People like me who are educating? This today. They're not going to on addition of arguable and also. Impossible's to to be voted on. I'm sure that is Make you. There would be this. Many. These these. Escape you. Can I. Can I just ask you because you know it? Really, it really is obviously very. Passionate debate. I guess the really is the basic laws suggested at least from what I've written. Red Rather that Hong. Kong would carry on in sort of the way. It was from one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, seven under the under the One Nation Two Systems until twenty forty seven. Why is it that the Chinese government? Couldn't wait until twenty forty seven for this kind of move to happen, and you say nothing's happened, but you know when you just heard Nathan say hundreds of people have already been arrested under this law and nobody quite knows what's going to happen to them. Told you this. It's nothing about as soon racing. Set whereas China. Has Faced national security legislation every country that I mentioned out. Words. Ration- Nation names. Out The. Nothing. Is under the basic goal that was. In nineteen ninety. That's on call. Is Jewish fiction over national security. Well? The tricky thing is. Dumb. As, a result of riots now share the. Violence. Concerning on autonomy as you want to be your. Going back to the originally and a statement says it doesn't listen who results by he and this is small. Booking national security that's like on educate American. Why did double. The. Being done. By Beijing he's no different. CHARGED ONLY NATURE Of America and justice will be dispense the Komo under your system. Boy Raise the terror. Just. This. Allen who I know, that's your perspective. I think some would disagree with you in the US and the UK that the law is no different, but this is to be continued for another day, and we'll certainly keep watching to see if what you say, transpires that the people will be fine, and they won't make a huge amount of. Legal anti-democratic difference over there, so we'll watch. Thank you very much. We'll have you back on again. 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Now as the US election creeps ever closer, speculation is mounting over who Democratic presidential nominee. Joe Biden will pick as his running mate. Our next guest argues that it should be one of the many qualified black women in politics today, so Lena Maxwell is host of the political radio show signal boost on Sirius. XM and back in two thousand sixteen. She was director of Progressive Media for Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign her new book, the end of white politics how to heal liberal divide argues that the Democrats failure to focus on communities of color could be their downfall and here. She is talking to Michelle Martin. Thanks Christiane. Max Long thanks so much for talking to us. Thank you for having me. You open the book with a seeing Birkik. Really captures what the book is about You are on a panel as something called Linda Con- This is July of two thousand eighteen, this obviously after twenty sixteen elections where? The outcome wasn't what you would have hoped. the the panel was called West next liberals, and you describe the scene I'm going to set the stage for a you call them. The end of the Bernie Sanders supporter, White, male millennial, an uncompromising rock round input to heckle. Anyone deemed insufficiently her aggressive, so let's set the scene here. You're trying to get your whites across about why you think. Two Thousand Sixteen ended as did you give this radical statement? All of the Democratic candidates were need to do a better job of speaking to and about the issues that black women in particular care about the most is they want win that twenty twenty Democratic nomination, and that's why Bernie didn't win and Two Thousand Sixteen Oh, my goodness. shocker. But then what happened? I got booed. I I was booed and heckled It was it was very hostile. And to be clear. I went to political in twenty nineteen. The same thing the same thing happened. I was booed for articulating berry similar points, the mention of aiming over shars name got who's from those same folks, and so there's a gender piece, but there's also a race piece on that I was trying to highlight because for so long. Black women have been electing Democrats. You Know Doug Jones is in the Senate because of black women organizing particularly on their own to keep a child Molester Roy. Moore alleged molester out. Out of the United States Senate and I think that to the credit of those lack women. They didn't need to be told to organize to prevent that reality from happening, they knew that Doug Jones had a history of prosecuting the murderers of the four little girls in Birmingham, and so they he had a connection to that community, and I think that more Democrats should look bad example and the exact example like Stacey. Stacey, Abrams folks who really go directly to black women and you know essentially engage with activists and community leaders who are already doing the work I take. That was a Eureka moment for you and that at that meeting in July twenty eighteen. was that your Rica Moment for you? What did that crystallize for you? We'll I felt like there were things that were very obvious to me that we're not obvious to those. Those who were around me I. think that the folks in the room, particularly the white men in the room they think the majority of the base. They think that they are the most important part of the dates and I was just trying to demonstrate that that was no longer true. It's not going to be true going forward as demographic shift I'm. The coalition's become different. You know now. We're in a moment where. We have to focus on this specific issues so that we can build this rebuild this. Obama s collision, and those folks are part of it, but they don't even want me in their ten. You know if I'M GONNA. Get booed just by pointing out some of the ways in which we can improve our messaging towards communities of color, and you're GonNa do me. I think that you need to do some reflection on you know. Why do you feel hostility You know towards a woman of Color Black woman making that point. You make a big point in the book that all politics is really entity right now and I. Don't I'm Devin g politics has taken on. A bad connotation in political circles at least some political circles. You say that that's wrong. Why is that wrong? We'll percival these. The I talked to her. Recently, we were just laughing about the fact that of course a term that was fine by black dumbness in nineteen, seventy seven, would all of a sudden be a bad thing right once once it becomes more of the part of the mainstream conversation as soon as people start being like Oh. Maybe that's the thing. Thing we should pay attention to. It is demonized by those who understand the efficacy of leaning into identity based politics as the coalitions of people of Color and those demographics are shifting, and so, what would I think in in what I'm trying to say in the book? Is that Donald Trump has exposed the fact that what we've been doing in the Americas essentially white identity politics the whole time we particularly been leaning into that and this moment as the president. Runs and explicitly racist campaign. Targeting a particular segment of his base that he thinks response to those kinds of messages, and they are on, and I think that you know what we need understand. The progressive side is that we cannot fall into this notion that identity based politics is dad because they understand the demographics ships. That's why they're suppressing the vote That's why they're voter. ID laws targeting communities. We need to understand that the the math and the demographics on our on our side and. And that identity based politics is authentic way to speak to those communities. I'M GONNA quote easy of ribs again just because she's. She's the smartest person on this particular issue. I think in this moment on, but she says identity politics is sort of like the flip of I. Don't see color like I see you right and I feel like that's a really powerful validation to communities who have been historically marginalized and ignored by the political establishment interesting. You're saying that the. President trump and his will. His whole reason for being politics is white identity politics, but method you just don't hear very often I mean we talk about identity politics. They're genuine talking about the old color of women to some extent for generally people color. You know why is that? Because we default to whiteness, we don't see. Whiteness is an identity, and it is an identity and I think Donald Trump finally exposed that to a lot of white Americans who who didn't have to think about race. You didn't have to think about gender or the intersection of identities, and how that is impacting people I, think Ovid has has made that clear to a lot of people on, and you see this racial reckoning happening, and all all different sectors result of people, just thinking things through in a different way they're. They're noticing more inequities and systems, and that's important. Important because that means that if white Americans can understand the ways in which their whiteness benefit them in ways. They didn't realize you know. It's those things that they didn't have to think about. They didn't have to think about. You. Know going for a jog and maybe getting shot because you were mistaken for Burger this is not an experience that a white person is having, and that's a privileged, but that doesn't make you a racist that just means that you have certain privileges you know. I have certain privileges I'm able bodied. I have a certain level of education and. Socio economically pretty privileged. And I would say that that's that's okay I. Mean I can just identify those things about myself, and that doesn't mean that I'm a bad person or that somebody that has a white privilege as a racist. It just means that you have to have an understanding of how those privileges then offit you, and then you need to reach back and help other people, and that's fundamentally. I think my perspective on most things. Is You know try to help? The core of your arguments corner book is that Democrats need to start speaking intentionally to the concerns, the real and lived experience. Particularly of people of people of Color but meticularly women of color, because that's the new base, as and you're saying that they're not doing that, but why don't you say to people who argue that really it should be policy earth because policy? I is how you bring everybody in, I mean you could. You could argue that you know what's. Could never get away from his skin. His space is his name, and so that he spoke policy Hurston, because he was obviously, I was able to bring in people who frankly were might not have been as comfortable with a man of color in that position, and this is the way that women everybody who have traditionally been marsh lies. That is how you bring lettuce policy sent. Sent a session, the free centers. Why is that wrong I? Look at it a little differently. In terms of having you, we've the policy end the message, but also consider who the messengers are, so for example. I think that Bernie Sanders excellent job of changing the debate about income inequality, and you know the impact of corporations on politics and Wall Street and their abuses, but I feel like. He always stopped short of articulating in detail how he was going to get us to that vision. And so I think that it's a combination you have to both message directly to communities understanding how policies are impacting them specifically, so if you're talking about equal pay with a group of black woman, you'd better understand how it impacts them in a different women, it does white women and same as for Latino Women, so I think you're weaving why you need the policy and how it's. It's going to be tailored to that community. And then you're. You're talking to them in language, they understand. Maybe that means you're talking to them on social media platform. They actually use you know. Maybe it means you're you're you're doing and I do live with denies which is something that the Biden campaign did the other day, so I think you know you have to both. Have the message weaved in with the policy. Resist your body. You wrote this book. Really quickly I mean it's pretty timely. Past year, but you know the world has changed an awful lot with his short time, and our job is that the former vice president is the presumptive nominee John. I'm just GONNA. Read the book here. You saying the inability of Biden Sanders and. Democrats even speak authentic about race and acknowledged pro which is an Achilles heel that needs to be tested so. What now! Well I would say that I. I'm a fan of Vice President Joe Biden in the sense that I do believe him. When he says he wants to be a transitional figure on to sort of a new generation of Democrats, you know. Maybe they look more like the squad Then you know the traditional establishment, so I believe him when he says that so I I can't I'm not a fan and I had met the vice president, and he's very nice and genuine and open, and so I'm a fan of him as a person I think that his policy record though I do have some issues and I just want him to. To fully account for those issues, because once you do that, then you can talk about what your vision is for the future, but if you haven't accounted for the consequences of the policies that you did in the past, then why should we trust you that you're going to be able to do anything good for us in the future or that? We should trust you on the ideas that you do have to build a different future If you can't account, I mean one of the points I make in a book about how some of the candidates didn't gain traction. One of those Harrison and you know that was largely due to. Her inability to fundraise as much as some of the other candidates like a mayor or example but also the criticism of her that she was a cop. And I was like. Joe Biden wrote the crime bill that Comma Harris as a district attorney, and later in a tornado was like those were the laws that she was. Implements and that's where. He's feisty. Presidential pick becomes super important, so Zelina who I just want to say that you know it is impressive to see a list of qualified black women and women of Color and women broadly that he has to choose from, and that's really exciting moment, so I like to sort of pause and say this is a moment but then also I think a black woman in particular would bring in a perspective that he needs. He needs that perspective. He needs somebody. Give Him some real talk about the impact of the crime bill on communities of Color, and how it ripped apart families that are still actually feeling the consequences of that. Which? Is Is. A Fun read. Thank you. Fun I mean you obviously love politics and. Kinda, love the game like the people, but in a way it's really depressing to be on one because. Well no mean just in the reason I say that is, you're saying described, and we only have time to talk about like a fraction of it here with the kind of the disrespect. The kind of you know diminishment you know. I know the the Pablo microaggressions. In your case, there are actual aggression directed at you and other people working in the space. I mean it's not like. It's a new thing to have accomplished African American women in politics I mean Shirley. Chisholm Art Jordan. Call me I'm more as you point out, Harris. Run the. You know But. The fact that you have to fight so hard to be heard. As you described in the book. And we're talking about people who are supposed to be on your side because you're really about Democrats, more broadly and progressives in particular. What does that say well? I mean what I always try to do is create space so that other people who are like me can be heard also so I never want to be the only one in the room talking. you know I. Think you know what I really wanted to do with? The book is to get people to think about this differently. They really need to like you, just we. We have time unless you have small kids, you know where his quarantine. We have a moment to sit down and think about some of the ways in which we're doing this wrong. You know how we're not supporting each other I mean the fact that we have to tell. People are masks. You know at this point. I feel like not wearing a mask is it is almost like a Maga hat. It's like. Okay, I know how you feel about black and Brown people. If you don't wear masks because you know that we're disproportionately killed by this virus, and now you're going out in wanting the fact that you don't think this is real. Even you know I, I. I have five extended family members died. because. nobody in my immediate family, but you know I have an immune compromised mother, and so it's like terrifying every second right, and so I think that the reality is so visceral in this moment that it's like you know it's unfortunate that you. Have to yell. Sometimes you heard, or I have to write a book saying like you know, move the way this is you know what I have to say and I hope people hear me, but at the end of the day I want other black women to see politics as a career, also because our voices are needed in this space there. Are you know Hillary couldn't hide more black women than any presidential, but there could have been double, and it's still probably wouldn't have been enough you. You know and I think. We have to be an every room in every department rebuilding the website as you know Nina a is a one of the coders who built a website and IDA's the one who did I'm with her and that logo and so are were black woman so so I feel like we have to see politics as job and it's A. It's a career as well because there's always a campaign I mean I don't know what's going to happen. Donald. Trump wins again abby. but I do think I. Want to create space his full on, and that's why I I think it is depressing definitely to your point about being drowned out by lose, but I know that. My my clarity in sort of the vision that I'm pointing towards which is just backed up by data. You know I think some people will see that and then hopefully. I created a space so other women of color. Particularly other black women can be all can be heard also. Selena Mash. Lo, thanks so much for talking with us today. Thank you for having me. And of course we are all waiting to see who Joe Biden will choose as his running mate, and finally in the race for the Holy Grail, the first results are in for a corona virus vaccine. This one developed right here in Britain at unprecedented speed by Oxford University, and Astra Zeneca and they bring much needed hope the trial involved just over a thousand patients and show that their immune systems fought the virus, and the vaccine was safe to use, but scientists cautioned that more research is. is needed to establish whether it actually works on a larger sample and over time this is the antibiotics movement gains. Momentum and experts warned that a covid nineteen vaccine will only work if enough people take it, which is a reminder that this that in this life and death battle battle between science and misinformation trust in public health is everyone's responsibility, and that is it for now you can always catch us online on our podcast and across social media. Thank you for watching and goodbye from London.

Hong Kong president John Lewis United States China John Donald Trump Nathan Law Portland Nathan Joe Biden Americas London congressman West Congressman Jim Clyburn United Kingdom Mitch McConnell
Hong Kong Pro-democracy Activist Nathan Law Wins the TIME100 Reader Poll

TIME's Top Stories

02:30 min | 2 months ago

Hong Kong Pro-democracy Activist Nathan Law Wins the TIME100 Reader Poll

"Hong. Kong Pro Democracy Activists Nathan Law Wins Times Twenty twenty time one, hundred reader poll. By the time staff. Time asks readers to vote for who they thought should make the twenty twenty time, one, hundred list and annual compilation of the world's most influential People Nathan law a leading pro-democracy activist and the youngest lawmaker in Hong Kong's history took first place in Times poll with three point eight percent of the four point seven million votes cast by readers law made news in July. When he revealed that he fled Hong Kong after China imposed new controversial national security law making separatism, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign countries criminal. Offenses and attempt at cracking down on Hong Kong protests though the movement continues in Hong Kong, the Security Law and covert nineteen have slowed pro democracy efforts. Most of the world has been severely impacted by covid nineteen and nearly two hundred thousand people in the US are dead globally more than nine hundred thousand people have died healthcare workers on the frontlines battling the virus received the second highest percentage of time reader votes with three point seven percent followed by essential workers who received three point four percent of the vote. Before the corona virus up ended lives all around the world this year all eyes were on Australia between September Twenty nineteen in March twenty, twenty more than seventeen, million hectares more than forty two, million acres of land were burned in sweeping bushfires across Australia and thirty three died Australian firefighters received three point two percent of the vote from readers of the thirty three who died nine were firefighters according to the Australian parliament. Twenty twenty hasn't only been a year marked by a global pandemic and natural disaster after Minneapolis police officers, killed George Floyd on May twenty fifth a Movement for racial. Justice years even centuries in the making swept across the US and in parts of the world black lives matter protesters received two point, five percent of the total votes. Ultimately, time editors select the one hundred most influential people of the year and will announce the fullest during a televised Special September twenty second at ten PM. On ABC.

Hong Kong Twenty twenty Hong. Kong Nathan Law US Australia Australian parliament ABC George Floyd China Minneapolis million hectares eight percent million acres seven percent twenty second five percent four percent
 Why has activist Nathan Law been forced to flee Hong Kong?

Today in Focus

31:21 min | 2 months ago

Why has activist Nathan Law been forced to flee Hong Kong?

"Tonight. Nathan Law the Hong Kong activist forced into exile in London. Tell me about your childhood early memories of growing up in Hong Kong. Was Born in may nine China in nineteen, ninety three and I came to Hong Kong with my mother in nine. My parents both Lou Kalos workers. My father was a construction worker in my mother was strict cleaner. Relieving in public stays government, subsidized housing end. Sometimes, my family was relying on government subsidies. So I remember when I was young I. Didn't have the luxury to enjoy much the things that McHugh cheerful. So I guess that's that's my humble background. This is Nathan Law. One of Hong Kong's most prominent democracy activists. This month he's been named one of Time Magazine's most influential people of two, thousand and twenty. He's just twenty seven. Is He is campaigning made him a target for the Chinese government in the summer? He left Hong Kong when Beijing imposed a controversial national security law. He's now in London having left behind friends family and fellow activists who've made the decision to stay. But Nathan's fight for democracy in Hong Kong continues. Being very high profile, overseas dissidents try and. My very best to arouse the attention of the global community to be. To China. I am worrying about my safety on a regular basis. From The Guardian I'm Rachel Humphries today in focus why activists Nathan Law has been forced to flee Hong Kong. Graham Harrison you're the senior international affairs correspondent for the Guardian and observer and you've met Nathan Law. Who is he and what's he like as a person? So north, Noor is probably one of the most prominent pro-democracy activists in. Hong. Kong in his spare time. He volunteers at a rescue center. He didn't home for abandoned animals that he's a kind of. Trauma Charismatic Guy I don't just sort of in his politics. You could say, but sort of just in his life and his personality as well. He's incredibly young had this quite extraordinary life in a way he he began his political career as a student leader during the umbrella movement which democracy largely student-led movement. The reason it was cool. The umbrella movement is that they became a symbol because the protesters using them to protect themselves from the police use of crowd dispersals take acid. People started to propose an idea of civil disobedience with will also widely adopted when ultimate king had the full rights protests in the sixty's in the US. We occupied the major one Raiso Hong Kong for seventy nine days but eventually, the government refused to listen to us and the government a ended without making concrete efforts on having a democracy. I mean as you say, the protests didn't achieve its aims, but it must have been an incredibly exciting thing to play a pardon. Yes. Of course that was a think of the first CFO disobedience actions, mosses, civil disobedience actions in consistory. When you are in occupation sites, that is a podium is a few inches. Above the ground amid climb up the ladder and you stand on the platform and you knock down when it was a not people were there. See of people and they were holding up the phone and turning on the flashlight and you could see seat of stars. And people were chanting slogans like democracy now really passionate. And in that kind of moment, you really feel the power of people and it kind of mates. Strong impression in my mind is like faith imprinted in my head I have that momentum and the drive to continue to fight for the democracy of the city even though the path has been very turbulent. Did you feel optimistic at that point in that fight? Did you feel positive that you were able to? See those democratic aims in Hong Kong. Worth of. Undoubtedly when you when you saw so many people coming out. For. The same coast and very tournament. That was definitely a moment that you saw. We are going to make history will going to make a change. But reality he's you back. Quite rapidly after emotional flush, your realized at. Your opponents is so strong. We'll talk about the largest. -Tarian country in the world now, you'll soon realize. Change. Is. Difficult. But by the time you have a choice, you can be pessimistic give up. Or you can be tenacious continue. So I think most people have chosen the second one. In. Many ways protests with Sina. So unsuccessful they were broken up by the government off the sort of just a two month. But if you speak to anyone from low suggest you want to to any of the other kind of prominent figures who part in his movements. They were really important kind of fooling grabbed in terms of tactics techniques. Row then did Nathan take on after the umbrella protests ended Nathan Oh became a founding member of a political party and was elected to Hong Kong's legislature but he did not get to serve very long because of controversy surrounding the oath he took when he was swearing in it wasn't just him the democracy lawmakers who will ended up being disqualified in his case before he was sworn in he gave a speech essentially attacking the government in quitting Mahatma Gandhi you can't Tang me your kind poultry me. You're kind even they tried this body. But you will never. On my mind as a result of this, he was along with these other lawmakers disqualified from parliament and his seat was taken from him. Nathan becoming elected to the legislature and being forced out was a big moment. Any cemented you as a political figure in Hong Kong an awesome it. There was a huge amount of attention focused on you out. Did your family feel about my family's has not been politically active? They have been tangled with daily works that garnered him Brian Butter. So at first, they worry about men opposed me from participating in politics even though they are not like pro-beijing people, they just want stability. And that's what to be honest. Light does something I. I can. I have never. been able to offer them since I was involved in ten to fourteen. And I completely understand it they they flat also from mainland. China, it was way comically was extremely unstable during the childhood growing up. And understand that kind of shoot a Wedneday successfully moved to Hong Kong and tried to stabilize their life. So yeah. The effort beginning they. They were doubtful in trying to persuade me not to get in full deeper and deeper. But Yeah. At the end of the day, they didn't stand out. They're not going to change me. And they're not going to change the frustration of a lot of the I think. Not long after that along with your friends and fellow protesters Joshua Wong and onyx child he was sentenced to prison for your involvement in the umbrella movement. What was that like? Well I that was I felt really bad during that period of time. In. July twenty seventeen. A day after my twenty, four, th birthday I was Unseated the court ruling. And in amongst time in August. I was sentenced to months of imprisonment. One month before my time, I was visiting the prison as a legislator. Talking to older superior officers in the person but on the next day. I've to be there. So it was quite a. Turbulent journey for me. So it was tough but I think for me I I I was quite relieved after I really make. A my mind strict. That will person time full inactivates in Hong Kong is inevitable. the government manipulated the legal system. And the colts is getting more and more aggressive towards protesters and prosecute anyone that they like on the. Delta. Critic leadership a managed to go sweat a relief peaceful the an calmly. He said team of eight month sentence. What kept you going through that time? The love from people and. From them. Actually my. Key Driving Force for me to move forward. And, along the. Journey that you walk through in your political life, you've seen so many people suffering from a also injustice from the government's also applicable prosecution. And when you feel them. It translates into your Muslim bulletin detail. To move. One Mile Mole for them. You have to show a lot of responsibility. Does that ever feel overwhelming? Yes full for an activist. A So it's difficult to balance everything. For example I mentioned about the expectation of my family's. And it's devastating. For me to always disappoint them. When they felt like. You're not really having stabilized then. Putting them in. A in a what were position on the com- basis. And as You have a lot of things. that. Personally cannot achieve or tame your relationship go your your life go other than politics. It all screw up by by political participation, and also like people pay speculation to you and. You will demand yourself on hot in harder. N. sometimes it it it it. It will burn you out. Is Not an easy task for me to admit that it's okay for me to fill a bit tired and. To try to have arrest. And Continue. The have been a period of time I d myself so much that I. I was suffering. Emotionally. But is a life lesson you learning and your? Advancing. The next chapter in Nathan Story and the story of Hong. Kong. Feels like last year when millions took to the streets in protest. Can you remind us how those demonstrations big arm? Began as a very specific protest movement against an extradition law, the government wanted to pass this law that would have made it possible for Hong. Kong authorities to extradite suspects humane on China for trial and furlough people in Hong Kong. The driven extradition treaty with mainland China really struck at heart of the city's identity. These incredible peaceful protests, the largest one, two, million people turned out. and. In response. They were very brutal tactics when the police very hard response to kick acid. and. So then the protests became about police brutality as well, and then eventually the movement more I would say into a broader pro-democracy movement. With people sort of making broader demons, full vaccines to government ready for democratic rights in. He recovering these protests. Emma. What was that like for you as a reporter? Petite the beginning of the protest movement it was really extraordinary inspiring ready to be out on the street. Will they Hong Kong is part of China overseas, there is nobody to us. So being in Hong Kong seeing people turning out literally in their million, it was really a a very kind of inspiring demonstration of sort of the best of democratic ideals. The idea that people have power to change things peacefully if they show arche they, Karen. Then, obviously, over the months the mood in the city, the situation, the city changed dramatically. Straight from around. The, not. From the top, the worst for people are panicking a little bit. On? Free. Coming Five. Bring up. Here for. Two hours, number five and a number of. Areas. Of. Hong Kong. Going escalated protesters became much. Police brutality so escalated. The protesters, they would often say to you that they didn't necessarily think that they were going to achieve what they wanted it but I heard for many protesters we have to come out anyway we're not coming out because we have hope we coming out because in the future that might be possible, and in fact, that proved to be very passion because the National Security Law which trying to brought in literally overnight at the end of gene. No one in Hong Kong was allowed to see the the festival anyone could read it when it came into force has essentially criminalised. Nice, that the protest movement. How does the new national security do limit protests and is this why it's been so controversial It was controversial for several reasons. The first was that it was post in Beijing Milton home. The lure allows Francis Chinese security agencies to set offices in Hong Kong. And it also criminalizes a lot of activities that before protected. As Paul of Hong Kong's protection of civil rights. It also has this other clues which caused a lot of consternation, which is the that essentially gives China jurisdiction around the world. So anyone who makes any comment that is considered in violation of this new anywhere in the world could potentially be pursued for that. If they landed in Hong Kong, that's very draconian enough ornery people living in Hong. Kong. Does not impact them on them now. So over scree Chinese government would say is that As only lower biting, you have nothing to fear. But but the reality is that it has dramatically changed Hong Kong. It's been used to undermine academic freedoms, political groups of to disband. So Nathan lose the political party that he was Paul and several other political parties had to disband themselves. It appears to have been applied retroactively, which is very alarming. So people who've been arrested fool doing things before the law came into force. Nathan do you remember the moment when you first heard about the national security low he how? That we all saw the news of the law coming, of course in news outlets. So happening in just the past few minutes China's national parliament has approved a controversial national security law for Hong Kong which criminalizes acts of sedition and terrorism we were at the national like. Beijing. Unbelievable. It was such a whole. Saw At the beginning we didn't believe that Beijing would do such A. Boat Move Ashley because it will intrigue International Repercussion and. You'll be huge scandal for for the Christmas party. But eventually they did it. and I think that was the time that we at least me for myself. I really had to think of what I should stay in Hong Kong. Not, only foam of personal safety which. Is Of course in grave danger but also for the continue, what's your follow International Africa's work because one of the front that the National Security Law wanted to talk heads as the international efficacy walk. say. You decided to leave. What was it like stepping onto that plane? And knowing that you might not come back to Hong. Kong again. I only half my backpack and my Harry case with me And when I stepped into the airport, I was afraid that I will be stopped it. Because This authoritarian regime traits, dissidents sometimes delay you go sometimes they don't. So I was afraid I couldn't go pass through the gates and luckily I could. And when I really to the plane? that kind of anxiety relaxed. And substitutes it was. A true feeling that I'm really leaving city behind me. Possibly for decades. When playing took oath I looked down to the skyline to light fuel phone call in which will so fi Brunson. So impressive I was thinking that that was properly. The very last time I was going to see it in a very long period of time. And it will solve. but I carried mission and a responsibility with me. And understand that No matter. How difficult emotionally that. That was. my decision is more than myself. Coming up Nathan arrives in London to an uncertain future. What if the future of energy depends on all of us? Can we trump's form not just energy Along, does well. How can we all share this world better? Discover how that Siemens Energy Dot COM I'm a why of all the places in the world did Nathan law decide to come to London? Surfing really interesting I mean part of that. You could say is the UK's cultural ties with Hong Kong. There's a lot of Hong Kong who've lived studied worked some point in the UK. The UK is also going to be potentially very attractive place because the British government has made a offer. Paul to citizenship, which actually covers millions of Hong Kong residents in the government's own. Figures estimate the in the next five years up to two hundred thousand people might might take them on that offer. I. Don't think this would be a factor Nathan low because he's such a prominent figure. He probably asylum anyway, he wanted it but I think for a lot of other protesters people on while ni-nice him Britain has offered a hall to citizenship for all holders of British National ABC's Paul's Pal's which would slightly strange clinical era documents that. Gave people a right to British consular protection when they were traveling but not the right to live in the work in the UK and essentially Johnson's kind of upgraded those postal said they. Now it's not a full you can't destroy the you can hit but you they give you a Paul. Krugman. You can build a license that you can eventually become a. British citizen. Why do you think the UK government is is doing this were you surprised when I heard about it? Yeah, I was very surprised media. This is a government that his. Reputation for itself in an electoral policy on sort of what they describe as a hard line on immigration. So to come up with this policy. which is a generous and very positive response to the pressures that have been. Brought to bear on on on whom consistent with this new law. Would was very supportive. Nathan you've been in London for a few months. Now, have you been able to have any contact with your friends and family since you got here? I haven't been in touch with them since I left. And I announced in my public statement that is my ties with them. Because when we take? From. The. Implementation of the national security will in mainland China. It does not only talk it the person who they wanted to prosecute. It also threatens in families. some of the humorous lawyers Families Suffer from. The harassment of the authority like the true drink chemical to school. the whole families are being surveillance monitored. AM. Wife cannot leave the country expect Tra end for me. The only thing that I could do to protect them is to. cut Omari contacts with them. Do you feel safer now you're in. London. Of course, comparing staying in Hong, Kong, on on the Chinese soil. On is a safer but. I, mean, is difficult to say that you are completely safe. As we all have been seeing news about how? Author attorney dreams poisoning dissidents around the world. And sometimes I wonder whether the next would be me. Even though I don't I don't really have any concrete evidence warning signal that shows me will suffer from that but it's difficult to to really not to think of it because you understand how angry Chinese policy is. Read about you when they. used the whole propaganda machine to smearing campaign on you. And well to be honest I'm walking to pass. That not many Hong. Kong. People have walked. We've just recently that Joshua Wong. One of your friends, a CO leader of your movement someone you've worked with for. A very long time has been arrested again. And in August, we saw the newspaper tycoon Jimmy Lai drive out his office. And arrested. How does it feel not to be there at this time? With all of this happening. while. Of course, it's difficult. You always want to share that kind of paying Moments of disappointment with all your battles but I understand that I've. been on duty. which is to broadcast that. Truth and. Did, they must have people from here. So I think even though I feel bad but I'm doing something full our shared costs and that is enough How do you see? The protest movement in Hong Kong progressing now mean speaking to you listening to you it feels very difficult to understand how the aims can be achieved with these new laws in place assay wide ranging in draconian. While of course, in short term, few show, we are all pessimistic but I think when global ties is changing when China. Is being punished force gross humorous relation and when they realized that. There must be changes. In order to survive. To Change Your phone call, he's going to single handedly achieved by Hong Kong people. will also have to had. A global tight? And more and more democracies. Slang that threats from China's Rail And trying to implement measures to hold them accountable. I that? Is the lights in the DACAS time and we should grab grabs it. Essentially. The only. Thing the only tool Hong Kong sort of pro. Democracy. Campaigners in protests have that fight is international support. Is Really hard to see. China making any concessions a tool but you know, pat a lot. You might say with with the Tibetans and the Dalai Lama the influence own Chinese policy in Tibet his paps been very low but he has presumptive Tibetan identity in exile. He has cats the issue of Tibet given it very high visibility internationally so I think an effective campaigns by home calmness who enacts out will be very important to trying to keep that cool only international agenda. What is the future? For Hong Kong and what is China's ambition for the region? Essentially the National Security Lou. Has Bruton End. I would say to Hong Kong semi-autonomous status in real terms, and I think you know the authorities in both Beijing and Hong Kong to use the law to. Essentially crush dissent in Hong Kong. They probably embiid Asian it in an ideal scenario being something like a Chinese singer pool where there's not really much political plurality bought you have a very healthy business sector I, think ideal outcome from this. Does. Very brave people who appointed a very committed to continuing this struggle, but the space for that is definitely definitely shrinking. must feel very strange not knowing whether you'll ever be able to return to Hong Kong how do you see your future now? Nathan. Why I see my future. I'm a person with future. Just, try to imagine why none was elected in two, thousand, Sixteen I. Have never imagined. That, four years after. One time. I am in London and cannot. Go wrong. Call. I half is now I have his presence. And I have to see it as a present for me. In Order To, really do. I need to do. And to explore the future step-by-step. And I was see. The contribution of the movement as my power Ot. Thank you very much for speaking to me. Thank you so much. That was Nathan Law and emigrant Harrison, you can meet Emma's reporting on Hong Kong at the Guardian Dot Com. We can also find the excellent fight for Hong. Kong series, which this week is looking at the implications of the National Security Law, not just in Hong Kong, but all over the world. Thanks to Nathan and Emma, speaking to me today. This episode was produced by Joshua Kelly and myself and sound design was by far KAKUTA. Executive produces on Akot Jackson advil may not. We'll. Be Back Tomorrow.

Hong Kong Hong Kong Hong Nathan China Hong Kong Raiso Hong Kong London Nathan Law China National Security Law Beijing Chinese government Time Magazine Kong UK US Joshua Wong Guardian Lou Kalos
China's war on your speech

Axios Today

09:45 min | 5 months ago

China's war on your speech

"Today's episode is sponsored by Goldman Sachs. Good morning it's Tuesday July seven welcome to axios today I'm Nyla Voodoo and here's how we're making you smarter today. Our government is telling foreign students that if they're colleges, go to online only classes in the fall. They will be forced to leave the country. Fuss Wall Street is shifting its back from President. Trump to Joe Biden but I. China's war on activism is today's one big thing. Overnight people in Hong Kong have gone from being able to protest and speak freely to living in fear, those actions could lead to life in prison, and now Beijing is saying it's new Security Law for Hong Kong applies to anyone in the world including you and me I have to risk. That I would not be able to go back for years and the behind my family my cat. And all the cash and. Hope, for the past two decades Nathan Law a pro democracy lawmaker, who just spoke with Bethany Alan Abrahamian she covered China for axios. He told me that many of the statutes in the new National Security Law could apply to him, and he could very easily face years, if not life in prison for his previous activism. He is not currently disclosing his location. Because he knows that Hong, Kong authorities are not satisfied with him. Simply leaving Hong Kong. In fact, there is a provision in the new law article thirty eight, that explicitly says that any kind of organizing or protesting in support of democracy in Hong Kong is illegal, no matter who you are no matter where you are regardless of whether or not, they are permanent residents Kong, so I think there are probably people who are listening who are thinking. How can China really enforce this? What could happen? Is that any person who has been public in their support of the protests? As soon as they fly into the Hong Kong airport or Inter Kong by some other way could be detained could be charged could be arrested why it really matters is that it's so clear. That China has essentially declared war on global activism and global speech. It is hoping to tamp down any elements of the protest movement that survived beyond Hong Kong's borders Bethany I. Wonder How people say they feel about it now like Nathan and other people I think the mood in Hong Kong right now is in part one of terror. People do feel afraid, but at the same time some people are hanging onto hope and what Nathan told me in. Our interview is that he feels that. The Pro Democracy Movement is still very much alive. The were more than. A hundred thousand people moshing onto the streets, regardless of the freak of being imprisoned for years, because see bravery for inside the movement at tonight's not I think that we're gonNA. See a slow crushing of the soul of Kong see how it can be otherwise, and I fear that they may succeed in really crushing the protest movement, and in eliminating many of the freedoms that had previously defined the spirit of Hong Kong. while. It's really tough to hear. It's tough to watch. Bethany, Alan Abrahamian is the China reporter at axios. We'll be back in fifteen seconds with a look at how wall. Street is betting against President Trump. Cova thousand, nine hundred is changing markets, industries and the global economy. You can hear the latest insights from Goldman. Sachs experts and thought leaders at GS DOT com slash covid, nineteen or on any of your favorite podcast platforms. To axios today there's been a rapid shift in the stock market's wall. Street is now positioning itself for Abidin Presidency Dion rebellion is our markets editor? The investment community has kind of done a complete about face from feeling pretty strongly that trump would win to now really preparing for a Joe Biden presidency, it's been a complete one eighty, so let's look at this by the numbers last week, One City Group poll showed almost the same percentage of fund managers who had expected a trump presidency seven months ago now think Biden will win, and it's not just Biden. They're expecting. Expecting a democratic sweep of the House and Senate, but what does it mean for wall? Street to be preparing for these changes, the biggest expectation right now is for higher taxes Vice President Biden has said that he is going to roll back. President trump's tax reform. That's the tax cut in act which lowered corporate tax rates to the lowest. They've ever been also lower personal tax rates, and he's also talked about doing some things on capital gains, taxes, essentially raising taxes on corporations and the stock market is still on the rise despite our dramatic economic recession growth and Are Falling. So really at this point it's anything goes in as much of a fool's errand as it was to try to predict the stock market before. It's somehow even more so now. Here's the bottom line. A few months ago. President Trump's campaign thought a healthy economy would get him reelected now the only healthy part of that economy. Wall Street is betting against him. Dion Rowen is excuses markets editor. Is a sneak peek into our newsroom. The conversations we have Mike Allen is one of our co founders and he's with me now. Hi Mike Good Morning. School has been out since before the summer, but there's a lot of news around what's going to happen in the fall and when we look at universities, ice made an announcement yesterday about foreign students and online only classes. No, these immigration rules are going to be absolutely hellish for international students. If you're in the US, you have to show up on campus to keep your immigration status. So if your school offers only virtual learning, you have to change schools if your school offers a mix of virtual and. Learning you have to be in the classroom and here's the catch. Twenty. Two for students were trying to get in the US are American consoles around the world have stopped processing pieces during the pandemic, so what a students can't get in any way and another catch. If you're an international student in China or Brazil or Europe, their Cova travel restrictions and meanwhile Mike. University also said they are going to be all online, not just for the fall for the whole academic year. Yeah, so Harvard said that they're going to bring back forty percent of their. Their students, but once you get there. Most of the instruction will be virtual and no break on tuition Princeton also said what they're gonNA, do it so first years and juniors will come to campus for the fall semester, and then in the spring, sophomores and seniors and Nyla. Here's Princeton's catch. No partying, you have to sign a social contract where you agree not to host any off campus guests, including family members or romantic partners, very different college experience are good luck with that. My thanks for those insights I appreciate it mile. Have the best day. Before we go today. I wanted share with you. How the National Museum of African American History and culture is documenting this moment. Black lives. The purchase the started a few weeks ago. In continue today are part of history, and that's why the museum is asking people to save science. T shirts from black lives matter protests until the pandemic is over the Smithsonian's Lonnie bunch also says they're collecting videos, photos and audio online right now. This is new time for museums collect different ways to have different ways to understand the story, and if you could find more ways of understanding for the bear. That doesn't I sit. You can reach our team at podcasts at axios, dot com, or reach out to me on twitter at nine Boudou. If you want more news before tomorrow, you can tune into her afternoon podcast sexiest recap. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and we'll see you back here tomorrow morning. Goldman Sachs experts and thought leaders are sharing their insights about the trends shaping markets industries in the global economy. You can hear the latest insights on cove, nineteen economic and market implications at GS DOT. com slash cope nineteen or any of your favorite podcasts platforms.

Hong Kong President Trump axios Joe Biden China Goldman Sachs Nathan Law President Bethany Alan Abrahamian Kong Inter Kong markets editor Kong China Nyla Voodoo Hong Beijing US
Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Nathan Law

The Current

14:01 min | 4 months ago

Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Nathan Law

"I told the court. To. Use One small man. Giant wheel. But I do wish say official that I'm wrong person right now. Uncover season seven. Dead Wrong. Killed tipple. It suggests maybe not. Available on CBC listen and wherever. You get your podcasts. I'm Keith MacArthur unlocking bryson's brain is a podcast about my son is. The rare disease that keeps him from walking or talking bracelets perfect and his life is really hard, and our families search for a cure. Oh my gosh, maybe science ready for this. It's part memoir part medical mystery. We can do just about anything modifying DNA heart in my throat. Cure is controversial unlocking bryson's brain. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. This is a CBC podcast Nathan. Law has been a leading activist of Hong Kong's Pro Democracy Movement for most of his adult life, but now he is fighting for his home from afar. Mr Law fled Hong earlier this month after Beijing controversial national security. Law came into effect. He joins. He joins us from London Good Morning. I? Why did you decide to leave? Hong Kong. Another current national security low, it is hard difficult boss to progressive international campaign in Hong Kong, because that will be sent me to two years of imprisonment so easy both on that repressive, very strong voice with a public figure on the national level to continue in front of the movement. So this is the major emphasis of media thing, so you're worried that you might be detained if and not allowed to leave if you remained. The Hawk it's peaceful demonstration freedom of expression and also really wanted to destroy international funds that brings pressure to Beijing, so yeah I think we talking to our understanding is at this new security lock could actually allow for punishments up to a life sentence for anti-china sentiments. Could you have actually continued you pro democracy work and not have been detained under this new law. Depends on how the government exercises. The law is written such a victim that they could basically Put any political editor in jail if they wish to do to do it. So for now we're still got a movement alive, but How many of the actors will be judged? Radio depends on how much how far grow mammal go. How safe do you actually feel in the UK right now? What for now I? Feel were asking me say. Will constantly musing riddick cautious rate help on surroundings because we all know that how far China could be so yes, me I will be extremely capital. You'll be moving around. You say yeah, yeah, Whoa, especially stay in the same place for too long then it will occur us from being like following all the time. I'm wondering how effective you think you can be as a leader if you're not physically in Hong. Kong while Holly claim myself as a leadoff, the movement because it is a little. Before me, international funds, which is to do the. Work to speak up a Hong Kong. People tell the truth on the international level. I will do my best to connect with the media with a political scene here and also expressed the message so I think. Yeah, indeed, we upbringing changes to the whole world. But if you're meaning for the movement to continue, why did you disband your organization demo system well as them officially, just one of organizations that helped it commitment. And I. Would, definitely be old to spend Africa. the implementation special security. which would leak shoot well, exposing our documentum, and so and so forth so these. Are the factors that we consign. Critics of Hong Kong's Pro Democracy activists in the movement. Who say that not all of Hong Kong is on your side that is actually divided in opinion when it comes to mainland China in its role there is that a fair criticism? Well host. Wait we. We have a diverse field, but you know enter the data, the majority of people in support of the movement you into certain demands of the mid. To have independent inquiry commission on the police, brutality and also democracy. They had more than eighty percent of road in the society. Yes, indeed, we under the Beijing's propaganda, what we have observed of Internet's Army that they they speak up on behalf of the Miss. Their close, but most of Hong. Kong people are on the side of democracy and freedom. In Hong Kong the chief. Executive, Carrie. Lam says that the new security law will make the city safer. She said that it's mild. Compared to, let's say a similar laws in other countries. What do you make of that assessment? Well if you look at the penetration of the law, we talk his freedom of expression. On the very first day of first of July of Implementation. that were people being arrested just because they in protection all the facts and 'cause that have the protest slogan on. And on the very next day, the government issue statement saying that these slogans are in violation of the National Security Law, so basically our think people just because of their fault, because they expression, and you will necessarily I need across the country have relevant restrictions on people's minds on people's of freedom of expression, because they should actually the fundamental adamant of liberalism. So Wow, this is a lie of blatant live from Caroline. Where did you expect any different from her? Or any changes? into society has to be cushal at by The Movement from Bolt on so we hope that that would be more comfortability for the government. There will democracy autonomy. Given what you're saying and how you describe this new law, One Country Two Systems. That's what Hong. Kong was promised. Where do you think that actually stands now? Voiceover at the end? If you look at the core values of one country, two system, which is Heidi, will autonomy and Hong Kong people ruling. Coma trains democracy. Then these two things I'll finished now under the National Security Law Beijing Appointments officials in the agency in Hong Kong, which could authorize the decision of the Hong Kong government. And well the secret police and oldies truck on and law implementing call, and we can have a seat course they on the dish willing so yeah one-country-two-systems basically, and so if one country two systems. This is over, then what are you? What is the new iteration of Hong Kong that you want to say? Well. Well. This is the current state. Before us, of course, we need to fight for autonomy and democracy and this Kong people deserve and The ending of one-country-two-systems signals a huge breach of China on the international obligations and his promises to people, and this should be condemned by the international community. As a result of all this change I imagine that for many people leaving is is probably becoming more and more attractive as an option. What does that mean for Hong Kong's future in your estimate. Well off a phone call citizens, even though they are thinking leaving, but there are many of them thinking stay and to fight on their own capacity on their own front. For me, going out means I have to. Put My percent at folks on the international campaign international life because work. For the others they have their own well calculation and decision. To for me. I don't think we'll see massive outflow. Young, Collins, but as long as that he's options when they are in grave danger. They have the choice. You've said that you feel that your your decision to leave was a strategic one for the movement I? I wonder if there's a part of you, that feels that you've you've also maybe let some people down by leaving. Well my leaving I receive a little bit encouragement and support especially from the Dodge Gras community and many of us have witnessed the white terror spreading home call our friends at the facebook account did attain the Post that supports off to move them into win, and so forth so we can see that imminent danger and we all agree that we need to have some public. To talk on the international level to around the close of international funds of the movement. So I think I definitely receive any kind of criticism, but I think generally people. People think that that is a news and is a very strategic movement. And on a personal level. How does that feel for you to have been chosen as the person to do this? Why it's definitely helps, you have to leave behind your family's your friends or even the two cats that you're on the streets. these are not easy choice, but for me. It's more than my personal choice I'm. I did it because that is a larger greater cost than my personal interest so I think yeah, continue to fight for Hong Kong. You will fight for hung on. What what do you want to see from governments like Canada? in terms of fighting for Hong Kong when it comes to what's happening there? Well I think the Canadian government. has a issue policy that are very impressive for sample on all fronts. Eight book plans Stop paying attention treaty with home, calmed popping, importing some military use technology and I think these should be developed and at Canadian government Josh online with the other countries to form a more while coherent and assertive alliance that could really fight against author expansion of the Chinese Communist Party. So I hope that that would be more collaboration. was there a missed opportunity here? Nathan I mean. Do you think in a way the window for international? Intervention in the situation has passed. To too late for the past decade we've been engaging with China or would a piece mosquito strategy, and we thought that China would open up automatically and become democratized and free, but the Western countries made the wrong decision made a one woman house package so now at least we have to act now. We need to hold China accountable and we should. Not Override Imerese with trade. Use sending. Yes, we should stop now. Definitely you have. Called for Western. Governments to impose sanctions on Chinese government officials. I wonder what echoing US. Policy does to your standing at home. I mean know when there's a deteriorating relationship between China and the US. Does it kind of threaten to discredit? You're standing at home in some sense. We, we should get rid of The framework of US China will okay. because. This is only about two countries. is about values Muslim? Countries share the same values. We would think that the government should be held accountable within that humor should be protect touch a royal flush vice before now China after thing and making a place which originally has portion of that light rule flow relatively free it into a zero one. It is not only about you as in China's about the community that have the shed ferries which includes Canada UK European. Union on. We should join hands joined. Just the last couple of questions you've watched probably over the last few years. A number of pro democracy movements that have have hit walls that have that have disbanded or have had trouble. You know achieving their goals. What makes you think it will be different in Hong Kong? Well I think. It's important that we never give up It is difficult to foresee when we. To. But the point is we don't try then. We will never be able to do it. So I think it is a matter whether we have competent that we will win over control. But that we have no room to give up. Your twenty seven. Do you think that you'll actually see democratic rule? in Hong Kong anytime soon. Be Not, but I'll definitely. And do you see yourself ever returning to Hong? Kong. Democratic. So not for a while. We all feel quite grim about shaw future phone call. But I think it's an we are not entitled to feel hopeless where to empower people. Push the myth control. What so for me? In all on time, yes, we will concur Nathan Law. Thank you very much for your time. Thanks for speaking with us. Thank you. Nathan Law is a Hong. Kong pro democracy advocate. We reached him in self exile in London. We did request comment from the Chinese Embassy in Ottawa. Beijing's new security laws in Hong Kong and we did not receive a response for more CBC. podcasts go to CBC, DOT CA slash podcasts.

Hong Kong Hong Hong Kong government China Nathan Law China Beijing Cure CBC London bryson US National Security Law Beijing UK National Security Law official Keith MacArthur Canada Beijing
Friday 3 July

Monocle 24: The Globalist

58:46 min | 5 months ago

Friday 3 July

"You're listening to the globalist first broadcast on the third of July two thousand and twenty on Monocle, twenty, four, the globalist in association with UBS. Live from London. This is the globalist I'm Emma Nelson and very warm. Welcome to today's program. Coming up, we'll be in Hong. Kong as of Beijing's strict new security laws are being felt on the ground. We'll exorb- also examine the swift reaction from right across the West. Also had be profiler star of the Ethiopian, music scene, whose death has led to widespread violent protests in the country plus the latest chapter in one of Istanbul's most famous. Famous buildings and Andrew Moolah brings us the week in review. US President Benito Cartman found himself this week having to send his current letter Turner Kayla. mcnerney into the White House briefing room to announce that the president of the United States does in fact read, thank you Andrew will also flick through the day's newspapers and find out why Finland's air force. That's quietly abandoned the swastika. That's all coming up on a globalist live from London. I A quick look at what else is happening in the news. The Texas Governor Greg Abbott has ordered face coverings to be worn in public arising corona virus cases in the state trade insecurity negotiations between the European Union and the UK of ended early over serious disagreements between negotiators and Taiwan has announced it will reopen its de facto consulate on the Pacific island of Guam. The move is likely to irritate Beijing. Stay tuned to Monaco Twenty four throughout the day for more on these stories, but I one of the leading voices in the pro democracy protests Nathan Law has fled. Hong, Kong the student, leader and former. Former local legislator says he will continue his campaign from overseas well, it's three days since new security laws came into effect in the territory. Critics warn they spell the end of the one. Nation Two Systems idea in Hong Kong itself have been hundreds of arrests, and around the world, some nations such as the US and the UK have taken swift and firm action in protest at Beijing's moves. Let's hear more now from our Hong Kong Bureau chief. James Chambers so late last night. he announced that he had left Hong Kong and he wouldn't say where he is, and this comes hours after he was testifying. Remotely, over over the Internet to the US Congress on its hearing on Hong Kong so. Nathan law was a prominent is a prominent pro democracy advocate in Hong Kong is a closely aligned with Joshua one. They're both. Belong to the same party Dempsey Stove. They're both heavily involved in occupy central back in two thousand and fourteen, and he actually won election to the local parliaments back in two thousand seventeen. He's actually three years ago to about this day that I went to his office in the legislature to interview him. A Nice little corner office with loads of young stopped running around. And I guess that was the pinnacle of his career, and since then he got kicked out. Because of the oath-taking Saga where a lot of pro democracy legislators got removed because they didn't take the oath properly a now. He finds himself living life as a political exile. Some saying that this is a big risk that he is taking both personally, but also it is a very strong sinus to what life is like for pro democracy protests in Hong Kong now. Well the thing, no one. Three days after we've. We've seen the text of this Law means the first time we storage. was on Wednesday. And, we're still ever still. Wondering and waiting and for. What Freud actually means. On during the marches on July first. People who were arrested under this law under this bill with the ones who are advocating independence so I guess we need to be clear going forward the difference between advocating for for democracy and advocating for independence. It's definitely. It's definitely clear that there will be no that won't tolerate any any calls for for Hong. Kong. have any kind of self-determination away from China. But and that's no surprise to anyone here. The big question now is how much they will tolerate. The more traditional and the more peaceful calls for for Democracy in Hong Kong to be able to choose. The chief executive here now. Nathan Law and Joshua Wong did come up in that kind of pro democracy movement. They weren't at the they went figureheads. Radical side of it, which pushed for independence, but they have both felt that they are themselves at risk under this law, because we just don't know how it's going to be applied, explain to me just a little bit more about what the atmosphere is like in Hong. Kong. It is only three days. This new law came into force, but The pictures that we're seeing from outside Hong Kong. Is that if you are in any way expressing any kind of dissent, the retaliation from the authorities is swift. Was Yes on Wednesday when there was a few thousand people on the streets, the police did come down hard and they whisked anybody off. Who was promoting independence and I guess the strategy. There was to make some examples and to scare everyone else into submission But you know for the for the vast majority of of the city it is, it is weirdly normal here and has been since there's been came in on on Wednesday It does seem like you know for for the activists in Hong Kong. It's B. It's going to become even more uncomfortable. But for now for the rest of Hong Kong I guess this piece on the streets. It's a very very sunny, very very warm time of year and everyone seems to be out on the streets doing what they normally do, so you know what you can't see. I you know at the moment is what's happening Foot for the activists in some of fleeing some. A some will no doubt go underground, and it'll probably end up being a bit like the occupy movement you know. When the police came and cleared that off the streets after seventy-nine days, it went very quiet here. Feel for five years, and then suddenly it sprung up again in two thousand and one thousand nine so I imagine we'll be looking at a similar scenario. What about the number of people who may now leave I mean? We're seeing Nathan Law. Quitting the territory, we've also seen offers by the United Kingdom to allow up to three million. Residents to actually come, and in the UK. Yes I mean. I guess we should see that as a bit of a insurance policy. I don't see you know. Vast numbers of of Hong Kong as fleeing right now and get on the next plane. To London three hundred thousand people apparently have be no possible right now on a further. Two point seven million could be entitled to them. but. It's not like It was. You know pre nine, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, seven, when. Thousand hundred thousands, people left Hong Kong because they didn't know what was going to happen, we might see this. Turn into into a bit of a trickle, but I think everyone's waiting right now to see what this security bill actually means I mean for your average Hong Kong, last year was very disruptive time. This year if you're you, know your family and just. Go about your. And you might find that Your quality of life improved somewhat. I I have some friends who were thinking about moving to Singapore because they didn't want their young kids to get. Sucked into the the protest movement, so you know there are. Pros and cons on both sides and it's. It's definitely the kind of. The politically motivated ones the engage ones. The the the activists anyone who's interested in politics, anyone who has political view. It's very uncomfortable. Place to be right now, and it's those kinds of people who be thinking about leaving, but not everybody's going. Everyone is following Nathan. Laws lead at the moment. You know his his buddy Joshua. Wong is staying here. He's going to run. Plans to run for election in September and some of the the main activists I spoke to last a few weeks ago. Like Adrian and Jimmy Sham they you know they sit. There stay here even though. The facing up to the reality of. Spending that time in prison. If people were to go, you sent you talk about people who intending to leave. Where could they go because the Chinese authorities have said that they will pursue to descend anywhere in the globe. Yes that's true this the scary thing about this law applies everywhere and to everyone I mean applies to the conversation. We're having right now as so there's. There's no way no way you can kind of go to to to escape the application of this law but there are places that Hong Kong people have gone in the possum and might like to go now. Like you know. Canada has a large population. People in Vancouver me. Australia is a is a place where Hong Kong people like to go and of course you K has opened the doors to anybody who would like to come an and is entitled to be no passport, but as you said there's no. There's no getting away from from this law. So if if you if you plan light Nathan Nathan, law to continue our activities. Overseas you have to be extremely careful, and that's exactly why. He's not been broadcasting where he's gone to because I mentioned, he is on a list of of people that the Chinese would like to get hold of. And I'm sure they'll be. Trying to to track down where he is. What Business When we spoke at the beginning of the week, James You. You talked about sort of the the the anticipation of how the rest of the world would react to to what's happening in Hong Kong has there been any more decisive action taken by businesses in the knowledge that the place that they were once working may not be the same from now. I think we spoke earlier in the week about that being a bit of A. Between. The political activists, and and perhaps the rest of Hong, and in particular the the business community I mean they. They've been very quiet or have come out in support of this This bill. and. You know when you when you consider what every business is interested in. It's you know kind of safety and stability and the opportunity to make money. And, that's what Hong Kong. Always was and I guess the. Everyone's waiting to see if that's what Hong Kong will become again. Everyone's. Everyone at the end of the day is acting in their own best interests. And for you, know the thousands of foreign businesses here and local businesses. They're here to to do business with with China and so there's been very quiet from from the business community. Even even some outspoken. The American Chamber of Commerce have kind of taken A. Wait and see approach. To See what this bill actually means so you know at the moment I think we're all in the same boat role just trying to understand what this bill actually means, and we won't know until you know. you've for months I guess until the first cases go through the courts and we. We actually find out how. How the authorities from the Hong Kong Police to this new agency that the Chinese government is setting up will enforce it. James Chambers on the line from Hong Kong. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on the Global St with multiple twenty, four. I think. That, is it? Music had data the Ethiopian singer and champion of ethnic rights. He was murdered on Monday in a suburb of Addis Ababa. His death has led to widespread political tumult in the country. Many credits Endesa within sparring the protest movement, which lead to the appointment of matters, prime minister two years ago well to find out more joining us on the line from is Carter One Jerry? She's a journalist for F. S. N. agency joins me on the line. Welcome to monocle twenty four Coletta for those of us who don't know who was challenge Tessa Yeah John this someone was regarded as an icon, if especially for the over MIA ethnic group which is. A group Groupie and He's dead picking people talk of. The Nation is has been confirmed as good a little ethnic nation. We get a little more ethnic groups coming into because they believe that is above Lonzo. Romo and that's where we had a lot of protests and the. To get it a having been the voice of the voiceless in the past between two thousand, fifteen and two thousand eighteen, when the more led a force. That's made that that'd be a transition the country, so he he's a possible will compete at a big box when she was bone through the coaches. It's astonishing to think that one person is. Has Been credited with giving a voice to Ethiopia ethnic majority the aroma. How is that come? About I think he's one of the naming. Because we all more organizational people who bold enough to get to the streets and push for this change, there are those who could not an assembly remember. The previous regime tried to stifle some of the forecast by enhancing a federal. Agencies making, read them all that so not so many companies that treats and particulars. They wanted, but so many then people could do that because people also need that motivation through phone, which are more. kind of song. He encouraged people and many people that changing come, so he's he's recognized, is one of many who who used a nonviolent means. If we may use, those words, to try and bring the song and dance with Gregg Morale's protesters who would want to shoot him in the suburb of Addis Ababa charity of this week. That's the question that and that's the speculation, and that's why we've got so many. A lot of nations came up with more people even pointed fingers at the pride themselves on the government thing because her channel had appeared in. About almost a week. We'll criticize the current administration, probably the top something to do with. Those who say he'd probably has something to do with eating because currently. How issues regarding the feeling of the. If, you gonNA write a dumb has been conflicts, so they're pointing fingers at easy. I've never say probably consists some private conflict between human friends or a he and his own personal foles. Speculation about the police. It's even dating originally arranged some suspect in. But they're still asking for fourteen days of investigation. We never. Had any, what's it like what the purchase will really strong? If you've got strong on cheesy in two Wednesday while we had people coming into fishing, people, young people and people from the region. Let you remember the movie can borders the Baba even before for people from the could come into the city whenever their divisions in protest here so we had people in the streets on Tuesday. Of Wednesday buck of the city, but with time than we saw the security pushing the streets government into warnings that he could muster it that now we're not seeing people. Greenwich Peaks, or like doing boxing attention because the fact that we got military directly in the streets of. Officials in the states, we've got residents within the BUBBA coming out with six from time to time to look around and the patient to I mean to chip away. People who are coming in that shows extension, so we don't have. The protesters were coming around singing and all that, but you can still feel the tension, so the authorities have a very difficult job here don't. Don't they? Because people need to express their right to protest, but is there any fear that this actually could go further? Yes, there is a right to protest, but what? The government is saying that the chin, if only the participants stick by the end of their purchase investment to seen not even now, even in previous times is that people looted? People participate these advantage. And especially, since the goods coming from the Malaysian they come clean for some odd. Baba thing that. They need some of these things they're don't because assets, vehicles and beauty, and some of them, even talking other people, so that's kind of the. The main agenda, of Perkins, which would reach legal and also the Fox the having even a shutdown you choose the other than. If? He's supposed to be like say she just economic. The the government argues that. They'd because for justice are using it to communicate and tell them how should move, and that's like making hud for people to from. To put this down, so if you time, but I remember. Be Seen the moments, and the government is using logistical emergency to do. What con- ensure that especially makes. Is. He appears moving very quickly. Economically socially it's it's embracing multi democracy the way. That any country tries to. What does this say about the tensions that were bubbling under before he? was killed. When extended. Period Freeman Frieden. Look even had an injection yet to officially making the findings we see. Period and a little things have gone on to eighteen. When he came to power we still. We still people from even on region. I think he's biggest challenge opposing changing because people though the function of people wanted change wanted it took little change meaning the transition of power from the previous ethnic group them so that they would have. There's GonNa each time, right? Him where he said, let's to be more nationalized. People talk. About that, but also got some people saying that he's dying of a gives me. There's no really. What people folks, people, but those are the biggest China. He got the previous region, which was the not predominantly, but it's great. Regain good husband giving him. From onto saying that he is imperialistic so the oldest. A mixture of so many positions that he's getting well. When ended up that now he's the say. They love the election. In others that's created more tension. Because let's say there are countries depend. Maybe should have here, but the Prime Minister Save Mill. Elections between nine and twelve months up to the funding. declared. Anyone so all that is is is creating conflict, but he's biggest challenge. That where he comes from, he doesn't have that one hundred percent support for each. Coletta one Jerry. Thank you very much for joining us on the line from Alibaba and as Coletta explained, there is no Internet in a theater at the moment, which is why we've had to do the interview on the telephone. Apologies for the quality, but we do what we can still to come on today's globalist, Andrew. Mueller fills in the knowledge gaps and we go through the newspapers to stay with us. UBS has over nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries. Over nine hundred of the sharpest minds and freshest thinkers in the world of finance, today. Find out how we can help you. CONTACT US AT UBS DOT COM. Eight twenty one in Paris seven, twenty one here in London. This globalist and it's time for weekly reflection on the things. We know today that we didn't know seven days ago. Here's our contributing editor. Andrew Mueller with what we learned. We learned this week that we will need to get used to president. Vladimir Putin, of Russia. Russians voted on Wednesday on constitutional reforms, which will theoretically extend Putin's lease on the Kremlin from two thousand and twenty, four, two, thousand and thirty six, there were few, if any reports of Russian staying up all night to watch the results come in, and fewer still of bookmakers, offering odds on whether or not a grateful people would respond positively to the noble offer of this awfullest president to sacrifice his retirement to ensure the continuity of their immune deficient government. He's Luke. Luke harding author of shadows state on Wednesday's briefing. He's going out style in style in. He will be in the Crimin- until his seventy s possibly even as early eighties I'm well clearly see off Donald trump whatever happens in November. He'll see Boris Johnson and he's actually a dictator. I mean that really is the word for it. Because political opposition in Russia's being squashed rail opposition over the last two decades quite systematically first of all, it affects new generation of Russians who want change wants something different in who are fed up with the kind of Putin system. Said they will suffer first and foremost, but also it means some of the crazy things. The Kremlin has been doing with its spies in recent years, trying to hearken sabotage in subvert the West. All of that will continue of the many reasons to be concerned about Putin. Breaking himself in high among them is the prospect that he might have given his American counterpart ideas, and it wouldn't be the first time. Am I right? There that's the kind of edgy settle. That keeps you coming back US President Benito Cartman, who long ago voyage, valiantly beyond the boundaries, which wants to find the limits of self parody found himself this week, having to send his current letter turn Kaley mcenaney into the White House briefing room to announce that the president of the United States does in fact read not a doubt that was ever raised about any of his predecessors. Does read any also consumes intelligence verbally. We also learned earlier this week. The rolling stones the threatening to sue president trump for the unsanctioned use of their songs at his Yoku Rodeos. We learned subsequent to that that the stones may have an unlikely partner in any future class action, the Islamic Republic of ihram and indifference to their pious sensibilities. We should probably Yank The music roundabout here. Iran issued a warrant for trump's arrest. In the case of the assassination of former hoods force commander, General Qasim Sulejmani killed by US drone strike in Baghdad. In January, prosecutors intent on safe trump along with more than thirty others involved in the January two three attack, and assessing that lieutenant general for Simpson money and his companions for the same reason they say all these individuals face murder and terrorism charges. On has requested Eric Notice people out for trump and the others, the highest level not issued by Interpol that seeks location and at of the individuals named relearned however that the chances of us. Marshals marching trump out of the White House in cuffs at Tehran's behest uh, slender ish at best into poll swiftly intimated that they intended to regard this as the approximate equivalent of someone dialing nine, nine, nine about a missing snowman in March. Trump almost disappointingly has not responded directly to Iran's threat possibly because it was written down. Do you see how skillfully we stitch this all together? And if trump has said something in the. Between the recording and broadcast of this live with her. Elsewhere we learned that we have not yet seen the end of the redecoration which have been a feature of the recent worldwide black lives. Matter Protests I'll. Mid. Some of these have been in the circumstances, probably unsurprising, if nevertheless powerful in Richmond, Virginia, one time capital of the confederate states male Lavar Stony ordered the removal of several rebel monuments, including a statue of confederate general stonewall Jackson not to be confused, obviously with the stonewall Jackson the Honky tonk singer, most popular circuit, early, nine, hundred and sixty s. you can hear in the background in which we are pointing out, so you can fully appreciate. How very clever this is! But we learned that some aesthetic adjustments were. Further Afield and what seems kind of like maybe a few decades overdue? Well sort of while we did learn this week. That Finland's airforce had dropped the swastika from its insignia and we will come back to that. We also learned if we read past this week's headlines. That Finland's Air Force actually did this about three years ago, but very quietly it is an open question whether the very quietly part was Kenny, public relations, or just standard finished tasks eternity. These people generally reluctant to speak up even if the trouser on fire. Here is Monaco's resident Fin Marcucci before being an impression of a Finnish person, noticing that their trials are on fire. Excuse me anyway. We learned once we'd burrow down to about paragraph six in this week. Stories that in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighteen, Finland was given a two plane by Eric von, Rosen an eccentric Swedish count who had adopted the in offensive swastika? Teeth and had planted one on the fuselage, the essence finish air force kept design. They scrubbed at from their aircraft after World War Two, but not from some badges and flags, which is weird, but in terms of persistently embracing embarrassing cultural artifacts, with which no decent person should any longer wished to be associated, not as we as. We learned that in spite of medical and indeed all other common sense bad in the ninety s rapper vanilla ice intends to proceed with an Independence Day weekend concert in the COVID, nineteen hot zone of Texas. So, we learned that this is how if all tickets are sold? Perhaps two and a half thousand Americans will acknowledge the birth of their republic. We may only hope that Isis base is all, but drowned out by the Rumble of George Washington Thomas Jefferson John Adams and Thomas Paine turning in their tombs. For monocle, twenty four I'm Andrew Mullah. Thank you very much indeed to Andrew Gill listening to the globe list. We'll be in Berlin a moment for more on the row over the future of one of its most important buildings, plus there'll be more on the finish swastika story that we heard about just then, but I the time seven, hundred, thousand nine here in London, a quick summary, now the latest world news headlines. Hong Kong's pro democracy, campaigners and activists reporting discussing a plan that would see the creation of parliament in exile. Texas governor Greg has ordered face coverings to be worn in public follows a rising corona virus cases in this state trade insecurity negotiations between the European Union. And the UK have ended early over serious disagreements between negotiators and Taiwan has announced that it will reopen its day factor concert on the Pacific island of. The move is likely to irritate Beijing. This is a globalist. Stay tuned. When it was built in a D, five, hundred, thirty, seven, Istanbul's Higher Safia was the biggest building on earth. It's lodged dome still towers over the historic district of Turkey's biggest city, and it's time it has served many purposes. It's been a Catholic cathedral, a mosque and its current. A museum once again finds itself the subject of another battle for its identity, Turkey's president register type Ataman wants to change it back to a mosque, so let's cross over now to Istanbul where we're joined by Hanan. Lucinda Smith she's a correspondent for the Times in the city. Everyone. Welcome back to the program Hannah. Just tell us more about how this rows come about. Well actually, this is a rabbit kind of comes around once every few years I mean I've been in Turkey for seven years now. Nothing is third time that I've reported on discussions to change the highest off your back into a mosque actually dates back. More than two decades too late nineties when. Prime Minister Netanyahu in Erbakan's who was ones I, Guess Political Mentor Edwin was a member of Erbakan's party. When he started his political career, he was the first person I lied to suggest this, but really it's an idea that's kind of gained more more traction. In recent years, edmonds brought up again and again and really it's a kind of very very useful way for someone to show his credentials. As a leader of the conservative half of Turkey, the part of taking that would be really really happy to see the high self you turn back into a place of worship for Muslims voted. The argument is got to the stage now where the Council of state the Turkish. Administrative Body is is having to make a ruling on what to do with it. Yeah exactly so they started concerts. Started discussing this yesterday. They've said they'll make their decision within fifteen days, but it's a decision on whether it would be legally possible for for the conversion to a moss to happen, so be A. Decision if they rule. If, they ruled that to kind of open the way, but as she is not the first time either that they have considered this back in twenty twelve. They also considered that they made the decision then that it should be a political decision, not legal decision. And the discussion was kind of quietly dropped, but I think the difference this time is owens really differently to the leader. The was in twenty twelve. He's oversee far more authoritarian. He's for more nakedly Islamist and also his relations with. Outside powers places like Greece, which causes incredibly concerned about this, and also with the US far more. Toxic and damage than they were. Eight years ago, so I think, should the court rule this time? The is possible for the confessions. Go ahead this far more likelihood that actually will tell us a little bit more about this dispute with Greece about what should happen to the herself here. Yeah well of course. Greece. If anyone's ever taken a flight with a Greek. Hairline noticed if he's coming into London Istanbul, they still refer to it as constant snipe or The city has a really huge. Historical and religious important for the Greek government, and all the holy of the kind of high religious body in. The host off your of Z when it was, it was the seat of east in Crescenzi Docs Christians. Say as a church for nearly a millennia. Before consonant, plus it will send was captured by the Ottomans in fourteen three now the seat of the Greek Orthodox Church is actually still in Istanbul of the Patriarch of Greek Orthodox is still based here although of in the highest Safia Anita for for the Greek government, and for the Greek church. They see this move as it happens, is a kind of triumphalist move is a kind of sign of conquest as something really symbolic nuts why they're not happy about asset. Tell us a little bit more about the international involvement as well because. Understandably the highest software is a is a protected UNESCO World Heritage. Site and UNESCO has had to wade into this argument, hasn't it? Yeah well I. It's as UNESCO World Heritage, site it's been a museum since nine hundred thirty five so at the start of the modern Turkish republic. When when Anatolia stopping the contrast of the Ottoman Empire and instead became a modern country as secular country. It was, it was changed into museums deconsecrated. And thus the state to had ever since Oh, if it was turned back into a mosque, obviously, it would become primarily. A Muslim place of worship. That doesn't mean that people can't visits it obviously the Blue Mosque, which is very near the highest fear in Istanbul, which is was built as Moscow. Still a functioning mosque is open to visitors. The visitors have sleep five times a day when when Muslims come in to perform their prayers. But then there are also questions you know. If if the highest off was turn back into a mosque, what would happen for example to the absolutely amazing mosaics? The Christian mosaics inside overseen an Islamic vaulters is supposed to that culture. Wall the highest software was being used mosque. They were covered up and it's only in the past century that they've been on and restored so there are all these kind of questions about what would happen if it was turned back into a functioning Muslim place of worship finally. Do you think that Edwin will get his way? Highest Safia will become a mosque once again. I mean at this point in Turkey. Everyone has such control over so many parts of the state including the legal system I mean the the judicial system is non-independent, but what we've seen from a whole host of other cases, especially over the past kind of four years, since the failed coup attempt against on his most courtesans tend to go in the way that he wants to go on the rare occasions that they don't. He tends to make statements expressing his displeasure, and then and then the revoked changed. So I think, it's very very unlikely that he won't get the decision he wants, but I think the big question. Is You know if you get that decision? Willy than push ahead. Over the years, the issue of highest fair, and what states should be has been really really useful for him. It's a really useful way to kind of get his base energized. Campaigning point for him, and obviously you know if the if the highest office was converted back into a mosque. Okay, that would be good campaigning point for him for a few months, but then his kind of over so the question is you know. Would it really be useful for him to do that? Or is it useful just to stir up this kind of debate and? It's and social polarization for a little bit, and then put it to bed again this as this happened again for the past couple of decades, and it is in this myth Istanbul correspondent, for the times, thank you very much for joining us on monocle twenty four. You're listening to the globe list and we have a look at the newspapers in just a moment. Stay with us. UPS is a global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of all people. We bring fresh thinking and perspective to are Wa. We know that it takes marriage of intelligence and heart to create. Value for all clients. It's about having the right ideas of course, but also about having one of the most accomplished systems and an unrivalled network of global experts. That's why at UBS we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference. To named the bulletin with UBS every week for the latest insights and opinions from ubs all around the world. It's time now to have a look at what's making the newspaper headlines today with a distinctly French theme. Let's hear now from Oracle senior correspondent in London Sophie grew, welcome back Sophie. Let us begin with Limo and We moment spoke a moment ago about the fate of the highest, Safia in stumble in Turkey techies in the headlines. International, isn't it because of what's happening in the Mediterranean to anger the French. Exact. He will tech in France having a rather. But a friction, the Mediterranean there was an incident on June the tents off the coast of Libya when a French frigate. Patrolling part of the NATO operation was trying to. Intercept about in search that vote and actually the Turks who were shepherding that boat talk? It's alleged that they targeted that the French weapons systems so. The. Florence polydor defense trenched minister has taken this to NATO to to be investigated and then this week. They've actually withdrawn from the NATO maritime taskforce, so it's it's it's a bit of a fallout is suspect within the NATO alliance, but it's also. Reflections underlying tensions to tell us a little bit more about these these tensions, not just between France and. Turkey. Not, naturally, but what are they fighting over? Well really supporting. Opposite sides of the conflict in Libya. And Communist Adwan is supporting. Sarraj the Prime Minister in Tripoli and and the French supporting. Field Mazda. The very complex issue, but it's actually goes deeper than that in the French in the tax who've been falling out of quite a few issues as recognition of Armenian genocide and the tax role in in in Syria, the question of the Kurds, so they really come to blows on quite a few issues internationally. And some of these things are just being. Almost! The manifested in this. Mediterranean Forum so actually you, can you? You can really take it down to absence of ideological issues and actually starting to fray, the NATO sort of vision in many ways is tell us a little bit more about this, because it's not good to have to NATO ally, NATO allies actually having an internal dispute. What does it say about NATO stability and its ability to to solve its own problems? When exact game in this piece in the morning is very much from the French perspective nicely Green Bay. Correspondent looking at sort of what this means for NATO and saying that Europe needs to have a bit more solidarity on this issue, but it quotes the the Turkish Ambassador in Paris thing look without Turkey you won't be able to deal with issues if Iran Iraq and Syria, you won't be able to access the caucus and Libyan Egypt. You're you're going to be sort of crippling your your. NATO. The moment when NATO is really on the back foot, you're calling this alliance and you need strategically so actually. This piece is really looking at kind of on. The future of NATO and how this didn't zero is affecting its power. Let's move to the French newspaper. Liberal Aseel, they are examining a voted where in the municipal elections this weekend and the suggestion is that there's this sort of good diagram tension emerging between politics, climate, change and the city. Will exactly it's actually wonderful. Philosophical Rumination by Pierre Show Baena in. You're talking about how? In Sunday's elections. Leon, Strasbourg Bordeaux at all chose green candidates, but it's looking at. How actually. Amazingly. We have this sort of vision in metropolitan centers and Metropolitan Dream, he's calling it. A Green Society but ringed by. Deeply, skeptical kind of belt of the suburbs, a often Franz, much more right wing, actually much more keen to get in cars and there's actually of psychological. Barrier coming in and it's it's very interesting. He's talking about the paradox of the green. City, where social solidarity which was created by the Labor Movements and industry has been used to flush out industry so he's talking about this ghost. Referring that accompanies each city shadow, so it's actually very poetic, if is to go, but also just looking at how the city is starting to realize. Realize its potential, but there was the sacrifices has to make, and there's some dangers of this green gentrification that us us a bit more about these green dangers I do I spotted that line about talking about each city is surrounded by ghostly periphery, which accompanies it like a shadow. It's astonishing, and the fact is you end up with too strongly delineated areas as a result those who? As charbonnier says are in the living the Metropolitan Dream, and those who are effectively shut out from all the phone. And Insane there the city is Darren in south parks and limiting transport and landscaping Creighton, this kind of really stooge utopia, and then on the. Outside of that these other people being blocked, but from my experience living in Paris I mean there. Is that Steve Been? Utopia? Utopia that's been I mean. In that guy is is now in an alliance with with the Greens as a socialist and you'll see seeing. Amazing push towards agreeing life, which is incredibly. And for the people who want to drive in their car in central Paris. and. You can see I. Mean the amount of times you'd come up with the in Paris. You have this compensation exactly The article is talking about an and people really coming to blows from really not very far away from each other, but just because of the the. Sense of being a modern metropolitan in front is very is very progressive and fairly left wing, and it's just so different to to the bone. Yeah, it is absolutely. Will you need his cross a certain road in Paris, and before you know it that green? It'll that you've been walking through. Suddenly becomes an enormous traffic traffic jam. Let's move on to brilliant article in Lamont talking about the impact that covert has had on French culture, and is a very very scathing about the video game. Yes It says only the video game has been spared from this absolutes of plunging in revenue in in coach sector, twenty five percent lunch, but this article by Likud VCR's just incredibly. Is it's. Like said in just. Just impressive to my is from coming from London perspective because there's just so much money going into the French coach was sector. And Emmanuel macron himself is actually. Darren teed performance sector will be covered until August. Thirty, first twenty, twenty, one, the tune of nine hundred and fifty million euros said this week this article details two billion euro been granted to various sectors coach French coat to set today. I. It just looks like. Michael is really intending to fund. The theaters the museums. And Music National Music Center has been given fifty million euros and just keep going. Does this oxygen of money? This article is talking about antenna can get back on its feet. It's also been talking about the importance of French. Regional newspapers hasn't. Rather, there's an article in west pulse which talks about. In a manual macron's. Trying to get everybody out of the of the Cova crisis together on pace. Exactly I mean it's very interesting. He did an. He didn't into yesterday. invited. Regional Newspapers Daily Palace. And I was just reading one souht-west, which need enormous at readership, in France one of the highest, and it just shows you the importance of the regional newspapers and France that the president would go to these people rather absently, bypassing the nationals in Paris. And talking about the Hong Trae and difficult, it's going to be trying to get that sense. A French solidarity from all the regions with this interview. Sophie Grove very much indeed for bringing the newspaper review. You're listening to the globalist monocle twenty four. Let's talk business now. The financial analyst and Brookhurst Louise's Kufa joins me on the line now. Louise Welcome back tennis us about the US economy moves to reopen it and get it moving. Despite the news that more lockdowns are being announced, didn't the Texas governor selling every musk's in public? So the big question globally is how quickly we bounce back. Do we bounce back fully? We partly bounce back or industries. Some certain industries damaged forever. This is this is the big question and America didn't go the whole furlough route. It decided typically American to just let businesses let. Millions of workers go so pre covid nineteen. The unemployment rate was exceptionally low at three point five percent at its worst. It got up to sixteen percent unemployment rate in May I mean truly astonishing. Twenty three million Americans didn't have jobs in April so know it's a very American thing to do what we're now seeing what we got yesterday. Today is Independence Day so markets and everything's closed in America's Day but. But the the the the dates came yesterday. What we had was the monthly June. Jobs report were almost five million jobs were added added that brings the American unemployment rate down to eleven to twelve percent, now of course trump and his supporters say oh, how quickly this is bouncing back! HOW FANTASTIC! The sees these signs? We did the right thing one I would say. There are still eighteen million Americans without work. Yes, it's down from twenty three million, but there were still eighteen million Americans that work and the unemployment rate is eleven percent. But as you said we've got, you know, it's not like we even have a second spike in America. We never really got rid of the first spike. We are seeing acceleration of cases in the country, and so what we also had yesterday was weekly jobless numbers. Indicating that maybe some of the people who are newly rehired may get newly fired. So this is the thing, so it's just extraordinary. The speed at which jobs were lost the speed at which jobs were covered, and potentially the speed at which jobs are being lost again because states are having to re lockdown on lockdown again. Because America hasn't got on top of this, it can tony to wear rule. These jobs are being able to create it from from. Everyone else is struggling with that bit well a lot of them are. Leisure and hospitality and retail as America reopened on various states reopened, but of course if they close again and lockdown again, they get lost, and this is the key point. Don't get too carried away with how quickly America has rebounded. If those newly rehired, get fired again. Let's move onto. The United Kingdom large numbers of warnings. For people not to go to bananas this weekend. Because the pubs rope and again Oh yes, isn't that the? Saturday you can get your hair cut. You can get drunk at a pub you. Can you book a holiday at? You can even go to Bingo. Rank big big company is set this morning. That bingo halls every opening tomorrow, so they should make Brits very happy. They could have a drink like a go at all. I can finally get the head on, and if there's a lovely BBC piece online that some headdresses are so keen to look after that customers that opening from midnight and one. One in north. London has got bookings all the way through the night till seven o'clock tomorrow morning. I'm pretty desperate to have my head. Give Him my husband and my daughter has been doing it for me, but I'm not sure on that desperate, so all of this looks good in terms of the economy bounding back as long as we don't mention Brexit, that's just not mentioned that okay I won't ask you then anything about the EU and UK negotiators falling apart yesterday, should i? Just move onto the fact that everybody can go get drink over. You know what? The Sunday newspapers are GONNA look like they're going to have photos. Splattered splashed across the front page of drunken revellers. He finally able to visit POB tomorrow morning. HOW ELEGANT WE ARE! Finally tells about twitter dropping its language. So this is really really interesting. In the aftermath of George the death of George Floyd and the global protests, many companies tech companies that are looking at that language of the programming coats, and it's very common well. Basically, they have Mazda. Refers to the main version of code. They have slaves which replicas blacklist used to describe items that are deleted or forbidden websites, white lists and this. This is language. Slave based language. It's been around for decades. A lot of these programming languages have been around for very long time, and it's not just twitter J. P. Morgan get up. There's a whole load of of companies are looking at this language and thinking this is probably inappropriate, and so twitter says we all going to look at the language and our programming code, and we are going to change it now. You might think Oh this bunch of. Of Californians, it's no big deal, so I can't tell you what it's like to experience racism I'm I'm white, but I can tell you what it's like to experience. Sexism and I can say women don't blame. Don't do maths blame the women. This eats artfully endemic and the little things I feel. Do make a difference. Most of this now is unconscious bias, not conscious bias but I firmly believe it's things like this that do slowly change. The endemic. I'm fairness in our society. Louise? Cooper many thanks as ever for joining us. You're listening to the globalist. Live on local twenty four. Finally go back to a story. This Andrew Miller was talking about a little earlier on. It may be hard to think about the sticker as an emblem of good luck, but when Finland's air force was given a plane with one painted in blue on it in nineteen eighteen, it was at that time seen as a charmed symbol, but Nazism in the second world, where notwithstanding the swastika state, a key visual symbol of Finland's air force. Until now tell me more I'm joined by Monaco Helsinki correspondent. PECI butts of patchy very warm. Welcome to the program, and it was mentioned earlier on the rather eccentric. Swedish count started. This story will off. That is correct so Finland gained independence in one, thousand, nine, hundred seventy, and started building its armies, airports and everything from scratch, so we didn't have any. Place any fire fighters at that time, so the Swedish noblemen, Rosen and gifted us a sort of a fighter plane at that time. War The IT board the Blue Swastika and he considered it a good luck symbol, and and and it's basically was adopted then symbol of the Finnish Air Force, and remained so actually until the Second World War when Finland having first four alongside the Germans against the Soviet, union, then actually. had a very brief war against the Nazi Germany and then he was dropped as a symbol on the plane. So you haven't seen the swastika in the Finnish Air Force planes since the what what to, but it's been used in the scenes on kind of. Unique decorations and BLIMPS, and and so on and and Finns have never really considered it. A bad thing for say. Since we had two decades before the Nazis nuts almost, but it has had to explain this to my foreign friends, quite of quite a few times, and the decision has been made to remove the swastika from what from from all parts of the Air Force. One is why actually taken them until now? Oh, comparatively recently to do it. In Yeah not all not over units. They're always still some unit, so it was removed quietly, which I thought was very surprising two years ago, actually almost three years ago. As the symbol off the air force command, it is still used by some units in the air. Force and actually if you look very carefully so so used on the Finnish, presidential flag the. Cross of freedom. Symbol on the presidential flack, but he's very inconspicuous. Who can't really tell if you don't if you don't know? But! Yeah, it was. He was dropped because. This is a quote from the air. Force chief of staff. Cost so many understanding so they basically. Are Stubborn, but after a some indicates just gave in yes I can. I can see why there might be some misunderstanding. You mentioned that it was removed a little while ago Y. has it taken so long I? Think it's about three years for us to find out about this move. That's a very good question. I, you know there are so many different emblems and logos. In the Air Force this was the logo of the Air Force Command. I didn't even know Air Force Command had its own logo. You don't see these things really and as a boost for. PHOENIX. Just going to presume that on any given air force emblem there will be. This was to go so the fact that he was now removed from the air for Air Force commands emblem. Nobody just really noticed it until a professor in the Housing University by the name of David, and actually my former professor also. Who is researching the use of Swastika? Noticed I think it was actually on twitter. He noticed that the air. Force Command tweeted something they had a. they had a different kind of logo finally briefly. Does this now mean that? In the absence of the swastika, Young Finns will be clamoring to join the airforce. That's a very good question. You know. I have to remind the listener is that Finland currently has mandatory military service? So you know it's not like we've had a choice, but. You know joking aside. I believe that actually in some ways some people might have been put off by this symbol and its connections with the Nazi Germany, so so who knows maybe young Finns will be flicking the airforce after this snow that it's being. So to speak cleaned. Bets in Helsinki. Thank you very much indeed for joining us on the program. That's all we have for today's globalist. Many thanks to our producers freese James Page Reynolds Color Avella and Daniel. Page, our Research Charlie Phil mccord in our studio manager, Louis Allen off the headlines as more music on the way, and the briefing is live at Madeira in London the globalist returns at the same time on Monday, but for now from me Emma Nelson, goodbye, thank you very much for listening and have a great weekend.

Hong Kong London United States president United Kingdom Hong Kong Finland UBS Air Force Istanbul Texas Turkey Beijing Hong European Union Nathan Law prime minister NATO Brookhurst Louise Joshua Wong
Pro-democracy leader Nathan Law flees Hong Kong over politics of fear

Front Burner

24:14 min | 5 months ago

Pro-democracy leader Nathan Law flees Hong Kong over politics of fear

"I'm Malaysians Lyle and I'm Herman the Rudbar and we're the hosts of inappropriate questions. Did you lose weight? How are you doing? How'd you get pregnant? We talked to people who have been asked these questions we ask where these questions come from, and be darned some more respectful with serious, so whether you've asked an inappropriate question or been asked an inappropriate question gum. Get inappropriate with us. Inappropriate questions is available now you can find it on the CBC. Listen APP, or wherever you find podcasts. This is a CBC podcast. I want you to listen to what a protest in Hong Kong sounded like this week now that China's sweeping new national security laws in place. That scores of pro-democracy protesters lining the railing of a mall, motionless, holding up blank pieces of paper without a word on them, because the simple slogans were used to hearing from these protests like liberate Hong Kong. Could now earn them. Criminal charges in Hong Kong have made their first arrest under new national security law carrying a flag that said Hong Kong independence. People in Hong Kong have long enjoyed. Freedom's not found in mainland China, but the new security law threatens them dramatically. It outlaw separatism, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign countries, meaning that criticism of Beijing could lead to imprisonment, even life sentences. It has the support of Hong Kong's -Secutive, and on Tuesday Carrie Lam even said that it's brought stability to the region. Not Doom and gloom for Hong Kong. I'm sure with the passage of time and effort, and in fact in the facts being Lehto. Confidence will grow in One Country Two Systems, but for activists the new law cast a dark shadow on Hong Kong today I come out and Chen out and one party dictatorship. Knowing full well that. Trump out, get arrested actress, no longer a meaningful distinction between the system of Hong Kong and out of China it's. One of the most prominent figures of the Pro Democracy Movement to flee the city. Nathan Law was a student leader in the two thousand fourteen umbrella movement and went on to become. Hong Kong youngest lawmaker at just twenty three years old. He served time in jail for his involvement in the protests, but remained on the front. Lines of the demonstrations now is unclear if he will ever return how. Today, our conversation with Nathan Law. I'm Josh Block and this is from. Remote. Hi Nathan thank you for joining us. No thanks for is a Haitian. So you're speaking to us from an undisclosed location. Can you just talk about why you don't want to reveal where you are right now? Yeah we all understand how far China could be so for now the awesome uncertainties concerning my personal safety so I would love to. Review my about and conduct public events once I kind of like fix out. The situation is. You spent your entire life pushing for democracy in Hong. Kong you have been in jail. You faced police violence. You've been attacked by Pro Beijing protesters. You faced a lot of adversity. Like why after all that have you decided that you needed to leave now? s because after the national security laws implemented the room full international advocacy work on the ground in home, call has been launched limited, and I think this is crucial for Hong Kong because we indeed need the help from the international community to really hold China accountable and to stop is humorous violation. If we continue to do what we have been doing than, this will definitely be seen as breaching the national security level at least two years of imprisonment, and this law is tailor made for targeting the freedom of expression and making people afraid of speaking something that they're entitled to do so so for me. Leaving home call is actually more than a personal choice is a strategic mood for the movement. I imagine it was a very difficult decision though for you to to make this choice to leave the city that you're from. Yes definitely leaving the team you side, you have to leave behind connections, families, friends, and possibly you're not going to see them in a very long future. Before me, even though I understand is really difficult and painful to make the choice I think he is for the greater good. Nathan I want to get a sense of what's actually at stake here for Hong. Kong with this National Security Law. I mean for civil. What is it about that place that you want to try and preserve and uplift? In nine hundred, Ninety, seven Hong Kong was handed back to Chinese government by the British government. With the promise that Hong Kong people will enjoy autonomy and democracy. Century and a half of British rule in Hong Kong is simply history tonight. China is in charge now as for Hong Kong. Can only hope that is a new uncertain era. It's history begins. These people are here to protect them. Not Police. Then people did not believe that it would work under the communist rolling so democracy and autonomy were promised wrong people and we had been waiting China to fulfil his promises, but it hasn't so now. We are still in undemocratic society that we can. Let's our chief executive, and also autonomy are being eroded by the Chinese government, getting more and more intervention into our obeys, and for now under the National Security Law, our freedom of expression, one of the most treasured freedom phone copy poll is demolished on the first day of the implementation of National Security Law we witness that that there were several cases of people merely in section off the flags and stickers that have the slogan on them. Arrested three hundred arrests all told some for alleged violations of Beijing's news edition more vision of items calling the Hong Kong From China just because they exercising freedom of speech, the government just announced that one of the slogans of the movement will be seen as a breach of the law and could lock in jail for years and people now doing self censorship and also the library. Shelving, taking off books from the Democrat, even though those. Are Not relevant to the curb movement. So we are now entering. The era is not long ago. one-country-two-systems we're under the autocratic wrangles, China and that as the problem. I have repeatedly said that it will be a tiny minority of people who could be prosecuted and targeted by this law. Are you anticipating? Dozens of people being prosecuted hundreds. Thousands. I would rather not to arrest or prosecute anybody. If everybody abides by all. The purpose of this piece of legislation is not just to punish. There's also to determine. Nathan. You've you've been involved in pro democracy activism since becoming a student leader in the umbrella movement in two thousand fourteen. Which is pretty much here in entire adult life. I WanNa ask you a little bit about your own story as an activist. Can you tell me for you? The moment you were taken up by the ideals and the cause of pro democracy in Hong Kong. Nestle of. A politician or legislator young I've been living in quite a humble life I been living in. Public housing provided by the guns and my parents. Blue collar workers the trick cleaners. They were construction workers. They basically lead from China to Hong Kong. In the pursuit of economic opportunity and also political stability, and for me I have not been taught about democracy and human rights at all at home, or even at school, because I was sitting at some light pro-beijing school by was in my childhood. But one thing record. My curiosity was about new And I remember that when I was in high school where he received the Nobel, peace, prize Xiaobo, author, literary critic, human rights activist and Nobel. Peace Prize winner. It does not been possible as you know for Lucia Bowl or any of his close relatives to come to Oslo. To receive the Nobel Medal and Diploma and The school's principal publicly denounce him so it really triggered my curiosity. Because I thought that people getting Nobel price should be excellent people. So why did the school criticizing so? It really triggered my curiosity and look into the works at been doing the Jim, Osika and efficacy work and as An enlightenment. Moment for me. To say I mean I the photographs and videos from the umbrella movement that were broadcast around the world, and we were watching. Here are stunning I mean you just seeing the millions of people taking to the streets seeing this sea of colorful umbrellas in the streets, a sea of umbrellas, the symbol of a mass demonstration underway in Hong Kong. They've gone onto. I'm prejudiced to come here because the piece kind of hovering the red sign as if to suggest that they might be about I can hear the beating them. Grela been pulled him away. Tell me about for you, you know. What was it like to be on the front lines of those protests, and is there a particular memory? You have from that time that really captured the spirit of that moment. While it was actually really overwhelming, because you knew that you are fighting against a giant than seemed like unbeatable, but you're carrying special people. So, that was Ashley made me more humble myself at Phnom feel like I. Am just another person like I didn't really have the power to change anything. And for the memorable moment I think it's always good to see. The occupation zone turned to be a Topi people have each other unconditionally. Could people share stop? People care each other. I think that was the beauty of humanity The I enjoyed very much during the occupation. So creative protests that we're doing. We are trying to make some new ways of. fighting for freedom, the loss of things impossible, but it happened so if we have hope. I believe I believe. We always have to carry hope because as an access. That is no room for you to feel hopeless. You always need to have that spark, so they could night to people. This is not a short term. Fight is a long term battle, so we may encounter a lot of difficulties during movement. But it we could step by step moving Hong Kong forward spreading the idea of democratisation liberals on that thing that would be conceded as a step forward. I'm Jonathan Goldstein host of wiretap each week. You're invited to listen in on my telephone conversations whether funny, sad, wistful or even slightly strange. Here on wiretap. Show I didn't think that people actually listened to it. Breath of your genius, and it's not just that you're funny, but you can cripplingly pointedly depressing. The Wiretap Archives available on CBC listen spotify. Apple podcasts and wherever you get your podcasts. The theatres have closed, but the show look on, play me. PODCAST is thrilled to present a new series. The show must go on featuring provocative productions from some of North America's most acclaimed creators for the stage. Sit back and experience everything from chilling thrillers to Gut wrenching dramas to irreverent comedies each month experience the exhilaration of theatre from the comfort of your own home, claiming available wherever you get your podcasts. And yet you know. I heard some of the chance. Of the movement were things like the people united will never be defeated, which of course is a chance that has echoed on the streets? You know throughout the world. How how aware were were you and develop activists of similar kinds of protests that have happened around the world and throughout history? Yes. Of course we learn about the history of democratization Taiwan Korea, runabout, black lives, movement, and the US. These are all grey up examples that we could go into possibly about what fates that we will face. Every single country the democratisation. Had always being voted the and cruel, and that may seem fide future call. So in two thousand sixteen. You're twenty three years old and you co found this pro democracy. Organization and political party Demo Sisto with with Joshua long and then you're elected as Hong Kong's youngest ever legislator. Also newly elected Hong Kong legislative spin a Swiss rise for the cultural studies and the graduate, but pretty soon after that you are disqualified and then arrested and sent to jail for what is called an illegal protest at at Hong Kong. Government headquarters. They were charged in connection with the twenty fourteen umbrella protein vision to put the tree behind bars is a major blow to Hong. Kong's youth led push for universal suffrage and I'm wondering how you cope with that emotionally to go from this incredible wave of success with the umbrella movement with your political party. And then have the whole thing end in such turmoil. Yeah I basically degrade from legislator a personality just four month. And it was definitely hot, Patrick set and how to digest, but for me like reading about all the while journey off the great in history like Montana's King Mandela. Day For beats through difficulties FAW harsher than will I was experiencing. It gives me courage the US one day after achieved something they have to mentality to bear that kind of paying journey, so I think yes, indeed. These stories gives me a little power. In, two thousand and nineteen, you took to the streets again this time you were protesting a controversial extradition bill, but the police response to those protests seem to be very different this time than the umbrella movement hundreds thousands are demonstrating against a deeply unpopular bill allow mainland China to extradite people from Hong Kong and put them on trial. Many of the people in the city do not trust Beijing's justice system. They responding with tear gas and rubber bullets and water cannons. Tell me about your experience of those protests. How different did it feel to you? You. Slide that daugherty has grounded inimitable power to the police and they could basically do whatever they want. For the past year, we have not been seeing any of the police officer on the any forms of investigation, even though they have been come into Seoul. Many misbehaviour for example shooting protests in the chest. And we've been this. Is that the violence elements of the government has taken control and has become like a military state. To what extent that set the stage for this National Security Law. Well it means that they do not treasury, humorous and freedom anymore. These are all post into the rubbish Bin, and we'll stay cash the stability of the government and how they could Cauti-. The is the rule of law. There's no one country two system, and there's no Hong Kong that we used to know. We used to recognize on a vibrant city that has raw law or even the become freedom in Asia. For now we can ever see it. ooh! You talked about your parents having fled mainland China. That the blue collar workers and I'm wondering how they view your activism. Were they supportive of the work that you doing and do agree with the ideas that you were fighting for? Of course they are very worried. The understand how brutal has. Come response he could be. But they also on. The stage because GONNA. Sign that we need to fight back, but for now I I'm unable to keep close contact to them because it would possibly endangered if I'm talking by Rotea judging funding limitations of National Security Law in mainland China. People could be incarcerated. Because what you've done the because of what your family had done. Despite the National Security Law. We are seeing protesters. Take to the streets although there now carrying blank sheets of paper. What have you been hearing from? Protesters that are out there right now. Yes I'm. They're changing their strategy to become more creative and so. In order to circum fans, the punishment or the restriction? But if you have been following how the police officer deal with these protests, these police officer was still Wong them saying that, even though you're holding black paper, you are possibly brushing the national security all so that is really upset. You never know that when you will rectal, you're not you never know that. Where is the right line? How brought and how thick it will draw, and that is the power of politics of fear. It will need you to self censorship to a degree that you can never expressed you genuine. Need me. I. Imagine adding to that fear is the fact that on Wednesday new. National Security Office officially opened in Hong Kong and the mainland Chinese agents working in the territory for the first time. What is that signal to you? Well secret police has always been up fall. Way Audio phone people. It was like something. In the old days in Germany, East Germany, but not in Oakland but we fennell now we re indeed shoe like a st reality. The secret police they have on sweeping Powell unlimited power to talk to people in Hong Kong tapping. Fall freezing assets. Confiscating the passport. They're entitled to do so without the permission. So this is something really frightening. Funk on people. And extensively the under the National Security Law, it doesn't just govern the behavior of people living in Hong Kong, but activists abroad as well now that you're doing activism from abroad, you're still not necessarily safe right, so yes, sessions the. Be. Doing overseas with that from the. Become puddle to Soak Aladdin's that they collect if Beijing consider your past behaviors as the breach of the L- The low actually applies to you when you enter Hong Call. So for example, if you had done coverage of the scene John Concentration camp, but now there's real proof. Secret blueprints of mass incarceration and indoctrination of Muslims, an accused China something that they would never meet. That could be conceited, as will reviewing the stacey credits, or if unlike colluding before him forces, they could call up cases on you. I mean the the language is is is vague and maybe intentionally so. Yes of course on. Politics of fear they need you to guess is so different from the common law system mode legal system in advance world that we have to be precise so that people would understand that what constitute a breach of the law. That kind of writing style of the national security role. In the complete opposite it is intentionally written in fake and brought term, so you have to guess and by guessing you possibly conducting self-censorship, so that is how the politics of fear worked in Hong Call. We and we already saw the Lenin walls, coming down and a lot of the posters coming down. Even before the office was opened. Yes indeed and they don't even know what kind of slogan constitute a violation of the law. You say Hong Kong. Cheer up things like that. That could possibly be one of them, and no one knows and that is the problem. What are you missing most right now? Of course families, connections, friends, and the two cats that I. Rescue from the street, so these a while a really precious connections mine by fleeing you. You are basically those behind. How hopeful are you that you'll be able to return one day? Well the possibly take a very long wild to achieve, but for me I'm quite atonement. That I, even though I'm overseas, but I will continue to national advocacy work. And hope that I fight for that democracy and Freedom Hong Kong. Wish you the best of luck in your work and thank you for speaking with me today. Thank so much. All right before we go today some news about Canada's economy on Wednesday. Finance Minister Bill more. No announced that the federal government's deficit is expected to hit three hundred forty three billion dollars this year. The unprecedented number is largely due to the cost of covid nineteen programs. This kind of federal spending hasn't been seen since the Second World War more, no says he hopes for a quote successful relaunch of the economy, but that he couldn't when the government might return to a balanced budget. That's today I'm Josh Block. Thanks for listening to fromer. Home. For more CBC PODCASTS GO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts.

Hong Kong Hong Kong National Security Law China Hong Nathan Law Hong Kong Hong Kong From China Freedom Hong Kong Beijing Hong Call Hong Kong Pro Democracy Movement CBC China Josh Block US Carrie Lam Lehto Lyle
Voice & Chatbots in Healthcare - Nathan Treloar, Orbita - Voice Tech Podcast ep.048

The Voice Tech Podcast

1:03:58 hr | 1 year ago

Voice & Chatbots in Healthcare - Nathan Treloar, Orbita - Voice Tech Podcast ep.048

"Welcome to the voice tech podcast. Join Me Carl Robinson. In conversation with the world leading voice technology experts discovered the latest products tools and techniques and learn to build the voice out to the future and one of the concerns about these always on always listening devices that are they surveillance devices Hello and welcome back to another episode of the Voice Tech Podcast. Name's Karl Robinson. And this is episode forty eighty eight voice and chat bots in healthcare now. Today's episode was recorded on the seventeenth of September. Two Thousand Nineteen. It's my conversation with Nathan Law. The CO founder and president of orbiter. Now orbiter as you may know provide software to improve patient engagement in digital healthca through voice I and Conversational Ai Solutions. It's really exciting. I got for you. Today is the first time I think we've talked about Karen them. On the show ended up conversation festival we cover the current state of voice and chat bots is in healthcare today and then we discuss some of the many ways. The voice can actually improve the quality of delivery. This includes remote patient engagement. Mechanical Trials Customer Service and has many many more examples. That Nathan gives us I including some of the case studies. The orbiter have worked with with various industry clients lance to what white voices contractions and then dive into some of the orbiter product features. Now there's a full suite of products offered by OPETA. They've got a twenty four seven vet assistant. They've got voiceover knowledge. Engine drag and drop visual detail to actually create these conversational flows a wire frame. prototyping too so much much more besides so we're going to talk about all of that and then we dive into the security and privacy questions really on topic obviously whenever you took my house to the difference between security eighteen. Privacy took around Hippo and why hip compliance is so critical in the USA. And the fact that I'm in a lecture is now blind can we trust big tax voice platforms uh-huh with our health data and other questions come up in the discussion site. Stay tuned for now. I want to say a huge thanks to our new written words sponsor read speaker reach behoove compounded in one thousand nine hundred nine and since become one of the leading B2b text to speech companies worldwide with over ten thousand customers in many different verticals. They develop branded custom custom. Voices for household names brand around the world and they've got more than ninety high quality custom Texas speech voices over thirty languages videos that products include a cloud production on premise. Solutions for things like ibaz conversational systems voice assistance at automotive robotics public announcement MM systems learning platforms and much more and they've also got an a system. That speech enables websites there in fact the first ones to create that back in one thousand nine thousand nine so so that sounds like something of interest to you go check it out at a read speaker dot com. So if you've been asking yourself what your company should be doing with voice. You worried about missing the boat or if so you need to be at project. Voice predict voice is a five day mega conference taking place in Chattanooga Tennessee from from Monday January the thirteenth to Friday January the Seventeenth next year which is incidentally the week off to see yes. We're very proud to announce that project voices chosen to sponsor. Answer the voice podcast. I really impressive. Event produced by Metro. CEO of score publishing and host of this week invoice podcast is billed as the number one event for voice tack. Ai In America really impressive land lineup of Sponsors their Amazon Google Samsung Microsoft Sadi's Benz mayoclinic many more listed and it's unique because All the major ecosystems are presented by side In fact that the event is structured structured. So that on the Tuesday Wednesday and Thursday each of the days have an emphasis on a different ecosystem. There are of course. Huge number speakers are presenting. Different breakout tracks tracks on marketing. Healthcare storytelling smart home education and much much more. Such huge amount to learn as well as workshops to take part in social activities taes even a gala event. I'm the full program can be found at project. Voice a Anyone who's anyone in the world. The voice is going to be there of course and give you an idea of the event is more than three thousand attendees. I'm said he's Benz. Are bringing voice enabled cough. You'd have a play with. I'm Chattanooga got a new goes well is not a place that I voted before. It sounds like it's definitely worth visit is really good tech scene. Apparently I've rain in Nashville and Atlanta and the best news is everything is much cheaper. The New York San Francisco. You can save a few pennies talking to money Bradley assorted amazing. Discount Code a special one for voice. PODCAST listeners actually in order to encourage people from Europe to make the trip to the states at never mind twenty percent like the other codes going around you can get thirty percent of the ticket price with this with this code. Foist Voice Tech. Kyle so if you go to voice to use the code voice tactile you get thirty percent off all the tickets that you got which is an amazing deal. I should definitely consider going to this. Event is one event on your calendar. Twenty twenty and thanks once again to voice for its support of independent media. If you'd like to sponsor the show and you can find find all the details at Bush dot com slash sponsor just quit reminded minded that full episodes of the voice cast and now only available for free for a limited time off to release. You can get all the full episodes voice dot com dot com slash pro by becoming a voice. Tech- pro you not only unlock access to the entire back catalogue episodes but you also get exclusive content may just the voice rose and get to the episodes weeks before everyone else for stat. Pros also get episodes with bonus questions no ads and high quality sound and Best of all you get that warm fuzzy. Feeling that you're supporting the show helping to ensure that I can keep producing episodes like this one so in a nutshell. If you want to keep the pasta focused life get more content high quality content and get it for everyone else. Open your browser and visit cost dot com slash pro. I'm very pleased to be joined on the line with Nathan Law the CO founder and president of orbital based in Boston Massachusetts in the USA over to provide software to improve patient engagement in digital healthcare through voice fast and Conversational Ai Solutions. Nathan's also a respected expert and frequent speaker on consumer and business trends invoice conversation with faces in Healthca as such text and data mining content Edmund a knowledge management and advise hundreds of the world's largest companies and government agencies on reputations previously Nathan how kids exit positions at Fawcett Microsoft Microsoft ramp and Nathan. Thank you Carl. Happy to be here. Yeah it's GonNa be a really interesting conversation. Voice in healthcare. Is the topic the first one I've had out on the show actually on on subjects causing enough but one I've had some experience professional of what a number of companies on healthy nineteen projects I. It's really is the topic of entrusted mine interested Kane's got into it and to fully dive into the the products weeks on a number of products every that number benefits that we can talk about. Let's talk about the the Industry Festival festival keen tonight. What that what the current state all voice and chat bots in the Healthcare Industry today well Certainly reached a new level of interest. Listen awareness mainly driven by the advance of these new smart speakers like Amazon Alexa of our devices they generally fall into two categories. Voice is technology and one that many people healthcare industry may be experienced with which are or a physician or clinician. Chasing dictation tool sears. Quite a lot of interest in applications quotations for improving efficiency of clinicians who increasingly are spending a lot of their time doing data entry so the idea that voice assistive device can orb dictation not capture and take a burden off of physicians is a general category of use cases of great interest. The dictating to count on my right mind standing on the image of what we see on. TV that taking notes and that passing them off to their assistance to Taipa To take further action is not what leading or they These days that they stood out electronic medical records. With these dictation APP store. What are they doing? Well they're They're evolving the use case. You describe which is really just no taking has been around for quite a while companies like nuance Base out here in the Boston area is one of the big players in that space. have been quite successful delivering solutions Lucians for clinicians. That are really about notating next step. Of course to be able to take those notes had some structure to it and be able to put that content into more structured farms. So it's one thing to be able to record a general note about a Hitchin visits. Nice thing to record a prescription or diagnosis or on that sort of thing. So the intelligence. These virtual systems for clinical applications is improved great so the new in fact has been promoting late a virtual system that's almost an ambient virtual system which listens in on the conversations between the author and the patient and can support. The doctor would know taking recording putting pieces of information and more structural fashion and at some point even interjecting offering suggestions through the course of the conversation almost like having a an aide in the rumor nurses system around. Wow is that right. A case things have really evolved from a simple recording some nights on on Cassatt. Yeah they've evolved. Although I I think the technology in this case in some ways ahead of the use cases it's applications out. The technology voice recognition improved dramatically. That's one the other evolutions combination of better performing technology and software better machine learning algorithms for speech recognition cloud computing. I think just general processing computing strength has resulted in higher accuracy. A speech recognition core technology is required for all this or so note that even just in the last five years proved dramatic has resulted in out boom in the use of sister technologies. Absolutely absolutely what what was saying in in every industry rally that you said that the tech was ahead of the use cases. Can you dig into that. I mean it's not because it's very difficult to create change in these in these big entrenched organizations like hospitals and doctors surgeries etc.. People with a lot of tradition and the way they do things. That's certainly a big part article. I think The other reality is that the applications of these virtual assistants in a healthcare setting demand content experiences says that are optimized for it in just to paraphrase kind of up to six phrase just like any other digital experience the content informs How these voices in virtuous were so? It's one thing for her to just record information. But if it's going to stay. The physician or clinician says the record this medication the ability for the virtual system to recognize what the physician is saying. That's acknowledges there but handling the peculiarities of save. Some drug name requires a healthcare overlay from recognizing all the strange drug names. And that's what we do at Orbin. Among of the things is make sure that these virtual systems are optimized for healthcare use cases. But I think if I put it into a categorize at the bigger part of it is disability for these large entrenched organizations to move to these new technologies. The third thing that is sewing down is appropriate concerns about privacy the seat insecurity if you haven't always on always listening virtual assistant the question is how do you ensure that virtual assistant. That's always on and always listening. Always always available isn't picking up on other things that might be set in the clinical setting so insured spaces in particular so I think they have Avidan a An exam room. Which is the Clinton physician impatient art? It's nothing to havoc on a place where a might be a shared space or there might be other information that picks picks up on and while these concerns are appropriately. Art Ton of Fagin. There's some what of a precedence for it. In the sense that people do walk around with cell phones which can also also capture information but that is a concern in the with the healthcare organizations. We work with their compliance and security departments are are quite cautious really so they are really making sure that these checked all the boxes inspected these new towns right. I can imagine there the quite significant penalties for not daring to those kinds of standards. And also there's a huge Aranda risk as well if you if you become known to three one one incident of patient listen information getting out right on the US hippo regulations that are Verron. It's no less. Sop sub stringent in other parts of the world so Those are the obstacles to adoption in clinical settings other category of use cases is patient facing virtual assistance. And that's where we were more on the patient facing side. Applications for patient engage on patient Education Communication Care Coordination of these patient enablement type of use cases so the most since the simplest example in the one that people gravitated the two earliest when the Amazon Alexa powered devices came on the market was just simple educational declines mayoclinic Partner of ours. They developed a Alexis skill. which is a voice application available over these Alexa power devices like an Amazon Echo that can answer basic questions on this case the questions about first AIDS how do I treat a sunburn? What will I do if I could buy a spider things like that? In those cases those very first instances instances of consumer facing voice applications were geared towards the educational scenarios and often simply just branding and for or some of these healthcare organizations that chance to put that date that time. The Walter Problems they just want to downing blocks in the way in so that that's happened is continues to happen. There's quite a bit of interest in tapping what amounts to a new digital marketing. I'm channel so many of these. Healthcare organizations have websites of mobile APPs for the patients and they look at smart speakers. Voice enabled devices Whether it's a smart speaker are increasingly your own. The smartphone itself you know have a voice interface and then of course. There's certain put them in cars as well. You can have purchase a car that has a hands free Alexa experience built into. But as long as you've got your case with Amazon Alexa experience experience or lexa count. You can access these services and Sir Marble how many that are out there that are oriented around health education. We are a few of the Mitch Mail and more of our coming on the market every day as we move towards more clinical applications. What we are seeing in the market is an interest in applying voice I technology to support patients with chronic? Care needs elder care. Needs Post acute care as you get a new hip. You have a care plan you have a voice Howard assistant that can walk you through your recovery. Okay its second day of treatment or second day after your the procedure with your new hip remember today is supposed to put you know. Try to walk two hundred steps Check the wound as a lot of stuff to remember. Yeah the absolutely. This is something that I came across. When I on a chat BOT project full diabetics specifically wrote remote Karen Monitoring Diabetics we two wheels accredited educational tool festival which evolved into more of a remote patient engagement system? And it was. It was real surprised to me as as the fest wet with these kind of patients to the discovered that the problem of medical adherence and these other actions that patients have tight in the manage. Chronic conditions like diabetes all to get get better off to a having been admitted to hospital for like cardiac surgery all these things that cost a lot to be admitted to and obviously the insurance paying for them. Don't want to then get elegant and have to be readmitted to hospitals there as a lot of money at stake you know. There's a lot of people suffering problems that they don't need to had they taken the medication cry from the right actions as the number of number of different use cases around this remote patient engagement seem. I know that's why we're over to lies. Are there any others while other use cases around that theme that exist before there's a few others I'll talk to in a second. I did WANNA point out that you did bring up Chat Bot and while I've been talking about voice really really we think of them as part of a same category of user experience that are built around the idea of a virtual health assistant. Somebody bar even turn attorney. Use The acronym V. H.. A health. Assistant okay this the idea is that you have a conversational. Ai Our assistant that that can do things like answer questions. provide information do coaching service an interface or proxy to an actual human and uneven relaxed to human when the situation requires it but the the common theme is that it is a virtual an AI AI powered conversational agent that has an interface that can be voice Howard experience but could also be just taxed or touch. You know the modalities. Oh doughty's sometimes were a choice to decide. Define the different ways of interfacing with it whether it's text touch voice gesture it's still conversational. And it's responding to an ad hoc more natural language interface that would patients in some cases. Patients are individuals who for one reason or another cannot use other digital interfaces as well as they can or are more likely to use as a conversational agent. That has ideally built into it. Some you know personalization some empathy at started. Thanks for the most. The most prevalent use case an and interest around voice are for elderly and people with other fiscal communist illness that prevent them from using a smartphone or web browser they can can use. Our voice is one of the last things you use doing doing a conversational experience. Virtual helpless system for those cases are the most obvious the absolute Taylor said they still got control of that voice. My Lust sent me some degree of USA that the hands are dry. Honestly that's how among other reasons why we were we're interested in this of my on. My Co founders Phil Rogers tonight both dealing with aging loved ones and observing. They're more they're Tennessee to adopt these. He's kind of voice assistance more likely than say a smartphone. APP Said said to us. This is a a new way of user experiences for healthcare that's transforming harming digital health and Zonggai's generally. We can solve some problems. Were not intractable on solvable. But more difficult to solve with it's traditional technologies rights object. So it's come from a real experience a real need and it's developed excellent I guess alongside the the fact that you can and make technology more accessible to these patients of these people in different situations lateral system unique benefits of having a voice interface as well such as being relatable bowl and therefore more convincing more influential ever that behavior so it's not just simply making existing technology accessible to more people as actually improving the technology at the same time us us one of the ideas Healthcare's interesting we do talk about. Hey I a lot in a I. Artificial intelligence machine learning is required to be accurate. Provide Hayek ASEAN recognizing people are saying the converting their voice into some representation of a machine can process speech to text usual technology. That's applied that is based on machine learning approaches on a subset of a larger category. But what is is also the case in healthcare. If somebody's asking a question of a particular condition it gets something related to diabetes. What are the symptoms of diabetes? Might be the question. And if your healthcare provider having an artificial intelligence calculating compute what if things are the symptoms of diabetes is is really not what this is intended to be usually there's a clinically vetted and deterministic response to that question. Here are the six established clinically. manically batted answers to what are the symptoms of diabetes. I think it's important for your listeners. Understand that we talk about is not being applied always in a virtual system that can be intuitive and intelligent enough to figure out how to diagnose a patient. There are some elements of that which I'll get to in on a second. Mostly it's about being intelligent and recognizing what they're saying was without MVP and being able to have a proper clinically. Better answer to a questioners Schnur I so but getting to the use cases so he talked about the basic digital marketing abuse. Case get an Alexa skill up there. We talked about remote patient gauge on. The idea. Here is that might be a virtual assistant to help somebody recover from a procedure your or between clinic episodes of clinical care. Maybe it's congestive heart failure. They come in to check in with Dr Sham on a care plan that is managed harshly sleep through a virtual system that can remind them about when to take medication. Remind them about what therapy they should be Partaking in at a particular point time I answer basic questions even if necessary open up channels of communication to their clinician when some indication suggests that the now that line of Communication that should be escalate the variations of that or things like clinical trials so there are a number Pharma companies who are looking at using a virtual health assistance powered by voice chat to streamline how data's collect patient's clinical trial not one of the interesting because Quite strict protocols on chemical trials. And how you collect the data you need to randomize then you need to present the questions in way so that must be unless we call it a challenge to got into a voicing devices while it is share your story we're working on a project awhile ago around clinical trial for rheumatoid title arthritis patients and their standard set of questions that the patients would have to go through on a periodic basis so Assess how well they're handling the the treatment for the trial and one of the questions was to fill in. The old school way was to fill out a form that decide. Which of these symptoms have you experienced in the last since last taking the Assessment and their list of about fifty different symbols. And if you imagine trying to apply that question to a virtual assistant are by voice or if you and I were having this conversation I was to ask you. Which of these following have you experienced and I start reading them off? That's not gonNa work right so you have to rethink the form of how those questions are asked to a voice experience so the way we came about it was we would recognize that there may be fifty core symptoms that we want to check off and and it just generally asked the question what symptoms tell me the symptoms. You've experiences last time. We did the assessment. Just had Arash I Numbness in my left hand record. That news natural language processing techniques Captured the discreet symptoms. And Populate Not Study Coordination Dashboard using that approach. Much like a doctor would do in real life or doctor would never read off fifty symptoms most likely once I and maybe some followers based the the patients sent right but doctors applying his or her intelligence to say all right you know he said numbness but I know that that checks. It's this particular box in this farm. So they would they would do that. Interface so designing a virtual assistant to take on that responsibility take some thought there are several approaches is for resolving what the patient says to a form that is more restricted voice. Tuesday is a weekly newsletter. The help you build better voice apps whether you're looking for research chops deaf chops or design chops. There's something in there for everyone. Just go to voice tech podcast dot com slash newsletter and. Look forward to your Tuesdays okay. So that's Kinda trials them while some of these cases of voice in healthcare one is this is more of a generalized use case but customer service or patient service helping patients to access the services that they need using being a digital experience. Often we can just chat bought in a website find a doctor find a location on implanted and then take them to that next step so they can schedule schedule appointment and or if they have a question ago saying before the virtual system. Whether it's Chapada voice can relax to a humid so at some point it. It may say all right. You've asked a question that is at a level that suggests I should exclude connects you to our call centers. I'm going to do it that way. Sometimes I go. Virtual virtual waiting rooms telemedicine use cases. Where even the where? The patient is actually trying to engage with a clinician through telehealth. Oh Health Service often. They're put into a waiting room type of situation and while they're waiting you can. They can engage virtual system. That can answer questions. Collect some information. So there's those two variations on the same use case which is a virtual assistant that serves as an initial proxy to the human call all center and in some cases. It may answer enough questions for the patient. Where they they say okay? I should go to the emergency room are A. I'm I'm clear on what I need to do. I need to speak to anybody. The tricky thing and all this is to make sure that S- that virtual system isn't implying that it's making any decisions Ryland thank decisions straight. Up Information is a thin line. Isn't it yeah early. Yeah I mean this sounds pretty an hour. I would love to just ask of actual assistant with veterinary doctor. Can I book an appointment And Getting Gilda information and then possibly pay cut through. If I had to be. But I haven't seen that deployed yet other examples apples of that actually being out in the wild and the moment they using not that I know of yet I can eat the very soon. They'll be some that are based on the technology orbit is bringing to market in the concept of consumer health virtual assistant powered on there are chat bots out there often those chat bots a pretty thin in terms of the services that they will expose some of the patient. Portal services are introduced this concept except about they're really just a sin wrapper around the traditional scheduling tools. There you know before the Konno's thinking thinking pundits let's the overtime I thought you know the one thing that I would love to have. His is a chapel connected to my health insurance say in in France they cover most of your health bill anyway. Nothing that the government pay seventy percent send you still have to get insurance to cover the last thirty percent and often lung companies provide that a mutual L. But these health insurance plans as they are in the. US are incredibly complicated. And and the French you know I really take me a couple of days is to find whereas before I would love to just be able to say I'm GONNA cover dental. And if so which doctors can I use my the GO-TO and I'm looking to get done and just have that Dick Straighten and then make an appointment with the with the doctoral dentists which doctor does takes my insurance. It's for this particular. ICU Our gives the best deal for this particular procedure. And is not my wichita the best review all we were working with some of the larger. US based Compares Health Insurance payers in that particular use case combined with an enrollment which is an annual thing for a lot of people in answering questions questions about best coverage they should have on re-enroll into their corporate plan or employer plants usually sponsored by one of these commercial players. These are and even for Medicare air. which is the US federal government program for the healthcare understanding With the options are for enrolling enrolling into Medicare these are are use cases that are upgrade interest. Your use case very relevant here could I can. I knew that already knew. These is pretty complex. All right so that's a nice to otas product suite. Then can you give us an idea of what is today whilst the proposition and the typical types of clients the Kearney Lisa Yeah so we are a offer technology company our primary mission is to empower our clients healthcare organizations cost industry tap into the our these virtual health assistant so virtual health assistant platforms the HA platform that acronym that I've observed is coming into common use this way we do this through our farmers that we layer on top of the core technologies from major vendors like Amazon Google not some of our own technology to provide a way to create these healthcare first virtual assistance across these various use cases in a way that is healthcare specific so the terminology and unique natural of healthcare because our focus completely on healthcare we built on our platform an understanding of that unique language. Judge handle all the peculiarities of second. Were Omni channel which is a fancy way of saying that you create the develop and maintain the experience in our platform and you can publish it to an points like Alexa. Google assistant chat bots even SMS base chat bots lots and weapon mole chat bots. So you design a bill your experience once in this virtual assistant essentially portable across all those channels and portable across different modalities dollars whether they're typing or texting or speaking or touching and we support all of the conversation models. The third thing is that were inexperienced management platform first and foremost so what reason we came into the space is a Mike. Founders Co founders. Come from the web and content management an experience world so building technologies for Web and Mobile Applications Williams served in this new conversational world voice chat. BOTs this is. You don't want to be in a place as an enterprise of any size healthcare otherwise where you need engineers to create a manage that your virtual assistance. So much of what's built on our platform allows nontechnical people to manage that experience that includes the content that served up the way okay. The the virtual assistant speaks the CADENCE. The tone that's all managed you can be managed by non technical people so content and experienced managers are keys for us and You know in the case of mail 'em whole team. Oh content experienced managers who are using our tooling to build these experiences without having to know the low level Java script or python technologies that most of these core tools demand. So that that's another differentiator and the last thing I would add is we are an enterprise grade platform which means that central to our proposition ability to integrate with other systems and healthcare that includes electronic medical records systems where the information that exists in that system informs the virtuous system so if the personalized the needs of the individual needs to be able to access information about that individual likewise in the other direction if Some information about the health often wellness that somebody can be captured to our virtual assistance. You own a record that someplace and often you know it's not that we're going to be that database a record the needs to be some system that we integrate but those are the sort of the key value propositions our customers range from major healthcare systems to large payers to farmers that are using it for clinical trials like I mentioned also Healthcare USE CASES FARM INCLUDING PRESCRIPTION POST PRESCRIPTION BRAND and engagement or efforts. Expensive Biologic drugs. That's a use case that's emerged and then a probably sixty seventy sixty percent of our customers. smurfs come from the digital health solution provider so they're integrators agencies and digital health technology companies that imbed our technology inside solutions. They're taking the market so we become more of a vernacular it's an oem playing for or embedded inside somebody else's solution. That's a an increasingly more common use case but at the same time we've we have as great customer some of the biggest healthcare brands in the US least and increasingly starting to see interest in other parts of the world interesting account wonderful Got Number of products that benefit from those catcher interest rates at one of them is. Is this assistant. But 'cause you'll deploying all these different platforms like Google Assistant Ancho attract really what you're providing. ICM CRIME IF. I'm wrong his the if the engine behind that is the access to the data is the decision making is the protection. And then you you deploy scales APPs actions etc to each of these platforms. foams provide this Three sixty solution for the client NAGATA. Exactly right I wish I recorded that marquee material. Okay ready when we go live. The actual assistant that depictions in savage says I should say have you didn't create your own virtual system. Of course you're using other people's yeah yeah we don't have our own branded virtuous system design our clients create virtual assistance in using our platform. You so we're not we're not acquitting. Random virtual system that we're taking out there that's called Carl answers questions from ABC's sorry name as is a previous life so in that sense where rather who white labeled inside these virtual systems at our clients are building. I'll give you another example. No concrete example. We work with a local house will system here in Boston up. Brigham and Women's Hospital and they are developing virtual assistant for patients nations with elevated prostate cancer risk. And there's a regular check in support for those patients done remotely through an APP that has a virtual the system built into it that can answer basic questions. Collect information about how they're doing report to them there are less. PSA levels levels generally provide support between episodes of CARE CHECK INS in that case. It's not a virtual system that's brandon orbit. We are integrated into that mobile APP. In this case it's a smartphone APP where our virtual assistant of virtual systems power buyer technology maintain manage optimize optimize Enhance using our tooling by Brigham. Folks I say I say integrations with that associates. I guess the whole privacy security taking must be a big part of what our yeah. Yeah and that is. That's a big topic in our space. We talked about a little bit on the clinician side. Hi But even on the patient side as soon as you start transmitting. Let's call protected health information. Phi across the world or regulation in this country but everywhere else the demands a particular attention to all those components that are going into the solution in some cases. There are the experiences devices that we can use without concern. Because we've checked all the boxes in our own platform in the device supports it where we can have a voice or Chapada experience that is a for example hip compliant with the smart speakers like Amazon Echo devices and Google assist devices become popular in the home or just now getting to a point where you can start using those devices for hip compliant applications in April of this sure Amazon announced the first program for bringing on Hicfa compliant solutions on the Alexa Platform. Yeah maybe contest Actually mean what is what is hip hop is only USA RYAN SAYS USA regulation sort of healthcare specific version of GDP are in Europe but taught the hippos regular set of rules and regulations for the privacy insecurity around healthcare information that were set forth initially back in the nineties. The policy rules regulates been updated several times since then to keep up with the evolution technology but they apply to to order called covered entities which are hospitals insurance healthcare insurance providers and other types of organizations that have access are in in anyway anyway touch personal health information. Phi An en- transmitted so they they apply to those covered entities. They also apply to any service provider. Sure that has handling that same information on behalf of those covered entities so they're called business associates and we're one because we provide a service to avert entities healthcare organizations where health information is transmitted. So what hip is just earls. Regulations is not a compliance test. Is this rules or regulations that you need to comply with an if you were found to be in violation. Their fees penalties associated with it. And there's a quite significant zone understand. They can be quite significant. Yeah so you know naturally for the right reasons we take them very seriously. We care about privacy and security of persona protected health information but also it got the hippo her regulations The are hanging over us so all of us take very seriously at orbiter we no. We've GOT OUR NO FULL-TIME GETTING CLIENTS OPS through make sure that we're doing everything that we should be doing to comply with those regulations and generally make sure that privacy privacy security of data's protected Announced Monday came out back in April is at Amazon Alexa. Platform announced is a hip hop eligible version of Alexa in fairy. Generally what that means is that Amazon is taking the steps necessary to ensure that they protected the information that goes through this version of their Alexa Platform. You spoke on top of it and that they're willing to sign let's Olive Business Associates Agreement with organizations that want to Bill PIPPA compliant applications using lacks so that willingness to sign a business disagreement is the requirement to be a compliant with regulations hip-hop. I'm nounce that they have in a limited rollout ability to do that and back in April they announced it. I think just six Early adopters in their program and they're gradually expanding that program program to include other Alexa skills. Applications that will fall into this category business associate agreement. Where does that place in terms of responsibilities on Alan Amazon shoulders. It just. It's an agreement on their part with the organizations that are building the applications on top of Alexa to ensure the protection of any data that gets passed through Alexa. That may contain protected health information. I say promise to follow the rules of Hippo. Basically it's pretty much. 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Discount if you enroll as attain thing to go and check it out and see. If it's right view four step podcasts dot com slash rubber copy. Okay though I had said you know that that is secure on Damas inside. Because they've signed the agreement best the debt is secured on your side. The the distance between the the peasants speaking the data and the the interface How can we really ensure that by secure as well as I seem? That's not included in the regulations are right so this is what I was saying earlier. If you're in your home and you have an Echo Alexa. The device for some are smart speaker that has integrated or deployed to it. A voice experience for healthcare voice voice. Experience allows you to say things about your personal health and maybe it needs to be two things one. It has to be some information about your health and wellness like your blood. You know you still use stating your blood pressure. Restating our body temperature or something you know some prescription and it's able to identify who you are. So the density of the individuals speaking is key. Yeah next between the data and the identification of who you are is what crosses over that threshold that makes sense because I listed a blood pressures and timestamps means nothing to. Nobody has sunny. When you put into that they actually identified information so combination of your personally identified information somehow knows who you are and and the data that's being transmitted combination across into the realm of Kipah a compliance so their techniques that can be applied lied to anonymous the experience and resolve it resolve identity in a different way? Some of these are merging. But the question you asked about. Somebody's speaking seeking to advice across. The room is possible for somebody to spoof you and interface with that same application that always application pretending to be you you or in the other accidental capture some commission about that. So it's a bit like any other digital experience. Where if you're speaking over the phone phone to your clinician and yours? You're talking about your health and wellness. And there's some way to identify you. Your phone number isn't identifiable apiece of information. Then that's the precedence right. So as long as you're in the privacy of your own home the bounds of what can be controlled around interacting smart smart speaker versus or interacting with your own foam and transferring Health information really the same so that the president there is the same. There are some some rules that are starting to be investigated around surveillance audio surveillance and one of the concerns about these always on always listening devices that ah the surveillance devices Amazon will tell you and the others will tell you that the only listened to initially the wake word to you gotta say Alexa or computer. Later are echoed awaken up knowing. Aren't you do then. It starts recording what you say. And that's what goes up to the cloud process secure but there's some mm concerns that It wakes up by hearing something that it didn't that it was thought was the weight word and it triggers into a listening mode. These are their use cases on scenarios that trigger concern for a lot of people is is Alexis truly and always listening to you or Google or spear the ones always potentially listening to of course without potential comforting things that you didn't intend it to so yeah. There's always a sentiment but it's interesting what you said in the home is designed into private and miss that's covered under the hip regulations on stunned that the difference between security and privacy and from what I can say so so far. It says a lot about security tomato Ensures that the data is secured on the service is not a pesident viable and it's not an able to be access by unauthorized people's copy hats etc so security As to how your information is protected but then there's also privacy which relates to any Bryant control your pessimistic Always been you know after it's been captured HYPOCR cover that as well as I including is uh so the idea is that patients can request the data. That's been collected. They can request it at Vive removed. They can place of specific requirements on the a covered entity in their business associates. That are behind that covered. End The service and basically have ultimate control over the data that's being collected so that's Serbs captured in the privacy rules one of the interesting things about some of these services. I keep picking on Amazon Alexis. I know more about with that service on some of the other ones out and L. to declare I don't represent Amazon. Anyway of everything I say is just common knowledge in out there for public consumption but Alexa does record and capture and store what you say to Alexa device but Amazon also gives you the ability ability as an individual going your Alexa account and delete the history of what's been recorded and I may have this wrong but I believe there's an Option that's been added recently where you can indicate that you can take more control over. What's being recorded to double check that? I think that I know that Bali's police service providers Amazon Google and others are frankly they're responding to Back in the market on. What kind of control needs to be in placed independent hip healthcare as its own peculiar armaments but just general privacy and security concerns have compelled these large companies to take take steps Beyond initial deployments. At least give Lamar control of the patients are how they want their data to be doesn't count an opt-in base in cases of course the majority of the data. Yeah I can understand that it's important to outline the there's two separate things in the hippocampus. Both of them obviously obviously in light of all the contractor at you know the the series of contracts is going down. The contract is listening to the voice requests from of course all the old age platforms Basically can really trust these. Big Tech Funds can we interface and trust Amazon Google etc without health data. When when these things keep coming to lie even if they are EPA compliant trust is a funny word onum degrees trust vary depending on the circumstances of Sort of an individual saying right down to it you know the breaches ebbing that have occurred in the US market the more egregious breaches. This of healthcare data. Come from all different parts. We know about facebook can big providers like that but payers and the providers themselves wealth awful suffer from preaches so as you had complexity in different interfaces you create more exposure to risk and the whole exercise value mitigates that risk while I was gonna say about trust is what's interesting when it comes down to it if you're a millennial who is using Alexa device to you just manage their health and wellness more generic way your likeliness. You may be more or less willing to trust that service with your data depending a on generally how trustworthy trusting. You are as an individual but if you're an eighty four year old person living alm alone in your only interface to the outside world digital interfaces a voice system. That's always on always available. We'll play your favorite song whenever you ask will Tom Tell you the weather will tell you. Your sports team won your willingness to give up a little bit Assume a low risk because that device might have more information about. His Life is mitigated. Some by the fact that it's providing this better quality of life and giving you a sense of security and support so I always think of it like example like to give us in answer. They have this where you are as well in the states. We have Boston easy. Pass tolls sorry Drivers or your license plate allows you to go right through on charges your credit card on many of these automatic tolls. They're very very efficient popular because we now known no longer after. Spend the extra thirty seconds to dig to our coin box throws point again they say tracking a movement. But they're always also try with a no are we are no one. We're going through the tollbooth quite a lot about us. When it comes down to us and do we trust that? And what's the risk reward ratio that we're going to use to decide whether we should drive on the tolls and have these automatic services or not. Most most people are willing to give up some sense of security and exchange of convenience that gifts so obviously healthcare is a whole different as a pattern and as an example. I do call that out. Because degrees of risks vary depending on the individual. If you're a quadriplegic living home alone you're probably more likely to give up some on some of the risks and exchange arrive service that point absolutely. I know there's another concern the I've heard expressed in a few times. which is that these these companies especially especially google actually less so especially Google really? The help is based on on data and selling data to other people in the form of advertisements etc.. Yeah assignment facebook as well. FACEBOOK had more of the high profile scandals but really that's businesses And the idea of having a big on this based around data knowing all your health data and then selling that to the highest bidder probably insurance companies and then having the decisions from the insurance companies taken on your behalf flights that you may be one day denied health insurance because of data Google's amassed over a period of years on you is kind kind of a scary prospect for some people are not. I don't think it's realistic. While say I I have to agree with you. And it is a scary prospect. I think the simple truth is it. It is a brave new world. The data that can and is being collected with these new digital experiences is pretty stunning. I'll tell you as a technology technology company in this space you know. Investors are very keen to know. What's our data play? We are quite careful. All our contracts to make clear that we do not added on the data that our clients do and you know or or their clients scenario but even for us to be able to use that data in it's aggregated anonymous way just so that we can keep the lights on on our platform and our service. Nick shirts doing the right things and worth while. This is a right that we'd like to include clued in in our agreements and so although you know actually monetize that data would be the next level in our space in healthcare space. It's it's it's a Hartzell and it'll be interested in. I know that the pressure on the big guys who are trying to be in healthcare is exactly that our using the data One example trying to describe it in the abstract that we've heard is if you had a healthcare application for a particular drug. It's it's brandon drug. Maybe it was deployed as a Google or Alexa skill voice application. How might eh that user of that application be re targeted elsewhere in the digital ecosystem based on the information? They're sharing through that one application me. No it happens now you go to somebody's website and you express than you say every Ryan cookies cookies sat you know so now we enter. Apply that to these vizquel ice while so it's definitely a brave new world and we're trying to be with our clients remindful in clear on or the web the state of the artist respect back to privacy and security data us. And how we you know part of what we do is making sure they are is open in terms of knowing how these things I think. It's I think he's writing upon point the whole trust thing because selling data to insurance companies might be quite win quick profit prophet and the short term but it it it also destroying trust invoicing devices overall and that company brand as well so much money in house it really makes sense to look at the look at the long game and protect customers data and do right by the customers and gain that trust because if they can capture that as the channel for the health services the woman in the long run. That's why the money right and I think we tell it to the top. You say you know what are is. It's really not a maybe you could make the case that it's technology that we are talking technology. That's a serves as a barrier for the adoption of these these applications in healthcare care but is sort of a push me pull you type of thing right in the technology. The technology was there to ensure that privacy security was rock-solid throughout the application than the regulatory conditions would be addressed but but we also say the regulatory requirements are beyond what technology but the technology is meant to serve right. So let let me give you an example right if the voice experiences a hands free always on always listening virtual assistant. That's in your home. If that is the the Precondition for the solution and just the idea of always on always. Listening device is a non-starter. That's not a technology you probably. It's more of a A user experience and what we've done for those examples if we got mechanisms in our platform that allow you to identify yourself. Virtual Assistant multitasker identification. Some of these devices can use facial recognition even voiceprint recognitions say aches. Am I really talking to car confirmed who you are. So that's a technology problem but if I walk behind you while you're talking to your virtual assistant and shout out something that might be considered protected health information. It's a bit like walking behind you while you're talking on your cell phone yelling and something in to the cell phone that could be captured by one of his on the other end. You can't get around that you have to just accept. There's some acceptance to a certain level wrist housing or and what you have to do floyd those scenarios I definitely I love this comes out and testing and what can with real uses of costs by now these. These risk is what. What is it that people actually do? Because it's very easy to there is in a in a dark room and didn't get foy and once you get into the real world that Jason Arrows really emerge. There's a one of our clients develop a way finding application for using voice a win until you can time. I'm in the President Wade through that voyage. No no way finding a wasting. It'll be a good teacher. Now wait way. Finding your your way around. I think we'll say now. They're they're funny. Solutions out there but the idea was the kiosk of some sort where you could go up and say show me the way to the cafeteria while in concept the seem pretty simple and very powerful and useful their concern. was that if this device was always on always listening and you could just speak to it that scenario described before where somebody could be walking by and doctors walking by and say just Mrs Johnson. It looks like Looks like she's going to need major surgery that the identity of the individual and some statement about her wellness captured to that vices awesome breaching media so they need to think about it and so their own compliance organization internally at think about how do they prevent that scenario is a real. What what you know? The candidate isn't enough to put the kiosk in. Like a little soundproof or sound dampened. Room is enough to have a button. That says I'm not gonNA listen to push. This is so these are the considerations that they had the APP or go through when they are thinking about putting this experience shared so yes tricky is not even if you translate to the name to some. I'm kind of code. That would still be identifiable. There's not really any way around it as you have to have that authentication and the and the information accompanying each other say yeah three interesting anew. The orbital also provides tools in order to to map out some of these prices and you gotta a drag and drop visual editor understands the ability to create why frames the prototypes. Is that right. Yeah we have fairly four components to our platform designing A building managing and optimizing the mice. So there's four of think of it as a full life cycle platform for doing all those things ultimately creating a virtual system so PROTOTYPING tool allows said before nontechnical people to design what the interaction looks like between an individual and their virtual system. And Nice thing about it. Is that basically type away. Connect these flows. You create them and you type in. What the patient says he type in on what the virtual system will say back in you can play it and listen to it and even tune the speech cadence so with virtual systems but safe? It's voice voice and also look at it as it would appear a chat like interface. But once you've done that you can you can share it with others in your organization. There's a sharing sharing feature so that others can look at it on on. It can go through an approval process and then ultimately you got a fleet. The prototypes voice flow. So that is the foundation of your application from there. There's a A richer visual editor for actually creating the flow itself and that includes the same sorta tools for designing house focused but also connecting one step to another with things like conditional logic. It's the patient says. Yes so this question that I'm going to take him down this path. If they say this particular utterance someone take control that flow the exile lower level all tool for developers for integration services. Also was he wig low code Feldman Environment for developers. The bill custom integrations the back end systems or customer. Aw Law Business Law and then the last lesson of the analytics so being able to understand how people are interacting with the experience to tune tuna to make adjustments to the flow to reflect our real time feedback system itself was your predictions over the next few years for Voice Jason in the industry in Ecosystem in general what you expect to see arrival. And what are the things that you believe a missing that that need to arrive. While I think the the piece of the Puzzle Related Privacy Security is starting to take form takes shape where we are looking to the big guys to provide hardware where am infrastructure like Amazon. And we know that they are making moves in the stretch in and that's going to put some focus on news cases that at least two to the state have been less accessible more clinical allocation. So I like to characterize it that. Were moving from the consumer health health. Coaching anatomist health both applications to the more clinical personalized ones. And I think we'll start to see our starting to Sima some of those emerge I will see not more and more announcements coming from providers health care service providers that are more clinical and crossover to that That whole hippie category okay. Where can people find out more about Albert online online What's what's the website and that the social media handles yes? Our website is just orga. Dot is okay. We can be found on Lincoln and on twitter on facebook our angle generally or to underscore inc some variation of that or but a health. You find us also on through that. So she works so look follow it will do it. A huge list of resources Provided me with lots of Blogs and press releases and places where you prepared in different puzzles deaths at anyone who's interested in falling out with Panoply of different things they can click on in the show next to do check that out. Nathan's been wonderful to talk to you. Really interesting conversation and our jet thank you Carl. Chretien's today very much. Hope you enjoyed listening as always you can find all the show notes with links to the resources mentioned in this episode at Voice Dot. Come if you enjoy this episode. There's many ways spot me in the show. You can tell one friend or colleague about this episode You can always leave a quick review on itunes voice dot com dot com slash. I tunes or you can write for the blog voiced at podcast dot com slash publish. Finally you can become a sponsor at voice tech podcast dot com slash donate. I know that your contribution really he does make the show possible. I'll be back soon with another episode but until then I've been your host con Robinson. Thank you listening to the voice tech podcast.

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The risks vs. rewards of sending kids to school

Front Burner

25:07 min | 4 months ago

The risks vs. rewards of sending kids to school

"The he smashed pretty much every billboard and streaming record that matters it has already been streamed more than a billion times. People still to this day point to this is the moment everything changed. But whether you agree with those claims are not this podcast is it really about him either you're not an astute businessman or you're inherently racist when it comes to black music and his country this is not a drake podcast available now on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcast. This is a CBC podcast. I would like to hear. A real plan I'd like to hear. What the classrooms are going to look like how many children will be in a classroom I want to hear about cleaning protocols. It seems scary. When we felt so insulated up until this point. Schools across the country are getting ready to open up their doors to students many for the first time since the pandemic shut them down months ago provinces have released their back to school plans which focus on getting students back in the classroom. But many parents and teachers aren't convinced that enough is being done to keep people safe at this point, I have such little faith in the government's reopening plan that I don't think I even want my child to go back into the school system even though it will be stressful and exhausting for me I feel like it's in my child's best interest to stay at home. Emily Oster is with me today to talk about those concerns. She's an economics professor at Brown University and the author of books like Crib Sheet and expecting better which look at parenting from a data perspective, and she's used that same approach when weighing the risks of sending students back to school. I'm Josh Block. This is stripper. Hi, Emily. Hello thanks for having me. So, let me start with my own situation. You know we have a five year old daughter who's going to enter senior kindergarten in September, and for the past few months, we have been pretty careful about social distancing about you know being calculated about the risks that we take slept to say it feels Kinda strange and scary to think about dropping her off to go to a class of of almost thirty kids. You've actually looked at the data how scared should we be about sending our kids to school? If even the answer that depends a lot on the viral situation but in. Where the virus is more Incan under control when we do look at what has happened with schools opened and that's true party will mean look at what happened in schools open in Europe and we have a bit of evidence also from from childcare settings that have been open throughout the US. The evidence is not suggest that these are in most cases, major spreaders of of the virus I think. That piece is a little bit reassuring I think it's quite reassuring. Kids also tend to not get very sick and are less likely to be infected in the first place. We think all of that is reassuring I will say I think that you are experiencing something, which we're all going to experience, which is this sort of visceral fear of getting over the hurdle of going in the first day. that. Somehow, we've been so isolated. It's been like stay in your house stay in your house near Your House and all of a sudden it's like go out and there's all these other kids and and I think that hurdle is GonNa be really hard back pretty nervous actually covert is still very relevant and there's a possibility of a second wave. We're going to be exposed to the. More or if we'll be okay, we don't know that. So I'd rather be safe than sorry your schools in most of Canada are opening up from kindergarten all the way to grade twelve. Tell me more about what we know in terms of whether one age group is more a concern than another. Is this is a place where I think the policy has fallen down a bit It's pretty clear that viral via the rioters is least likely small kids and also that those small kids tend to Trans Mitch less than older kids. So we think about the elementary schools versus middle schools or high schools the elementary school is going to be the lowest risk. The high school is going to be the highest risk I. think the other piece that may be is missing a little bit in these conversations is actually the. Benefits to in person learning are much greater for younger kids than for older kids because his much less subsitute able. So it's really hard for a five year old to learn on zoo whereas I, sixteen year old you know that's probably more accessible thing at least for many kids in that in that category. So I can see the reason to do everything to do everything at once of course, high school kids want to be back in school also but I do think that there's also an argument for more differentiation for sure. The other thing that really concerns me is a about how much information we actually have to make these decisions. I mean this all on some level feels like a bit of an experiment, not just on our kids but on on our community more generally. I think and I hope and I feel and. Not He's not an experiment to me I don't. Know. Are we going to send him back and just kind of thinking feel that nobody gets sick that first week and then nobody gets sick and then and then what so we're still learning about the virus schools only shutdown a few months ago how much information we actually have about the consequences of of sending their kids back to school on mass. You know I think that we don't have perfect information about this. I think when we can sort of triangulate in its adjusts that schools are not a major are not a major factor but that comes from Europe and Europe is obviously different from candidate but I think that will push back on you. A little bit is that like I don't think that we have the that neither of. The choice to keep the kids home nor the choice to go to school is one that has no risks and and neither of them is one we really understand the consequences of closing of schools has consequences that can be lifelong for some children. We know that there's been an increase innings -iety there's been an increase in mental health issues with young people is a mental health issue because I. Think the isolation especially when they're younger and they don't have the the rationalization ability but I know it's impacted him to be around his friends. So you don't you don't send hits the school and they lose out on on learning and particularly you know lower income kids are gonNA lose more and kids lose on socialization. You know they're gonNa be hungry because we don't have least in. The US school lunches are major source of food for many kids. So I, think that we are unfortunately situation where there isn't a good solution and I think it's tempting to say, okay we'll everybody just stay home like that's the safest thing but I I'm not sure that putting everything in that. That's really true and so I think it's important to acknowledge that other side is, is there also? So, you talk a little bit about the degree of risk, but in your view, wind should parents choose to keep their kids at home? So I think there's a few situations for that. One is I would draw some line around level of community spread I. People have suggested different things like five percent like if there's a five percent test positivity rate, schools shouldn't be open. I. Think that this is not an unreasonable number for parents to think about as well. I think the other piece of it is. Obviously families are pretty different. You know if you live with an immune compromised grandparent, then the risks associated with a family spread of of covert are very different than if it's just you know to relatively young parents with no health problems two small children. So I think that there is there's a kind of within family said choices which really have to do with WHO. Else is around in the in the household you know, maybe your kids have any health issues against the last piece, I'd put on there is just how much do you think your kids will benefit from being in person? There's clearly a lot of variation across kids in in how easy they find it to learn online and how like emotionally costly it is for them. To not be in school until I think all of those things are kind of something that that parents should have in in their decision model about what's the right choice for their kids? Well, in terms of online learning I, mean clearly it it doesn't work for everyone just how much easier school is when you're actually there with the teacher and not like behind a screen. You know is just a screen mayor and you're just at home. So you at home when you have to get up in the morning to go to school, you have more motivation and drive to actually do the work. Yeah. That's right. It doesn't work for everyone, and in fact, we see in the in the data at least in the US and we moved to remote learning in the spring. There were huge losses in like objective measures of learning like how many math badges or kids learning earning in these various things. We saw massive massive reductions, reductions in that. Now, I think people have pushed back to say. At the at the last minute like if we can design really good online learning platforms, things will be things will be better. There's some truth to that although I haven't seen a lot of efforts to to really do a great job. A great job with this I. Think for many kids. This is simply not gonna be feasible because they don't have Internet at home because they don't have a stable home life either a lot of groups for just. Be Feasible basically at all. WHO He smashed pretty much every billboard and streaming record that matters it has already been streamed more than a billion. Times. People still to this day point to this moment everything changed. But whether you agree with those claims are not this podcast isn't really about him either you're not an astute businessman or you're inherently racist when it comes to black music in this country, this is not a drake podcast available now on CBC listen or wherever you get your podcast. Hi Dr Brian. Goldman. If you haven't heard my new podcast the dose, this is the perfect time to subscribe each week. We answer your most pressing health related questions and right now we know you're grappling with covid nineteen on the does we bring in top experts to answer your questions about the corona virus and post some of our own get the latest evidence in a way that's easy to understand by subscribing to the dose it's. To getting through this difficult time, you can find the dose wherever you get your podcast. It strikes me as as a really challenging for policymakers because you know. It's much easier to to quantify the possible harm in terms of infections in terms of the rate of infection or even death. It seems difficult to try and measure the possible risk of keeping kids away from school and and the kind of harm that that they might face by not having the opportunity to learn in the classroom to socialize with their peers. Yeah I mean I think part of the part of the issue is that is the things like illness and from from Kobe are very salient and as it should be and we can really see things and we don't really see the kid who's Still living in an abusive household and for whom school would have been a place where you recognize that you recognize that abuse and and help them. We don't see that that's that's kind of hidden and so I think that there are there are real immediate consequences, not even the sort of long-term education completion, the kinds of things that economists like to talk about the real immediate. Things, we're not going to see them and so I think it's very hard as you say, for policymakers to kind of draw on those almost drawn those anecdotes like you'd like to sort of fight case with case, but we can't really and I think that that's part of what's made this conversation. So so challenging to have. You have to. How much you know how much reward justifies how much risk? Yeah, and there's no good answer and I think there's no good answer for policymakers in doggone answer for parents I. Think we're not used to that. We're not used to kind of say, we're GONNA, make a decision and we're not going to feel good about it. It doesn't matter which one it is. Is that the decision to send kids to not kids? We're going to feel bad about either of those decisions maybe one of them is the right one but none of them are going to feel good and I think that that's that's very hard and just not used. To we're not used to that. So you know it's interesting what's happening across Canada I know what's happening across the states as well as that that there is this patchwork of policies that different jurisdictions are putting in place to try and address the risks of reopening schools. I don't want to hear your take on some of these you know in in some provinces like Ontario, they aren't reducing class size until high school, Tarot government's plan for schools. This fall is being met by criticism from teachers, unions, and some parents groups they say, it doesn't do enough to keep everyone safe premiere. The Minister of Education have promised people in this province. That would expire no expense to ensure the safety of people including kids in this province today, they broke that and a very good example that is the fact that they have chosen not to decrease class sizes does the number of students in a class you know at the elementary school level does that greatly elevate risk the the reason have smaller classes. Twofold, one is to have sort of more distancing and some sort of interacts with the size of the classroom. I think the other reason is because if you have a smaller group. Then if someone becomes infected in the group, there's a smaller set of people that they are that they are influencing and I think that's the big reason to have. These kind of pods is recalling them. British Columbia has released plans to open schools in September full-time high school students will be limited to cohorts of one hundred and twenty elementary and middle school children to learning groups of sixty principle behind these learning groups is to create groups of students and staff who will remain together throughout the school year term and who primarily interact. Only, with each other, that does kind of make sense in part because it affects disruption. So if you sort of said, our policy is that when somebody is infected there somebody as a positive test, their pod is GonNa Quarantine, for fourteen days will if your pod is fifty people, that's a lot of people out of school if you're pot is ten people, that's a much smaller group of kids who were affected. So I think that there are kind of reasons reasons to do it for just practical value. We're also seeing these really. Creative solutions which look good on paper I imagine they're difficult in practice in Quebec they've created a system of subgroups where six students form a subgroup where they don't have to practice social distancing but every subgroup can only come within a meter of another subgroup and teachers have to stay two meters away from all the students and this this is pre preschool to grade nine in Ontario. They're requiring all students from grade four to grade twelve to wear face masks Halsey is to increase. It's a mandate masking from grade for up the evidence. Presented to cabinet overwhelmingly was it is less effective in the earliest years kindergarten to grade three constituency in May have counterintuitive elements if they don't know how to wear if they touch their mask more but the evidence that the coming to Sakaba was clear masking in schools in combination with other actions will help reduce the risk in schools. I mean, how difficult is it going to be for teachers to enforce these kinds of guidelines? So I think I would say sort of two things I. Even, if people do not do ever all these things perfectly if they do some of them that will lower the spread. So I think there's a reason to sort of articulate these things even while we recognize that, yes, it will not be perfect I think on the particular issue of masks see a lot of people say well, it's impossible to require these small children because they can't do it I just don't think that's that is consistent with reality I, think for you know very little kids. To in three, it's a little bit harder but you might my viral wears a mask to camp all the time and it's been fine I. Think the kids are probably way more adopted one this than we than we expect them probably to be frank more adaptable than than adult. So I think part of it is just modeling and being like, yeah, this is what we're doing and you know it'll be a little bit annoying but but they'll make it work because they actually are pretty adaptable people. It's obviously not just parents who are concerned about their kids. teachers are really worried too and I know in in. Ontario. The Teacher's Union says that teachers are anxious about being back in the classroom when the class sizes are not being reduced the BBC Teachers Federation is asking the province to delay the start of the school year. What kind of risks do teachers face who go back into the classroom now? Yeah. So I, think this is to me this is the most significant concerns you. There isn't that much data on this. I will say that some of the data we have is again somewhat reassuring. So Sweden kept their schools opened the whole time and actually had a pretty significant outbreak. But when they look at hospitalizations, they actually are able to look by occupation and they don't find that teachers are are high risk occupation. So they actually the the hospitalization rate look similar to to basically any other job that's kind of reassuring. But I think we really need to be recognizing this fear investing in things that are that are protective and I think if we're GONNA ask teachers to go back to costume, we need to classify the essential workers I'm we need to give them the protections of mine and if that means surgical masks, extra cleaning supplies and all those things you know I think that that's direction that we really have to go. Ooh I. IT seems like. following these guidelines, it is likely, but there's going to be cases of Covid in schools. What in your view needs to happen when Kobe case does pop up? So at least I would say not likely but certain. There will be killed cases in schools foreshore. and. As you say, I think that there needs to be there needs to be a plan to to address that and I think that there are two pieces of at one is kind of in terms of preventing spread there needs to be a very clear plan of exactly what happens with this with a sick kid. Or sick teacher you know that teachers don't have to come in when they're sick. The kids are kept out of school when they're sick that if they become sick at school, will they're sort of immediately like isolated and then and then tested out we need good testing infrastructure. I. Also think schools will need to articulate some plan for what will happen with other people at the school and so to what extent. If. There's a there's a positive case is the classroom quarantined is the whole school quarantine is the school shot you know there's different ways exactly articulate that but I think in some ways, the most important thing is to is to actually articulate a plan to teachers to parents both to make them feel better on also. So they can they plan for what will inevitably be some cases and possibly some school shutdowns. Right, I mean, this is one of the really tough things is apparent is that you know might be sending we thinking we're sending kids to full-time care in September. But then two weeks in the whole school needs to shut down or quarantine because of covid. No my husband let the other night was like let's sit down for an hour and talk about our new version of our pandemic resilience plan because the school says they're going to open but you know how do we know how long they're going to stay open and we need to figure out you know like, what are we gonNa do if they if they close and I think that that is. Something many households are probably talking about right now. Right. Especially, if we were to see a cycle of that where it doesn't happen once, but you know several times many times over the course of school year you know the way that I would put it is if if if my kid's school articulated that every time, there is a case in the school the whole school shots for two weeks. I'm not sure there would be any point in sending them back. So we've talked about the risks, kids and the risk to teachers. But we know about the public health risks of keeping schools open especially if the number of cases in the community starts to go up. So, this is the place where we probably have the least good data. So we have a bunch of places in Europe opened their schools for the most part and does not seem that the opening of. You kind of started the epidemic up again. Someplace. It's a little bit of an uptake someplace. It's all kind of not much not much of an update, but these are places where. The virus was on its way down. It was already at a pretty low level. That is a very different question than what happens when you open. Schools in a place with fifteen percent, you know positive testing rate, which is we have in some places in the US right now, I? Think we unfortunately do not have any information that will tell US although I think it's pretty clear. It's not a good idea. So you know, it's one ask before I. Let you go I. Mean you've talked about all these guidelines you talked about the limited risk that the younger kids face I think you know even despite that information being out there. Obviously, a lot of parents are very nervous about sending their kids to school in September and it's so emotional. I mean, the stakes are so high some classrooms with thirty students and to say one meter apart that doesn't work I'm trying to measure my anxiety and fear with. The world has to go on and we and it's not feasible for all of us to stay on forever and it's not. But I don't necessarily think sending my kid back should be contingent to an economic decision eat. And not just in terms of the risk would have to say as a parent like the thought of having fulltime childcare is incredibly enticing and he's certainly an attractive offer. So you'll what. Advice do you have for parents who are still struggling with whether or not to send their kids to school in September? Really I would tell parents you know you really need to sit down and think about what is the right choice and think about it rationally and try to you know it's not that I would say put aside the fear but tried to think holistically about what we know in in the evidence in how likely is it really that your that your kid will get sick and and can really work through and think about the and thinking about the benefits don't sort of ignore the ignore the benefits And then try to make a decision and try to stay with it and try to sort of follow through and recognize that you're not gonNA probably feel great about whatever decision is but I think the other thing to recognize is there is this sort of there is really this hurdle that we're all GonNa face on day one, which is like, oh my gosh, what was doing but I think that. Probably particularly, in low prevalence areas, what is GonNa Happen School's GonNa Open It. It's going to be okay and you know sort of that and then you're gonNA realize how good it is for your kid. So I just trying to make the decision in thought away and then try to try to stick with the decision you made I. Think is probably the best advice I can give, and we thank you so much for this does put my mind at ease somewhat somewhat that's what I'm here for putting your mind at ease. Thank you for having me. Before we go I wanNA give you an update on a story that we've been covering according to Chinese state media Hong. Kong. Police have ordered the arrest of six pro democracy activists living abroad. All are wanted on suspicion of violating the National Security Law which was imposed on Hong Kong by the Beijing government. At the end of Ju- state media has said it would criminalize acts of succession subversion and terrorism critics argue it could undermine the city's civil and political freedoms. One of these activists is Nathan Law who was on our show just a few weeks ago he's in the United Kingdom. Right now, and upon finding out this news, he posted on twitter that it affirms his decision to continue his activism on a global stage. Nathan wrote quote what I now face is far greater than my own gains and losses. The price of displacement is what I'm willing to pay. You can find my full conversation with Nathan Law on our feet. That's it for today. Thanks for listening to from Burger. For more CBC podcasts. GOTO CBC DOT CA. Slash podcasts.

US Europe Ontario CBC Canada Emily Oster Nathan Law Kobe Brown University professor Your House Josh Block Covid twitter Minister of Education Hong Kong Sakaba United Kingdom Goldman
Democracy Now! 2019-06-17 Monday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:02 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Now! 2019-06-17 Monday

"From New York. This is democracy now. People do on this that we have to take to the streets. We have to continue protests in order to get our coast obvious out to by the governments in all the, to get the expert expedition Bill. Be withdrawn and also carry to step down up to two million people filled the streets of Hong Kong and the territory's largest protest in decades, the protests for suspension of the extradition Bill, but activists are now demanding Hong Kong's top official resign as well. We'll go to Hong Kong for the latest then sixteen shots documentary looks at the two thousand fourteen Chicago police killing of seventeen year old Macron, McDonald's and Chicago's cover. There is stashed Cam video that hundreds, the official story what we saw was in our opinion, three Merck. There's an escalation of involvement from people across the city. Just as us is Jason Van Dyke being convicted of the murder of the corn McDonnell, we'll speak to wreck Rowley the director of sixteen shots all that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org. The warrant piece report, I mean me Goodman in Hong Kong, as many as two million people took to the streets Sunday for another mass demonstration against a proposed Bill, that would allow the extradition of Hong Kong residents to mainland China, which critics say would infringe on Hong Kong's independence in the legal and human rights of Hong Kong, residents and visitors Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam, suspended the Bill and apologize for her handling of the situation but protesters are calling for its full withdrawal protesters also called for the resignation of carry lamb. Meanwhile, prominent pro-democracy activists twenty two year old Joshua Wong was released Monday after a month behind bars and has vowed to join the protest movement. People we will not silence under the suppression of precedent. She and the ship excecutive Carolina, Carrie Lam must step on otherwise I live in the next few weeks before the trendy two and I read all home trust. Sobering T mall. Emo home, people not only one million to me, and people will come and join. Until we get back basic human rights and freedom. We'll have more on Hong Kong after headlines, Iran's Atomic Energy Agency is announced just ten days away from exceeding the limit of enriched, uranium stockpile permitted under the two thousand fifteen on nuclear deal. Iran started rolling back its compliance with the landmark agreement last month following the US withdrawal. And the embryo position of sanctions last year. Unsighted Iranian president has Sandra Honey reiterated his tomato to European nations and other signatories that they must show positive signals in polling, the pact for Ron to maintain its commitment as well. This comes as the United States continues to blame Iran for attacking two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman, Thursday without offering any new evidence that they did secretary state. Mike Pompeo said the US is considering a full range of options. Some of the US claims have been directly contradicted by the Japanese owner of one of the tankers Iran has denied any. Volved meant and accused the Trump administration of trying to sabotage diplomacy for fueling the threat of war reports. Emerged Friday of a six year old, migrant girl from India, who died of he's stroke in the hours, ONA desert last week after being smuggled into the US with her mother and three other Indian nationals were to patrol found the body of garage, car on Wednesday near Luke Ville, Arizona. The temperature hovered around one hundred degrees Fahrenheit day, the girl's mother had gone to search for water while she stayed with two of other migrants and her group. Volunteer humanitarian group, no, more deaths which provides water and other assistance to migrants crossing the harsh Sonoran desert tweeted, quote asylum, seekers have been forcibly turned away from the nearby Luke Ville port of entry we need water, not walls. A new report by the New York Times has revealed the youngest child to be from their family after migrating to the US via the southern border was a form month old baby. The child Constantine Mutu was taken. A US officials enter Trump zero-tolerance family separation policy and put in a foster home. His father was putting immigrant prison before being deported to his native Romania constant tennis since been reunited with his parents and his displayed signs of emotional, and developmental issues. His parents say he's not walking or talking in more Gration news, immigration and customs enforcement is put fifty two hundred immigrants quarantaine, after they were exposed to mumps chicken, pox, thirty nine immigrant prisons around the US are affected by the outbreak. In South America powers been partially restored after a massive blackout hit Argentina erg way. In parts of power Sunday officials say the unprecedented blackout occurred after a failure in the transmission of electronically from a hydroelectric dam that feeds regional electrical grit Argentina's vowed to fully investigate the reasons for the systems failure. President Trump lashed out at the New York Times after published a piece on Saturday saying the US. Is ramping up cyber intrusions into Russia's electric power grid. Trump tweeted, the New York Times report as a quote, virtual act of treason. The report asserts, the US is, deploying, new cyber tools and a warning to Russian President Vladimir Putin, over interference in US elections. The report also said military and intelligence officials have avoided sharing the full details of such operations with Trump in Casey, countermands them or disclose the information with foreign officials India's imposed new tariffs on twenty eight US products in response to the Trump administration's hike on steel and aluminum taxes, as well as the decision to withdraw India's preferential trade status earlier this month. The new tariffs will affect goods, including apples, almonds lentils and chemical products. And in some cases will be as high as seventy percent in Guatemala voters headed to the poll Sunday, and highly contested presidential and congressional elections as votes continue to be tallied. Former first lady center Torahs. Leading in the presidential race with around a quarter of the votes, but a runoff is expected in August between the two leading candidates Torres has been plagued by accusations of money, laundering, and ties to drug traffickers. Critics have warned of widespread corruption leading up to the elections. Toma Adana a former attorney general who helped prosecute hundreds of cases against mollis political and business. Elite was believed to be a favourite to win before being banned from the election's over what many believe are trumped up allegations of embezzlement and tax fraud, which she denies Aldana has left the country after facing death threats and a warrant for her arrest in Sudan, ousted, former President, Omar al-bashir made his first public appearance Sunday since his overthrow in April. He was taken to the prosecutor's office where he was charged on several counts of corruption, including accepting illegal gifts and hoarding. Foreign money of assure was charged in may for his involvement in the killing of anti-government demonstrators during the months-long popular uprising that led to his ouster protesters. Continuing to demand the country's ruling military handover power to a civilian forty in Somalia, a car bombing Saturday near a checkpoint at the presidential palace in Mogadishu killed at least eight people wounded another twenty five the militant group claimed responsibility, shebab also claim responsibility for the death of ten Kenyan police officers who were killed Saturday after their vehicle struck. An improvised, explosive device near the border with Somalia in Spain Barcelona's leftist mayor out of colo- with sworn in Saturday for another term after she managed to keep her post, despite losing less than five thousand votes to account on separatist during last month's European parliamentary elections, mayor Clough was reelected by city, ho representatives after members of the socialist party, and representatives backed by former French prime minister and Barcelona mayoral candidate Manuel Valls voted for her in an effort to prevent the Catalan. Separatists from becoming mayor President Trump will officially kick off his twenty twenty presidential bid Tuesday. With a massive rally in Orlando. Florida, the rally comes just over four years after Trump's now infamous, descent down a golden escalator at the Trump Tower to announce his two thousand sixteen candidacy. Meanwhile, media outlets are reporting the Trump campaign, his fired several pollsters after leak numbers showed him trailing. Former vice president, Joe Biden, and Bernie Sanders and several battleground states in Maryland. Police are investigating the death of Zoe spears twenty three year old black transgender woman, who's at least the tenth known case of deadly violence against trans women this year, all of them African American spears body was found on the street with several gunshot wounds last Thursday in Fairmount heights, just outside Washington DC, only a few blocks away from the site of another fatal shooting in March of a black trans woman named Ashanti Carmen. The two women were friends in the police are trying to determine if they're murders connected. We'll be Caratto executive director of the LGBTQ community center be and a close friend of Zoe SP. Sears said, spears moved out of her apartment fearing for her safety following Ashanti, Carmen's murder, the fallout for prosecutors in the central park five case continues lead prosecutor Elizabeth lettera resigned from her lecturing position at Columbia law school, after a petition started by the black law students association calling for her firing gathered over ten thousand signatures. This comes after former prosecutor Linda fairstein was dropped by her publisher and forced to step down from several nonprofit boards as well as Vassar colleges board of trustees due to renewed public scrutiny following the release of a Netflix series about the case, which saw five Harlem teenagers of color, wrongfully accused and convicted for rape in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine to see our, our interview with voodoo Varna director of when they see us go to our website, Tamara now dot org. And in Arizona Phoenix, as mayor and police chief have both apologized after a video showing office. Shire's pointing guns and yelling at a black family outside of Family Dollar store caused widespread outrage over the weekend. The officer say they were responding to report of shoplifting when they drew their firearms and started screaming orders using profane language out of father, a pregnant woman carrying a baby in a four year old girl. The girl had left the store with a dull which was not paid for. According to down. Would you. The woman can be heard saying, she's unable to hold her hands up because she's holding her baby and that she's pregnant the parents say the police officers violated their civil rights, and our filing ten million dollar lawsuit. And those are some of the headlines this is democracy now democracy now dot or the Warren peace report. I'm Amy Goodman. We begin today show in Hong Kong, whereas, many as two million people took to the streets Sunday, calling for the withdrawal of a Bill to allow the extradition of Hong Kong residents to mainland China protesters, also called for the resignation of Hong Kong's chief executive carry lab and other top officials who push for the extradition, Bill, they sing mounting protests lamb has apologized for her handling of legislation as an indefinitely. Delayed vote on the Bill, but the Bill has not been fully withdrawn Sunday's protests came days after riot, police fired tear gas rubber bullets and pepper spray at tens of thousands of demonstrators. The recent protests of the largest Hong Kong. Has seen since before Britain's handover Puncog and China in nineteen ninety seven since then Hong Kong is operated under a different legal and political system as mainland China, a setup known as one country two systems critics of the extradition. Bill say it would infringe on Hong Kong's independence and the legal and human rights of Hong Kong residents, as well as the people visiting com. Meanwhile, one of the most prominent pro-democracy activists. In Hong Kong, twenty two year old Joshua Wong was released after a month behind bars in two thousand fourteen helped lead the umbrella movement, which organized protests in Hong Kong Wong vowed today to join the protest movement. People we will not silence under the suppression of precedent, she and the Schick, second Carolina carry lamb must step phone, otherwise, I live in the next few weeks before the trendy two and versity all trust of sovereignty mall. Emo home, people, not only one median to then, people will come and join our fight until we get back our basic human rights and freedom. We're joined now by two guests and Hong Kong. Nathan laws with us pro democracy. Activists will also hope lead the umbrella movement. He and Joshua Wong have been nominated for the Nobel peace prize for their activism, he was withdraw shoe it just after his release today and here in New York. Minky Worden director of global initiatives, that Human Rights Watch word lived and worked in Hong Kong in the nineteen nineties woke me both to democracy now. Nathan, let's begin with you, can you just describe what took place this weekend? What your demands are and whether? You feel. They have been met. Well, I think after the Tumim people watching down last Sunday, Carolina did issue an apology, but it is definitely not enough. Demand is very clear and sounds she has to retreat, the proposal, she has to investigate the police brutality, and she has to step down. So I think the these, these demands on met in the future, then will be more and more protests and rallies. Nathan, can you explain what the law is? And why protesters will not accept it. Well, a home cones one country, two system with China, one of the most important feature is that we have separated legal system in home cone, with independent, just fish trial, and also rule flow, these found in China, and if this is passed than it allows China to extra people in home calm with epoch aces, and they have to be extradited back to China to face unfair trial. So impose thing just too old office. And can you talk about the police response to these massive protests protesters, putting the numbers at somewhere this weekend around two million people in the streets of Hong Kong. Well, the most brutal repression to protests, happens all last Wednesday when we have gathering outside legislative complex where the general Tang our nor McCain, but the take place and the police tried to disperse people with teargas and rubber bullets and these unprecedented forces and definitely proportional. We could see that police were out of control. They were beating people who were lying down on the ground without any resistance. They were vying. Gunfire, two of the protesters these off elating every ordinance every, every ru that they have to obey in order to protect the safety of citizens. On saturday. Hong Kong's chief executive carry LAN address the people of Hong Kong, this is what she said, on deep sorrel and regret that the deficiencies in our work, and various factors have stirred up substantial controversies and dispute in society following the relatively compus of the past two years. This appointing many people, we will adopt the most sincere and humble attitude to acept criticisms, and make improvements so that we can continue to connect with the people of Hong Kong. Nathan law your response to the chief executive of Hong Kong. Well, I do believe this press conference, the performance of Caroline mate more people coming down to the street, even though she she will pose the Bill. She also said that the Bill was with good at Hanshin with peppers. It's just people don't listen to don't understand Bill. So these kind of reframing Restorick rhetoric lies that Hera lamb set during the press conference in the people more angry. And she also defended the police brutality, saying that the protests on Wednesday was also a riot, so that it could legitimize suppression or the police brutality. They have been taking and these things also really upset all the citizens so that our number of people much ING onto streets increased from a median to two million within the week. So Carrey must be the one who made all these. Happened. Can you talk about China's overall Roland nece Xi Jinping was into gca STAN on Saturday? Celebrating sixty six birthday with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Beijing won't let Hong Kong's later carry carry lamb step down. Even if she wants to some say, your thoughts on this Nathan law, what this means for the mainland as well. Well, full credit lamb and for the Beijing government, they always said that is not the initiative from Beijing the initiative from Kerry, and we can as information from different sources. We also know that it was initiated initiative from Kerry, and she tried to push show, what the proposal so that the Beijing power in Hong Kong or central mall, centralized and strengthen script to Hong Kong about money and also route resting politic this and so on. But she misjudged how rats and the public angle is way more larger way much larger than expected. So, I think even though the Beijing government is backing, but that's possibility that the Beijing government, if they want to preserve their reputation show that they are lenient and their rationale. They may sacrifice Caroline if needed. I wanna go back to Hong Kong pro-democracy activists Joshua Wong, who is just released from jail today as he spoke. Nathan you were standing right there next to him. Urge to withdraw issue, low Puzo and is for the TC to step down and to face how two million people already join the fights and urge her to ban the political responsibility in future. I will join the fight, and I hope you will join protests. Can you comment on what Joshua Wong's his release just released earlier today and the significance of this, why he was imprisoned and what it means for the whole movement? Well, Joshua was in Joe because of his participation in the brenham of men so off almost amongst Joe cintas. She he came out, and he immediately when to not, and also the protests ties you see what's going on, because the person you've got a very limited resources of inflammation. So he has to keep up the pace and know about things in order to make a good gesture on the strategy of the movement. But and yet today he's very concerned it and. Like we still continue to fight and with his participation fights would be most wrong, and Morphou, and why is it called the umbrella movement. And you can you describe your intentions and founding. It. Yeah. The umbrella movement happened five years ago, and it is named because people were very peaceful. And when they faced a police using the pepper spray, they only block it with umbrella. So you could see a scene of. A leased line of umbrellas facing the police in police was spraying pepper spray. So the name of umbrella movement started from this sin, very Connick one. And overall where you think. The twentieth happening later this month. President Trump will be meeting with Xi Jinping. What do you wanna see come out of that? And can you comment on the US China relationship and how it affects what's happening in Hong Kong. Well secretary Pompeo just said that President Trump would discuss Hong Kong issue with pain Monday meets at g ten t so I think it is a. Paternity full the US to stay that they have massive interest in Hong Kong, and they share the same they grow, and you live as values with Hong Kong people, so that we will into China to really treasure the demand of people and stop suppressing them. I think a very important message because it is only about home cones interest, but the interest of the whole free world and the interests of America. So I think if President Trump indeed meet. Presidency in Djibouti is not only about calling them, ease knowing about trae, but is about something that way much more important. Nathan law is a pro democracy. Activists who has also hoped lead the Brel movement, both he and Joshua long been nominated for the Nobel peace prize for their activism. Nathan, I want you to stay with us. But I also wanna bring in Minka warden of Human Rights Watch. You've been following this movement and detail you lived in Hong Kong, if you two can talk about the significance of movement that was some described it as a failed movement until now. Well, first of all, like to say that Joshua Wong getting out of prison today as a very significant moment. He published an article that had echos of the letter from the Birmingham jail. And I think that helps put this movement in the context of protest movements worldwide but also through history and the. Umbrella movement when it happened in two thousand fourteen was a landmark movement of especially young people who weren't even born at the time of the Hong Kong, handover standing up and saying, we understand what makes Hong Kong Special. We understand that only in Hong Kong with our rule of law press. Freedom, religious freedom. Our ability to protests freely that we understand these rights and freedoms are very precious, and we're prepared to stand up and defend them the umbrella movement itself. Nathan law was actually elected to the legislature. In a landslide. He was the youngest legislator when elected. And yet, within a year, he was thrown out of the legislature. And that was a series of moves that have been made by the Hong Kong government to assert control of the legislator legislature. Right, throwing out elected leaders, and I think the there's been a question of whether there was a legacy from the umbrella movement. And last Sunday with a million people turning out into the streets peacefully and yesterday with as many as two million people turning out. I think you can see that the umbrella movement has had an enduring legacy that continues to stay can you talk about the extradition law more about it? What seems to be the latest in a blurring of lines between the mainland China and Hong Kong, and how much control for people to understand, does China exert over Hong Kong and where you see this all headed. So the extradition law is the latest in a series of moves from China to undermine Hong Kong's autonomy, and human rights. And I think if you were to look at all of the things that distinguish Hong Kong from China religious freedom of functioning rule of law judicial system that is largely independent free press is absolutely essential and the abyss. To protests, all of these rights and freedoms have been under steady assault from China. But in a way that the international community really wasn't paying a lot of attention, certainly it caused enormous fear and concern in Hong Kong. But in the twenty two years since the handover from Britain to China, the defense of human rights and the rule of law and Hong Kong has largely been left to Hong Kong people and every time there has been a crisis like this. They have stood up, what the extradition law does that is so pernicious is that it would actually legalize kidnapping it. Would I think in recent years, we've seen the duck tion of publishers and businessmen? There is a businessman who was obstructed from the four seasons. So the four seasons hotel, Hong Kong. Yes, a businessman was abducted and five publishers, and then several of them made force confessions. So I think for Hong Kong people. They see this. This as a fundamental assault to the values. Their core values where you have the right of due process, for example in the courts. So the extradition law itself could legalize kidnapping. Why does China why is trying to pushing us at this time? And what does this mean for Xi Jinping? Well, I don't know that there's evidence that this is coming from China. Hong Kong is a is a supposed to be an autonomous system. It has an enormous bureaucracy. There's a big question of whether this was the Hong Kong leader, Carrie Lam, who is not elected by Hong Kong, people moving a piece of legislation where, where she could show Beijing, how much she was in control. As Nathan law said, it's, it's backfired spectacularly and I think the important question is what's going to happen next? Carrie Lam has said that they will suspend the law, but not withdraw it. There are parallels in recent Hong Kong history where the previous chief executive moved a piece of legislation on Saverne. Version that would have undermined human rights in Hong Kong in that situation, half a million people took to the street. The law was withdrawn, and ultimately, the chief executive was tossed out of office. So I think there's a parallel in recent Hong Kong history, but the concern is now Xi Jinping, China, your final thoughts. Nathan law. Well, definitely this kind of legalizing leading indeed impose a little threat to the Hong Kong people. And that's why we have too many people watching down to street on Sunday. And we hope that by continuing Ella pressure to government. They release into even though they are not mechanically elected. But the Powell of people must be shown. And the power of people must be respected Nathan law. We want to thank you for being with us, pro democracy activists in Hong Kong, who's been nominated for Nobel peace prize, and Minky Worden director of global initiatives at Human Rights Watch this is democracy. Now, when we come back, the story of Liqun McDonald, and the Chicago cover up. Stay with us here. Training under the way the labs. As take the change people. Got it all arranged live in my dream. Some nights house cream below in Milot eleven cozy private zone. Now here I am standing here this month, two years, waiting for the shadow. But sometimes wonder. Did we st-? All fair by Denise. This is democracy now. I mean Goodman's we turn to a remarkable new documentary that just premiered on Showtime. The film is called sixteen shots, it examines the two thousand fourteen murder of African American teenager. Liquan McDonald in Chicago. This is the trailer. Chicago. Police department averages maybe thirty police shootings year. I think it's a level of people being desensitized from new violence. When you look at the police reports that were signed off, it's justified shooting. Somebody gets new. Threat. What the local news put out an individual with a knife coming at the officer that is not story. This is shot, and it's a lot of bullet holes in them just. Oh. There is stashed Cam video that hundred sixty official story. What we saw was in our opinion. I remember there's an escalation of involvement from people across the city. Just as us his Van Dyke being convicted of the murder of the corn McDonnell. This on the brother. He was down. Tonight has not had to reckon with what happens when you don't hold folks accountable almost overnight, the power jalousie of cities to Sion's crater. There's eighty six minutes that are missing. Qualm case was not a cover. The story of our racial nightmare in this country. The trailer to sixteen shots new documentary on Showtime. Former Chicago police officer Jason vent Ike was found guilty in two thousand eighteen of second degree murder sentenced to six years and nine months in prison for McDonald's murder than dyke was also found guilty on sixteen counts of aggravated battery one count for each of the sixteen bullets fired at McDonald. We'll democracy now recently spoke with Rick Rowley director of sixteen shots. I began by asking him to lay out how this film chronicles this case, beginning with the day Kwan McDonald was murdered. We show the moment that every single actor along this, this, this, this process kind of steps in for the beat cops who initially respond. The first thing they do is a race. It seems very clear they destroy evidence erase this surveillance video that's from a Burger King. That's across the street eighty minutes. Just raced off the of the machine, they shoo away, witnesses the take some civilian witnesses back to city. This is described to us for the first time on Cameron this film. They describing threatened. By officers in being coerced into trying to say that they didn't see what they saw then this. The immediately. What happens is the spokesman for the fraternal or police. The police union. Chicago comes out, and he creates the first version of this story. And that's a story that goes out to the press everywhere. And that is almost always the first and last story. I mean, there are thirty to sixty police shootings a year in Chicago every week or every other week in the course of my lifetime. That's that's thousands of people who've been shot and, and the cases, all end in the same way small note in the end of the press. And, and then we turn the page I want to go back to Burger King where the police come into the Burger King has closed circuit TV. They don't have a warrant. What do they do? They demand access to the surveillance system. They don't have they don't have any legal rights to go in and seize the equipment, but they do. Anyway, they get the night manager to give him the password in there. We can see them on the surveillance footage messing around the computer system and the next day, eighty seven minutes from all of the cameras is just missing. And, and we know we, we actually did a bunch of reasons. We contacted the engineers who install these systems in this just. Doesn't ever happen. Not only is it missing. But there's multiple redundant backups on that machine that are all also missing. So it seems evident that the officers on the scene there a race that footage and just made it disappear. We're there were witnesses non police witnesses the late night, killing these are the witnesses and your film to the shooting alma Benitez, but I fear and Jose Torres wanna talk bad about all police officers all that. I have a lot of friends police officers, but seen this and loss pretty much the trust in, in the police. We're traveling northbound on Polaski. I was actually the first part up at the scene. Come off from work. I was headed to Burger King. I see a guy running next on my window. He was getting chased by the cops were chasing him shoot. Through. Good view. The were a lot of police officers and just in what he was trying to get away from. The first came in and he dropped shots in. He literally truck. And small bowls. Sikwan McDonnell move. Been seemed like getting up just seemed like he was paying. But that's other shots coming in. Under guys more shots, the conscience. We're going name. His just jumping you could tell it was. Katie and next thing I remember is yelling stop shooting. He's dead already. I said, why they should mommy's on the ground from was posing threat. The Texas Komi over and they took us to a precinct. The separatists in three different rooms. It into a small office, and they started questioning and asking me what happened. I talked to several detectives now one and they keep asking the same questions over and over again. What did you see? How many conscience did you hear? The war kep telling them what I saw they were trying to make. They will tell me stuff like where we're watching the video, and your story does not met and. And if it doesn't match and you have video, what am I doing here? And these. Whoa. You know it's not good to lie. They really wanna meet a change the story of how many shots I had heard. If I didn't tell them what they wanted to hear it definitely thought I was going to that's almost Benitez, talking about what she saw an Jose and savior, Torres before her now compare these I witness reports to the spokesperson, and the head of the fraternal order of police. Clearly I mean backhanded arrives on the scene, and he he immediately packages for the press. The official police response, which is that this was a violent offender who is waving a knife and a menacing way. And and had to be shut it. You know, the, the stunning thing is that even after the video is released even after peck him than DeAngelis, whose spokesman for the DeAngelis, the former head of the at the time and Gary McCarthy, the police chief even after they saw the video, they were able to look that and said that this looks like a justified shooting then dank was not the first officer on the scene. Yeah, one of the one of the interesting poignant parts of the stories. The first responding officers responsible at nine one one call saying that there's a kid who might be breaking into trucks, and truck yard they show up. It's officer Gaffey officer make Elliott and they do everything by the book, as you would expect law enforcement. Officers to deal with it. They don't provoke McDonald's. She has a knife. They've follow behind him. Ten paces back with their lights on, and they call in and ask for a tasers for the only kind of nonlethal enforcement. They have they follow him for a significant amount of time, more and more officers at arriving the tasers on its way and then suddenly then dykes car, pulls up. He jumps out of his car and under threes under six seconds. He's unloading his clip until quote, McDonald, and so these officers have now just witnessed an atrocity, and they go, and they all have to make their statements. So the statements from their nine other officers on the scene. Most of the statements say that, you know, tell a completely unfactual account of what happened on was waving the knife advancing on, on officer Van Dyke, which is just a lie. Several of the officers say. I didn't see anything the officer who's driving the car that has the dash Cam in it claims that they didn't see anything happen. So that was the greatest active resistance, probably that was was imaginable for, for, for an officer at that time knowing that, even if you tell the truth, nothing's going to happen officer because nothing ever has one hundred and eighty your history, the Chicago police department, and that the only the only outcome is going to be that you're going to end your career potentially and put yourself in danger. So, you know, so anyway, all officers statements kind of corroborate this, this completely untrue story that look was the aggressor. Let's go to the clock. And it begins with the F O P spokesperson June. None of these guys are in power and office right now, Pat Camden, and then to the head of the fraternal order of police also not there. And ultimately the police chief, Gary McCarthy was fired as well as you look at something frame by. Frame again with the emotions that are involved. You can draw conclusion, Mike conclusion was, you know, the officer did what he had to do to protect him. So. I see a situation that is. Gotten away. I don't know. Where everybody's head is at in that situation this knife. I'm so that's right. Somebody gets new you within twenty one feet of you with an open knife. You could die as you saw. And I've seen the Quan mcdonagh was murdered. This family wants Justice to be so injustice for us is Jason vandyke being convicted of the murder of the coin McDonnell, which of these people is not like the other, which of this people just doesn't belong in. That's pastor Marvin hunter at the end, the grand uncle of Kwan McDonald. Yeah. The it is, it is one of the one of the remarkable things is that in spite of all the facts that we have about this case in spite of the video of all of the evidence has come forward. Those facts are not enough to secure the narrative even in the face of those facts. There is another story competing story that is very powerful country, and that's built on, on racial fear, and that is what was being mobilized on the other side of this sort of discourse. So you see you see that on. Full of the trial. The defense invokes constantly. There are these amazing moments where Dan Herbert, the defense attorney for officer Van Dyke talks about this as a horror film, says imagine watching a horror film, and the monster suddenly turns and looks at you and then the music starts to play that's what happened here. So he's casting local McDonalds. A monster dean Angelo says the former head of the says to Jackie soon, the producer interviewer. You know, people need to people to recognize no one's accepting the fact that what we need to do is go after that monster who doesn't belong in the street with you or my wife or, my daughter, basically, with white women invoking, the oldest. The oldest nightmare American racial nightmare. There is so Tober twentieth. Two thousand fourteen is the day Liquan McDonald is gunned down by Jason Van Dyke. Again, Van Dyke, then controls the narrative, or the F O P does by saying that he felt his life which threaten no one saw. Otherwise. So this was just par. For the course talk about then how this case developed how it changed from that night. So that would have been the end of it, ordinarily in anyone of thousands of other cases where this has happened. But two things happened that weren't expected. I was ab- lower law enforcement touch with investigative journalist Jimmy Calvin and told them there's a video out there. There's a video in his horrific and he was worried that it might be destroyed. If no one started asking for it the other parallel thing that happened was the family began to ask questions so passer, marmot hunter, the great uncle of. Cuomo. Donald he when la- Kwan's body was delivered to the funeral home. The funeral home called them up and told them in the news, they're saying he was shot once in the chest, but he's full of bullet holes. So they took pictures and they took those to an attorney, and they began the process of exploring civil litigation around the case, which ended up opening a separate line of inquiry that, that helped rip the case, open, we're at Crowley, director of the new documentary, sixty sixteen shots will be back with him in thirty seconds. Gotta chain around. Got a chain. Got a shame. Things go to. Trigger. Change by Mavis Staples. This is democracy. Now, I made me Goodman, as we continue our discussion with Rick rally director of sixteen shots just premiered on Showtime. This isn't about just public officials changing their minds or video coming out from an insider in the police department. This is about people on the ground who couldn't take it anymore. Explain how that movement built, who is will Calloway. Absolutely. No. That that's that's definitely true that one of the one of the essential processes through this is that everyone is the system is playing by the rules of a game that's existed for over one hundred years, and they and they know that they're going to win because they've always done, but what they don't realize that outside in the street and in culture, the rules of that whole game are changing. They live in a different world by the end of this case than they did at the beginning, and they live in a different world, because there's a social movement other that changed that world. And chilling Carruthers the, you know. Former head of B, Y P one hundred. And we'll Calloway in activists who became involved with this case from the very beginning are responsible in, in a large way for the those changes that happen. So will was an activist working police issues on the Ricky avoid shooting, which happened in Chicago ear- earlier, when, when he read Jamie Calvin piece that revealed that there was a video out there. He formed for the video, along with a bunch of other media outlets like a couple dozen media outlets for it for the video all the foyers were denied ongoing investigation. It's, it's typical logic that is that is deployed whenever people wanna keep things hidden. No one everyone else dropped it will drop it. He sued the city everyone, he sued the city and he won. It was it was another on precedent moment for, for transparency in the city and so talk about what happened next. The judge ruled in would have to be released within. A few days. Yeah. So suddenly suddenly, the city realizes that this entire machine that they had had faith would continue to function had fallen apart. It had just exploded. And so, so the state's Turney need Alvarez immediately brings murder charges against officer dyke. This is the first time in officers ever been charged for murdering a black citizen day, day before the videos released then the videos released and it sends shockwaves through the city because there's video is there. There are a lot of videos of the shootings that are circulating. Now, most of them are shaky cell phone videos, partial recordings recording begins partway through the encounter. This video is unparalleled in its clarity. It's locked off shot from the dash Cam of police car. And you see every second of their of officer van dykes interactions. With McDonald, you see his car pool up can jump out of it and big into fire. There's isn't a second before the video starts, you see everything. And because it's happening on, on a street with the lane, the lane lines painted it might as well have been taking place. I'm graph paper. You can see that look wanted moving away. You can see that he's no threat. It has. And you can see his body lying on the ground while then that continues to shoot into its unprecedent as clarity and end in it's an in into horror. All of this is playing out before the video is released in the mayor role reelection of Rahm Emanuel and explain what happened. Exactly. When the video dropped in the process of his campaign, and also a settlement, the family made that people did not know about for quite some time. Yes. So, so the city we know from internal Email and communication, that have been the journalists sued for have been released that the city was obsessed with this case. All of mayor Rahm Emanuel senior staff were discussing it. They were circulating stories about it. They were talking about the video, but there was no lawsuit filed about it yet. So the raw manuals is in a very tight runoff with. And he didn't win a majority majority the first election in a runoff. It's very close. It looks like he might lose. And this video could be released at any moment by the family when they if they. Decide to bring charges. So the. The lawyer for the city, the mayor's office sends their lawyer to make five million dollars settlement with, with Kwame. Mcdonald's family before any charges have been filed, there's no lawsuit. It's a preemptive settlement five million dollars to delay the release of the video till after the election's over. So Anita Alvarez you and Jackie SuAn interview several times, the state's attorney who does not bring charges against Jason Van Dyke, even if she clearly has seen this video, what did she have to gain by not bringing charges will? It was great. Because when heads really started to roll around this case, and the institutions inside the city split a turned against each other people begin briefing against each other. So we were able to get much more candid interviews from from everyone around. It's a great moment to be duck, my filmmaker when that happens, but we interviewed need Alvarez, while she was still state's attorney, and she makes it very clear. She admits that she saw the video right away, but she says it's very hard to. Police officers and, and you know, we didn't we thought we would lose. But once the video is about ready to is going to be releasing. No, it's going to be released. She's worried about civil unrest in the city. She's where they'll be riots. Sushi charges Van Dyke with murder the day before the videos released to try to preempt the anger that everyone knows is going to is going to roll out into the street. Rick rally set up this next clip. So charges have been brought against Van Dyke. The day before this videos, released the whole city is expecting doesn't know what to expect expect civil unrest. The police are on high alert people are talking about about riots, and, and the movement when the whole city clusters around their phones and their computers to watch the video of the moment is released, and when they see it, it is, it is shocking graphic. It's ridic- and the protesters pour out into the streets on black Friday. The busiest shopping day of the year, and they shut down after thanksgiving, thanksgiving, and they shut down the magnificent mile downtown Chicago, this clip begins with Charlene. Carruthers. Times one. Two three. Four. Seven. Eight nine ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen. Who sat sixteen times? On. He was their brother. He was down. I ran from the police. In a city, how many hours put in a position was Gago police foregone on me. So when I saw the quantum saw me will Calloway. So when I saw LA Quan, I saw me. Yeah. That is. That's a, a sentiment that was felt throughout the kind of moving out there will describe it different times as a kind of divine Justice, divine, poetry, that aquatic Donald figure who is so marginalized in the city that he was practically invisible up until the moment of his death. Ended up taking down the most powerful people in the city of Chicago. So the trial takes place September of two thousand eighteen describe the moment of the verdict. The trial has been this. This amazing kind of public spectacle in Chicago, the focal point of the city's attention for the weeks that it happens. And, and as the jury is, as the case to the jury, and they go into deliberate. The city's on on the edge of seat. I mean, the people again, are fearing rights, if there's an acquittal, don't you know? The everyone is called back because there's a verdict is ready. We I'm filming in front of city hall because one or two hundred activists have gathered in front of city hall, and their plan. Is there certain is going to be not guilty verdict? It's unimaginable that police officer will be found guilty of murdering a black citizen. And so their plan is to go inside city hall, and shut it down. Shut it down. If if it comes back not guilty and be arrested. So we're standing outside the whole the whole group is leaning into their cell phones playing the video over megaphones, or the audio over megaphones it is this incredible moment. And as the verdict is read I guilty of second-degree murder and then the sixteen counts one for every shot shot one guilty shot to guilty shot three guilty as those shots are being read out people are weeping. They're in tears, something unimaginable has happened. But it's like a tear has opened in the fabric of political reality, and, and something else is visible on the other side of it. I've seldom seen moments of that kind of intense public intimacy I was incredibly grateful to be able to be there and see it, but. A feeling amongst everyone there that, that page had been turned and that something we were in the new moment, new moment that we were going to all have to find out what meant. Ultimately, though, while he was found guilty of each of those sixteen shots while Jason Van Dyke was found guilty of second degree murder. His sentence. Two months later in January of this year. The two things happened days apart. I there was a conspiracy trial for the other officers on the scene where they were charged with conspiring to cover up this murder all of them were acquitted the next day Van Dyke was sentenced and the judge judge gone decided not to consider the sixteen counts of aggravated battery one free shot. Only consider the second degree murder and, and gave him six and a half years. Eligible for release in three years, and the we talked to the jurors who felt betrayed. I mean they went in there. So each count of aggravated battery carries six to thirty years per count. They thought they thought that they were giving. Verdict that was going to mean Van Dyke was going to jail for the rest of his life. And instead, it was shortened to, to less time than I mean, there are hundreds of people in Cook County jail right now, awaiting trial for more than three years, because they can't afford the five hundred bucks. It would take to make bail. And so what do you think is the lesson today as the activists continue in the streets of Chicago? And what this means for the country as Showtime broadcasts your documentary. I mean, there's two things that, that cut through this for me. I is in the scale the massive scale of the cover up. I mean, this is not this is not a scandal is not a Barrett behavior. This isn't three people in a room deciding, that they're going to clear, this one bad officer. This is every institution in the city. Being complicit in this in somewhere another in small ways, or large ways. The other lesson is that for all of the strengths of this machine. It, it was it broke down that, that wall of silence with shattered in this case, and it was shattered because dozens of people at crucial moments came forward and took brave stands and broke it, and also because of the sustained attention in pressure of moves. This is this is a story arc. That's four years long. People stayed on this. They stayed in the street. They stayed active and they kept pushing this. And so that I am. I'm in all of the of the people of Chicago and of the journalists and the soda movies there who, who maintain the pressure throughout and manage to. To win victories, that have been elusive in every other city in this country. We're at growly director of the new documentary sixteen shots at just premiered and available on Showtime. Rick was nominated for an Academy Award for the film dirty wars, and that does it for our show, congratulations to democracy as general manager. Julie Crosby and her partner Rebecca wallet and the birth of their baby. Ryan Joseph Crosby wallet. Welcome to the world democracy now is produced by Mike Burke, Dina. Governor mate, shake wills Tammy Lauren semi L cough. John Hamilton Robbie Karen, Honey. Masud Jirina, Durra, Tamera do and Libby rainy. I made me Goodman. Thanks for joining us.

Hong Kong officer murder Chicago Hong Kong Wong director China Liquan McDonald Hong Kong chief executive Amy Goodman Nathan law Jason Van Dyke Sikwan McDonnell Jason Van Dyke United States attorney Bill
The increasingly tense US-China relationship

PRI's The World

49:04 min | 4 months ago

The increasingly tense US-China relationship

"Support for the world comes from hint water fruit infused water with no calories in no sweeteners hint is available in over twenty five flavors, including watermelon and pineapple water in stores or delivered from drink, hint, dot com. He had to flee Hong Kong. Standing Up to China is more important than ever, and it's very important for us to realize this is a global fight is noxious about Hong Kong I'm Marco, Werman today on the world leading, Hong Kong democracy activist and his message for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo also today. Deep political divisions in the US are opening the door for Russian meddling in the next election Dr Democracy is so dysfunctional so chaotic that there's profound opportunities to sow doubt and how to think about climate change optimistically if we are negative body if we are pessimistic, I came routine, we will not be able to get out of it. The stores more today. You're on the world. I'm Marco Werman. You're listening to the world The US China rivalry! It's been a mainstay in us. Foreign policy for decades then only more says since president trump came to office. The two superpowers have clashed over trade security, human rights and China's Hong Kong policies yesterday during a visit to London Secretary State Mike. pompeo spoke about the tension. We hope we can. Build out a coalition that understands this what we're collectively to convince. The Communist Party is not in their best interest in this kind of behavior. Later that day POMPEO met with pro democracy. Activists Nathan Law. The tooth spoke about China's new National Security Law which encroaches on the rights of citizens in Hong Kong Nathan. Law joins us now from London, so you met yesterday with Secretary Pompeii the residents of the US ambassador in London. What was your message for them? From my part, I mainly talks about the current situation of call and the way for the global community to move forward in order to China Accountable I. Think is very important for us to realize. This is a global for it just about Hong Kong, but he's about how democratic value can be preserved, and how Chinese Attaran regime can be held accountable and to stop them from spreading the -Tarian expansion, and what'd secretary. Did. He guarantee US support? While baseball on meeting protocol I'm the neighbor to review the contents of the meeting, but we have. A very full and very positive discussion the US under well they will show the well doubt determination in combating the Chinese author, a terrorism by actions that the Russian directly a US is going to be more and more assertive. The US is going to be more assertive and did he explain? What that assertion will actually look like. If we observed the trend or the trajectory of how us has been reacting to China stretch than would see that we'll get a little sanctioning or a lot of concrete policy changes in regards to these two countries. So according to a recent polls, Nathan more people in Hong Kong see the United States rather than mainland China as a threat to the semi-autonomous territory. help us understand that. Well I didn't go through that date high. If you could share with me to be honest, the position that US China has been taking is always controversial, so the poll was conducted by London based firm for Newsweek and people of were asked whether they would consider the US government to be more of an ally or more of a threat to Hong Kong and its interest thirty eight. Eight percent of respondents felt it was more of a threat. So let me put this to you. The trump administration decided to do away with US special status recognition for Hong Kong making business harder for companies that want benefit from the territory and what it has to offer. It seemed like it was punishing Beijing. But what impact does that move have on everyday people in Hong Kong. Well of course I agree that that is no good solution on the current situation, as long spe Djing reviews to Gronk autonomy and democracy respect though Pino Hong Kong people while only one hand. We've got a cancellation of the potential treatment, which is exactly triggered by an Oscillation of autonomy in Hong Kong. The other hand we do not do anything. Then we'll be subsumed by the politics of fear from Beijing and Hong Kong. People still suffer. So for me, I understand that sentiment while both ways seems, do not work, so I think what Does Work Ace Beijing? We need to hold them accountable, and they have to realize that as long as home. Call enjoys autonomy and democracy, so the Hong Kong enjoys these economic prosperity and resolving their weight applies. Of course all of this came to a head with the national security law that push through which gives it more power to enforce its rules in Hong Kong. Is that why you Nathan left Hong Kong, and while you're currently in London where you're worried about being imprisoned. Well. Of course, this piece of law is written by Beijing Online. And leaves room full government to interprets in order to put. In jail, and we're talking about las long sentencing or possibly being for by back to China. These kinds of threats indeed are huge for a political activists. We are able to continue to progressive international advocacy work on the ground, because while the things that I've been doing for example talking about holding China accountable could be seen as the breach of the law at least two years of imprisonment. So who may I have a unique position? We also home calling continue to voice phone company pool. So was it? In fact, your concern of arrests imprisonment of possible extradition to China that got you to leave and move to London. Well definitely and I. think that is a neat for the Movement to sustain the international fronts that we need poetry with international pool tile that we speak freely without the restriction of the National Security Law. According to reports when you met with Pompeii, you brought up human rights violations in China's Xinjiang region and Tibet. Why was that important for you to bring up? Not just talk about Hong Kong. Witnessed the humor isolation, China has been enormous especially in the area, concentration came knocking millions of illegals so I think it is important that we bring out Hong Kong. He's a so example, and China, has been helping stomach abuses to tools, asking minority or people they don't like and while this problem has to be tackled by a joint efforts from the international community. Hong Kong. Pro Democracy Activists Nathan Law speaking with us from London. Thank you very much for your time. So much. Tomorrow. We'll hear a different perspective from Hong Kong. Regina chairs the pro pro-beijing conservative New People's Party. What does she make of democracy? Activists like Nathan Law. Feel sorry for that. All the prolonged, said a face now are up their own way. Infecting true young actress, young to commit judgments on these fundamental issues Regina. Yip is the guest on this week's podcast of the economist asks. We'll bring you parts of that interview tomorrow. Now moving onto Saudi Arabia. King Salman is spending some time in the hospital there this week Saudi state media report he had surgery to remove his gallbladder, and it was successful nothing life threatening, but whenever an eighty four year old national leader is hospitalized for whatever reason it raises questions for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Those questions about what a possible succession might look like the World Sharon Jafari reports the modern day kingdom of Saudi. Arabia was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, two, and since. Since, then it's been ruled by the same royal family succession has mostly gone from father to son or brother to brother eighty four year old King Solomon took over from his brother into fifteen. Joseph Russell was the US ambassador to Saudi Arabia back then. Oh, yes, I got to know him very while this describes Kim Samoan as educated Matt. It says the king loves to read to his grandchildren so whenever he went back to New York while says he would buy books as gifts for some on. In the old culture of Saudi culture books never had pictures. That's because the ultra conservatives in the kingdom considered images to be un-islamic, so made sure I brought books a lot pictures. One time was false, as he brought by another bound copy of one thousand and One Nights, a collection of middle. Eastern folktales, and the king loved it. At the opportunity to work with online, I grew very fond of him, but while Kingston Mon- might be the most powerful official in Saudi Arabia. It's his son. Crown Prince Mohammad Bin, Salman who runs the kingdom on a day to day basis. NBS known is next in line to the throne. Nowadays, the process of succession is overseen by a special group of authorities yes-men. Faruk is with Carnegie in. For International, peace in Washington, the previous king had established what they call the allegiance council, which is basically a counseled from the surviving sons of the funder for NPS to become kings. She says this council would initiate a process for members of the royal family to pledge allegiance to the new king, but right now there's a problem. The Allegiance Council doesn't have had the last one died, and I think the position has been vacant for over two years now and one member at least of the allegiance council is under arrest Prince Amit faulk says NBA has been controversial figure since they want his made it his mission to consolidate power and supply line any potential competitor. Nabil Nura an expert on Gulf affairs says MP's has arrested an intimidate viable members of the royal family also rounded up hundreds of businessmen and activists. He was to show that he is the guy for the position, and he wants to make sure that there are no challenges in his way to the throne occupied. Was it all after. that. The king went to the hospital state TV showed him holding a cabinet meeting from there. That's to show that the king is alive and well, and still in charge, but nobody says it's an open secret that MBA's is actively pushing to become king while his father is still around. Why well a number of things one of them is related to the US actually Hamad bin. Salman wants to make sure that he ascends the throne while president. Trump is personally that states trump has been supportive of the crown. Prince says it's not clear if joe. Biden would do the same besides the American election does also the G. Twenty summit in November. It could be a critical moment for MBA's to show that he is in charge. And some people from the Royal Family might not be happy with Hamad bin Salman, being king, so hammered. This might ascend the throne while his father is still alive to make sure that everything goes smoothly. So where does all this leave the US? Saudi relations Yes menfolk says NBA is a controversial figure in Washington DC. She says it's not internal policies that have raised eyebrows NBA has has been the war in Yemen and according to the CIA or did. Did the kidding of Washington Post columnist Jamal and unfortunately like many things inside Washington there is polarization and the debate is very much politicized, but let me tell you that the concern, the uncertainty about the rule of Mohammad Bin, Salman is certainly bipartisan. People differ on what to do about it, folks. Some things have not changed Saudi Arabia remains a key player in the global oil market and president. Trump has boasted about selling weapons to the king. Now with the possibility of political transition in both countries on the horizon, there are big questions about the future of the relationship between the two longtime allies. For the World I'M CHANGE JEFF why. You remember where you were say ten years ago or so wherever you were. The odds are pretty good that this song was playing in the background. Yup One direction, the British boy band, ruled the world in the early twenty teens. That was their debut single. What makes you beautiful? Today is a ten year anniversary of the group's founding, and the one has been on hiatus since two thousand fifteen. They're marking the occasion by releasing a special anniversary website with remixes live footage. We play some, but well. The thing is so popular that it crashed before it even went live probably should have expected that as the band mentioned cells in a video released ahead of time. The. At their peak, one direction had millions of fans number one albums. They even ventured into geopolitics in two thousand thirteen, then UK Prime Minister David. Cameron made a cameo in one of their music videos than a few months later, this happened. Today. The camera has defended the UK at G. Twenty summit, making referencing the Beatles I'm one direction this comes after a Russian official reportedly dismissed Britain as just a small island that no one pays attention to like a lot of us. One day has changed a lot. In the ensuing decade Zane molly was the first breakaway from the band in two thousand fifteen, which started the break-up. Fans everywhere were heartbroken, and since then each member has pursued a solo career Harry styles. For example, you may have seen him recently in the World War drama dunkirk. In other words, the band has more or less moved on, but hey. It was a beautiful thing while it lasted. I'm Marco Werman you're listening to the world. Every week. We looked together at solutions to the climate crisis today on the big fix. We speak with someone who sees optimism as a solution. We have come here to let them know that change is coming whether you like it or not. Can we turn this around? Option the only option that we have. What we do now. And in the next few year. Would profoundly affect. The next few. Years. Christiana forget us is a former diplomat and longtime climate change leader whose whole brand is optimism. She presided over the two thousand fifteen Paris climate talks for the UN. Since then she founded a group called global optimism. She's Co authored a book titled The Future We. Choose surviving the climate crisis. My colleague Carol Hills spoke with us this week from the act of his home in Costa Rica Carol asked her why she chooses not only optimism, but as she says relentless stubborn optimism to address climate change, it is only by doing something positive to contribute to the solution that you actually dispel bubble of despair and move into a much more constructive frame of mind and a war impactful. In which you can make a difference, yes, we have a very difficult situation frontal, but if we are negative about I guarantee, we will not be able to get out of it, so the only choice that we have to even have a chance no guaranteed what to have a chance to address any of these challenges or all of them back is to take a determined. Optimistic Mindset that says we don't know exactly. We're going to get out of it, but we are minimal and everything that we have to address that now. You've a podcast called outrage and optimism. who or what are you outraged at? I'm outraged at the fact that we have only started to address climate change. I am particularly outraged at those people who deny reality. That I think is really absolutely unforgivable. So now I want to bring in the pandemic, and there are a lot of parallels between the pandemic and climate change global problems, and he global solutions has the pandemic changed your perspective about the ability of countries to work together to tackle these big global issues I have been concerned about the fact that it was unavoidable. God the first few months of tackling the pandemic was basically an isolationist approach. Let us build the walls around ourselves, but to really tackle the pandemic we are going to. To have to develop a vaccine and the development of the vaccine plus the production of the huge scale of vaccines that we're going to need plus the distribution. All of that cannot be done in. It is Latian this way. It has to be done through collaboration across companies, and certainly across countries so I think the biggest lesson for climate is yet to come. The biggest lesson is going to be derailed I want to tackle this well. Then the only way is radical collaboration. The UN's big annual climate change meeting has been. been delayed from this fall until twenty twenty one, the twenty twenty meaning wasn't important deadline when countries were asked to set new more ambitious targets for cutting down on carbon emissions. How much of a setback is this delay to move very frank I was against delaying. Because I have always felt that a time line is a healthy pressure. However after the decision was taken, we have now seen that there is an incredible public finance mobilization that is occurring around the world. That financing is at such scale at such speed that it will. Will determine the carbon intensity of the global economy for at least ten years. If not more so there is a huge opportunity here over the next eighteen months, which are precisely the eighteen months to cop twenty six four countries to really be very mindful about injecting dot comparable in such a way that it both gets the wheels of the economy spinning again and leads us to more carbon, efficient sectors and companies and an economy like the coronavirus pandemic, some people are far more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change than others. You talk about the power of him to help inspire people to act on climate, change and lower emissions. What do you see as the potential of optimism to also address the inequalities that are exacerbated by climate change? You know that's probably the most important question. The mother of all injustices planet is climate change. Now, that is where. Our moral obligation to address climate change stems from. Because if we do not devote, our energies are thinking. Our actions are decisions are finding that our policies toward addressing climate change. We are implicitly or in fact, even explicitly. Contributing to more inequality, it is precisely because of the inequality that we ha- to address climate change Christiane Figueras is a diplomat and the founder of the global optimism group. She helped negotiate the Paris Agreement in two thousand fifteen. Thank you very much. My colleague Carol Hills. They're speaking with Cristiana. And continuing something, we started a couple of weeks ago. Poems written by young people around the world about the climate crisis. This week. We hear from a teenager close to home. Hi My name is Carolyn I. M Sixteen I live in Rockville Maryland. By is writing. This poem I was kind of thinking about how a lot of things I do as I'm sure many of us can relate to. Really don't help much with climate crisis like I'm sixteen. I'm learning how to drive. A know that may getting. My permit is going to contribute one extra source of pollution into the world. While I was writing this hour snaking about what it's. Like to just forget got any of that. Happen just. Live in the moment, but unless really not possible so. That's kind of tournament I'm trying. Express in this poem I. Guess Ignorance Is. Bliss but it's not bliss that we can afford. So anyways. Here's is my poem. Infinity collapsed. My number sits on the slope of a hill adorned by Oaks Arches of autumn flooring Red Goldman Pumpkin. Season arrives. It has not yet come, but the leaves outside a break into Colonel Crisp and Brown sometimes to collapse infamy into a single point in time I label now. Pretend that nothing ever existed until this moment this now and that it will all cease to exist in abreast. That the fragile globe is. Is Link top teetering on one point before it's over an in this now? The trees Oso Green. Also Green Greener than anything. I've known to assist so I. Memorize the chill of Pre pumpkin season, and the exact shade of line the ducks, my forest of Arden. Memorize the icing of Arlington last thrill, so that one day I can breathe it onto. My children kissed them with a melnace of fall, and so taking all in. Just in case. For. I don't know when it will burn. That was Caroline Din in Maryland reading her poem. Infinity collapsed produced by Zor amyloid, and originally published in the International Educational Organization right the world you can read the poetry of other young writers from Mumbai to a Buddha and catch up on our climate change solutions reporting at the world dot. Org Slash big thinks. You're listening to the world. Life got real quiet during lockdown turns out, so did seismic activity was offering us very concrete observation of Saturday buried with people. Staying home as a way to protect each other stay inside, and the ground stopped shaking. We'll explain and across Europe. Turkey's president is hunting down dissidents as ahead here on the world. I'm Marco. Werman your with the world where co production. Of W. G. B. H. Boston NPR. Rex for years has been an agreement between the US and Canada when it comes to asylum seekers. The deal gives Canada permission to turn people coming from the US back at border checkpoints, even when they're requesting protection, but on Tuesday a Canadian judge. Change that the judge ruled authorities must stop turning over asylum seekers to the United States. Reporter Emma Jacobs has more from Montreal. Land. To New York Jonathan sort through best tickets from his trip last fall from Florida all the way to the northern edge of New York state. This is from from Brooklyn last bird. And wanting him. When I go on him I get a taxi. and. I come to the bought it the Canadian border, but he didn't go to an official border crossing because of a deal struck in two thousand and two between the US and Canada. It's called the safe third country agreement, and it lets candidate turn back. At official crossings and hand them to us, immigration officers, so Jonathan found another way in the country road, the dead ends in a gravel patch at the Canadian border that spot became so popular with asylum-seekers police now wait twenty four seven on the Canadian inside. The new arrivals. This is not a fourth eventually, Canada. If you cross gear, you guys. GonNa be arrested by us. People like Jonathan us from Haiti do still get arrested when he reached Canadian soil, but they're often. Let go and can apply for asylum Jonathan asked to use his first name only because his case is still pending in Canada. But things may change soon so that asylum-seekers wanting to enter Canada might not have to go by these back roads. A Canadian judge has ruled the safe third country agreement violates asylum-seekers rights. Because of what happens after people are turned back at official crossings Alex knee of of Amnesty International. Canada explains anyone who is turned back at the Canada border is handed over to US officials. Amnesty has been fighting the US Canada agreement screen years saying it exposes asylum-seekers punitive conditions in US custody. You may very well end up in detention for an extended period of time in you ask immigration detention centres. Sometimes Co mingled with criminal convicts. Commonplace before being released on bond, coming to Canada Jonathan spent almost two years in US immigration detention including a county prison. He says within weeks others held with him started to break down mentally some of them who become crazy some of them talk. You know by themselves, you know. Know. Happening what's happening in her ruling Canadian Judge Ann Marie MacDonald focused on US immigration detention conditions. She singled out one plaintiff a win for me. The opium named. NYDIA Moustapha after being turned back from Canada Moustapha spent a month in new. York, county jail, including time in solitary confinement, unable to get hull food. She lost fifteen pounds judge. McDonald said it wasn't her. Her role to judge the US asylum system, but that quote Canada cannot turn a blind guy to the consequences of turning back Mustapha and others now. Alex naive of Amnesty, international hopes the judge's ruling stands. We have urged our first reactions to the ruling that that Canada accept this decision and refrain from mounting an appeal. The government said it's reviewing the decision. Decision and nothing can change right away. Judge McDonald gave the government six months to respond Craig Damian Smith. A migration expert at the University of Toronto says that. If the safe third country agreement does eventually end, asylum-seekers could go to official border crossings. The big question is whether or not more people will decide to come as a result of this decision we. We don't know that it's very difficult to say, and I think that much of this will depend on what happens in the November election whether president trump is reelected and continued his crackdown on immigrants in the US that six months delay in the judge's ruling expires just days after the US presidential inauguration next January for the world. I'm Emma Jacobs in Montreal. In Moscow this week, a spokesperson for Vladimir Putin said Russia, has never interfered in electoral processes in any country in the world. We know that's not true. The Miller report documented Russian interference in our two thousand sixteen presidential election. Now an American historian chronicled a century of election meddling by Russia and by the US David. Hammer and his new book rigged Zeroes, in on the twenty sixteen presidential election, and what President Obama did and did not do to combat Russian interference, so I'd say the only way to understand President Obama's response to Russia's operation is divided into two parts. The first part is Russian efforts to manipulate voters. Public opinion as you said one one part of which was social media manipulation, the other part of which was the hacking and releasing of emails, the Obama Administration a very poor understanding of the social media component before Election Day, but a good understanding of emails, but the second component of Russia's operation or the second aspect was efforts to target ballots to manipulate actual votes and what I demonstrated. My Book based on my interviews Twenty Six. Six of president, Obama's advisers is that Russian? Military intelligence systemically penetrated are voting systems had the ability to alter the voter data and even vote tallies of US citizens on election day. Which is why is I detail? The White House, and DHS were running crisis teams on election day itself bracing for Russian cyber attacks, so this is a multifaceted weapon that involves built efforts to manipulate people, and also to penetrate and potentially manipulate our infrastructure. So David having done the research. What do you know about how? Russia is currently meddling in electoral politics in the US? So the difficult thing about writing about covert operations is that it's very difficult to do so in real time. Because by nature, they're not supposed to be publicly understood as they're unfolding many operations that I detail in the book only became clear years or even decades after they took place but with. With that, said we know a couple of things and we know that from folks like Robin Muller View and a hill in Chris wray that Russia will interfere in the twenty twenty election. We've seen intelligence reports that Russia's targeting the two thousand election. We've seen Joe Biden say based on his classified briefings that Russia is seeking to destabilize and undermine our election. Which is why I'm watching out for this specific sort of. Areas that I mentioned because if Russia does proceed aggressively, it will be as always either manipulate voters or to alter actual ballots. Electoral interference operation does one or both of those things. What can the US do to make it less likely that the November third election will be contested, or it's validity, and I don't anticipate that the sitting president we'll do much to eight and that mission I think he's been doing the opposite and saying that the vote will be rigged, which furthers doubt about the election, but we also should be clear that just because he's engaging in. That sort of doesn't mean that there's nothing we can do I think. Think that the media should be very aware of the source of any hack materials that emerged and shouldn't just focus on the contents I think social media companies should be transparent about whether they're identifying foreign actors, manipulating their platforms, and honestly I think this really fall on the citizenry in a in a rather profound way, because what the purpose of electoral interference often is to manipulate people, and if citizens care that, they're being manipulated care about identifying the accuracy and validity of the propaganda. They're seeing care enough to. To vote in order to exercise their democratic rights, and also stay calm, and not let sort of disruptions, alarm them or undermine their confidence in our democracy, that goes a long way David. In your book, you also add one important prescription against reductions The US should not be involved in rigging elections, taking us back to the CIA and Italy in nineteen, forty, seven and yet former senator Harry Reid a Democrat leadership. Panetta former director Democrat. You quote them. They actually believe that US meddling in other countries elections. Elections as a counter to Russian election meddling efforts. That's okay. How do you respond to? That doesn't suggest we may never emerge into pure voting so I disagree with their argument. I think it's important to recognize that argument persist. It might not be public. This is a debate that will occur in the shadows of government about whether the CIA should get down in the mud with Russian intelligence in nineteen, forty, eight, inner, somewhat similar moment Harry Truman decided we were going to respond to KGB electoral interference with. Electoral interfere into an incline response at the outset of the Cold War. My argument is that we are in a family different moment today to respond to Russia's electoral operations, which are no longer to advance an ideology, it's to undermine democracy with our own. Electoral operations would only further undermine democracy and would only further undermine our ability to speak out in favour, free and fair elections, because in the digital age not only are these operations more likely to be uncovered, but our elections are also extraordinarily exposed, so we shouldn't be promoting this kind of behavior. We should be seeking. Seeking to establish a norm and banning against it, and we should uniting the democracies of the world against it and punishing actors who who engage in it, and for us to seek to do that while also engaging in covert electoral interference to me is not only untenable, but entirely self-defeating, and if Russia's objective, which it is is to tear down democracy, we need to renew our democracy. We need to build up the democracies of the world in supporting them against this type of political subversion and the worst way to do that is to be subverting their elections ourselves. David Hammer is the author of rigged America Russia and one hundred years covert electoral interference. Thanks for explaining all this to US David really appreciate it. Thank you very much for having. This month marks the four year anniversary of a failed coup in Turkey since then the government and Ankara has jailed tens of thousands of people and continues to hunt down thousands more many of those people escaped to Europe, but it turns out. They aren't necessarily safe there and Horvath reports on today fifteen, two, thousand, sixteen, a goop within a Turkish minute they try to overthrow the government. My Sunrise he was cleared. The coup failed and president reject type at again had survived, the crackdown began the next David, the s and torture of thousands of soldiers and military cadets, but soon and again was targeting civilians as well because. Daily cutting on. They are escaping. They look for a whole to escape wherever they escape. We will chase after them. Pesident AG again and his government have gone off their people. They accused of being therapists, notably the followers of Imam Federal Glenn a one time and again ally. They called himself goodness, a neighbor, once a powerful force inside Turkey since two thousand sixteen Turkey has shut down expropriating ten billion dollars worth of assets and closing honest media, outlets and schools. Nate Schenken is with Freedom House and an expert. In Turkey, he says good honest have been left jobless with no chance of restarting their careers, and he says most of them are innocent with the people in the Golan movement. It's not even clear. where I would say it's rather quite clear. They had nothing. The vast majority of them had nothing to do with any of this whether it was the coup attempt or any other kind of I. Want many good Ns have sought refuge in Europe, but had an always found it. One of those people is businessman Abdulah Boop boop moved from Turkey to neighboring Bulgaria in early, two, thousand, sixteen, thinking the country would be safe for him US an easy member. He vantage a State Agency for Refugees to ask about asylum, but instead might to members of the Bulgaria Intelligence Service. By. unsorted one of them will. Let us help you with your business here. You can attend movement meetings. You let us know who attends those meetings, and what they say I didn't agree to that saying I was already cooperating by answering the questions Bulgarian. Courts denied an extradition requests from Turkey for BOIUC, but in Turkey the foreign minister announced that they were bringing back a person of interest from Bulgaria. Broke was on his way to a meeting. Please blocked his vehicle MOGAYON's promptly handed him over to Turkish authorities of the border. He stands accused of being a member of a terrorist organization and was detained in prison for more than three years, although bill area is a signatory to the Geneva Convention. Guaranteeing the rights of asylum seekers. At least seven more individuals are known to have been handed over by the Bulgarians. Human rights activists say countless others have been illegally pushed back at the Bulgarian and Greek borders. Turks have fallen trouble in other countries as well including Germany where they makeup, the third largest group of asylum-seekers. One is a twenty nine year old journalists. Who didn't want to give her name. Fled with a group of eleven, other Turks across the ever survivor to Greece there they encountered fleas on with other migrants David, putting van, the also be Dick A. Soda. We didn't know what was happening or where they were taking US finally. The vehicle stop secure. A Wash they started to pull us toward the river, we said we didn't want to go back and reminded them of the Geneva Convention, but they were so harsh and never gave a response. She says a group of masked men appeared from the forest and started to beat them in buttons. She tried to protect her husband, but they turned on her a man, speaking broken Turkey stalled them. You are a big problem hair. After hiding in the forest from night, the group eventually made it to Germany. Germany grants protection to less than half of the Turks who apply according to official records. The journeys family was denied asylum and their case is under appeal. Turkey has been putting pressure on Germany to go after goodness I'm on those wanted is an and saw who who was working at a TV station before he fled Durkee, he learned he was on a wanted list. When German police knocked on his door. nusamba-linked comes from come up with London. Police a couple of. The! The the police said the Turkish government gave your name to the German government. You're name and photo were in their documents. The police warned saw to go back to Turkey and promise him the protection of a neighborhood virtual, but saw is concerned about the possible actions of German thanks, many of whom are added supporters. GonNa Miss. The. I came across to Turks in the midst of a quarrel. One threatened the other thing. I'm going to report you to the Turkish consulate. The use this as a threat sauce s decks, increased defile file complaints, using the mobile up of the Turkish police, circumventing German authorities who send the mere thought human rights law in the capital car, and now runs refugees suport action in Germany. He says the Turkish government threatens sedans by going after relatives back in Turkey. Turkey. No one. Is Safe. Stay confined you. They are your son or your wife. He points out that even mothers with infants are imprisoned in Turkey. His own son was detaining Kyra for five days. Is Because of YOU MO? My Life and As. You can imagine how I feel. In Germany as an other parts of Europe. Exile Turks can trust easily durkee suspended operations against dissidents for three months due to the coronavirus, but by June Turkey announced operations had resumed with the arrest of seven EA suspects for the world. I'm Anne Hardback. You spend time with us every weekday to hear stories that connect you to the world that connection continues on social media. Join the conversation about the global stories that get you thinking. You can follow us on twitter. The handle is oh so easy to remember where at the world. Life has been quieter lately hectic at home. Maybe but you've probably noticed less traffic fewer planes, flying overhead new research published today shows it's not just quieter above ground. Coronavirus lockdown also meant a quieting of seismic noise below ground. The world's Caroline Bieler explains when you think seismic waves, you probably think earthquakes. The tremors caused by tectonic plates, scraping against each other and releasing energy in waves through the Earth's crust, but on a much smaller scale we humans make seismic waves to. From traffic. Lane landing and taking off even lots of US gathering in a stadium. Just have a word for this one. They're called football. Quake's anyway. We mostly stopped leaving home this winter and spring a lot of that seismic noise. It stopped. What we discovered is as lockdown measured. Swear taking place in different countries around the world. That was very clear. Significant decrease seismic knows that's Raphael the plan. A researcher at the National Autonomous University of Mexico research he co authored was published in the journal Science today, and shows manmade seismic noise dropping up to half globally this spring, so that was very interesting, because it was offering us a very concrete observation of decided of people were staying home as a way to protect the job it. It also presented an opportunity for science. Usually, lots of seismic noise makes it harder for researchers to detect small earthquakes. One of the plans co-authors compared it to trying to hear your phone ring at a rock concert this spring. The background volume got turned down. We each and focus on the natural signals. Trying to detect very small is derived, couldn't be absorbed before with last mount of filtering and processing more like hearing that phone ring in a library deploy, says identifying these earthquakes when it's quiet. Quiet is going to make it easier for scientists to find them again. When all that background noise comes back, scientists across the globe have been making local observations sometimes with small seismometers in their basements since lockdown started McGill University geophysicist Yang. Djing says this study brings those observations together to paint a global picture. She wasn't involved with the research. I think this is so far. The most comprehensive Stati on the global scale I'm very impressed by the scope of the study. It's part of a relatively. Relatively new sub field called social seismology, which finds connections between seismic activity and things like economic growth. This is sort of new direction that part of says Molly, branching into so I think there is a lot of contribution that's as you might be able to make in addition to just looking at the earthquake shaking records in this case, seismologists see the vibrations were making or not, as a gauge of how faithfully we're following doctor's orders to stay close to home for the world. I'm caroline dealer. From the cute daughter of Scottish vaudeville performers to create a song that inspired Joni Mitchell Anti Ross part of jazz trio. Lambert Hendricks Ross died this week. She was eighty nine for several years in the fifties and sixties. Her voice was seemingly everywhere. That's Ross along with her partners. Dave Lambert and Jon Hendricks accompanied by Count Basie on piano. They were one of the first interracial jazz ensembles tour globally, but years before that kind of success. There was this child star Andy Ross. When Ross was just four years old in nineteen, thirty four, she sailed with her family from England to the states for a vacation in New Yorker. Parents entered her in a singing contest for radio show, and he won her prize a six month contract with the Film Studio Mgm, she moved to l. a. and lived with her aunt. and Ross landed the part of Annabel. Logan the girl singing here on the short film. Our gang follies of nineteen thirty eight. Yes definitely a precocious tendency towards scatting of vacation to the US, ended up turning into a childhood, Hollywood career, and her mom and dad. No I didn't see them until I was seventeen. That's from a two thousand one interview. Any Ross gave to Hamilton. Colleges Phillies Jazz Archive. When she was seventeen, she left Hollywood and returned to London the same place. Where years earlier as a toddler, she learned how to charm and audience the family. We'll do shows in the park and pass the hat and recalls being a three year old performer I woke up to the little bandstand. And pretend hours loss and the. An actor playing a policeman. And choosing on a big, Danish or something. And I would say I'm hungry on the loss. And he'd say well if I give you a bite of this for. Can you do not so I can sing. I can dance and. At which point my father would pay are playing RPG on the accordion. And I sought to sing. told me. When. She was an adult, any raw singing with long overlooked, she returned to the US as a nineteen year old had a hard time finding gigs, but in nineteen fifty to a record producer asked to write lyrics for a jazz sack Solo. She came up with this tune twisted, forgot about it went back to England and meantime twisted became an underground hit in the US. It was a song that Inspire Joni Mitchell years later in nineteen sixty, Ross Andrew trio would finally record their own version. Any Ross hit some rough spots dinner life. She nearly died of a heroin overdose in London. Her career faltered at times, but she always managed to find a Gig, and you can't say this about a lot of people. Her entire life was framed by song. Lane! Laura. She was. was swinging world, coats. You from the man and Bill Harris Studio at W.. G. B. H. IN BOSTON. He can find US online anytime at the world. Dot Org. I'm Marco Werman, see. With told me. X.

US president Hong Kong London Turkey Marco Werman official China trump Europe Saudi Arabia Prime Minister David Nathan Law Hong Kong National Security Law US China Beijing Hong Kong Nathan
Amanpour: Hamid Baeidinejad, Bill Burns, Nathan Law and Tracy K. Smith

Amanpour

58:17 min | 1 year ago

Amanpour: Hamid Baeidinejad, Bill Burns, Nathan Law and Tracy K. Smith

"From CNN films. Apollo eleven. Landed experience Menotti's greatest feat like you've never seen before with newly discovered incredible footage. Apollo eleven Sunday June twenty third nine on CNN tired of spending hundreds of dollars for prescription glasses. Xeni offers thousands of affordable. Eyewear styles starting at just six ninety five no ridiculous markups. No hassles. Just quality affordable. I wear delivered right to you visits any today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. Everyone and welcome to on for his what's coming up. We always have the authorization to defend American interests as Iran threatens to break out of uranium limits, set by the nuclear deal, America considers a full range of options in response to attacks on shipping. Where will this current standoff end Iran's ambassador to Britain joins me for an exclusive interview and top US diplomat? William Burns weighs in. In Hong Kong protesters won't back down even off to the chief executive suspense that controversial extradition law. They wanted to resign, I'll speak to pro democracy activists. Nathan. Also, America's poet, laureate dives into families pause and America's troubled racial history. Walter Isaacson talks to Tracy k Smith. Welcome to the program everyone. I'm Christiane Amanpour in London. The Trump administration says there is quote, no doubt, Iran is behind last week's tanker attacks in the Gulf of Oman. And as a leading Republican senators threatens to quote fire and fury of the US military could be unleashed. The saber rattling is getting harsher on both sides, America's European allies, say they have yet to see credible evidence to support those US claims and the owner of one of the time, coz, the Japanese Tanka questions, the American account of what happened, but President Donald Trump leaves little doubt where he stands. Well, Iran did do it. And you know they did it because you saw the boat. I guess one of the mines didn't explode, and it's probably got essentially Iran written all over it. Today. Iran ratchet up the tension on its side threatening to exceed limits on both the size of its uranium stockpile. And the enrichment levels said by the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal, while still staying well below the purity levels needed for weaponization. He is Bayrou's come vandy Iran's atomic energy, spokeswoman. All the passing to the point six or seven enrichment is an action, which has been foreseen for the second phase, so we are have warned the Europeans that the time is running out. So we have on the twenty days to start with this major. Now, it is all part of a policy announced by president Hassan Rohani to reduce its commitments to the deal while not fully withdrawing from it. So it is a dangerous dons and as tensions rise across the region. It could all too easily escalate into a violent confrontation, the British Foreign Secretary, stuck close to the Trump administration's analysis saying it is, quote, almost certain that Iran was responsible for the attacks now with an exclusive look into how Iran is dealing with its side of the confrontation. How made by Dina, John is Ron's ambassador to Britain, and he is well, he's welcome back to this program. Thanks for being with us. So where do you think this is going clearly just in the last twelve to twenty four hours? Both your side have stepped up confrontation and the Americans have as well be have not stepped up confrontation. Because the decision that we announced the around forty. Days ago that if in fact the other parties to the j superior would not. Live with their obligations. You don't decide to little bit suspend some of its measures on the Jason vio- a was clear to everybody. Now we have twenty days to rectify, the situation otherwise, Iran as promised would in fact, suspend some of the measures that in fact are enshrined in the jase appeal, but we have prepared ourselves and as. It was announced today. Maybe within the ten days from now, Iran would be at the situation that can speed up its program, and we will be passing the limit designed in the JCP away. So it's not a confrontation but today we have announced forty days ago and we have been waiting for other parties to rectify their commitments, correct. But the thing is it hasn't yet worked. I mean you did this forty days ago, you took an action around that time. And you're hoping that Europeans would somehow persuade the United States that there must be some ability for you to have the economic side of the equation to your nuclear commitments on that hasn't happened the United States, if anything is more determined to squeeze Iran. Economically Europeans have not been able to just there your tummy energy spokesman saying this twenty day threat to increase stockpiles. And the level of enrichment is to hopefully get Europe to do. Something about it. But then not. So are you playing with fire? There is confusion may be here. The announced for today's ago that if in fact we have we have decided to suspend two of the measures designed in the CPA. We are not committed any more to the level designed by Jason, but we said that we give you sixty days if you rectify, the problems, and you would. In fact, implement your commitments, Iran can roll back. In fact, this suspensions, for the fact is that, that, that they're not Europeans have not been able to do you know something that I don't know and the Americans continued to ratchet up their pressure. What you've just done has been met with the following response from the United States that the plans to exceed these internationally. Agreed curbs amounts to nuclear blackmail and must be met with increased international pressure. That is from the White House today. So my question is, are you playing with fire here because, you know where they stand and, you know where the Saudi Arabian stand, whether you a stands they want to squeeze you and it looks like you are playing into the hands. These policies by the others are not new policies. We have mentioned that we have an agreement, which is the Jay Scipio a other Roy's either, we would implement this agreement in full all parties are committed to their obligation. That's all we would facing today, partial agreement if you agree that there is a partial agreement, Iran, is, is, in fact entitled to suspend some of the measures until the situation is clear. So the question is that it's very funny that the United States and this administration, which has characterized the JC puree as the Vorst agreement in the history. Now, they are expecting that Iran would be fully committed with this agreement. If it is a funny agreement, if it is an divorced in ever made in the history, how come that you expect Iran would be fully committed to this agreement so we have we have announced very clearly that either we would have a full commitment to the agreement or as designing J superior itself, this agreement can be partially implement. Okay. So that's all pretty bureaucrat. Attic now, his the real stuff. There are attacks on tankers in the Persian Gulf in the Gulf of Oman. You are being blamed for it. Iran is, is being blamed for being responsible for it, and let us just take your own governments word your own. Foreign minister, jevon sorry has said that we will respond to what he calls economic warfare against us in the past president RoH Honey, and your top officials have said that we could strangle the flow of Persian Gulf oil from Saudi Arabia Kuwait, Qatar Bahrain Iraq and UA. If the US embargoes Iranian oil. You've said that you said that you are in control of the straits of HMOs, and you can stop it. So now you've been blamed for stopping this is in fact, what secretary state Pompeo has said just this weekend? It's unmistakable, what happened here, these were taxed by his Lama, Republican Veron on commercial shipping on the freedom of navigation with the clear intent to deny transit through straight. This was on the Vermont side of the strait of romo's. There's no doubt. The intelligence committee has lots of data lots of evidence the, the world will come to see much of it, but the American people should rest assured. We have that confidence with respect to who conducted these attacks as well as a half a dozen other tax throughout the world over the past forty days. So would you say to that I have two points first of all, is that they are misusing the statements made before your president? And the foreign minister, we said that if Iran would not be allowed to export all from the Persian Gulf. We will take measures to ensure that other countries also cannot do the same. But we are not at that stage yet w get into that stage, because as you find a sanction all your oil exports, sanction is a defining squeeze them, prevents them. Stop zero. So if, if it would be zero, and we would not be able to expert or os. Transported from the region. That would be a new situation and we have the courage to announce very clearly that we would not allow the others also do the same, but they are not at that stage. The second point is that in fact, the Americans are telling us that they have assessments that they have intelligence, the question is that what the assessment is based on. You can have your assessment. I have your assessment that the people on the streets can have their own assessment assessment is reliable when it is based on, on evidence on the facts. We have not been facing with any kind of evidences, or facts till now, and we would be delighted out as the experts international experts have called for the United States that they would show and they would infect publish the complete footage of what they have before the incident after the incident, a not really to pop. Only a disorder about this, this, this video that we're going to play right now, which President Trump publicly spoke about saying that if we're all sits about. Of course, it's you basically, this is this boat is meant to be your military your navy going to collect an unexploded mine of some sort on that boat and, and then to dash off with it. Now you deny it, they say it's you onto me this question, embassador, your Defense Secretary on the supreme council with IOT on a harmony sham. Honey, says, we are in charge of security in the Persian Gulf and around the straits of homos, we can maintain security, if that's the case who is doing this. The be or living in our region. This is part of our country, the state hormones, and we are, in fact entitled to keep the security of, of this part of the of the world. But, you know that there are so many ships coming and going through this. In fact, this part of the war, and the first country was very sensitive to the security, and peace of this part of the world is Iran, because we have the longest shows independent Gulf. So we are very determined to help everybody, if they have a proofs, if they have intelligence or information will be delighted that does information intelligence would be shared at the international level, because this world is different from the older road when the big powers can make decisions behind the doors, now the media, and the international research organizations, and the international people have the interest digital interest to know about the fact the facts and factual events. So we doing alongside that tanker and again, I mean, you, you haven't actually answered me, but do you know who might be able to get through Iran's secure? Apparatus there. And 'cause I mean we've seen explosions on these time, because that's a fact who could be doing it. I know we should see who are the interests who have the interest to disrupt the security in the region. You know, that there are countries in the region and beyond the region who have invested heavily billions of billions of dollars to trap the United States into conflict, Iran military conflict with Iran, they are, in fact, very determined not to allow this project would be futile project because they feel that maybe President Trump is not is not determined to go. As as much as necessary. Maybe he doesn't want to go into a war, so there are elements in the region, and beyond that, in fact, they would create a situation that United States would be dragged into, and you're talking about what your foreign minister calls the B-team altern bin Salman, PB Netanyahu. That's what you're saying now. Right. That is a very real scenario that you're so here now is what a very influential Republican Senator says, Tom cotton about the consequences of all of this. Unprovoked attacks on commercial shipping warrant a retaliatory military strike against the Islamic Republic of Iran going back to president Washington and all the way down to President Trump. The fastest way to get the fire and fury of the US military unleashed on us to interfere with the freedom of navigation in the open seas in the air, there's exactly what Ron is doing. And one of the world's most important strategic chokepoints, the president has the authorisation act to defend American interests. So they using an internationally recognized. Statement of defending international peace and security on defending against the threat to that. Where do you think this is headed? Unfortunately, we are heading towards a confrontation, which is very serious for everybody in the region. You believe a military confrontation. I don't know a military or women cardinals said, yes. Partial cotton also said that potentially strike limited strike on a on a on a target in the Persian Gulf. I don't know about the strategy of the US on this. But I am sure that this is a scenario that some people are very forcefully working on it that they will drag the United States into a confrontation. I hope that the people in Washington would be very careful not to underestimate the Iranian determination that if they would be wrongly entering into a conflict, they would be very sorry about that because we are fully prepared. Determined by our government. And people are on forces that we would not miss of meeting to the to the wheel of the United States. Let's let me tell you, very frankly, that, in fact, the United States is asking for negotiations negotiations should be done at the in fact, voluntary determination of the, of the of the all sides, twin negotiations you cannot force any country to enter into negotiations. What we want from the US is to be normal country not to interfere with Iranian relationship economically. She with other countries. They are threatening all countries in the region and beyond not to enter into economic agreement the trade agreement, and this is a kind of economic terrorism that the rightfully in fact. College. United States should not be a pressure is Iran into negotiations. United States should decide to be aside from the relationship between Iran, not other countries. Can I ask you finally about gesture of goodwill that you could you could take within a show some pictures here? You obviously see them, you obviously see Richard Ratcliffe, maybe even his parents whose camped outside your you had to leave their to come to see us today. He's on a hunger strike, because his poor wife is still in prison in Iran, and she's also started yet. Another hunger strike. We'll just flip to the next picture because it is their daughter, who turned five and she's just celebrated couple of days. Any Ron Hubbard say she's there, because her mother is in jail, and she needs to be close to her mother. When are you going to release them? They are innocent people. The judge to say that she's innocent or what the judge has decided that she's in fact con has been engaged in criminal activities. And she has been in fact has a verdict to imprisoned for five years. We know that she's a mother. We are very sorry about the situation that the daughter should suffer from, in fact to be not being the mother, we understand that the husband is frustrated, we understand that, but we are facing with the situation that has been decided by judicial we do not have any other over the judiciary. We have been in fact, relaying the concerns to the judiciary. And in fact, this should be resolved through, in fact, the proceedings in the court, and we hope that there would be some positive decisions. But the question is that in fact? Adding to the pressure against Iran at this time, because Mr. cliff has decided very wrong timing, raise this he feels that maybe we are facing a difficult situation. The Persian Gulf, he feels that there is a in fact, Dominic policy, which is very sensitive in the UK this week two to select the prime minister of this country. So I'm not sure that in fact, this is a genuine effort, but we will do our, our best to help him that in fact, this situation would be fully. In fact, reviewed by the budget, traditionally is a very, very tense time. Thank you for coming in about survived in. Thank you very, much need, a now, we turn to William Burns, who is one of the most seasoned and accomplished American diplomats his dealings with Iran. Spanned several decades. He's been assistant secretary of state for nearest affairs ambassador to Russia and. Jordan in two thousand thirteen when he was serving as deputy secretary of say he was the US diplomat tasked with the secret back channel talks. The did eventually lead to that nuclear deal in twenty fifteen an experience, he chronicles in his new book, the aptly named backchannel Bill bones. Welcome back to the program. John, it's good to be with you again. You have just been listening to the embassador, Hamid Biden talk about what's happening in the region and the. He they, they believe that it's wrong the pressure that the United States was put on Iran regarding the nuclear deal, which you were instrumental in helping to negotiate gimme where you stand on, on. What's going on in the heat of this rhetoric now as Java's of economic warfare, by the United States being waged against Iran. I really I'm worried about the dangers of esscalation right now, I'd say, I, I do believe Iran was responsible for the recent attacks on tankers in the Gulf. I think those attacks were reckless and dangerous. But the fact that you have to ask the question about responsibility, the fact that the administration seems to be having such a difficult time persuading some of our closest allies of our case is a Mark, I think of how much our credibility is suffered. And how much we've isolated ourselves since President Trump made the really unfortunate decision to abandon the comprehensive nuclear agreement. So I worry right now that hardliners on both sides in Washington. And in Tehran are beginning to climb up a very unsteady escalatory ladder. So where do you think this is heading? I mean, you say escalatory I mean, you could describe it as a real massive vicious cycle is in effect right now with the US doing one thing, the Iranians doing one thing and back and forth back and forth. It is possible that accidentally or deliberately there could be a military confrontation given the you being there before in all your years. How do you think that will play out? I mean, a full scale invasion of Iran strike in the what do you think is going to happen? I'm in the Middle East, as you well know, Christiane is kind of a land of unintended consequences. I don't think President Trump has any intention of military intervention an invasion of Iran, but, you know, it's a world in which, especially in the Gulf, which is very crowded and combustible. Right now, you can have an advert and collisions, especially when the two sides are not talking to one another. And those collisions can escalate very quickly. Can I ask you to use your experience and and flesh out why you think Iran was responsible? I mean you heard the questions that I asked you embassador about them having responsibility for security there. But the German Foreign Minister, says that whatever has been said by the US administration does not amount to significant and determinative evidence, are you have Russia and the rest of the Europeans calling for calm and deescalation and not be to trigger happy. And you have doubts being raised by you know analysts about the speed with which the US is now prepared to say what our intelligence shows this. What is it? That makes you say that it is. And if it's them who is it? I don't have access to the information at the administration has right now. But this does fit a pattern of past Ronnie, and activity. And I think the doubts you hear from some of our closest allies are less a reflection of the credibility of the evidence, which I'm sure, they'll see and quite a bit of detail over the coming days, and more their doubts about the direction of American policy and getting wrapped into the kind of dangerous esscalation, I mentioned before, what a lot of our closest allies right now is an American strategy that says, it's about course of diplomacy, but which so far has been all about the coercion part and not much at all about the diplomacy part and that raises real doubts in their minds, and it puts us, I think a much more difficult position taking the obvious step, which any administration would do right now is to try to build some international consensus to deal with threats to freedom and advocation and the Gulf and said state. Pompeo kost this a little bit like you would just saying in terms of past behavior. I just wanna play what he said over the weekend. Do you have to put it in the context of forty years of behavior inside the Islamic Republic around? This is this is consistent with how they behave. Previously, the last forty days we've seen a number of activities, not just these past two, but for other commercial ships, which challenged the international norms of freedom of navigation. The United States is considering a full range of options. Okay. So full range of options, we've sort of discussed what, what might happen and the accidental happening. But this business of putting it in context of the past forty years. Play play that out for me. You know what? Exactly does that mean because actually for the f- about two or three years? It seemed that there was a much closer cooperative relationship during the height of the nuclear deal. Cure, and especially on the nuclear issue, which didn't solve all the problems between the United States in Iran. But at least with regard to the most immediate risk that Iran's actions, posed we and the rest of the international community were able to reach a comprehensive agreement to prevent Iran, from developing nuclear weapon as I said that wasn't the ultimate solution to dealing with threats posed by Iranian behavior, but it was a significant step forward. And as I said, before, I think, abandoning agreement has led to a whole series of foreseeable consequences as Iran, which I think, I in the first year after President Trump decided to bail out of the agreement was trying to wait out the administration. And now it's trying to demonstrate that, you know, we can inflict damage on the running economy. They're trying to demonstrate they can inflict damage on our interests and the interests of our friends. And that's a very dangerous cycle to be in it really does seem very. Dangerous. Indeed, if you were advising the current administration. I mean, what would you say? I mean we've heard their, their supporters like Senator cotton talk about fire and fury. We've heard a Pompeo talk about all options on the table. What would you advise right now to? And again, this is all happening in the context of the fake evidence that led to the Iraq war. That's the backdrop against which a lot of people are going to judge this. And I think what's important now is to try to find you know, it's the classic diplomatic challenge. Try to find an off ramp, which helps you to begin to de-escalate the situation. I think for the United States in terms of our strategy we have to get realistic in terms of what our goals are, you know pressure can't be an end in itself. It has to be connected to some realistic, and, and otherwise, I think, hardliners really become mutual enablers in both capitals. We have to be able to quietly, send signals that we're prepared to talk seriously about a range of issues. It would help a lot in trying to find and move down that offramp if Iran, where to take some of the decisions such as the one, you mentioned at the end of your last interview, another words for purely Amana -tarian reasons to release, you know, some of the people, but Britons and Americans Chinese American graduate student from Princeton who's being held. Unjustly and Tefron to begin to take steps like that. There are other issues that we could talk about whether it's with regard to conflicts in Afghanistan, or in Yemen, that I think it's really important to try to look cold-bloodedly at the dangers of esscalation and take some quiet steps. So that the situation at least doesn't get any worse, so Iran, using going to take further steps to pull away from the nuclear agreement isn't going to conduct further attacks and the Gulf, and the United States begins to consider, you know, the virtues of not adding to the pressure that we're building right now that might create a circumstance in which you could not only deescalate, but begin to talk quietly about some of these really, really risky. I mean, he does sound very optimistic that that's going to work. So I just want to quickly ask you briefly. Now what you read of the real intent coming out of allies in the Persian Gulf region. Saudi Arabia, the UAE. They all say we don't want war, but where. Really, you know, by the same token, they really happy to ratchet up the, the strangulation news. I think there are a lot of cheerleaders right now for hardliners in Washington cheerleaders in the region who really aren't interested so much and saying, better nuclear deal, but are interested in producing either the capitulation of this Orion regime, or its implosion. And no one needs to be convinced me of the, you know, the threats and the dangerous at this Orion machine poses. But I think neither of those goals, implosion or capitulation are realistic ones. And until we get more realistic about our ends. I think the means that were employing maximum pressure can contribute to a really dangerous. Esscalation. Well, we're certainly going to keep watching this. Thank you so much from from for your invaluable perspective. Hi, I'm Bill Kristol feeling confused about politics, who isn't. That's why my podcast conversations with Bill Kristol. I have thoughtful conversations with leading figures in politics and public policy we reflect on where we are. And we consider where we're going subscribing itunes or wherever you get your podcast and check out our archive for conversations with guests like Mike, Murphy, David Axelrod, Ron brownstein, and Paul Begala. No spin no soundbites just thoughtful real conversations. Please do. Subscribe today to conversations with Bill Kristol. Remember to create an ad like this one, visit pure winning dot com slash CNN the right sheets. Can take your sleep and your style to the next level with bollandbranch? The upgrade has never been more audible. Every set is crafted from one hundred percent organic cotton. They get softer and softer over time. That's why they have thousands of five star reviews and even three US presidents have Boll and branch sheets. Try them for. Thirty nights. And if you don't love them, send them back for a full refund. Go to bollandbranch dot com today for fifty dollars off your first set of sheets, plus free shipping with promo code CNN to spelled B O L L, andbranch dot com. That's bollandbranch dot com, promo code CNN, too. We turn now to another tense confrontation in Hong Kong where massive protests continued for the second weekend. Organizers claimed two million demonstrators took to the streets. She executive Carrie Lam promised to suspend the controversial extradition, Bill with China, and she apologized for code government shortcomings. But protesters want more they're demanding the extradition, Bill be fully withdrawn. Jochen Awang was the leader of Hong Kong's, democracy, movement and is now free to join the protests. He was released from prison today after serving one month of a two month sentence for his part in the city's last major demonstrations. That was back in the fall of twenty four team in his first public comments Wong. Join the call for a complete end to the extradition, Bill. Suspension, the evil Bill. It not it's not enough. We asking for withdrawing the proposal in the next few weeks. Massive mobilization, March and demonstration will happen again. My next guest Nathan law is a close friend of Joshua Wong, and fellow pro-democracy. Activists in Hong Kong, he was also legislated, there, though, the government removed him from his post, no greeted wall on his released from prison. And he tweeted this message. Welcome back, Joshua Wong to join our fight hashtag, no China extradition. Nathan law, welcome back to our program. Hello. Well, so tell me where is this going Carrie Lam, she has admitted shortcomings? She suspended, the extradition Bill and the protesters say they will more. What is it exactly apart from a full withdrawal of the Bill that you want? Well, very class. I, we want her to retreat, the Bill instead of suspending because she wants said that in her press conference set of the Bill was good. The Bill goes with good intention, and possibly take could be region reintroduced. So for us asking her to retreat that is the safest solution for us. And Secondly, we won't fool investigation on the police brutality, on Wednesday because the police wolf using way too much brutality and forces to the peaceful protesters. They aim at the protests head with a rubber bullet and use tear gas to them. So these are actually Neath a when you use in this way, so is important for us to fight back Justice, not only for the Bill before the people who are injured in the incident. Let me just play what Carrie Lam said this weekend. This was as she was suspending the Bill and then I'll play what Joshua. On your your, your colleague. There has said. I have to meet that I'll explanation and communication work has not been sufficient or effective. The government has decided to suspend the legislative amendment. Exercise restart of communication with all sectors of society. Do more explanation work, and listen to different views of society. I want to stress that the government is adopting an open mind to heat comprehensively different views in society, to us, the Bill. People will not get silence under the suppression of presidency and the chip excecutive Carolina, Carrie Lam must step on otherwise, I live in the next few weeks before the trendy two and -versity of home home transfer of sovereignty mall and Mojo, people not only one million or two million people will come and join our fight until we get back our basic human rights and freedom. So there you have the two sides, clearly, clearly saying exactly what they think do you think is it is it because you all think this is a real existential test for Hong Kong that if this Bill somehow gets through, it's kind of the end of a Hong Kong as we know it. Well, definitely the, the Bill in the pose a lot of threats to every single one of us in two thousand fifteen there were five booksellers in Hong Kong cross-border atop that back to manage China from Hong Kong and from Thailand, and they were forced to confess on TV and we all consider as a political suppression. And if this law is passed than this kind of cross-border adoption will be legalized and normalize and Hong Kong people like not only political dissidents, but reporters reporting sensitive news, in China preaches, apprec- in Manchuria, or train, the main churches, and so on, you name it, these people could be extradited because can respond. They don't like them. So is a very important Bill that we must stop it. Do you think that there are people who are talking about a mass exodus, and remember, obviously, for view is that Hong Kong is a massive financial. Hub and a big hub, as you mentioned for journalists who are based in that region. Many foreign journalists as well. Is there talk now of people young people, particularly abandoning the city state? I think is on the country. Well, there have been a lot of people more than millions people marching down to St. a majority of them are young people. They come out not because they, they're losing hope, but they are like having hope to save the and they wanted to save gutters. Liberty and freedom of the hometown. So I think, well, I can see lots of energy, and well forward-looking mindset of them. So I think that the afterwards and prosperity of phone call, if we keep going keep fighting for that this thing could be happening in the Fisher, okay? Now what do you what do you expect? Because the United States, obviously has a role. It also has a special relationship with Hong Kong and the US of state said, the President Trump will bring up this issue with president, gee at the G twenty which is not so long from now. What, what do you think the US can do? What do you hope President Trump will say? Well, actually, the America has of provocative interest. In Hong Kong, there are more than eighty five thousand a year citizen in Hong Kong, and more than a thousand three hundred companies and is it has referring strategic importance to the foreign policy is Asia in Hong Kong for a US? So I think, well, protecting home cones rule of law and autonomies also beneficial for us in preserving his interests. So they've Xi Jinping. And like President Trump is going to meet in a g ten thirty I expect that President Trump is not only talking about trade or economy. They talk about values and they will talk about freedoms and real flow. And these things. The well, the, the, the reasons why home could be very successful in terms of being financial help and being one of the most advanced international city. All right, Nathan law. Thank you so much indeed. We also will continue to watch this issue. And our next guest is the official poet laureate of the United States. Tracy k Smith won the Pulitzer prize in two thousand twelve for life on Mars a collection of poems on science and religion, and she's being the face of American poetry ever since twenty seventeen when she became poet laureate. Her new book Wade in the water brings us back to earth and explores American history through an extraordinary series of letters exchanged between slaves and their owners in the eighteen hundreds and she sat down with our Walter Isaacson to talk about it. You've written an extraordinary memoir, ordinary light in which you talk about your childhood, your background. How does that relate to your poetry? I think a lot of the stories that I tell in ordinary light and some of the questions about family and divisions -ality live and my poetry, but they came out differently in prose, I felt like telling. The story of my family and pros was an act of persistence peeling back different layers that in my poems. I've managed to leap away from I'd also allowed me or even maybe forced me to develop vocabulary for talking about race that I hadn't as a poet, found, and faith was also part of my upbringing and life on Mars there. There are some questions about God and the afterlife that come in, but I wanted to go back to the very beginning, and think of how did God become a part of my life hell of I wrestled with, with that relationship, and what does it tell me about who my parents were, and who I am? So the memoir answered answered those same questions differently for me he should note with your fault, who's a inertia engineer, but growing up black in the segregated south before then. Right. And then you write life on Mars which seem. To have some resonance from what he's doing. My father was born in nineteen thirty five and rural Alabama, he left the south in the early fifties to join the air force, and he always told us he left because the south was too hot. But I think that there were other factors at play as well. He was somebody who had a huge curiosity about the world and really the universe about the university. I really systematic mind. He was an engineer by training. After he left the service. He took a civilian job which allowed him to work on the optics for the Hubble space telescope. And that was something that I think delighted him because he had been science fiction lover growing up and to be working on a tool that would show us as he described it how the universe itself was born with something that filled him with immense. Delight and tell me about your mother and the influence, she had my mother was my dad's generation. They were born with any year of one another. And she had been a librarian and schoolteacher before I was born and I knew her as a stay at home. Mom her faith in God was something that really drove our family. And I think gave us a sense of hope and support getting through, what was hard was always a matter of, let's get together and let's pray about it. And she was also. Somebody who was really funny, who loved meeting, new people and listening to their voices and stories and who delight us with stories of her own upbringing in the south together. I think my parents really gave my siblings and Mia sense of anchoring that stretched from. You know, the spirit realm, and the sense that we belong to a creator, who, who loves and cares about us. And the sense of the world has something that was structured an orderly, and that we needed to work hard to contribute to was your any tension between your father's view of the universe as a scientist, looking at it through the Hubble space craft and your mother's view of the universe looking at it from religious, and spiritual viewpoint. It seems like there should have been. Right. We think about these two things as really different from one another. But my dad had this really beautiful way of synthesizing these perspectives. And I remember the question of, you know, creation versus evolution would always come up in conversations when they were talking about faith with somebody who wasn't a believer, and what I would say, you know, the bible talks about time and heavenly terms and earthly terms. And I, I would love to believe that God's sense of seven days might be millions. Billions of years on earth. And in that time, ablution is probably something that could happen and an instantly, I felt free. I felt free from this burden of having to say. Well, if I love God, then I have to turn my back on these other things that feel real to me. He said, no, you don't. The universe is huge. And there's a space in it for a lot of connections. We might not think are logical. And your more. Recent book Wade in the water is about thinking about what is like to be black in this world, quite a bit. Yeah. I mean, in some ways, those very same questions, who are we had, we relate to one another. And what do we do to one another move through? I think most of my work, but in this book race became the, the, the, the point of collision, and I think it's because we live in a moment where those questions of difference have suddenly become so. Profound and. Unsaddling to bunch of. Yeah. I mean, there's a sense of violence, that's a rapid around. I think fear over this difference. And I felt suddenly like the history that used to feel so far behind us was kind of catching up, how can poetry hope so. Well, I love poems because they pull me out of my own perspective. No matter what I'm reading it's a poem, that's coming from someone else's vocabulary and imagination and poems are sometimes challenging to our own sense of authority, our own assumptions about the world. And if we let them they invite us into a larger and stranger view of experience and of what is possible if you do that enough, you become better at accepting other people on their own terms? You also become more curious about who they are. And what experiences have contributed to their perspectives, and I feel like you know, that's one of the one of the bridges that might get us from where we are now to where we really ought to be in winning devices. You use to do that in making poems out of a collage really of letters and entries and writings of African Americans who were fighting the civil war. Others. How did how did you come up with that idea? And how does it work as poetry? Well, I was interested in history because it felt so eerily present. And so I just was looking back at historical documents trying to learn I had a question about what the experience of black soldiers and their families would have been in the civil war. And so I found all of these primary documents letters and deposition statements and whereas I thought I was going to be reading them kind of matab. Sizing them and coming up with my own vocabulary for discussing them, I was overwhelmed by how moving how coherent how persuasive poetic and also a live those voices feld. And I said it doesn't make any sense to overwrite these voices with my own. I should curate something. And so that's where the impulse toward found poem began for me. And another thing you do in this book is I think you call a racial porn, and would you take a document document. Maybe we all know some words we all know, but erase a couple of words and explain that to me. And I think you have an example declaration, which I'd love you to if you really erasure is a is a an art form, that's been around for, for generations, and I think it's interesting because it takes one document that expects to live in a specific context and to be received by specific audience, and it tampers with that. Little bit. It invites us to hear it differently and sometimes what you hear is a counter current. So I have a poem, that is called declaration, that comes from the declaration of independence. I was rereading that document. And I got to a place where I began to hear something and the grievance that, you know, the colonists had against England that felt very similar to. Agreeance that contemporary blacks might have about the nature of America and American history about the role of black life in this country through the ages. And it felt very unsettling to me. It's funny because when you're writing your off and saying, okay, I want, I want to be spoken to. I want to hear something that's not just me. But when that happens, it can be really surprising until the poems called his poem called declaration is in to the region of independence. Tackling but was the rations declaration. He has sent hither swarms of officers to harass our people. He has plundered our ravaged our destroyed the lives of our. Taking away our. Abolishing our most valuable and altering fundamentally the forms of our. In every stage of these oppressions we have petitioned for redress in the most humble terms, our repeated petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our immigration and settlement here, taken captive on the high seas to bear. And that's of course, from the declaration, accusing the king of England have things he's done. And yet, when you do the array, sure it makes it more universal something we live through every generation in our history. Yeah. I think you're right. I mean I definitely hear grievances that feel very, very applicable. But I also understand that it tells me this is a story that others have also lived in their way and shouldn't that foster kind of compassion, kind of understanding or couldn't it. And I think that's a question that runs through many of these poems and their poems that are hard on this country because I love this country, another of those poems striking image, political resonant strikes home to me because I'm from Louisiana about Baton Rouge, and it's about an amazing photograph when incredibly well-dressed African American woman. L. Elegantly standing there as the police are trying to restrain the crowd. Did you do that poem from looking at that photograph? And if so what was in your heart when you did it? And then maybe we to some of it. Yeah, yeah. I was looking at that photograph. It's by Jonathan walkman photo journalist and the woman in it is named Aisha Evans. And she was at a black lives matter, March, and she's wearing this Ghazi sundress on a day, with, like a gentle breeze. And so there's this incredibly lira coll- image of her with the wind blowing the dress back. But on the other side of the photo, there are a number of police officers in riot gear. And so there's this really interesting imbalance between the weight and the defense on one side and somebody that seems to be standing in peace. I had an immediate gut reaction to that photo. But I wanted to look at it and see what else I could gather I wanted to see if the photo could invite a different. Kind of Okabe Larry for. For the sense of tension. And so this is what this is what I found. Unrest in Baton Rouge. Our bodies. Run with ink, dark blood blood pools in the pavements seems is it strange to say? Love is a language few practice, but all or near all speak, even the men in black armor, the ones, jangling handcuffs and keys. What else are they so buffered against if not loves blade sizing up? The hearts familiar meet we watch and grieve, we sleep stir, eat love, the heart sliced open, gut it clean love naked almost in the everlasting street, skirt lifted by. Different kind of breeze. Well, I read a really nice New York Times profile of you, and it said that after reading that poem, I think maybe it was in South Carolina somewhere, a group of police officers came up to you and said, ride with us and see it from our side only about that. Yeah. I read this minute community center and. South Carolina, and that happened. I shared it as I was reading the poem. I could see the officers in the back and I was thinking I wonder what they're going to make this poem and afterward. They came up and said, you're welcome. If you come back, here's our card. You're welcome to come along with us, and see how we do our job. I read a lot of different things in that offering. It was kind I think it was offered in a kind of motive civility, but I think they were also saying it's a complicated job that we do. There's a lot at stake and. We want to show you how how we take it. I wish I could have gone with them. Will you jumped on if I go back? Yeah. Militia one of the things about poetry in your poetry in particular, is that even though it's sort of tough at times, it has a healing under current to you feel that these poems could heal is that something you feel the role of poetry. Well, I think poetry can do that. I think poetry teaches us to look at things in a more courageous way. And to sit with them longer than most other forms of communication urge us to at this moment in human civilization. But, you know, even going back to that offering I believe that we're countable to each other. And I think I wanna believe that's what those officers were saying we're countable to one another. We are kind to you and maybe your imagination could also be accountable to the world that we move through. And I think the wish of that poem is to say, how can we take this more seriously? Love is a huge enterprise, and it exacts a lot of us. It's, it's challenging it's frightening to say if I love you, then I can't be happy or safe if you're not happy and safe. That's a big investment. Right. But I feel like it's something that we need to begin to contemplate. And I think poems, at least when I'm writing them they feel like a little laboratory, you know, I can do these mental exercises. These thought experiments that might prepare me to live a little bit differently to live with a greater sense of accountability. What did you learn from studying from a shame Ousseini? I learned that poems can take on huge questions questions about responsibility. And that poems can also bring us integrator contact with the private with the, the world that we know and belong to even if it's changing, even if it's gone poems can help us to touch base with the people that we love even if they're lost to time or distance. I also learned that being a poet can be joyful enterprise. Even when you're writing about things they're serious. Or remember when I was shame, as a student, I gave him a book to sign at the end of the year. And it was my senior year of college. And so my heart was heavy. I didn't know what I was going to be doing exactly. But I know what I hoped to do. And so I gave him the book and I was sitting there, he signed it and his inscription was a quote from Yates, and it said and wisdom is a butterfly and not a gloomy bird of pr-. Pray and I love that because he was telling me kind of buck up kid, we're doing this informed, your the little out of gloomy stuff that you have to write about. But you keep the butterfly alive. I hope so. I think about that a lot. I think about the what I now realize was kind of an ugly seriousness that I was, I was taking an applying today's questions, and I think shame says model as you can do this with an abundance of hope and joy and kindness generosity, and you can still get to the heart stuff too crazy -cation with congratulations on your new collection. Thank you ever been with pleasure. And Tracy k Smith later, social collection, which is called Wade in the water is actually available. Now, remember, you can always listen to our podcast and see us online at Amazon dot com, and you can follow me on Instagram and Twitter. That's it. Thanks for watching and goodbye from London. The manhunt for the Golden State killer is over. And there's a suspect in custody. How did law enforcement finally idea him after searching for over forty years, who exactly is the suspect Joseph James Dangelo? How did he fly under the radar for decades? And what are some of the victims and their families saying about the arrest? I'm Biagio Messina and I'm joke Vinci's and those are some of the questions, we explore an all new episodes of unmasking killer. Subscribe now at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts. Hi, I'm Bill Kristol ever wonder what the godfather films or breaking bad can tell us about the health of the American dream or what it was like to be in the Pentagon nine eleven or how supreme court justices talk to each other, when they get together at a conference. These are the kinds of questions I ask and topics I discussed with guests on my podcast conversations with Bill Kristol subscribing itunes, wherever you get your podcast. Check out our archive with guests like general David portrays, David Axelrod, ion her CLE, Ron brownstein and Justice Samuel Alito subscribed today to conversations with Bill Kristol.

Iran US President Donald Trump president Hong Kong Persian Gulf Bill Kristol America Nathan CNN Pompeo kost Tracy k Smith CNN Gulf of Oman Wade Jason vio Christiane Amanpour Walter Isaacson government Islamic Republic of Iran
July 12, 2020 | On GPS: America's stunningly flawed Covid-19 response  the problem and the solutions. Also, is the two-state solution dead? If so, whats the alternative.

Fareed Zakaria GPS

42:04 min | 5 months ago

July 12, 2020 | On GPS: America's stunningly flawed Covid-19 response the problem and the solutions. Also, is the two-state solution dead? If so, whats the alternative.

"We expect a lot from our home is where we live our lives where memories are made where we rest and recharge work and play its home at home advisor committed to keeping yours up and running whether you need to repair and overloaded appliance or bill that summer backyard retreat use the homeadvisor. APP to find a local pro who get the job done right whatever you need, big or small. They'll do everything to make sure everything. Download the HOMEADVISOR APP and get started today. This is GPS public square. Welcome to all of you in the United States and around the world I'm freed Sakaria coming to you live from New York. Today on the show America is number one in new corona virus, cases and by from. So how and why did the superpowers efforts to contain the Bendik go so wrong? We got hit. By the virus that came from China. After, one of the country's pre eminent physicians Zeke Emanuel. Then the Harvard Scholar Danielle. L.! and. Hong Kong is forever changed after China imposed at Conan new lauder. What's next. For the protest movement. Can have a future. I will talk to one of its meters from law. Who is now in exile? Also from peace plan has put the final nail in the coffin of the two state solution. Is there a viable alternative that could satisfy Israelis and Palestinians? Beata beinart tells me about his provocative new idea. But first. Here's my take. The United States is in a unique position among the world's most advanced countries. Far from having flattened the covid nineteen curve, it is watching cases, Spike and several popular states and Dr Anthony Fauci recommended this week that these places seriously look at shutting down their economies again. Meanwhile in other rich countries as diverse as Germany, South Korea and even Spain in Italy the number of new cases, plummeted months ago and has stayed low. America is still exceptional, but no longer in a good sense. In order to understand why this is happening, let's start by examining something America. Got Right economic stimulus. In March and April despite the most polarized climate since the civil war. Congress provided two point four trillion dollars in relief and the Federal Reserve provided even more. This adds up to about twenty five percent of GDP. One of the largest spending efforts in the world. That might explain why. The stock market has barely noticed that the economy remains in its worst condition since the Great Depression. But the size of the stimulus place to America's one great strength Shear Heft, the US economies huge, America's borrowing capacity apparently limitless the dollar for now supreme. It's easy to write checks. At least it should be more on that later. But every other sense American government has failed. It's not just donald trump in the White House which have done a miserable job bringing. To the diverse federal agencies and coordinating with the State's. Look the CDC the FDA and arms of health and human services all failed in their own ways as did state officials. Americans accepted extensive lockdowns far more readily than many predicted, but this period of suffering was meant to buy time for the government to set up systems of testing tracing in isolation, so that once the lockdown ended, people could return to some semblance of normal life confident that the government was monitoring and reacting to new outbreaks. In truth, it squandered the time. Although trump declared in me. We've prevailed on testing his goal of five million tests today with testing available at virtually every cvs in Walmart is still just a dream. Most states still don't have comprehensive testing or contact tracing in place. Is this about money. What federal spending as a percentage of GDP is where it was forty years ago, but that statistic conceals more than it reveals spending on entitlement programs social security. Medicare, and Medicaid has gone up massively as the population ages and healthcare cost sore, but most of the agencies of the federal government have been starved of resources while being given more tasks and mandates. Even the writing of the checks proved hard this time. Countries like Canada and Germany sent out funds faster and more directly than the US provide quick relief to their citizens, while Americans had to wait anxiously navigate websites that didn't work and apply again and again to get a response. The number of federal employees are smaller per capita than in the nineteen fifties. Despite the fact that it's real us, GDP is seven times larger. The government barely hires new recruits anymore. As a brookings report notes, one third of the federal workforce will be eligible to retire between now and twenty, twenty five, and only six percent of federal employees are under thirty years old. You see for almost half a century. Politicians on the right have pursued a strategy of starving the beast and detects campaigner. Grover norquist explained I don't want to abolish government. I simply want to reduce it to the size where I can drag it into the bathroom and it in the Bathtub Steve Bannon. The ideologist of the trump revolution made clear that his goal was the deconstruction of the administrative state. Guess what it was already happening. Winning the fight against Kobe doesn't require a huge bureaucratic apparatus. Hong Kong Singapore Taiwan, and South Korea have relatively small governments measured by government spending, assure of GDP on the other hand Denmark Norway Germany. Have also done very well, and they have relatively large states. All of these cases government bureaucracies are well-funded, enjoy considerable autonomy are not burdened with excessive rules and mandates, and they recruit intelligent people who are accorded respect for working in the public sector. In the United States. We have a culture set by Ronald. Reagan who, as head of the federal bureaucracy, joked fill the. Nine most terrifying words in the English language are I'm from the government and I'm here to help. Kobe should be a wakeup call America needs to rebuild its government capacity. The goal is not a big state or a small state, but a smart state for now what we have is just stupid. GO TO CNN dot com slash free for link to my Washington Post column and let's get started. WanNa bring in one of America's best known doctors. Zeke Emanuel was a top level advisor on health policy in the Obama. White House he is now at the University of Pennsylvania, where he is a professor and the vice provost for global initiatives. Here's a new book out called which country has the world's best healthcare? Zeke, let me start by asking you. If there's one thing you would focus on to explain America's exceptionally poor response to Covid I mean that's such a big. Set of failures, but if there was one thing one variable, you could change. What would it be? Leadership. We've had a lack of national leadership and National Coordination that you've seen almost every other country. That's not a good job whether it's Taiwan or Germany or even Italy. Where you've had actually a coordinated? Program across the whole country, and that allowed a much more rapid response and not one that was haphazard and counterproductive. And when you say leadership, you mean presidential. While leadership at the White House. Yes, it has to be presidential passing on that Manville. The people who are going to coordinate whether it's PP or testing or contact, racing or preparing for a vaccine when we get one, we just haven't had that and you've seen the president say he has the Authority cashing responsibility to states that have done it in very different ways and in an uncoordinated way. When? We look at testing, explain this this failure because as I say the whole point was meant to be the lockdowns by time to set up a system, and it feels to me like the American healthcare system will public health system doesn't seem to have thought about or plan for a situation like this where you needed a tremendous surge. Kind of zero to five million. How would that work in? Why didn't it work? Well, you have. First of all you have to get the big testing. Companies lab core crash and To actually invest in this is a good thing to do. And they sat on the sideline for a long time. Thinking all this will be a bubble. It won't be at work. Are Capital investments so the federal government should a comment and made it work the. Belt the valuable to that the CDC. Frankly screwed around and did not get the test. Right and send out bad testing equipment. We did not secure the. the supply chain, and we didn't bring on our universities rapidly, which have a large Layton testing capacity and compare us where it maybe five, hundred, fifty or six hundred thousand. Kate testing cases a day Germany was three, hundred, fifty, thousand, in early April and Germany has a quarter of our population so it can be done it just that we did not again. Have a national coordinated effort while with the. That was moving all the pieces and had the money to make sure that this was a viable. Enterprise and as you're right, we're now four months into this and we're no better off than we were in mid March. And what does it worry you that? Where we are going to get to? Certainly by October, November and people are going to be spending more time indoors. that does seem to correlate with the virus. Spreading faster. Meritas I pointed out over and over four months now there are four things lead to spread enclosed spaces indoors. You point out. crowds prolonged periods of time and force acceleration, sneezing singing yelling, and yes, it's worrisome. Why do we big outbreaks in the South? They're indoors. Because of the heat is one hundred and fifteen degrees in Phoenix. It's GONNA move, so we've just moved the cases around. We've also increase them. Because we've to rapidly opened up bars and restaurants, indoor places with crowds where people are for a prolonged period of time. We have not done this in the smart way. You know contrast this with a Germany or Italy. That only opened up early May when the Arnav that's. The spread was below one so actually. The virus was declining consistently. You know we opened up in many places a well before cases were declining, and certainly before the are not was below one. Let me. Ask You about Taiwan. Because it really seems to be a country that against all odds has done extraordinary well right next to China, millions of visitors from China. And by the way is you know because it's it's in your book. China Taiwan spends on healthcare as a percentage of GDP I forget the number something I five percent, or because it's it's it's not. Right much lower than us and yet what did? Manage to do this extraordinarily well. If there's any almost every country's made mistakes except maybe Taiwan. Narrowly well, so they were suspicious of China, and they prepare since two thousand and four for this event second, they have a face mask wherein culture and everyone was wearing face, masks and third, the government used its information through its health card network track people in near real time. Their utilization of the health system to identify people who are at risk. Make sure they get cashed it merge it with their travel history, so they know who had been trying in China and get them passed it so they identified all the cases rapidly and to this day they have less than four hundred and fifty cases among twenty four million people seven debts. Near Perfect execution and everyone could learn a lot and their health card has been a a secret here. which I think is something. We should look at very very carefully. Explain that very quickly. We have thirty seconds left. What's the health card? Everyone has health. You can go to the doctor. They swipe it the Ministry of Health knows that you're seeing the doctor when you leave to get paid. The doctor swipes at again with what they've done. The ministry now knows why people have been in what's been administer, and they have as I said near real time in just a day or two information about what's happening in the healthcare. Healthcare system you know if go to our biggest insurance, you've got to Medicare. It takes literally three or four months to know what's happened that you can't really act rapidly in a pandemic or other emergency using that kind of information, so if we actually had a car, we a trusted independent agency, not facebook or Google and not the federal government, looking at this information and monitoring it and helping. Manage patients and manning thing outbreaks. We could really really respond much more rapidly and know who's at risk and be able to advise them and also get them. Thinking pleasure to have you on. I won't. Bill Clinton proposed a version of that card. What is it now in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, almost thirty years nineteen, ninety three. Exactly that's. Next on GPS. If America's covert response has been so flawed, what can be done to fix? It Harvard's Danielle Allen has a plan. America's getting back to work in this new economy your. Business needs every advantage to succeed. You need to be smart and smart. Companies run on the world's number one cloud business system that's sweet by Oracle with net sweet. You'll have visibility and control over every part of your business. Your financials HR inventory ECOMMERCE and more. It's everything you need all in one place whether you're doing a million in sales or hundreds of millions net sweet lets you expertly keep track of every penny. It gives you the agility to compete. Compete with anyone work from anywhere and run your whole company right from your phone. Over twenty thousand companies trust net sweet to make it happen. Make Yours one of them learn more by visiting net sweet dot com slash GPS from there. You can schedule a tour of net sweet and get their free guide seven actions. Businesses need to take now. It's truck full of the top strategies. Executives are using as America reopens for business. Get your free. Guide and product or now at net sweet dot com slash PS. For three days in a row now, the United States has recorded more than sixty thousand new cases of covid twenty, thousand more than the next closest country. Something is wrong with American healthcare. The American response to Covid Nineteen, which has been deeply flawed joining me now with the Solution Danielle Allen. She leads an All Star Group of social scientists and public health experts. Who I intensely studying the covert response and offering recommendations on best practices. Allen is the director of the Edmond Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University where she is a professor. Welcome Danielle let me ask you if I may to start by explaining. How do you get around the problem that Bill Gates talked about on this program and others right from the start which is. You need a national lockdown to make this work. You need a national strategy for testing. You need national standards, and yet in the United States. Power is devolved. I mean there's something like two thousand five hundred different units that have some authority over healthcare of fifty states. What does one do? Good morning aid. Thanks so much for your important question, so let me start by saying yes, we need a national strategy national lockdown. We needed only in the very beginning when we really didn't know what was hitting us. It's really important that responses be tailored jurisdiction to jurisdiction according to the incidence levels of Covid, so we can now see that there are places that aren't near zero incidents, and then there are places that are over twenty five new daily cases per hundred thousand people, those places that we would call in red zones shows going back. Stay at home owners, but that's not true for the places that are near zero case incidents. We need a national strategy of suppression. Mitigation is not good enough mitigation as well. We've been consistently talking about that. Just means slowing the spread flattening the curve sombat plateau that we saw allow that candidates flattening the curve. What we need to do is break the chain. Get Back Down to near zero CASODEX for the entire country. That's what every successful country has achieved we can do it does require focused on getting zero requires to seeing the different incidents levels in different jurisdictions and tailoring policy appropriately. And how do you do that? Particularly with regard to the testing and tracing goose, you say. In your report. That is the key that the only way you can reopen. The economy is why having testing tracing system in place. Exactly we need, we'll be fought. Infrastructure so I'd like building interstates got have that infrastructure to deliver the goods and resources that we need as a community, so there are really two parts. There's the states do, and it's not true that we haven't made progress from March as Dr Manual said. In fact, states have made remarkable progress in many instances building bat infrastructure. It's not everywhere. We need to get that infrastructure everywhere. The second thing we needed to solve the testing supply chain problems. We have six categories of lab in this country that could be supporting a full build out of. Infrastructure we have only maximally activated two of those categories of lab. We have activated state. Public Health labs. We activated the commercial clinical APPs allow course in the quest and so forth. We have only partially activated our hospital labs. We have barely activated our university. Research labs are commercial clinical labs and our veterinary labs Julia make great use of veterinary labs, often surprising to people, so in order to maximize all of our capacity. We have to scale up yonder state level. We really do need a solution that's at a higher level than the state because it's a scaling problem, so what we're recommending is in. Compaq's an interstate compact is a coalition of states that's formerly blessed by Congress, and then Congress can directly fund that compact the new. York New Jersey Port Authority is an example of an interstate compact group of states solving a complex problem that has to be solved a higher scale level than the state, but the states need the underground knowledge to bear on the problem, so you use a compact. Compact, for that Congress can funded directly. We also use impacts for emergency management. So every time there's a disaster Kenner the states are in what's called an Ama, compact and documents, the federal government to direct resources and support that empowers the states to deliver on the strategy that the state's design, so if we could have reachable interstate compacts, we would then be able to do bulk orders for testing. Testing that could add a whole neighborhood of marine testing to our capacity. This is hugely important. Because testing isn't just the numbers of tests we do is about turnaround time. We can't actually do what we need to do with contact tracing if results take more than ideally twenty four hours forty hours tops to get back to a person, currently with the spicing across the South West is taking the. The loud quantity lockers six to eight days to get results back. That's almost like not having testing capacity, because you can't actually use it for contact tracing break the chain once the results are that slow, so we have to activate all the categories of capacity. We have to do that. We need a scale that's above the level of the state. An interstate compact could help us achieve that. I have to ask you when you lay out the extraordinary plan Did you come to do this Europe? Professor of political philosophy you're actually trained in classics and ancient Greek and Latin You sound like somebody who's who's got a fire in her belly. Are Two things I was. I'm very fortunate to be a professor at Harvard, and very early on February and March was very clear to me that the bodies of knowledge here at our school public health and our school medicine in our labs, and so forth that were not making it into the public conversation, and this was very frustrating to me, so I've been sort of on a path says I call it liberate the knowledge. Okay, we actually do know how to control this disease. We do have the capacity in this country. There are places in this country where people have figured it out. Massachusetts has laid out really powerful, impressive teased. Doe. Daniel Island pleasure to have you on. You so much! Next on GPS China says its new national. Security Law for Hong. Kong applies to everyone everywhere. That includes me talking to you here on TV from New York City. I have about to interview. One of the meters of Hong Kong's protest movement. Tune in to see what happens when we come back. There's a show we think you might enjoy. It's called the Ted interview, and it's hosted by Chris Anderson the head of Ted you'll hear from prominent civil rights leaders on the path to ending systemic racism. Including Dr Bernice King Daughter of Dr Martin Luther. King Junior and CEO of the king. Center you'll also learn about what corona virus means for the global economy, and how we can create meaningful connections, while apart for more deep dives with great minds. Check out the Ted interview wherever you listen. Paul has been cast over Hong Kong. Ever since China imposed a new national security law, their books being removed from schools journalists. It concerned that they could be arrested for honest reporting protesters have had their DNA swamped by the police. In ordinary, people are worried about which of the people they talked to maybe spies. My next guest. Nathan Law has been a leader of Hong Kong's protest movement and he fled the city after the lowest passed. Nathan I. What is the atmosphere among the leaders of the protest movement among ordinary Hong Kongers right now. Well of course people worrying because the national security low basically grounds Hong Kong government I'll sweeping power to prosecute polygamists that they like to. Because while the law is written very fake foam for example. If you trick a hatred towards the Central, government of the Hong. Kong government, you could be prosecuted, but they have never defined what so-called creating hatred mean it will be a tailor-made of cases, fall lot of political ATIS in Hong Kong and provide legal weapons for the government to conduct political prosecution. So the the Hong Kong government says the doom and gloom over the law is unfounded, and they're all nations impose their own national security over their territories. So why shouldn't China? It also says the law was made necessary after outside groups inspired protesters to violently push for independence. What is your response to that? The National Security Law in Hong Kong specifically. Talk it freedom of expression, which lung of the other National Security Law restraining on the very first day his implementation, there were cases. That suspects. They were just carrying flags or stickers that have the slogan of the protest song. They were already arrested and the next day. The government announced that this Logan's off. The movement are considered to be breaching the National Security Law. Circuit eight is not targeting those so-called protester, but talk dating the freedom of expression of people, and they will prosecute you just because you're exercising your right to speak, so this is a fundamentally different thing in Hong Kong and they're using it as like legal rapin to really talk at peaceful protesters. So what can you do I mean the protest movement now under these new pretty draconian conditions. And what do you want? The United States and other Western countries to do. For now, Hong. Kong people are really resilient and tenacious We have just have A. Primary election for the pro-democracy camp and more than six hundred thousand people came out to votes. This is actually an astonishing thicker given that the government has been threatening the people that this is a illegal or even a primary election that may breach the National Security Law, which leaves them two years of imprisonment, so you can see Hong Kong. Is Pretty much still alive. For the Western democracy, especially for the US I've actually issued an open letter. Urging democracies. Which have signed the extradition treaty with Hong, Kong including the US to suspended in order to show that Hong. Kong now we know rule of Nola, so well signing these treaties will be inappropriate and also targeting sanctioning and only individuals who are responsible for the humorous violation in Hong Kong China would be preferable for us because this is how we hold China accountable. Do you think the world should boycott. The Winter Olympics Ping Ping the will be held in China. Yes definitely the well was should reconsider whether our mechanism to hold China accountable. Still effective you could see for the past that case, trial on circumstantial or the. Infection or Any mechanism that whole China accountable so that they have countless and analysts. Violation in China, for example, the concentration camps and John in Tibet. The military intimidation to Taiwan also was happening in Hong Kong so winter Olympic only impact is motto is is not allowing a such autocratic country to abusing his people, and I think it is not right for us for the world to still continuing your support to the Winter Olympics in Beijing in two hundred, twenty two. You are an exile but I can't imagine it would be very difficult for the Chinese government to to track you. Do you worry about your own safety? Well of course we all know that how extensive China China's rich could be before me. My consideration is more than myself. Because under the National Security Lowell, if we have any progressive international advocacy work that we have been doing for years for example pushing legislation that could hold China accountable. Then we are sent me to the to well years of sentencing, which it will limit the room for international, because he work on the ground in Hong Kong, so my leaving me more than my personal choice is a strategic move down I hope that I could kit my voice on the international level alive so for me. Yes, indeed. I'M NOT IN A. Position, but I will risk it in order to speak the truth to the to the world. May. Stay safe. Thank you so much. Thank you. Next on GPS. If the two state solution is dead and Peter, Beinart says it is what is the next solution for the Middle East. BEINART has an idea controversial one and he will explain it when we come back. Think about your home for a moment. It's where life happens. It's where you build that tree house or try that new recipe. It's where you rest and recharge work and play. You expect a lot out of it, and that's why homeadvisor is committed to keeping your home up and running no matter what they match you with the best pros in your area. Pros who can get your home projects done right from unexpected jobs. Jobs like appliance repairs clogged gutters and leaky faucets to projects. You actually look forward to like creating your very backyard, summer, retreat or getting that new pool installed whatever it is, they're here to help and the homeadvisor APP makes it easy. Use It to book and pay for more than one hundred projects with just a few taps, plus if you're looking for some local inspiration, you can see trending tasks in your neighborhood. So. Whether you need a last minute fix routine home, maintenance or an exciting new upgrade, homeadvisor is here ready to do everything to make sure everything download the homeadvisor APP and get started today. Although the trump administration's Middle East. Peace Plan said its goal was a realistic two state solution. Most who know the region well saw quickly that such a solution wasn't really possible under that plan for starters, the Palestinians have long said they need a significant amount of sovereignty and a significant amount of land to live in peace. Plan office them less of either than previous plans had fizzled. So. If, the two states' solution is in trouble. What is the next door eternity? Peter Beinart has an idea that was published in Jewish currents where he is an editor. At Large, he's also contributed the Atlantic and at CNN. Beat, let me start by asking you. The premise of your of your argument is that the two state solution is dead. And, while people might feel like this administration has put forward a bad plan, or there were other problems I think a lot of people who are still going to say no, the goal is still two states. Israel and Palestine living separately side by side in peace and security. Why did you come to the conclusion that that basic idea that you had believed in your whole life is now essentially dead. Hearing people saying that the two state solution is on the verge of debt. My entire DOT light in nine hundred eighty two former deputy mayor of Jerusalem, New Situation on the ground better than almost all Israeli said that if there were one hundred thousand settlers in the West Bank, it would be impossible, great, a viable and contiguous Palestinian state there now six hundred fifty thousand settlers. Israel's Supreme Court justices live in the West Bank. It's second most powerful politician arguably Avigdor Lieberman lives. They are Israel build its newest medical school last year in the West Bank at a certain point, those of us who have supported Tuesday solution and have been saying for years and years on the verge of debt is Thomas. Friedman data. Two Thousand Three John Kerry did in two thousand, thirteen to recognize if the egg cannot be unscramble and the price of continuing to imagine that there can be a two state solution is in reality, the acceptance of status quo that leads millions of Palestinians without the most basic of human rights. And so the the reality that you're describing the reality of continued Israeli occupation and settlement of parts of the of the West Bank, and particularly when should know the parts that are habitable right there? There are large parts of the West Bank, that are being given, but a lot of that is desert. Absolutely you look at the trump clan, even earlier plant, essentially imagining that there will be a kind of archipelago of disconnected Palestinian towns that might be connected by you know tunnels or roads with Israel controlling land in between that doesn't provide the basic dignity and opportunity for security and prosperity. The Palestinians like all people deserve, and that's why I reluctantly I say reluctantly, after a lot of kind of soul-searching began to think about alternatives, and as I read more and more, I began to think that they're actually bit. Equality could be a viable and even liberating alternative not only. For Jews to. So explain how that would work. One St with two one st that encompasses all of Israel the West, bank even even Gaza. and. normal voting for everybody you know in other words. Everybody has the same vote in which case. What kind of government do you imagine? Well, it could either be one state that gave a lot and Tani to different regions were different groups live, or it could be a confederation which would be to state, but allowed free movement a little bit like what you have in the European Union I. Know This it's hard for many people to imagine that a binational state state that encompasses two different national entities can work, but it's important to remember that Israel is already. Binational State is Israel controls all of the territory in the West Bank and even in Gaza where Israel controls, who comes and who goes and. And what we know from political science research is still deeply divided. Societies are more stable and more peaceful when everyone has a voice in government. That's why the violence in Northern Ireland. Stop when Catholics gained a vote in government is why violence in the political violence in South Africa ANC and other stop when apartheid ended I think it. Although a Binat depot, binational state would be messy and complicated in difficult in many ways he would actually be a more stable and peaceful place for Palestinians and Jews then one state in which millions of people lack basic rights. So a lot of people would argue with you and have argued with you. The time serve Israel has a very long Piece. Refuting your arguments and sort of one of the central arguments against your your case is the Palestinians. You assume that the Palestinians would accept this. You assume that Palestinians would accept Israel. They do not seek the destruction of the Jewish people and the Jewish state, and you know people argue there's a lot of evidence to the contrary. I think the the the again we know from other conflicts is the oppression. Violence and that justice inequality produces more peace and I. Actually think there's evidence of this in Israel Palestine to look at the Palestinian citizens of Israel or sometimes called Arab Israelis. They suffer significant discrimination, but they have the right to vote violence against Jews by Israeli Alston citizens, even though they have much more access to commit violence against Jews is very very very rare and. And I think that's because Palestinians are acting like other human dis when you give people the right to express themselves in nonviolent ways by voting by expressing their their their opinions very very few people want to kill or be killed, and I think it's the dehumanisation of Palestinians that unfortunately has affected Jewish discourse so much. That prevents us from seeing. That's true about them to. D-. Do you think there are people who say this is kind of a fantasy? This is utopian. There's just impossible to imagine. Something like this. How how unrealistic is this? It's unrealistic today at the two state solution is also unrealistic. Great moral changes almost always appear unrealistic early on the floor. There is a vast movement for age. Look at how black lives matter that move in a few months has made things that seem completely unrealistic. See now that the hospital, the advantage of equality which is the same message as the black lives matter movement. Movement has brought to the US. The same message in the Anti Apartheid movement is that it is a message compelling enough to produce a mass movement on the ground and around the world that can change what is politically possible. The two state solution is now means a fragmented Palestinian state under Israeli control is no longer a compelling vision to bring about that Movement for Change. You argued that That some of the founders of Zionism would have been comfortable with this. You say what they envisioned was not always a Jewish state, but always Jewish home. Explain what you mean. Today we've come to think of Zionism and Jewish statehood as synonymous, but really up until the nineteen forties wasn't. He looked at of the most important Zionist leaders either her SOLTA. Intensity to a hot calm. Talking about was Jewish society. A Jewish society could run its own affairs and be a refuge for Jews and rejuvenate the entire Jewish world where I call a Jewish own I. believe that that would be possible with with with quality choose would still have enormous power and influence to secure our interest in equal stay. White South Africans have done fine, and they represent twelve percent of the population. Jews represent fifty percent of the population and are far more economically. I believe that this Jewish society. To enrich Jews around the world it could be a refuge for those Jews who are in distress, and most importantly it would not require us to oppress another people and deny them basic human rights, which is a system of violence that sooner or later will bring violence on us to. Peter Beinart pleasure to have you on. And we will be back. Confederate Statues and symbols are being removed all over the country. Some say that this is long overdue. Others say that this is a dangerous effort to a race history. I'm Don. Lemon and this week on silence is not an option. We talk about what D- statues really stand for, and we examine our history our real history. Listen to silence is not an option on spotify or wherever you get your podcast. My Book of the Weakest Toby Ord the precipice. This is a startling, well written book about existential risk. The although us, we do not pay enough attention to the kinds of risks that could really end or drastically alter human civilization like nuclear weapons and climate change. He takes the reader through these risks and how to tackle them. Or does not a pessimist. He thinks human gun could live on for several billion years on this planet and poverty and disease invent fantastic new technologies. But to do all that it has to ensure that we get off the edge of the precipice. And now for the last look. When Mexico's President Andreas, minute Lopez over door visited the White House this week. He and trump were all smiles. They're unlikely allies. One is a self-described leftist and former indigenous rights, activists, the other, a self-described billionaire and real estate developer, but both are anti-establishment populace, and it is this similarity that has undermined both their efforts to tackle the biggest crisis. They face right now the pandemic day after day this week. Daily covid nineteen infections reached new records in both countries. So. How did it get so bad? Well populist governments tend towards cults of personality viewing external crises as direct indictments on the leader, so trump downplay the virus is boasting in early February. We've pretty much. Shut it down the government of Lober or He is called briefly published posters declaring Noah's gravy. In other words, it's not serious. Of course. The primary principle of populism is the rejection of elites including experts in the US trump has disagreed with his own government's advice on masks, testing and treatment similarly I'm Louis government was slow to see the need for lockdowns decried testing as a waste of time, effort and resources. Brazil's rightwing-populist jar both our has become the poster child for mismanagement and denial of the virus. That is until he got infected this week months ago. Bolsonaro claim that even if he got covid nineteen, he wouldn't suffer much to his athleticism. Attended anti lockdown rallies challenge supporters to do push ups. Like the others Bolsonaro dismisses experts and they guidance the Center for Economic Policy Research found that. Bolsonaro, supporters have followed his lead in disregarding social distancing. So now Brazil has the second highest number of new infections behind only the United States mass graves populate the countryside, an indication of an overwhelmed infrastructure. Both scenario trump and Lopez obrigado are seeing their approval. Ratings drop causing observers to wonder if the pandemic will mark the beginning of the end of populism. It's too soon to tell. Keep in mind. The pandemic also brings about economic anxiety and polarize ation the very climate that populist thriving. Thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week. I will see you next week.

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How Beijings National Security Crackdown Transformed Hong Kong in a Single Month

TIME's Top Stories

11:25 min | 4 months ago

How Beijings National Security Crackdown Transformed Hong Kong in a Single Month

"How Beijing's National Security Crackdown transformed Hong Kong in a single month? By Laney Baron in Hong Kong. After Beijing enacted a sweeping national security. Law for Hong Kong, the city's leader tried to allay fears of a broad crackdown on dissent by promising the measure would affect only a very small minority of people. But throughout July, the first full month under the new legislation, the measure featured prominently in a sustained effort to quell political upheaval in the enclave while also ushering Anna transformative climate of fear and uncertainty. The law's provisions which punish crimes related to secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces have been used as grounds for disqualifying political candidates, arresting students over social media posts, and banning common protests slogans. Though blows to the city's democracy movement over the past few weeks have extended beyond the far reaching law itself. Academics who are key figures in the protests were fired from their posts. Police raided the office of an opinion pollster and some vocal members of the political opposition have fled. The drama packed month was capped off in its final hours with a year. Long postponement of the September. Sixth elections while authorities cited the spiralling corona virus outbreak for the move opposition candidate. Saw It as an attempt to thwart their efforts to capitalize on the months long protest movement and simmering public discontent with success at the ballot box for much of last year demonstration shattered the city's reputation as a stable. Hub sparked by fears over Beijing's encroachment on the semi autonomous cities, freedoms and judicial independence. The protests morphed into increasingly bold and often violent challenge of the Chinese Communist Party's authority prompting Beijing to reassert control the new security legislation, which was drafted behind closed doors and imposed without public consultation encompasses crimes committed abroad and stipulates sentences of up to life in prison. It allows China's state security agents to operate openly in the city for the first time and permits tradition to the mainland for trial in Communist. Party controlled courts. Shrugging off international criticism and sanctions, Beijing, and its allies say they will take all necessary steps to safeguard sovereignty and restore stability in Hong Kong. They also insist the city's freedoms remain intact even as activists warn of an aggressive attack on their long-cherished civil liberties. Here's a time line of the major events over the last month. July first, less than twenty, four hours after the National Security Law was enacted police make the first arrests during an annual protest marking the anniversary of Hong Kong's return to China ten people including a fifteen year old girl and a twenty-three-year-old motorcyclist with a Hong Kong Liberation Flag who drove into police are detained their DNA samples collected and home searched. Chief Executive Carrie Lam says at a press conference. That Hong? Kong should be able to continue to enjoy the freedom of speech freedom of press of publications, protests, assembly, and so on. China's foreign. Ministry spokesperson Jolly John says the National Security Law is necessary to quote plug loopholes in Hong. Kong's legal framework. Every sovereign state has the inherent right to legislate in the interest of its national security. He says. July second, the government bans the protest slogan liberate Hong Kong Revolution of our times due to the perceived connotation of separatism and subversion of state power and interpretation protesters deny saying it draws on China's history and aims for political freedom. Legal experts have questioned the validity of the ban. Police warned that so-called Lennon walls made of posted notes with pro protest messages may violate the national, security law. Prominent Activists Nathan, law reveals. He's left Hong Kong over concerns that his lobbying of foreign governments to impose sanctions on the city falls foul of the new law. July third, the Education Bureau instructs all schools to teach students about the National Security Law with a quote positive approach to help foster eight quote unquote correct understanding of the relationship between our country and Hong Kong. U K foreign, Secretary Dominic Robb announces that anyone with British national overseas be Ano- status and their dependents can come to the United Kingdom and potentially received citizenship and offer that extends to an estimated three million. Hong, Kongers. July fourth. Books written by Pro Democracy, activists including Joshua Wong are reportedly removed from circulation at public libraries pending an investigation into whether they violate the national. Security Law. July sixth law enforcement agencies given expansive new powers to enforce the national security legislation. Including the ability to conduct warrantless searches, carry out online surveillance, intercept communications, and require Internet service providers to remove information. FACEBOOK Google and twitter. Say they're suspending the processing of any government requests for user data in Hong Kong while tiktok announces? It will quit operating in the city. July eighth Beijing inaugurates its new headquarters for the Office for safeguarding. National. Security in Hong. Kong. At the thirty three. Story Metro Park Hotel. Education Minister Kevin Young bands students from singing broadcasting or playing the protest anthem glory to Hong Kong in schools because it contains political messages. July ninth. Hong Kong's constitutional affairs. Minister warns that the Pro Democracy Camp selection primaries may breach the new national security law which outlaws obstruction of government duties. Several of the pro democracy candidates had bowed to veto the government's budget and force democratic reforms demanded by protesters if they secured a majority of seats in the law-making body. July tenth police stage overnight raid on the offices of the Hong Kong, public, Opinion Research Institute and independent pollster helping the pro-democracy. Conduct primary election police said they were responding to a citizens report that the pollsters computers had been hacked, prompting a suspected data leak of personal information. July fourteen, The New York Times announces that it's relocating its Hong Kong based digital news operation to Seoul after challenges, securing work permits, and amid concerns over quote, new era under tightened Chinese rule. President Donald Trump signs a law to sanction individuals and banks deemed to have aided the erosion of Hong, Kong's autonomy and approves an executive order ending the preferential economic treatment that Hong Kong has enjoyed. China's foreign ministry says, Beijing will use retaliatory sanctions. July twenty first while clearing out a demonstration in a mall that violated corona virus restrictions, police arrest district councillor, Raymond Chow. On suspicion of breaching the national security legislation. He reportedly held a banner featuring banned protests, slogans including liberate Hong Kong Revolution of our times. July twenty fifth at least ten candidates from the democracy cap including activists Joshua Wong received questions from electoral officers, reviewing their eligibility. The candidates are asked to clarify their stances on issues like the national security, law and sanctions. July twenty eighth longtime pro democracy campaigner. Benny, TAI is fired from his post as associate law professor at the University of Hong Kong sparking fears for academic freedom in a statement about the dismissal. The university did not name tie and only cited termination for quote. Good 'cause. The fire, ring overruled the university Senate which found tie had committed misconduct that did not warrant. Firing tie is currently appealing a sixteen month jail sentence related to the occupy central with love and peace campaign, he co founded in two thousand fourteen. July. Twenty Ninth Police Arrest Four people aged sixteen to twenty, one on suspicion of inciting secession in what appears to be the first such arrests outside of street demonstrations at a press conference. A Senior Superintendent of the newly established National Security Department says, the students are suspected of involvement in an online groups supporting Hong Kong independence. July thirtieth a dozen opposition candidates are disqualified from seeking election including four incumbent lawmakers widely considered to be moderates, the grounds given include. Hong, Kong's independence soliciting foreign interference expressing objection in principle to the national security law and vowing to indiscriminately vote down government proposals. July. Thirty first Laos Yucai Vice President of a Beijing Aligned think-tank tells Hong Kong's public broadcaster RTHK that Beijing was behind the banning of the twelve election candidates in order. To prevent hostile forces from taking over the city's legislature. Director of Public Prosecutions David Leong Resigns from his post, and reportedly reveals in an email to colleagues that he was sidelined from decisions related to the National Security Law. All four students arrested under the national security. Law are granted bail and ordered by police to remove messages from facebook group allegedly pledging support for a republic of Hong Kong. Hong Kong chief. Executive Carrie Lam postponed the city's September six elections for one year citing the severity of the resurgent Corona Virus outbreak at a press conference. She announces that she asked the Central Government in Beijing to determine what will happen to the Legislative Council in the gap before the poll can be called critics call the delay quote naked election manipulation and accused the government of using the public health crisis has an excuse to avoid a repeat of the district council polls last year when the opposition when ABC six percent of seats up for grabs. Chinese state media reports that Hong Kong police have ordered arrest warrants for six quote, unquote troublemakers overseas on suspicion of violating the national security law including Nathan. Law. And US citizens. Samuel. Chew.

Hong Kong Hong Kong Hong National Security Law Beijing Hong Kong Revolution University of Hong Kong Hong Kong Liberation Flag China Chief Executive Carrie Lam Beijing Hong FACEBOOK Joshua Wong National Security Department Nathan Chinese Communist Party Laney Baron executive
Massive wildfires in the Amazon rainforest

PRI's The World

46:57 min | 1 year ago

Massive wildfires in the Amazon rainforest

"The amazon is on fire and some brazilian cities are engulfed in smoke. It's not just that's the climate that suffers the effect of huge wildfires people are feeling to kind of thing in the is because of the ashes and his male of the forest finding a terrible meanwhile politicians and environmental activists argue about the way forward to combat climate change. I'm marco werman also today. Nathan law is one of the most visible activists in the fight for hong kong's democracy even as a student here in the u._s. Is receiving death threats. I have to stay very cautious serious about my life but i think for these cannot disobey take supporting democracy. Those stories are more today. You're on the world. I'm marco werman. This is the world thanks for being with us us today. Take a nice deep breath and say thanks to the amazon rainforest okay. I'm exaggerating a bit but the amazon region produces twenty percent of the oxygen and in the planet's atmosphere. That's why it's been called the lungs of the earth and right now. Those lungs are burning for the past three weeks. Massive wildfires in brazil have have been destroying vast parts of the amazon brazil's national institute for space research said earlier this month that a record amount of farce has gone up in smoke this summer more rain forrest sent in the last three years combined environmentalists have been especially alarmed about deforestation since the election brazil's president gyro bolsonaro last year he came into office promising to develop the amazon region for farming and mining bolsonaro had this to say to his critics yesterday ugliest alda regarding the amazon fis. I'm under the impression they could have been started by the ngos. What was their intention to bring about problems. In brazil. Romolo battista is the amazon campaigner for greenpeace. He's brazil. I asked him what he sees. When he steps outside in the city of manaus we see him announced. Some is smoke and ashes futterman is not close the the big fires have some spot fires but in the main capitals of the moslem is almost impossible to see the light of the sun i mean the amazon is a massive rainforest. How much of it has been affected. Well tanning right now about data. Difficult goes what we have right now. Is that the baltic spots because there is a lot of smoke. The satellite cannot read exactly what it what do we have a is record in the last nine years as to present bolsa narrows claim that ngos started the fires. What is your reaction to that. Also it's a attempt by the president to hide hi dean cellphone consequences of environmental policy. He has been adopted. Its attempt to blaming anyone who denounced the environmental problem screened by his own ordering. How how much of a factor is deforestation in causing these wildfires. Almost all of these fires caused by human actions they use the fire is an instrument of frustration <unk> to destroy inaugu by designed for different use of soil then once we are going to dry seasons much more difficult to talk. It's important to know that there was another fifty percent off the money for the full probational fire he cut house off off the income from this program what we see in <hes> pictures of sao paulo <hes> enveloped in smoke. Do you know how this is all affecting people's people's health whether it's in the amazon or anywhere in brazil in a lot of fights he knows own these are happening since these devices on east start they they have increased of people going to host out because of breathing problems in my nose smell smoke smell will forest bernie or can. She won't be breached in allies. Angle paying goes off a smoke and ashes in india. This is a big problem. Romolo battista is the amazon on campaigner for greenpeace brazil speaking with us from the center of the amazon in manaus. We've got until twenty fifty united nations scientists say that's the world's deadline line for going entirely carbon neutral. If we want to prevent the worst impacts of global climate change many of the democratic presidential candidates have incorporated that ambitious goal goal into their climate policy proposals but today vermont senator bernie sanders went a step further sanders says by twenty thirty the u._s. should transform two sectors of its z. Konami transportation and electricity generation entirely to renewables. That's just over a decade from now. So is that even possible. Dan trag is ahead of harvard university's center for the environment. You know i hate to say something is impossible but it certainly sounds extremely challenging especially for the transportation sector if we just take cars which in some ways is the easiest art last year in the u._s. About two percent of new vehicle sales were electric vehicles mccalls and that's that's almost double from the previous year but it's still a long way from even being one hundred percent of new vehicle sales much less one hundred percent of vehicles that are actually on the road and remember that cars are just about half the problem. There's the trucks and airplanes ships many any other forms of transportation that we have to think about what what do you think can be done in ten years. Well what's exciting about. The renewal energy world right now is that many sources of renewable energy have gotten really inexpensive both solar and wind costs continue to come down and the most recent exciting news news is it offshore wind has come way down in cost and so one of the first things to do was just to build out that wind and solar on our grid to me that should be a no regret strategy so give us a dose of realism here i mean what would you do to get as kind of carbon neutral as possible by twenty fifty the date the u._n. Says we need to be carbon neutral well. I think it's important to remember that the climate system the earth actually doesn't care about <unk> out u._s. Emissions per se cares about global emissions and so our goal is not just to reduce emissions but reduce emissions in a way that other countries can follow because we need the whole world to do this so you know having a crash program to reduce emissions but doing it in a way that is very expensive and looks very unattractive to the rest of the world doesn't actually help us solve the problem. We need to think about this in terms of global leadership and doing it in a smart way. This is one of the reasons the communists like a price on carbon so much because it doesn't pick the winners but let's the market figure out. What are the most cost effective ways to do this and that ends ends up being more attractive to other countries in the world to choose those same technologies well. It's interesting because <hes> bernie sanders plan includes two hundred billion dollars in green climate fund to help help other countries cut pollution. Elizabeth warren is also calling for a kind of green marshall plan. What are your thoughts on international aid being part of our domestic climate planet well. I think it it's a wonderful idea but the numbers are way too small. You know if we're gonna spend sixteen trillion dollars in the sanders plan to lower u._s. Submissions spending two hundred billion dollars for all the other countries in the world seems like maybe a little out of balance in terms of what the real problem blow requires but it's not the total amount of money. I think it's about how we're gonna spend it. I think one of the things that we should be doing is thinking about actually providing financing the way china's doing for energy investments around the world. This doesn't necessarily have to be foreign aid. We're not giving money away but we're providing wedding financing and we're providing technical assistance in making sure that countries are making wise responsible energy investments over the next twenty years. Dan trag professor of geology at harvard and head of the university center for the environment. Thank you thank you when it comes to demanding political action on climate change environmentalists recruiting each other to share their most effective protest tactics this month in france ecological groups have been holding a joint training camp camp for more than a thousand activists to teach methods of nonviolent protests including civil disobedience. They plan specifically target the g. seven summit that starts in biarritz france. That's this weekend bbc paris correspondent lucy williamson. Has that story the mood here this morning. Camp is really peaceful really tranquil. The sun is boiling hot today and there's hundreds of people in little groups getting their lunch on the grass. You probably hear that children running around under rows of brightly the colored flags. This is a country very proud of its protests tradition but the training camp here is designed to teach people how to make their protests count. Don't different moved inside the training hall. Several dozen people playing the lows of police these protesters and government officials from demonstration's your child's to practice keith protests skills how to block officials from getting to an event hell to engage with the police get arrested. They say they teach a strictly non-violent approach but is it irresponsible to offer large numbers of young people training meaning in civil disobedience. One of the trainers here today is lear of us. No i don't think so. Actually we are two point. Where what's our leaders. Political reduce. Do is irresponsible taking care of time. It's is responsible and that's why we are taking our responsibility and we are acting climates and and this is what is responsible to do this also white we train people. The crowd here has grown own since the camp started three years ago. More than a thousand people took part this month including nineteen year old leon. I was hoping to meet people bolstering the same ideas as i do and also trying to have some training about civilians and also environmental low. I'm a law student. I wanted to do environmental low as a law student. Do you think people should be breaking the law to raise awareness about the climate. I think you can break the low. If it's legged. I think some low dude for us. There are too complicated and there are really against justice. Sometimes it's actually actually a paradox. This sprawling site was donated to the camp organize by the local openly supportive supportive of the training here despite the fact that some of the actions being taught are legal and some of the key activists are facing trial for stealing official portrait of president macron. One of them is twenty three year old. Felix currently facing trial for removing the pictures from three town pulls in paris in excess double degree belongs to have so far collected one hundred twenty seven official portrait from across france expect to see them reappear at the group's protest during the g seven summit feels as long as governor in response to civil hardening on the other hand more to learn these techniques in half were mobilizing the hundreds who turn tactics of both police police and protesters have been under scrutiny and france after months of demonstrations by the julian social movement with the police facing accusations of unnecessary secetary force in dealing with them commander christopher j a spokesman for the french police union explained how they were preparing tearing for the g. Seven summit wants his country through gio gonzalez lawler new french. Police officers reuse them. Even uh-huh there is a certain apprehension because climate with this year's demonstration behind this fatigue police forces in olso of stigma police from extremist groups of what organizers at the training camps say their strategy is nonviolent and and they'll adapt their methods depending on the police response. One thing was sure of lia told me we want to have our message heard. Whatever the level evola police repression will do something the b._b._c.'s lucy williamson in biarritz france. That's where world leaders from the g. Seven seven countries arrive tomorrow. There's some it starts on saturday. Collectively the seven countries plus the e._u. Are the world's dominant financial powers but they also happen to be countries under the enormous political stress at the moment canada's justin trudeau faces ethics complaints italy's prime minister jess resigned the u._k. Continues to struggle with brexit and here in the u._s. Voters are still very much divided over the two thousand sixteen election and what could happen in twenty twenty one player watching closely from the sidelines is russia president trump arise and francis weekend and he's made the case that russia should be brought back into the g seven returning the group once again to the g eight. We'll have more more on that story tomorrow here on the world coming up next the west african nation of ghana is inviting the descendants of enslaved africans to come home. It's even offering them land for resettlement but this gone and chief says there's a learning curve for african americans moving to ghana you'll coming in and expectations that it should be like american communist america monica leaving. It was like america. You'd be discriminated against. That's coming up next here on the world. I'm marco werman and you're with the world. It was four hundred years ago that the first enslaved africans were brought here to the english colonies all this week we've been hearing stories rays from ghana one of the places in africa where the transatlantic slave trade began in the final stories in our series from ghana the world's rupa shenoy introduces us to the chief of of one ethnic group there who's apologized for its role in slavery first of all full disclosure when you visit some chiefs in ghana. You're supposed to bring gifts ap's specifically bottles of local whiskey. We bought three bottles for the chief of their new ethnic group only three unfortunately a i know one of the chiefs ministers explains the proper etiquette bring two taking in the chiefs palace in ghana's volta region. It's a green mountainous area with lots of lakes about an hour away from across the chief. Offer kutu arrives with his aides in traditional dress and sits in a thrown at the head of the room. He reminds everyone. I wanted to check their phones silent. I've been instructed not to cross my legs and to address the chief. As your majesty i asked him about a qualm history very safe wanting to talk about what moves today. I mean we'll talk to that. Cows go to greece and come home. They once ruled half this country they we're fighters and protectors victims of the slave trade and participants in two once they took over a so-called slave castle in acros where the danish lived and imprisoned the africans before selling them into slavery. The aquatic seized the castle for leverage in order to negotiate for better terms in the slave trade checkered history that hopping and we kinda dwell on the past forever. We've rented out. I'll pull it to our kinsmen with two can from the cousteau of <hes> especially in west africa to adopt brought to slips league drizzly condemned dot inhumane treatment. We cannot explain too much wide happened by it. Always says all do apology <hes> they should come home with the closure terrific so kind as brothers and sisters. The chief has offered land to any african americans who wanna come live here. Is the homeless home no matter what happened. We think this is where it belongs part of us. No one's currently taken them up on the offer still. He says he knows african. Americans love african culture and if they move here they should be prepared to be part of it is. I'm right salon of freedom. You know so what it got to do anything dilate. You can't even call your mumbai fascinating. You know by africa and i want to do that. We cannot call your dad by his repeater conscient- the differences between african american cultures those come up a lot. The name is fritz baffle. This is another cheap. I spoke to he's from another ethnic group from an area inside accra and he's a little less formal. We meet at a tennis klopp. No-win african americans come here and they want things done quick quick because they feel that these come home and therefore we should jump in welcome them. You're coming coming in and your expectations that should be like american communist america and even like america you'd be discriminated against thou- four has experienced with americans and he was a member of parliament in two thousand fifteen when the obama family visited and balfour escorted them through the castle one of the hubs of the transatlantic slave trade when a foreign dignitary comes to a new location in ghana he the first stop is supposed to be the traditional chiefs palace balfour says obama's advanced team wanted to skip that part about four insisted it was to and fro but we managed to convince the americans and so when president obama came he met the traditional ruler and they did the proper welcoming pour libation the traditional rights that we use one of his students. The visit was a huge boost for ghana baffour says obama addressed the history of slavery sorry in a way that didn't overtly place blame. One of the most striking things that i heard was that right above the dungeons in which male captives were kept it was a church and that reminds us that sometimes we can tolerate and standby great evil even as we think that we're doing good. It's not that because we remain that we've got to be guilty not all right. It's not about the game. It's about a conversation but the thing is when it comes down to the nitty gritty was roope who initiated the slave trade. He says it's europeans who started the slave trade and then imposed colonialism ravaging this country and setting it back decades ghanaian social media personality the and editor jamila wound pony odd ally says some ghanaians argue that they have suffered just as much as african american it becomes this narrative of the africans or the black people in america is struggling more than the black people on the continental. Whatever at the end of the day the reality is it was an injustice to an entire is higher group of people and reality in ghana today is that unemployment is high. Some children still work. Instead of going to school in some places is women can't own land. If you have to public hospital you have to bring your own bed sheets drinking water and hot water flasks. I've had conversations with people who i really really considered to be part of. Those who would help rebuild ghana like honesty some of our brightest most well equipped people and they're leaving leaving instead of asking african americans to return jamila says gun and should be focusing on what they can do to improve the situation here so educated heated ghanaian. Stay in the country. She's one of the few people openly questioning ghana's called for the african diaspora to return. What are they moving back home to. I know the struggle of living abroad studying abroad. I have done that multiple times but it's not the same as trying to figure things out in an environment where the system uh-huh does not work but at the first chiefs palace i did meet at least one family. That's considering moving back a mom and daughter. They were in the audience as they talk to their quantity chiefs question coming. Thank you the mother. Donna upper coup was born in ghana and moved to the u._s. When she was eighteen after retiring from a career in nursing she moved back here to be an advisor to the queen mother the chief smart she wants black americans to africa and ghana the way jewish people see israel will die for his right. So why isn't he done for africa. In is is slavery still africa wants them so this your the whole donna's daughter opera coup owns a tourism business in san francisco and is thinking about moving here herself. She has four young boys. I call them my little brown boy joy and the incidents with trayvon martin and to me arise give me pause in raising a young black man in in america. We want our children to experience being a place where they're free. They haven't made a final decision yet. Although a coup can attest that there's a lot of culture to get the hang up here if you get scolded for not doing the quote unquote right faint traditionally i implore all my brothers and sisters is in desperate. Don't take it personally because we're all getting. She says african americans who come to ghana should stand their ground because is africa belongs to them to for the world rupa shenoy accra ghana spent some time with all of rupa stories from ghana photos reporting and personal reflections all at the world dot o._r._g. You with the world tomorrow. The trump administration rolls out a new immigration policy that could keep migrant families in detention indefinitely. Sadly critics say there is a better way. The alternative is <hes>. It's a pejorative term but the alternative is catch and release it worth before i'm marco werman. Stay with us for that story here on the world. I'm marco werman and you're with the world world where a co production of the b._b._c. world service w. g. b. h. p._r._i. N._p._r. Acts the trump. Administration is set to publish new regulations tomorrow that would permit permit the indefinite detention migrants including children who went to the country without papers. The plan would overturn decades old rule known as the florida settlement agreement agreement. The floor is agreement came out of nineteen ninety-seven supreme court ruling it was designed to protect children from the physical and emotional harm caused by extended detention and and it limits the amount of time children can spend in detention to twenty days. The trump administration argues that migrants are using flora's as a loophole to get into the country. They'll hang as a professor of law at the university of san francisco and director of the immigration and deportation defense clinic. So what do you think of this idea. This rule change well. I think exacerbates the problem because the conditions at the tension centers terrible from health and safety to the the lack of adequate medical care and so this would just make things worse to be able to continue the detention of family units much longer than twenty days so removing flora's. I mean the the basic tension of course is the position of the white house trying to restore integrity. It says of the immigration system that if you enter the u._s. without papers you will be locked up until until processed. I mean what is wrong with that. Well what's wrong with that. Is that it it really ignores. Why people are entering the united states where they're fleeing or countries and it ignores the fact that this is more of a regional crisis and it's about people fleeing violence in in all different forms and to greet those individuals with a prison cell that just lacks any any aspect of humanitarianism. It is understandable. Why migrants are fleeing their countries the violence i mean to start with and you can't really blame. I'm for exploiting the loopholes to get into the u._s. And the flora settlement can be seen as a giant loophole when there is such a massive influx and backlog of migrant cases here here. What is the alternative well. The alternative is it's a pejorative term but the alternatives catch and release it worth before you process these individuals. They all know where they're headed. They often have relatives friends in the united states already and that's where they're headed in the pass prior two thousand fourteen it worked people would go to those places. They were told they had to report to deportation officers. They had to report to immigration court sports and they largely did at a more than ninety percent appearance rate. It works catch-and-release worked. That's the more humanitarian way so i i don't views a floor settlement as a loophole because people don't always come with their children so bill. Your work is focused on protecting the floor sediment. What can you do to protect it now. Well the litigators are going into court probably either tomorrow or early early next week arguing that the proposed regulation violates the stipulated agreement that was entered into twenty two years ago and the court will determine determine whether or not what is being proposed as consistent was what the court approved at nine hundred ninety seven. Do you think this plan of indefinite detention will will actually be implemented given all these legal hurdles. It's gonna face. We don't know what will happen at the lower court or the higher courts but if the court is going to true to the spirit and the letter of the agreement which is to expeditiously reunify folks with their relatives in the united united states. I don't see how the regulation will stand bill hang at the university of san francisco. Thank you very much. You're very welcome. Thank you earlier this month. Immigration agents raided multiple meat processing plants in mississippi. Nearly seven hundred people were detained in one day about three hundred of them were released but the rest remained in detention so far. None of the employers mississippi have been charged for hiring undocumented workers. What does that mean for those immigrants who remain on the job as the world's monica campbell reports. Some workers are speaking up for themselves but there can be consequences. We're where where lewis worked. It's a large dairy. You lived right here and you worked steps away from derry. You'll be address not the rest you live there with your wife and your children luiz alberto etcheverry a- is from mexico and came to the u._s. without papers when he was fifteen. He worked on farms for years like this one in turlock california east of san francisco. It's a big dairy. At least a thousand cows and in two thousand eight ideo was prepping a cow milking when she kicked him right in the ribs from biota thought that one hundred told me wanna say rutto protest i watch in aspect of the spirit he was knocked unconscious and when he came to a co worker orca was saying wake up of what he was told to keep working despite any pain. Joe salivary was activity as boss. He's owned dairies for years in california and he migrated himself from france in the nineteen. Fifties salivary says it trivia was lying and dan hadn't been injured. We spoke on the phone. No fractured great reap. He's still didn't believe it even after video return from a hospital with a note ooh saying he had a fractured rib and needed rest like doctor and i told him he gave him two weeks off and i always go through rifle. What's the oklahoma with you. I love you guys two weeks even even touch by account and he got the phone on me and then louis louise was fired him sued esmerelda zendejas was his lawyer documentation to support report the fact that he had got injured the injury was on the job and immediately thereafter he was terminated from his employment also sued for unpaid overtime and and alleged that there was no time to eat or rest on the job but then story took a turn their grumbling most karo it was at a deposition it's part of the legal process for his lawsuit and after he left that meeting he says he was followed by immigration and agents in plain clothes. He was stopped handcuffed and put in a van almost muraro poem at a lot. He said he didn't know where he was going and that only later the agents said they were with ice and they pointed to an old conviction for illegal gun possession that same day ideo was deported and left in tijuana mexico. He believes his bosses lawyer told ice where where he'd be that day and that it was a setup the lawyer anthony raimondo has been accused of this many times that he cooperates with ice about out immigrants doing his clients and raimondo doesn't deny that so if law enforcement contacted me about one of my neighbors and they were suspicious that my neighbor was doing something illegal we go and they asked me for cooperation. I would cooperate not long after he was deported. Lewis at jebediah came back to california wanting to be with his family be sequels to a capacitor tuna lay our style a lago. He says he crossed through a long water tunnel at the border and then reconnected with his as lawyer and he was granted a special visa for crime victims. It was based on obstruction of justice sense. 'egidio was deported while he was in the process of suing his former boss. I ask him after all of this. Would he see his boss again. You're not get limos blue care about announcing today us. He says at first he didn't want any problems and worried that standing up for himself would get him blacklisted by other farmers but he says once he started the legal fight. He didn't wanna stop. He wanted to set an example for his his kids but he understands why some immigrants might be unwilling to speak up like he did particularly with the trump administration's anti immigrant agenda move gill slap outside of the says. We can't be sure what might happen tomorrow. Essentially what's happening is that their immigration status is being weaponized against them. Jesse hahn is a lawyer with the national immigration law center normally she's in d._c. <music> but was in mississippi when we spoke she's assisting immigrants there after a series of raids at poultry processing plants. She says that if immigrant workers don't feel free to speak up. It doesn't just harm them. It harms all of their colleagues. If you have this whole oh system set up in such a way that immigrant workers cannot speak freely about the problems because they are at risk of <hes> these types of enforcement actions or retaliation from their employer then that doesn't only damage them that damages the other workers who are working under the same conditions just this month in new york w._n._y._c. reported on an undocumented man from china who sued the restaurant where he worked for back wages and while he was taking a lunch break during a deposition ice detained him and he's now fighting in deportation today. Louis idia works delivering cabinets and likes the job he's done with with dairy farms and he rents a small home and lives with his three children. They're all u._s. Citizens his son alberto listens while we talk he's he's nineteen and works in the fields picks apples and he says he worries about his dad sometimes that he could still get deported even though so he has a visa now. I've kind of scott room to be all scared for him. Yes oh scheduling his dad pauses for awhile and says superior for feed told him pull almost regard that's life. He says sometimes you take risks. He also knows his story is an easy one in he confronted his boss but got deported the list but are you looking at me the lowest price but he says that maybe by a sharing his story. It'll keep what happened to him from happening to others for the world monica campbell modesto california several big banks in hong kong today paid for full page newspaper ads at basically say enough is enough after two months. They want the protests to stop but that seems unlikely because more demonstrations are planned for later this week. Nathan law has been at the center of hong kong's pro democracy movement three years ago. He was elected to the local legislature as part part of a wave of progressive activism here. He is in two thousand sixteen taking the oath at the legislative council u._k. Chang me you can culture me okay and even destroyed this study but you will never imperious aunt my mind but a few months after that laws legislative career was brought to an end the judge barred him and his colleagues from holding office for failing to read the oath properly these days nathan law is traveling back and forth from the u._s. To hong kong. He's enrolled all the yale university but even there he's been the target of death threats adema where these messages that can make from that whether that american chinese will willett they leave but this very obvious that they tried all sorts of online harassment and then also sending threatening messages. What kind of message is what have you actually been reading and what form has the online harassment taken threat on my personal safety so i've already reported to the police department yup police department so that's one department of law enforcement. I mean some of these threats. I saw him talk about killing you. How aside from that or are you staying safe. One saying that i am choice is to stay very cautious about my daily life and try to be smart and try not to get into into dangerous situation but i think all these cannot deter me from participating supporting democracy. Do you really think that beijing's government. It would take some action against their opponents. In the united states. I have no guests on that. The best i can do is to state very cautious the the divide between the pro democracy movement and hong kong and supporters of the beijing government. It's playing out. Is you know around the world with demonstrations and counter demonstrations in cities with large chinese. He's populations like vancouver and new york city cities across australia. How new is this trend. And how much does it were. You well with free flow of information new with major media less following home computers for more than two months. Discount stigmatization from beijing doesn't seem convincing so i think thank the way beijing's acting loud encouraging people to spread false information to a tax <unk>. This tactics is adopted. Adopt a week or two weeks. Ago is a very coach. Iran's tactics from beijing beijing also says that washington is behind the protests in hong kong. How much truth is there to that. What do you think they have been saying that a protesters receiving money from the u._s. saying that <unk> trained asians and in saying that odor hostal reinforces are pushing forward the separatism movement in hong kong adding this hour long says and the global community end ending to national media outlets <hes> very clear about hong kong people's determination and self initiated action that is a potent accusation asian though that washington is behind the protests in hong kong how can pro democracy activists in hong kong counter that charge. How can you refute that now. You've got celebrities like jackie chan saying stability is a good thing these people fight for themselves and no other foreign forces behind them so i think it's crystal clear an an international media has been doing the job well. We know that to cover these stories and i think to maintain stability in hong kong is not but brutally dispersing people de legitimate demands but it's to talk with them and to on sunday demands and to implement democracy a system that could resolve conflict nathan law one of the leaders of hong kong's pro democracy movement. Thank you very much for being here. Thank you singapore takes education seriously. It's school system has been ranked as one of the best in the world but rankings for singaporean students will soon be a thing of the past. The government plans to put to stop to its system of ranking young children in schools annuschka. Obey is a child psychologist in singapore and she explains the kind of stress. The system creates. It's for kids well if you're talking about he s l. e. Basically <hes> students take this when they are in their six year fool primary education and they get an aggregate school once this is achieved than determines what secondary school they're streamed into so you can imagine originates very important in culture where tests are considered a very high priority. So what are your thoughts on singapore schools no longer using this exam ranking system on young children it comes off the back of a change in sentiment which is very much an emphasis on the joy of learning which i can tell can. He wasn't prevalent when i was growing up and going to local school here which i did for some years so what led to this change in singapore well. If you look at some of the statistics there have been increasing instances of kids speaking out about stress stress levels. You're looking at an average of. I think the i._m._a._x. Reports in average of two thousand four hundred new cases at clinics each year the i._m._h._o.'s which is the institute of mental health in singapore. These new cases of students coming in because school related stress. You have instances very very very sad cases of they think there was a young child in two thousand sixteen a young boy who committed suicide he jumped from his seventeenth story apartment after failing his midterm exams and being incredibly frightened to tell his parents and how much does that <hes> anxiety extend to affecting the physical health of the children the really good question and sewing societies twofold what you have is an impact on the child's emotions such as you know you may have children who present with depression helplessness fia you angela irrevocability lack of motivation on a physiological level though to answer your question because the body is essentially perceiving leaving that there's a threat now this threat can be the threat of failure and what that means the body goes into fight or flight so what you can experience is a racing heartbeat sweating wetting sleep disruption panic attacks difficulty concentrating and in long-term adrenal fatigue so it's it's very damaging actually on a physiological logical level what you wanna see. It suggests this move to drop exams is more than just kind of letting off the hook shirt look and to be clear. It's not that i don't endorse it i do. I just feel that there is perhaps a bigger shift that's required so so i went to local school in singapore for ten years i then shifted into an international school in and went to american university and it it wasn't until i went to the states that i understood this joy of learning that at the heart really of why we go to school is essentially to learn and that it's not just purely about how you're performing on a test now obviously the shift i think away from taking tests to evaluate students is important thing that's happening but that that shift i think also has to occur in the hearts and minds of people on a cultural level a news quebec child psychologists in singapore. Thanks very much for your time. Pleasure protesters in hong kong are finding inspiration from another nonviolent protest movement. It took place thirty years ago it. It was called the baltic way much like many hongkongers or feeling now people in the baltics in one thousand nine hundred nine saw street demonstrations as their only option choosing to participate participate in baltic way was not a big of a choice it was as natural as wanting to be free this month heartache was living in latvia back then she was twenty years old when she heard about the protests on the radio we found out that there will be baltic way and i do not remember exactly how how i found out. I think maybe radio and we basically got in the bus. Quite a few of us drove down toward the lithuanian. Dan border looking for the break in a chain a break in the chain of people that is joined hands with two million people forming a human chain across the borders years of three baltic countries lithuania latvia and estonia it stretched for almost four hundred miles if because of illu tiny part <hes> that the chain was not broken other than that it was just the unchained quietness just quiet quiet quiet. Nobody was singing. Nobody he was speaking but it was just father incredible. Feeling really people were protesting the soviet union's version of their history in nineteen thirty nine. A secret agreement between the u._s. Are nazi. Germany divided europe that led to the soviet occupation of the independent baltic countries. The soviets denied this saying that the baltic states had voluntarily joined the soviet union in school. You never learned about it. We never knew about it and all of a sudden you learn this whole entire you bits of history that was hidden from you. The baltic protests happened on august twenty third nineteen eighty nine the fiftieth anniversary of that soviet german agreement agreement people who took part in the baltic way wanted to send a message to the world. This metro hardly says they wanted freedom from the soviet union equals awful to see how the large powers worked together and how little the freedom of baltics matters so then you kind of wanted wanted to make sure that you heard the protest turned out to be successful in the end guenter schmidt ends is an associate professor of baltic studies at the university of washington he he says the baltic way was crucial for the independence of latvia lithuania and estonia. That was the turning point that at this moment gorbachev the head of the soviet union looked looked at the news from the baltic said we've lost them. It will ever get them back for schmidt hands. The baltic way reminds him of other pivotal nonviolent demonstrations including the civil. Oh rights movement here in the u._s. Seeing it happened in nineteen eighty seven through nineteen ninety-one for american was reconfirmation of these ideals that i'd grown up with as as having worldwide significance that through non-violent political organizing nonviolent assembly nonviolent silence free speech humans can accomplish great things a in the song is called. The baltics are waking up. It's in the three baltic languages lithuanian latvian and estonian it was composed posed for the baltic way and sometimes known as the joint national anthem of the baltics the <hes> the world's andrea reported on the thirtieth anniversary of the baltic way checkout address story at the world dot o._r._g. Our theme music was composed by ned porter. Manana bill harris studios at w. g. b. h. in boston. I'm marco werman tomorrow's friday. We'll see you then. The world is a co production of w. H. boston the b._b._c. the world service p._r._i. And barracks.

ghana hong kong marco werman united states amazon president brazil africa san francisco france Nathan manaus singapore Romolo battista mississippi california china america
Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong

The Economist: The Intelligence

25:52 min | 4 months ago

Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong

"When you need your bank capital, one is right in the palm of your hand. So you can check your balance deposit checks, pay bills and transfer money from your phone with a top rated APP and when you're done banking, put it back in your pocket, a banking experience built around you and your life. This is banking reimagined get started online anytime. What's in your wallet capital? One NA member, FDIC. This economist podcast is sponsored by Mastercard. Working with national regional and local governments around the world mastercard is committed to make the digital economy. What for everyone everywhere. Learn more at digital nation DOT economist. Dot. com. Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host Jason Palmer. Every weekday, we provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. The global discussion about racism sparked by George Fluids murder in America has made its way around the world including to the Middle East or many countries have black minority populations, each of which faces discrimination and worse. And the solution to one hundred, fifty year old mystery. A plague of bugs wiped out of Europe's vineyards in the eighteen sixties but it was never clear how they made their way to the continent until now. A. First up though. The squeeze on political freedoms in Hong Kong is ramping up and fast. On Friday, the territory's Chief Executive Carrie Lam announced September's planned elections would be postponed for a year and poss- sediments. I've always had to make difficult decisions but then the announcement I have to make today is the most difficult decision that I have to make in the. Insisted, the delay was only to avoid the spread of COPA, nineteen. The decision to postpone them the training train t electrical election has nothing to do with politics has nothing to do with a likely outcome of this round of. PRO-DEMOCRACY PARTIES, AD HOC for success in the poll riding a wave of discontent at Beijing's recent imposition of sweeping national security law. The legislation broadly defines and harshly punishes subversion sedition collusion with foreigners. Nathan law one of Hong Kong's most prominent pro-democracy activists recently spoke with our sister podcast economists asks why? Phones. Movement is still really strong though there have been protests against the new law. The millions of people who wants surged onto the streets have largely stayed home is police have cracked down harder just try to imagine if you live. In a country place that that is no freedom of expression freedom of them fraiche ethan freedom of thoughts. Then definitely, like protests does not exist or will be lushly quashed earlier last week, twelve pro-democracy candidates were banned from running whenever the elections happened. On Saturday, on Kong's police issued arrest warrants for six political activists living in exile in the West. Since the promulgation of the national security nor on July the first of the scope for political expression has been very much. Dominic Ziegler writes Banyan, our call him on Asian affairs. And because of that, there haven't been any street protests. of any size since July the first because of the consequences. For those taking part. But nevertheless, there has been widespread concern about postponing the election by a year, the Bar Association, representing senior barristers and other lawyers in the territory has expressed what it called grave concern and it said that a decision to postpone September's elections for the Legislative Council, which is known as Mexico was undermining a vital constitutional rights and so what does that mean in practice? What happens with the sitting lawmakers? There are all sorts of implications about what it. Means in practice because hitherto Hong Nor has been very clear you have to hold elections for this quasi-democratic legislature every four years. So the government of Kerry lamb, the chief executive is in a bit of a pickle about how it justifies this. Although she said, it was for reasons of the pandemic several other jurisdictions have been able to carry out elections, and that includes recently elections. In Singapore, there are certainly suspicions that the decision was taken not because of. The pandemic, but because Democrats had a good chance in fact. Gaining for the first time a majority in this rather gerrymandered council and indeed even obstructing a government policy or criticizing the government has it has been suggested by the authorities the risk of falling foul of the new. National Security Law. So this decision is absolutely shot through with politics, but nevertheless to take some finessing by the government. To show that the move is legitimate, the chances are that how it will manage that is to get a ruling from on high from Beijing saying that this is the appropriate course and it's worth bearing in mind that Beijing has always since Hong Kong's return to China. Has Always had the authority to intervene in Hong Kong's has the understanding would be that this would happen only rarely. But in the last few weeks, we've seen it happening time and time again, I think this is going to be the practice for the future. But what about the the the candidates who were banned from running here is, is there a risk that that Beijing will start to essentially stack the LegCo with with loyalists there in this interim year? This certainly is a risk Jason the bear in mind that all the moves around legend. have been made in order to ensure that the pro democratic camp does not secure a majority in the legislature. Now early last week, the authorities did this by disqualifying a dozen also candidates caming that even for criticizing the National Security Law that gave the government grounds for not allowing them to run. Now, a few dozen candidates actually sit in the current Legislative Council. So one big question that the authorities have to find an answer to is whether those four legislators continue to sit in a council session is is now being extended by a year. The chances are that the government will find means to disqualify. Those four and Beijing's moves go further than that. Recently, they're speaking of arresting pro-democracy activists outside of the territory, which is also unusual. That's right has happened in the past week on July the twenty ninth four students were detained for supposedly inciting secession. This seems to have had something to do with facebook page and shortly after became clear that the police had put on a wanted list, a number of activists who are currently in exile. So, there is an example for instance of how China intends for this new national security in order have jurisdiction beyond the borders of the country itself. These people were in the United States, the UK and elsewhere. One of them was not even a Hong Kong citizen better taken up US citizenship and so as as Beijing's hands gets heavier in Hong Kong Antoine Indeed all over the world. How are people coping normal life goes on so far as both the virus and the new political restrictions allow what is certainly happened is that the street protests that so colored and royal the territory last year are now very much a thing of the past. So the act the concerned the worry that. Has. Taken hold in the territory is one that is not always voiced publicly but in private conversations and the concerns really are about Hong Kong's long-term future. One of the possibility is certainly that many people discussing is immigration and a number of countries have. Roots towards long term permanent residency or even citizenship. Those countries include the United Kingdom Australia Canada, the United States. But many people are not in a position to leave immediately. But what happens now with all of the momentum that was behind the protesters but this whole movement now that protests themselves have died down to the protesters are moving abroad. What happens now it looks like well, over half of Hong Kong's population is in favor of democratic change but the possibilities for that through politics and through the ballot box have been very sharply restricted in in recent weeks. So there's a conversation emerging. About what form opposition should take? So people are starting to draw parallels with the Eastern European bloc during the Soviet era too many people here the national security nor is starting to look like the Ray quick building of the Berlin Wall in the early nineteen sixties and people are drawing comparisons with opposition in the decades following that in eastern Europe and that opposition took perform of underground dissident, it took the form of dissident writers and The church played a big role in eastern. Europe. Some hope that it may do here in Hong Kong one positive sign has been taken from last year's protests is an extraordinary. Creativity in in the form of protest art in the form of. Video making. So the hope is that maybe these avenues might at least allow a civil society not only to to hang on by its fingertips but also to grow. Don Thank you very much for your time fact Jason. For. Inciteful pair of interviews about Hong Kong's politics. Look for our sister show the economy asks my colleague and mckelway spoke to activist Nathan Law and to Regina Yip a Pro Beijing member of Hong. Kong's cabinet who said it's the activists themselves who bear responsibility for the mainland's latest moves. It's their choice they had. A goal on the provost part to self-destruction you. Choice. To want to commodes a separatism. From China I. Feel sorry for that. All the problems that they face now are of their own way. No. In fact, they are true young they are too young to commit judgments on these fundamental issues. Why should they be involved in promoting separation from China? Why should be that look for the Economist asks wherever you find your podcasts. Today more than ever. It's essential that we do all the right things to keep our bodies healthy inside tracker is the ultra personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood GNA and lifestyle to help you optimize your body from the inside out transform your body's data into meaningful insights and a customized action plan. Back recommendations you need to reach your goals. Are you ready to take control of your health and wellness journey unlock the power of your potential with inside tracker get twenty five percents off today at inside track or dot com slash listen. America's recent protests against racism and police brutality have drawn much interest in the Middle East. Some people have reacted with shock some with Schadenfreude. For others though America's unrest was an opportunity to discuss the problems with race in their own countries. Most Arab states have a black minority, each of which faces its own discrimination. The worst treatment though is reserved for migrants. There is a scene that played out almost every day for weeks for months outside of the Ethiopian embassy here in Beirut he would see cars pull up and drop off their passengers if the OB and women who were carrying their possessions and suitcases are in bags. Great girls from is our Middle East correspondent based in Lebanon these weren't women catching plane or catching a train. They had nowhere to go actually word maids, domestic workers whose employers. Could no longer afford to pay them because of the economic crisis here in Lebanon also couldn't send them home because the airport was largely closed because of covid one, thousand, nine, hundred, and so they dump them off outside the embassy they simply left them there to be someone else's problem. You would meet women who said they'd been sitting there on the curb for days on end using their bags as pillows simply left the fend for themselves. And isn't that kind of a general comment on how Lebanon treats migrant domestic workers? It is even before cove in nineteen. Before the economic crisis, there was widespread racism and harsh treatment of migrant workers here there are a number of cases where Lebanese have advertised their maids on facebook as if they were property, there was a post back in April that offered a Nigerian made who was described as being very active and very clean and she. was being sold for one and a half million Lebanese pounds, which is worth about a thousand dollars at the official exchange rates. There was also a clip that was circulated widely here in Lebanon in June it was from a television channel in Ghana that covered the return of two hundred or so Ghanaian citizens from Lebanon most of them. One, hundred, eighty of them were women working as domestic workers here, and they described horrendous conditions and treatments. Fit. After that sexual harassment. They bit s like animals. I have videos of this. I went through in that country and they also warned other people not to follow them to Lebanon not to come here to work. No. Doubt Music and go back to Lebanon is not a country that we should be. How does this situation come about? Where for instance, an people find themselves trapped with arguably abusive employers often starts with unscrupulous recruiters are agents migrants who come here to other countries in the middle. East. Are often promised good salaries, respectful working conditions and they arrive and find out that it's anything. But but then they find themselves trapped for two reasons. One is they often have to take out loans to pay fees to these recruiters and the loans can run thousand dollars two. Thousand dollars which when you're making only a few hundred dollars a month and you're trying to send much of that to your families back home it can take many months if not years to pay off those loans. So they find themselves trapped by debt. They also find themselves trapped by something called the Catholic system, which again exists here in Lebanon and many other countries in the Middle East whereby migrant workers are bound to their field or their sponsor, and so they can't simply. Changed jobs because their residency in their work permit is connected to their sponsor, and if they leave that job, they have to leave the country. So you meet migrants who say despite the awful conditions they're making more money here than they would make back home, and so they're willing to they're forced to continue to put up with US conditions because they're blocked from finding another job, and so all of this is a function of how the Lebanese feel about migrants or is this. Strictly a racial thing. It's hard to separate the two because almost all of the migrants here are either from east and South Asia or from Africa. So it's often connected to race as well as their status being migrant workers but the racism here it cuts across socio-economic lines I spoke with a black diplomat too says been pursued through upscale shopping malls Lebanon by security guards thought she was a housekeeper and they wanted to know why she was shopping without her madame without her employer. So Racist, certainly a problem here and in other countries around the Middle East and not only when it comes to migrants states across the Arab world have black minorities. You have Egypt for example, the Nubians who have been there for thousands of years you have in the Levant and the Gulf states black communities that are often the descendants of slaves taken by Islamic empires or the descendents of African Muslims who made pilgrimages to places like Saudi Arabia and decided to stay again, those communities face various kinds of commission as well. Would you mean by that? Will you hear some of it? Simply in the language that people use darker skinned people referred to with terms like opt, which means slave Anwar Sadat was president of Egypt darker skin than his predecessor was sometimes referred to as his predecessors black poodle you turn on the television in the Middle East and black face is fairly common sight on Arabic language television and no doubt that kind of racism manifests in in everyday life in lots of ways, it does you see it in areas of life. March choice of partner you have families that will see skin color as a marker for Associate Comic Status Lighter skinned people seen as being wealthier and more educated. You see it in the workplace as well in Iraq, for example, where there's a black community that has been there for at least a thousand years they to this day struggle to obtain government jobs and they're often relegated to doing menial work and living on the outskirts of society. You see it as well in the Gulf states where there's almost a racial hierarchy to employment. If you walk into a Nice Hotel and the Gulf you might see black migrants from Africa working as security guards or as porters. You will see them far less often in jobs that require interaction with customers. Waiters hairdressers, things like that those jobs which are better paid than less taxing often go to lighter skinned workers from Asia or from Arab countries I mean racism has been very much on the agenda over the past few months because of the the killing of George Floyd protests that erupted across the world did that wave of protests hit the Arab world as well? The protests themselves. Didn't reach the Arab world. This is a region fortunately protest often a criminal offence of we didn't see much in the way in street demonstrations either in solidarity or around the region's own issues with racism but it has certainly escalated the conversation that's taking place both online and offline. There was a video that circulated quite widely earlier this summer was shot by a Palestinian actress condit's. Who recounted some of the just casual bigotry that she's heard and day-today Life Semis Ben Aston Headache. Mariam. People often argue that it's harmless. It's just words. And allow. Them. One of the points that she was trying to make in this video is that it does hurt people and that it does have an influence not only on the targets of it but on societies broader attitude towards Black Arabs, and do you think having these kinds of discussions on social media and the like will make much of a difference? Is it enough having a conversation about these? Things is certainly better than nothing. But one thing that we've seen certainly in America through years and years and years of protests against racism and police brutality is that just having a conversation doesn't actually bring political change or social change. That's something that takes a long time and it also takes concerted effort in politics and education, and unfortunately one of the problems in countries across this region. Is that there are few avenues to do that, and so it's good to have a conversation about these things but. The ways that you actually go about making concrete change. Unfortunately, those ways are often blocked in the middle. East. Thanks very much for joining US greg. Thank you. A. A hundred and fifty years ago an alien species invaded rural France. These tiny yellow creatures ruin the local economy by eating their way through the old world's vineyards. But. No one could figure out exactly where they came from until now. For Look Sarah microscopic insects like fits, Pale yellow and they eat the leaves and the roots of vines so that basically a why make his worst nightmare Lewis Benny writes about science the Economist. In around the eighteen sixties and unlocked, sir appeared in vineyards in the south of France and basically went onto devastate them. It's one of the worst instances of invasive species in history and it was a disaster Laura has been reporting on new genomic research that uncovered the insects true origin. Came from North America we didn't know exactly where in North America came from or how it came to Europe. In the first place. There are lots of unanswered questions about the insect that this new research addresses and how exactly is it that they do their harm North America, it feeds on the leaves of wild vines and it creates these little. So two capsules called which allow it to feed of the vine without being detected by the plants immune system. When it came to Europe moved into cultivated vines, it started creating these capsules these goals as. Their known on the roots of the plants and that did a lot more damage because basically made the plant vulnerable to bacteria, fungi and other microbes living in the soil which infected it, and essentially slowly killed it. Why were the effects so different in Europe than they were in America? So the idea is that in America where the vine and the Luksa kind of CO evolved, insect has learned to live with the plant and the plant with the insect and kind of harmonious way when it came to Europe and moved from relief to the root it. became much more of a dangerous parasite and the plant had no natural immunity and binds with dying in droves and so what the European vineyards do about it the European arsonists and wine experts took a little while to find out what the best solution would be but they eventually hits on which was to graphs their cultivated European vines onto rootstock from North American vines and those roofs were protected against Fox or attack. It's still the solution today for in your in other parts of the world and so does this new research provide any roots to those? Kinds of solutions would have they found. So first of all, they found that the sequence of genomes of luxury in Europe resemble very closely sequences of Philoxenia in certain parts of the northeastern United States namely, uncle Mississippi valley where the insect infects wild vines, vitas, repair area, and so they're putting together basically a more precise story of how this insect came to Europe from those parts of America, which marries up with the historical facts and how much does pinning down where this bug originally got its start tell us about how it made its way to Europe. The leading theory was that Berge Ford Culture lists brought wildfires to Europe because they wanted to use them for decorative purposes in that are injuries and gardens. But what this suggests if the fluxes really did come from the upper, Mississippi Valley that was historically a French settled region and false identity is one of the authors of the news suggests that is quite possible that Fox survived on. Cuttings, vines patent the cool dry holds ships that came to Europe infected cultivated vines that way, and there's an even greater irony which is that some may have been brought from America to France to try and solve Naria problem of an earlier base of species from North America which was powdery mildew, and you say to a degree for luxury still threatens vines all over the world will. Help address that it made you. So one of the other findings is that within the genome of Philip Surra, there is a huge family of so-called effector genes around two thousand, seven, hundred of them, and these genes allow the insect basically to manipulate the plants physiology. That's a huge number of genes. It was once thought that there might be one single substance that allowed the insect PASA tides vise no such luck but it does obviously give us a wealth of information about how the to evolve together how the parasite doesn't its damage in cultivated vice. There is at least the possibility that one could find ways of blocking those genes blocking the mechanism by which the insect consequences. Laura thanks very much for your time. That's all for this episode of intelligence. If you'd like us give us a rating on Apple podcasts and you can subscribe to the economist at economist dot com slash intelligence offer. See You back here tomorrow. When you need your bank capital one is right in the palm of your hand. So you can check your balance deposit checks, pay bills, and transfer money from your phone with a top rated APP and when you're done banking, put back in your pocket, a banking experience built around you and your life. This is banking reimagined get started online anytime. What's in your Wallet Capital One NA member FDIC?

Hong Kong Europe America Middle East United States Beijing Lebanon Jason Palmer FDIC North America Kong China Lebanon Legislative Council chief executive facebook France Africa Laura Carrie Lam
7/6: Is Kanye Actually Running For President?

Hard Factor

44:35 min | 5 months ago

7/6: Is Kanye Actually Running For President?

"Would it is? Joe Man Randy savage this factor in the risk, no one. Does it better now. Nobody does it better? Myself told me something right down. Huh another episode factor presented by the Barstool News Network. It is Monday July sixth twenty twenty. Big Big weekend celebrate America Happy Independence Day to everybody extra listened to last Friday's podcasts. If you want to hear the street that Great Holiday Boys, you have fun. Oh Yeah. How do we talk? Doing okay. You Look you look fine? Fatter. Thank you for this. Weekend. We get time patent on a nice I also over eight so. Very heavy right now. Today we've got all the big stories we got a trump's fourth of July. Ghislain or have you say that name? The Epstein Person CON Yay running for president. All kinds of is a packet is gone or guys. Let's talk about Donald's big weekend, so trump spoke twice this weekend I to a crowd of like seven, thousand or seventy, five hundred in front of the Mount Rushmore Monument Monument in South Dakota. That's a cool setting to give a speech. I wouldn't mind giving a speech in front of the Mount Rushmore. That'd be pretty cool, right? It is cool. It's also in my opinion. It closes. Trump's face will ever get to mount rushmore but. The flyover picture over top of Mount. Rushmore is just like so. It's pretty serious. You have ten jets coming across over the top of the heads. It's been looks pretty what trump described as a display of power from our navy. But Yeah So Friday the third speech, people are people. Call Pretty Bizarre out there speech in my opinion, guys. I don't know my take on. It is that I think trump may have pulled to see what issues he can focus on to rally the base in order to try and get reelected. That was pretty much the focus of the speech. The L. A. Times headline think you think he's trying to to to to talk to his base and get them excited a lot of. Fourth of July speech. Rushing more. He's got some real what I think so too pet. We'll let me read you. Ellie onto something. The La Times the headline was at Mount Rushmore. Trump uses fourth of July celebration to culture war. and. That's the big criticism trump over the weekend. You know the funny part. Cnn New York Times Vox. And also Washington Post all pretty much had the same exact headline so and then, and then you look at the other side of basically broke on like you said it was like a campaign thing, and then Fox is like loading is a good speech. It basically broke along party lines media outlets covering it sure, but it was not something that the president should have done in my opinion. He really threw down a bunch of talking points that were kind of unrelated, but specifically let it be known that the monument behind him would never come down and all the bastards who want to come down. We'll never have their way. And who wants it to come down, you ask what's the soup? People who've repeatedly fucked America for hundreds of years. That's pretty much it. I looked I looked around that. A lot of people are asking for the Mount Rushmore outside of the sue. People who say Duckworth said that she's down to get rid of George Washington's life well, okay, so that came after the speech. I was a response to the speech, but I'm talking pre speech. Still, yeah it was a US senator, sure after the speech again, but he saying up there, saying all these people wanted to come down. No one's saying that during when he's giving the speech, but the soup, people said nothing stands as a reminder to the great, Sioux Nation of a country that cannot keep a promise of a treaty. Then the faces carved into our sacred land on what the United. States calls rushmore. So there's that he you know they're not that. That's tough when he put in. When you put like that to the people. That's tough, yeah! I did a giant faces. Native Americans have a lot to have a lot of axes to grind with America in general. We're talking about the redskins name on Barstool radio a little bit later, so that's right. That's another prime example. Deeply, but but pretty much trump trump talked about the four presidents that were on the on the on the wall there. And then and then here's some highlights. trump is signing an executive order for ten years minimum in prison for anyone that faces a federal statue. He really leaned in hard to the statue defacing. He was saying that they want to take down the Jeffersons and the Washington's and I did a little research guys. No one wants to take down the Jefferson The Washington's. One duckworth well after. After the speech. Whatever just to be clear will never take down beautiful. Mount Rushmore anything. We might expand it. So many pictures of his. BIT head. Wants that. He wants to think more than anything. He wants to be the fifth that guys. One Washington was taken down during the George Flood protests to Jefferson's guess, where and one of those Jefferson's move by hostile. To total a lot of Jefferson Davis statue, no Jefferson wasn't taken down in Charlottesville because they love them. Jefferson Charlottesville. One City we lost two founding fathers well, The Washington and New York was the one that got defaced. One was toppled, and that was in Portland Oregon I'm guessing Seattle Yeah. Okay Portland Oregon both there Here's a quote. Referring to protesters and progressives. They think the American people are weak and soft and submissive. Make no mistake. This left-wing Cultural Revolution is designed to overthrow the American revolution. Second Second Revolution Yeah, he's saying Communism I. Guess Right the another quarter of the violent mayhem we have seen in the streets in cities are run by Liberal Democrats in every case is the predictable result of years of extreme indoctrination and bias in education, journalism and other cultural institutions. Saying like New York, Minneapolis Seattle the places that really had a lot of issues in the last few months. That that because it's the liberal leadership. Is that what you're? Saying liberal leadership, but he's also saying that we're. The liberals are trying to indoctrinate their children, which is interesting. I thought that a bridge too far maybe. He went on decision I. Guess He's talking about how like the vast majority of college professors extremely liberal? Usually truth, it's very true. I mean divisive speech in general is is bad. And don't like that. He brings up all the time, but there's a weird. vibe going on recently in the past couple of years. Where like the you know whatever you WANNA call them far left as well as the fall writer or making things uncomfortable for a lot of people, everybody in the middle for the ninety percent of people in the middle. Thank you got to pick an extreme side. Otherwise we're GonNa Make Your Life Hell. And it's like come on sure. Pretty device yeah. he very, he referred to Andrew Jackson. Is the Great Andrew Jackson? I don't know if I would have done that personally. He went on to say our children are taught in school to hate their own country, and to believe that men and women who built it were not heroes, but they were villains. And that's pretty much the about rushmore speech. Sticking over to the White House for the actual fourth of July speech sandwiched between praise for American artists and engineers. This is probably the most bizarre thing speeches, so he's praising American artists and engineers. Trump slipped this little diddy in their. American heroes defeated the Nazis. dethrone the fascist top of the communists saved. American values upheld American principles and chase down the terrorists to the very ends of the earth. We are now in the process. Defeating the radical left the Marxists, the at are. The educators, looters, and the people who, in many instances have absolutely no clue what they're doing. So if you missed that there, guys, he was comparing his personal fight against the radical left to the that great Americans put forth well. Germany right in the ANTIFA argument again, so it's the same thing he keeps doing the he keeps using the ANTIFA argument for himself, which is a hilarious spins on that he's been going to like back to over and over and over again over the last couple of months. I wouldn't expect that to change. Also you can't. You can't cancel George Washington like I. Don't understand how people are trying to cancel George Washington and he was the only president ever not elected. He was selected because literally nobody else wanted anybody at all at the time because he was the only good choice so I guess that's the point where it was. No one's really trying to cancel George Washington. It hasn't gone there yet. That's that's that's my whole point is trump was say look over here to the left where everyone's trying to cancel your forefathers, but really the majority of the cancellation taking place has been. To civil war monuments specifically, that were erected during the nineteen thirties in the nineteen fifty. SPAT ask but he. But. He's Riley Pace. Yeah, that's cool like the stone. Mountain Georgia the militia. The black militia mark marched on that confederate mural over the weekend, too, and that's awesome, and that's a confederate mural. But what I'm saying is George. Washington was I. Mean He's the father of the USA based I, president wasn't elected. But I'm just saying people aren't really talking about that trump, but trump saying we're talking about. Yeah I. Mean but people are reaction to trump. Bring up, not if you just Google canceled George Washington twitter. There's like eighteen thousand posts and it's trending and stuff. You're wrong, pat. People are talking about it, so we'll. Get specific I'm talking about monuments being toppled because that's what he was trying to say during the speech, which was really hasn't been happening with Washington and Jefferson monuments. It hasn't really been happening with guys. Jefferson, I think he's a Dick Anyway but Washington nineteen slaves. Whichever zone had at least as many what I'm saying is like. Parts bad. Yes, look, that's slave. Ownership was bad at the time. It was legal in the United States. Even as boy Alexander Hamilton wanted to get rid of it. He people. The prevailing thought was no so. I mean until after the civil war was outlawed. So, what are you going to try to just delete all history before the civil war like it didn't exist, because then if it didn't exist in, you are reminded the horrors of slavery right I think that's a discussion that needs to be had, but we'll don't worry. We're going to have it because trump enacting a. Heroes Garden. I heard about this, yes, more statue. Anyway let's John Garden I'm GonNa Leave with a quote from Thomas Jefferson about slavery, a wolf by the. Maintaining slavery was like holding a wolf by the air the ear. We could neither hold him safely. Let him go. ooh! Yes Say, said the guy who loved slavery. Yes the almoner, critical gay, yeah, and Halle Haley with Sally Hamdan. BOOP SAT guy. Yeah I mean look like we were saying that was that was. The time doesn't make it right. It also doesn't make it not exist. Truth part of American history. Right moving on different topic equally is depressing honestly. What was that? We're speech. It sucked. Why didn't terrible? Why did we start the week with twelve minutes of that crap all right? Take, US, take us away well. They don't call us live still for reason. All right. d'alene Maxwell. That how she spells her name, but that's Jeffrey Epstein's Madam. Who ran his vast network of underground sex, slavery and underage prostitution for him for decades I don't know I've watched. You guys watching Netflix thing. I fell asleep. It was really boring. podcast about issues she's for decades shows the she was the queen of Castle. Decades is bringing in these underage girls, doing unspeakable stuff raining them, and then and then handing off. It was like what's that pyramid scheme where you like sell? All, Amway, whatever? Amway shoes at the top, and then share again people like six year, so in your body, instead of yeah, for no, she was the top of the parents of the globe. They made more money than the quickstart people. That's for sure well. Sure Epstein in her did awesome girls. Everyone made a lot more money than quicker. Don't get really you hurting I. Look at this okay new information coming to light so anyway. She was taken into federal custody last Thursday everybody thought she was either dead or gone and never be found. But Thursday morning a team led by new. York police new. Hampshire, police and FBI, it was like. Like sound like about one hundred people total they stormed, her mansion called tucked away. It was a mansion. She bought for cash in the middle of the new, Hampshire Woods. Earlier this year to hide. They stormed in and they said they arrested are put into custody in a matter of seconds from so. I don't our noses in New Hampshire. Yeah, she is. She had LLC that she that she created just to buy this house cash money. It was over a million bucks I'm so she just bought it and then hunker down there. She called it tucked away. Now it was it was it was like? It was such a Nice House that had like a name that's. Near The Beach House, where are you going to hide? This way this one's named tucked away. I think maybe that's a good option. A little too on the nose. There's no way there's no way this is her. She this is this is a doppler Ganger. There's no way this is her. You think they created a fake one her. Absolutely, there's no. Snow, who is that? The the billionaires. Through. Let's get into it. Let's get into Andrew. Have Statues made after. The British socialite she must have known something was coming because she was dressed and ready to go. When they stormed through the door. Apparently, there was just like helicopter circle in the house for hours before they got there because they're making sure she didn't leave. But the big question now is, can she make it to trial alive unlike our former boss Jeffrey Epstein? And, so she's lawyered up already. But we'll see like it's crazy that we're even saying that. Were saying now you gotta think outside the box, the elite, the billionaire, the Prince Andrew's and such. Potentially the Clintons and the trump's. Whoever wants to keep prouder wraps. They already did so. She's GonNa. Make it to trial because this isn't just lane maxwell. No I see what you're saying. She's a robot. That's got sick. Just a woman. That kind of looks like around the same age I mean. This is so fucking awesome, because if I assuming that she's not a robot mark breakage. Epstein getting murdered in prison really took the wind out of our sales in terms of a first of all the victims sales in terms of justice most importantly but. Our sales in publicly seeing these assholes have to recognize further sexual crimes against minors. That's correct and it's a huge list stateside allegedly large list including at least one US president like mark alluded to for sure. And also. Prince Andrew Part of the royal family across the pond. The man who famously lied about not being able to sweat for a decade, and then got kicked out of the Royal Family for obviously being tight buddies with Jeffrey Epstein. You think the Queen does not hitmen. Yeah! That's a good point, you polite. Look a little agitated today as you might be able to tell. Maybe it's all the Alkali this weekend, but I'm GONNA. Take US up further, and it is her. I think we should torture her to get the information. Well according to the New York, Times Prince Andrew's lawyers have been seeking lobbyists to help in DC for this particular case. It also coincides with Prince. Andrew having stopped cooperating with investigators on his own case about using their services. So taking it to the Internet. We have heart factor pat and the collective voice of twitter preemptively tweeting gain Maxwell didn't kill herself because. It's just like this laundry list of global elite who probably want this trial to happen? So like saying it's crazy were even saying this, but let's see the trial actually happens, and we get to find out about the global elite at all, or if they just get, keep getting on, and that's what I'm saying. You guys are all sheep. You're almost there with the joke about how she's going to kill herself, but wake up people. This isn't her. Done. Care of when our buddy. Volunteered to go live on the beach and help. Sea Turtles Get from hatching to the water. Yes I would. Opposite volunteer to do something like that with Glenn. Maxwell I would go and hang out and be a just an independent arbiter of of life for her and we. Get. You're just going to end up accident it to. ME. Everyone around. They'll accident whoever they have to imagine. Oh, yeah, no rocket accident Pat Cassidy head on what stop if you're if you're if you're within her pathway and put that evil mark well, you wanted to go to the beach. hurtles now. You wouldn't want okay, so you're just. GonNa to sit. And I want her to go to a dark dungeon waterboard until she goes up every fucking name that she's ever worked going to happen at trial marks. You gotTa make it to trial and. Trial. Selah for what she's old. She's old. Fox got nothing. It's optimism here. Hope we find out the truth. Not doing anything. About is. The woman that want to talk the way with for caches has a change of heart. She's Mark, could you? Could you look at the sunny side of life for just to? Deal more. Now. Is that s using? Cut Look the story. The moral of the story is she's in custody and we hope she makes it right for now. Don't listen dollars in the markets, not already over. Okay guys Hong. Kong is over. That's my story. Over for real guys, and we said this last week, and we brought up the legislation that was passing Hong Kong. China's now after the past the national security. Law, which is basically saying, we can imprison you for any reason up to life imprisonment. Well let's do a quick update. Things are moving fast over there, and not in a good way for citizens of Hong Kong pro democracy books have already been removed from. Hong Kong libraries so books by prominent Hong Kong about democracy like predecessors, simply books books mentioned democracy existing books I. Think some are like fiction and some. Looks are getting taken out of libraries in Hong Kong. Why. You can't have any mention of any type of government besides communism now, can you? Get it out of there. Being, burned or just taken out, and we know removed destroyed whatever whatever method that I mean maybe passing I duNNo. Burning might not be efficient. Enough considering they've already arrested people on the streets for carrying Hong. Independence flags might be time to move from Hong Kong if you ever published a pro democracy book even if it was fiction. A tale of two cities, the Beijing and Hong Kong version. It's time to go. Like the. McCarthyism in verse over there. Exactly Americans used to do this to people who were members of the Communist Party. And now they're doing. You know they're doing it for anybody who who promotes any type of democracy in China. That's right at bought up that book and particularly because. The Charles Dickens of Hong. Kong has got to get out now and you know Dickens was paid by the word right, so he's saying things like people were like. Wow, this book is so big Charles and he was like honey. Get paid by the word and it's GonNa be a long read basically giving her that Dickens. You're going to need a reading Latte to get through this one. By the way apparently, that's a myth. He got paid by the installment, but it's Funnier to say. He got paid by the word. Video went out gloss. It's funny. It's Funnier to see. He got paid by the word and do it patent. I did all weekend and that's make Charles. Dickens Dick euphemisms to the length of his book. Yeah, that's a little inside. It's. Your friends. When you're talking about buying when you're ladies, wants the SACKS A. Deep Dickens, aren't you? She'll she will just like shh. Shit, what if you if you wanted to have a threesome? Be like a tale of two cities. There you go, see wills already it added. Chapter One. Thing involves through apparently after tourists. Back to Hong Kong. Guys Nathan Law. One of Hong Kong's most prominent democratic activists has done just that and flown the coop because he realizes probably going to be a bad time for him if he didn't. He says he will continue as activism for Hong Kong from abroad which he did last Wednesday taking it to the Internet the official House Foreign Affairs Committee. Twitter account posted a video of Nathan Law speaking to Congress the US Congress and a Congressional hearing. Week where he explained to them, how fucked up the National Security Law that passed last week is and then they put this quote from his video on it, and said under this legislation Beijing just past about twenty four hours ago. Anyone who dare to speak up would likely face imprisonment once Beijing targeted you talking about like himself and anyone so much now lost in the city I love the freedom to tell the truth. That's a quote from Nathan Law who had to leave Hong Kong probably a good move. Yeah well, I mean that's how it works. They're going to be. You know scrubbing shit just like they do over in mainland China Yep. They're going to arrest. They're going to. People are going to disappear, and if you don't pay taxes there and you're the most famous female. Movie Star they they put like. Jennifer Lawrence disappeared over there for two years, didn't they put her on one of their fake moons. I Dunno, but then she came back and everything's fine, and she was you go to. Your taxes camp. Yeah, exactly and always talked about it. Many Times about how China was always GonNa take over Hong Kong as part of the agreement when Britain gave Hong Kong back to China, but let me just give you the the dates because we don't really on those. China was given back. How Kong was given to China by Britain in Nineteen, ninety seven, and as part of the agreement. They did they said side constitutional. That's it for fifty years. There will be a one-country-two-systems agreement where Hong Kong will operate under capitalism earned seven hundred forty seven, so they got halfway, which is probably longer than China wanted, and that's where we're at. They took over halfway through. Cool. Here's a fun headline. A rare case of brain distort destroying AMOEBA has been confirmed at Florida. Nice. Boys, we didn't realize it. Why is it always didn't talk about? We didn't talk about the lineup, did we? We just picked in an. Always negative stuff you know. What a Monday it's just like you. Have you have the the the stories just turning? And how many in the big headlines All shit, and then it's just everybody's dying in the in the main headline, also eighty degrees of my house for next I think. The air conditioning stopped working I rescued. I rescued a group of puppies that were in the sewer drowning. Didn't that's good. We can now I didn't I was just trying to know pats as brain eating? AMOEBA now. It's bad. It's getting really hot in here. Florida Department of Public Health announced on Friday that there's a confirmed case of Nalgiev. Foul Larry, which is a microscopic single celled Amoeba that can infect and destroy the brain, and it's usually fatal. So that's happening in Florida now. Sometimes it's just croon. Just turns you into like a vegetable. What he will do it, but I, it's one hundred twenty eight hundred percent since since nine, hundred, sixty two. There's been only thirty seven reported cases in Florida, but that's not going to stop twenty twenty from digging, this old infectious disease out of the vault and throw in this motherfucker right in the mix. By the way, guys if you look at them for a way to make a quick buck, may I suggest investing in the nose plug game nose plugs previously reserved as a sexual repellent pool parties are now going to be all the rage this summer, because according to the Department of Health and Florida. Adverse health effects on humans can be prevented by avoiding avoiding nasal contact with waters, since the immutable enters through nasal passages. Come on, we can't even go in the water with their nostrils anymore. stillwater was was this freshwater or freshwater exclusively William. Wow, you know there's there's all water has problems I've I've gotten stuff? Infected in both forms, freshwater seems to be worse though you know whose immune to this is our friend Armando. who constantly hold his nose when he jumps in water? Six nerdy thing to do who's and you have to. That looks like now honestly. Now the I know guys. I know no chlorine in his nose. And then now no brainy new. Look is warm, water does seem to be warm. Freshwater does seem to me Bas pad of choice. especially around power plants go figure around the one hundred forty three cases ever reported in the United States. Only four people have survived, and they were probably secret vampires. We can safely assume this thing is one hundred percent kilroy-silk. Can we still have contact with those? Dead. Or they're gone off the map. Try and find them in other news. Guys. Disneyworld is set to you will reopen next week, but if you're itching for adventure and Waterpark Fun and Florida Universal Studios is already open including their world class Waterpark Volcano Bay, Oh, man. Oh. Man really tune into a Barstool radio at eleven eastern, because lots of updates regarding. Florida's. what that Nadan Texas and what patent Texas two. Things heart that's teaser we'll we'll get. We'll get back to that one later. Let's move onto something fun finally. Guys Q. Non I. Don't know if you guys consider that fun, but. It's. In relation to the show. It's like fucking rainbows and unicorns yeah. She theory that's running and ruining our country. I love it. Throw it. We'll see here, so cure non not only their back, but apparently they never left, and it's so strong that multiple active legislators and new candidates in the Republican Party are actually in the cult, or whatever it is I think it's a cult. You guys tell me you have to take a pledge to defend the Constitution at the end. It says where we go one. We go all, and that's like the club motto right so. Can we a leader in the community on the fucking podcast we need you. Is the President Program I'll? Okay I'll get into it, so you have to do that pledge. And then you gotTA. Say where we go one. We go all and then I think you're in. You just have to do that. I sense, maybe I, maybe on Mount Rushmore the fifth had could just be a giant you. That's right just a big Q. And then after you do that after you recite the pledge to Cue. Doesn't include his name. Then you look for signs from Q.. I'm assuming. And then taking to the Internet, let's see what this is more about, so let's get skits some actual examples so. He's like Santa Claus. Yeah base he's like Santa Claus of information against the deep, so we'll dive in further in the appeal here, right? Exactly! Italian field. He posted a tweet with a video of General Michael Flynn. And in verse, the rest of his friends let see six people total three couples taking the oath, and it's the pledge to Q. On that they did on Fourth July and filmed it and it's. I just describing basically saying like I'll defend the constitution. And, its? Hold on now where we where we go one, we go all I'm looking at this picture here. We'll. Video the pledge which one is Flynn. He's in the middle. He's got reading the book. Okay, so it's not his buddy who's wearing a support general flynn shirt to a barbecue at General Flynn's house. That's just his closest friend who really supports data, so he bought. Shit? Well He, how you? How do you get invited local? His wife is wearing. She's wearing a Cunanan dress sundress, so really hit the merch store very hard before with the. Family, what so fuck. You think that's the most wrong thing and that picture. The hands up pledging pledging to cues probably. It's. Not Appropriate. If you're actually your buddies, best buddy to wear a shirt with your buddies, face on it, saying support your buddy. I don't know okay. He he wants he doesn't want. General Flynn in jail. They he wants them. Stay right there on his front porch and keep pledging to Q.. That's where he wants to I've seen you SIM for pmt in front of PF, never would rock M.. T. Shirt you pay me. Mundi in front of. Okay. And then this is another guy. K. W. Miller Congress Florida eighteen. He's a brand, new politician or twitter account at least running for Congress and Florida and he's a Q. Believer, and this is what he says on. Twitter says beyond say is not even African American. She's faking this for exposure. Real name is Anne Marie astrology is Italian. This is all part of the Soros Deep State Agenda for the black lives matter movement beyond say you are on notice Hashtag, Great Awakening Hashtag Q. on Hashtag. WW ONE GWA Hashtag. Trump twenty twenty. So those are the those are the US guys on twitter. Where did he get a check? Mark who? Mark. That was a mistake. He must have passed it from a Republican. Who's running in an old race? There's no way this guy got verified this year. K. W.? Miller for Congress goes on, and he says you all do know that beyond says song. Formation was a secret coded message to the globalist. Hope Question Mark The song, clearly admitted the she was demonic, and that she worshiped in the Satan is churches located in Alabama and Louisiana? She keeps satanic symbols in her bag. You know I always said she got a little too cocky with those lyrics formation. She has her bag is hot sauce, which okay continue yeah I. Mean I don't know it's. Just like the insane clown posse. You didn't know that there were. Christian Evangelical Christians, all the clues there they've been. Time, I can't tell you how much of that from K. W. Miller for congress straight from Q., or how much of it is just what K. W. Miller for? Congress creates based on what he thinks. Q. Believes similar to the tea party movement before it, but seemingly way way crazier Cunanan is a prophecy based like a constitutional zealot program, so the anonymous leader named Q, supposedly a high ranking government official, who is working with President trump to bring down the satanic baby eating deep state. Liberal globalists from the inside. And wondering why God you gotTa? Get rid of those. Hanoch babysitting. We GonNA live. This works right like why. How do people believe in this and then? And then like all these conspiracy theories spread in the same thing well, the theory is based on the reliance of left leaning media outlets to constantly personally attack Donald Trump and call for his removal from office to Q. On believes that this is evidence, solid clad evidence of the deep state, existing and trump, being somewhat of a messianic figure, protecting Americans from the evils of the deep state who wants to? Further erode their constitutional rights. Do they think the deep state can't Riggan election these hits? While at the. Office. If there's a date, the deep state can do, q tells you. The deep state can do I guess is. What I'm saying is what the deep state wasn't talented enough to rig a goddamn election. Oh No, what I'm saying. Twenty sixteen election, no kidding, but what I'm saying to the Q. Believers is this if he if you can't protect key lane, Maxwell right and get her deep state ass on the stand for this trial. Then you know it's total bullshit because Jeffrey. Epstein already happened under cues. Watch apparently so. My Hat's Russell my heads in a pretzel there. Though because I think I think the deep state already got just land but I. don't believe in the gather queue stuff so now now pretzel while q will q. will take you to a Pretzel and after all that talk about you. You're GONNA to chill. You need to relax your book your brain a little bit. Collect your thoughts getting back to level ground and guys. 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If you don't love it, they'll give you a full refund refund. TRY CALIBER DOT com slash factor. Don't forget Promo Code. Factor for twenty percent off first order it is a delightful product. A Hey, guys good news. We're going to end to fun ones. Cunanan and that. WHO declared for president this weekend? Ye Yes. Kanye West announced on the fourth of July that he'll be running for president of the United States of America Twenty, twenty. Taking it so seriously and he, he applied and time yeah, late, but better late than never by the way not everyone believes he is being serious about this the running for president, and if you go to sponsor predicted special, Promo eurorail www predicted dot org slash promo, so it's hard. Factor twenty take like two minutes to create an account and then deposit least twenty bucks. We'll give you a free twenty, and then you can all of that at least forty bucks. Bucks on Kanye West, either yes, he's going to run for president or no, he's not because he has to file the paperwork. In order to yes, run for president and right now. Only forty percent of people think he's going to that. He's going to go through with it sixty percent no, because he has an album coming out, it seems like it's very also he wouldn't be able to be on the ballot in Texas. New York and somewhere else. That's major. Indiana North Carolina, Maine, New Mexico Texas North Carolina yes. You can't really win, so aren't on the ballot. He's a bit of an uphill climb. He can't get on those ballots. But if you register as you can get on, the other states will pretty easy right in for Yeezus, those guys. You're talking about better name recognition than Biden and trump. Yeah, you send. You don't think he could win Texas. Just because he's on the dial. You need to be on the ballot. You cannot nobody's GonNa win. You writing. You can absolutely right in the right thing I think. People might write them in Tanya West. Even the, Con- nieces after us. You have to look up the rules. Gorgeous God right, God, and that's that's for us as he gets that one to. All roads leases they say. So I think. We'll we'll on the sixty percent side. No I think he's thinking publicity stunt, but I don't know. He might still run but I don't know I I don't think it's a serious effort. No, he's not GonNa win with I. Take Offense to that will. It's absolutely a serious effort. If you know anything about Jesus, he does everything full heartedly. He doesn't do anything half heartedly, okay. I believe look I believe is in it, but I just don't think it's a serious. No one told him. You know how you could sell more records running for president. He didn't. No one told him that, and he didn't give a shit about that. He cares about what's best for our country. which right now is this agenda not as yeezus agenda if we can get, Konya onstage with Biden and trump the debates. Very, Happy Group, Group guys here at heart factor, other candidates besides trump. Biden and Kanye West are Joe Johnson for the Libertarian Party. She became the first female chosen as the libertarian presidential nominee after four rounds of voting in late May of this year. A fun fact about Joe is she was a vice presidential candidate in nineteen, ninety-six also Howie. Hawkins the CO founder of the Green Party. Nine hundred four is their nominee again and twenty twenty as he won the not a few weeks ago, so it's trump Howie Hawkins side Oregon Hawkins and West. Maybe we'll see. I mean he's like he's. Paperwork Amici. His name. The other four definitely in Kanu tvd back to county for a minute. I don't know if he's the best candidate for president. But it got me thinking. Who is the worst and best candidates for president out of all musicians, so I'm going to put you on the spot worst candidate I! You Got Pat Ted Nugent hundred percent. Okay? Oh I'm sorry I. Take that back new Ted. Nugent kid rock kid. Rock's the worst CAP president of all time. and Oh will. As your worst, I feel like. Britney because you can't even trust her to not burn down her own yoga studio, so but but really if you elect Brittany, you're electing Brittany and her dad who I think conservative ship of her or he as power of attorney. Yeah, but he can't stop you from burning down a yoga's well. You can't be with her twenty four hours a day as too expensive, but the secret service will be so think about that, so you're getting a two for two for one because you're getting Britney plus. Sticks on our papers. I was going with Amy Wine House. No sensible blow. That's the. Also British I get she's. Hitler Hitler's. You could know musician. He wasn't raised. Well, you never know. He dabbled I find if you want to know live person saw speak ill of amy. How should you be terrible? President sting staying because also using people that can't be president 'cause he's. He's a British. People Bro, stop! This is part of the problem. This is why it's going to be a real pain in the ass for this person to change. Change, you'd be mad at him because they're British Dole time. Yeah I mean they're gonNA. have to go through the whole rule change process like day will do the rule change, but there there's no way British will be involved in that Roach. Inches can't trust though it's to sort. We get mad at people, Presidents Golfing. Could you imagine like sting during a three-day tantrums sex? ROMP. He's gone for three days just bang. Tax? Yes sure wars of started sir got. Forty hours of. Tantric sex I will. Who's the best fashion? I got several for the best. But I'll go off. My three top three best ice tea, Lizzo and Tim McGraw okay. Corpus just all seem like you'd like trustworthy. I'm into that. What about you pat I mean? I'm going to say masterpiece, and here's who good one masterpiece built like one of the biggest record labels from nothing absolutely nothing no limit. No limit records was a huge huge enterprise him with a Birdman ticket. Young money like I don't see how you could lose their. Those guys are Goddamn Mercan entrepreneurs, and if we fucked and put trump in the in the office because he's good at business, these guys, these guys fucking crushing business. Well we would. We would dominate the drug game. That's for sure just I think us. The all good choices I like Joe Walsh who actually ran for president in nineteen eighty before he was old enough to at the age of thirty three with. Talk. He had a campaign of free gas for everyone in nineteen, eighty free gas and nineteen ninety. I'd like to see what he has now, but my number one choices will smith. Everyone Smith. He went easily against anyone that he could run. He could run Democrat Republican, Party Libertarian whatever it doesn't matter if he's running, he wins in a landslide. Fuck fuck the rock. The Rock who is is technically because because because he appeared left song I, don't think so I. Think we're GonNa end the show with I hope I hope. Okay, and that's going to do it for hard factor. We're back on radio today. On Sirius X. Power, eighty five from eleven am to noon eastern time, so go sign up for your free serious account right now. Get the serious phone APP on your smartphone. That's what I did. It's very easy to use. I just use the phone APP like it's so easy. You WanNa mess today's show. We have some wild topics Kellyanne Conway's daughter and reaction to like hurricane. The, Washington Redskins, are our words. NAME-CHANGE SAGA, a new porn site. That's claiming it's ethical to win. Okay and You can hear about pat in my adventure in wine. Country Texas this weekend. What else We're on Sirius Monday through Thursday now and look. We're just jumping. Pumping out content jumping out popping out content because the squeaky wheel gets the grease, so we're going to squeak, you can help us get the grease by leaving five star review on I tunes by subscribing on subscribing and re subscribing by following on spotify or Pandora or Google play, and by telling multiple people, friends and foes alike to listen to hard factor. Once you've done that public service. You should feel good about what you've done. And reward yourself by having a great fucking day, though this is the rock kicking it with the refugee camp, and you're about to smell what the rock is cooking. Jobs Golf about fifteen leads in the West indies. I've got a pocketful of and a garden trees. I just wanted to Bingo for the radio. Series people in camps come up and. Take everything women. Amount of. Time and I got to grab man.

president United States trump Donald Trump Jeffrey Epstein Hong Kong Mount Rushmore mark George Washington Twitter Congress Texas Maxwell China TA America Florida Thomas Jefferson New York New York
Friday, July 3, 2020

NBC Nightly News

21:46 min | 5 months ago

Friday, July 3, 2020

"Tonight. These shocking new images and the Elisha McLean investigation photos of police, appearing to mock the death of the twenty-three-year-old on black bag officers, recreating the chokehold McLean was placed in several, fired the chief, saying quote. We are ashamed. How mcleans family is reacting tonight. That'll crowbar is now topping one hundred thirty thousand in the United States two hundred thousand new cases since just Monday. After a record week, experts now fear Fourth of July crowds could cost another massive surge president trump kicking off the holiday with fireworks at Mount, Rushmore Masks and social distancing not required. After years of debate, will this NFL team change its controversial name? The growing pressure from sponsors and what the owner is now saying. New Rules of the road. If you're driving to your vacation destination what to pack and plan ahead for and caught on camera man shooting, illegal fireworks win one goes right through an open window that house, arriving in flames tonight, the new warning from firefighters this holiday. This is NBC nightly news with Lester Holt. And a Good Friday evening I'm Craig Melvin in for Leicester Tonight the investigation into the death of allies. Mclean last year has taken another turn with authorities in Aurora Colorado same police officers reenacted the chill cold that was used on the twenty three. The interim police chief, saying quote, we are ashamed. NBC's gave Gutierrez is there. These are the photos. Aurora police now say we're taken by their own officers in October mocking the death of Elijah McLean. We're ashamed. We're sickened and we're angry. While the allegations of this internal affairs case are not criminal. It is a crime against humanity indecency. Late today, the city's interim police chief announced these two officers would be fired for conduct, unbecoming a third would have been fired, but resigned first of four was also let go after getting the photos in a group text and responding ha ha at four officer Jason. Rosenblatt had also been involved in the initial encounter with mcclay say. When he was engaged in the incident with Elijah McLean is absolutely unacceptable. McLean was a twenty three year old massage. Therapist is family says he sometimes wore a ski mask to keep warm because he was Nemec. Being suspicious, he was walking home when Aurora officer stopped him, and shortly after tackled him, apply to karate hold, and later a sedative McLean died at the hospital days later, the coroner said the cause of death was undetermined. An internal police investigation found the officers followed policies in the district attorney declined to file charges, but last week the governor appointed a special prosecutor to investigate. Police Department has a long assorted horrible history of racism and brutality. That needs to stop today. In the wake of George Floyd Staff. Mcclain's cases has renewed attention nationwide tonight. These pictures are sparking new outrage. Not only do we have a racism problem in America. We have a morality problem in America right? The fact that someone could make light of someone's death in any fashion is just. Is Immoral. Today the Aurora police. Union released a statement calling the internal investigation, a rush to judgement and saying that the Aurora police chief was unfit for her position tonight. Another protest is scheduled here. Gave Gutierrez for Steering Colorado Gabe. Thank you now to the corona virus emergency this fourth, of July weekend, the death toll in this country is now more than one hundred, thirty, thousand, marking the third straight day with cases topping fifty thousand here's McGill gear. As a record number of Americans test positive can staggering number or hospitalized tonight. Doctors warn this is just a peak in the first wave of our national pandemic with cases climbing in thirty three states. The US has now seen two hundred thousand new infections since Monday alone. It's unprecedented and every single day brings new experiences. It sounds cliche and trite, but that's absolutely the case facing their own record high caseload in Georgia, the state now has one hundred sixty testing centers, but across the country lines are long and turnaround. Time is slow. The governor in Ohio says the virus is spreading with vengeance seven counties in red alert meaning, multiple outbreaks arise in hospitalizations and a high risk for residents. This should be a wakeup. Call to all of us that we're in. In the fight of our lives and we are literally fighting for lives to fight the virus. The Chicago Health Department is now requiring travelers from fifteen states to quarantine for two weeks before venturing into the city in Illinois victims range in age from younger than one years old to older than a hundred and we'll see hospitalizations continue to go up and unfortunately I think we're also going to see the number of deaths start to rise again. With the start of baseball season nearly here today, word the All Star game is canceled as one of the League's biggest stars and expecting. Father says he's concerned. Honestly still don't feel comfortable obviously with the with the baby common. Stuff going through my mind right now as many begin their holiday summer taking a gamble casinos in Atlantic city packed. It's crowds at the beach bars and even backyard barbecues that can also spread the virus tonight in Miami. A curfew goes into effect to limit crowds. After Mardi Gras when New Orleans became a hotspot today. The mayor there says she's very concerned. After a new high in cases, and we do not want to go back California now finds itself as an epicenter for the virus over the last two weeks, hospitalizations are up about fifty percent as a number of people infected climbs roughly forty percent in cities like Sacramento nearly half of all new cases are people younger than forty. The age group some fear most likely to congregate this weekend. Doctors everywhere with this plea. The! Mask. I can't say were forcefully. Tonight for healthcare workers on the front lines. This is no holiday Miguel. Almaguer NBC News. Los, Angeles President Trump is celebrating the fourth of July holiday weekend with a firework show at Mount Rushmore tonight. Crowd's not required to wear masks or social distance. Here's Kristen Welker. In just hours, president trump will kick off independence day in the shadow of presidents past a fireworks celebration at Mount Rushmore tonight. I think it'll be fantastic evening. A campaign official tells NBC News the President Will Tell the truth about those tried to tear down and divide our country. Seventy five hundred people have ticket so far at while masks. We'll be available. They won't be required including for law enforcement officials at the event. Optional deputies are generally, won't them? The. Satay stations are available this morning today, the surgeon general encouraged everyone to wear a mask when possible please where a face covering, but would not weigh in on whether large gatherings are safe when pressed by Craig. We know that large gatherings presents the biggest risk right now. Would you advise someone to go to a large gathering? Yes, or no, well, Craig, if not a yes, or no, every single person has to make up their own mind. President trump has only been pictured. Wearing a mask wants fuelling criticism. He and his administration are sending mixed signals as concerns mount about a rising cova cases across the country and tonight. There are new signs viruses yet again impacting those in the president circle. After the trump rally Tulsa Oklahoma less than two weeks ago Herman Cain. Who is serving as a trump campaign? Surrogate says he tested positive for the virus Cain was pictured at that packed rally without a mask. White House officials sell NBC News. They'll have a new message on the virus that we need to live with it. They'll tout therapeutic drugs and ways to stay safe Craig. Kristen Welker at the White House, Kristen, thank you change could be coming to our nation's capital and to the NFL as well one team at the center of controversy over its name, taking a first step toward potentially rebranding itself. Here's Jeff Bennett with that story. Tonight after mounting pressure, the NFL's Washington redskins announcing it will conduct a thorough review of the team name, which has long been condemned as a derogatory slur against native Americans. The team owner Dan Snyder writing in a statement that he wants input from others while taking into account, the proud tradition and history of the franchise. It comes just one day after Fedex. The teams most prominent sponsor asked the team to change its name Fedex owns. owns the naming rights to the field where the team plays in Maryland also on Thursday, Nike appeared to remove the teams products from its website. Both the NFL and Snyder had for years defended the teams controversial name Snyder bowing never to change it. The name really means honor respect NFL. Commissioner Roger Goodell saying today. He supportive of this important step a former player for the team, also weighing in a civil leave, it should be changed. I think there's been enough public outcry from group that. They're being marginalized by their image as a mascot for an entire cultural identity reaction today on the streets of DC. Even with the name the name it's offensive. Racial Slur I mean that would be like having a team called the N. Word and tonight. The Wall Street Journal citing people familiar with the matter who say the team will likely be renamed by the start of the two thousand twenty season Craig. Jeff Bennett four stare in Washington Jeff. Thank you as the krona virus pushes hospitals to the brink. ERS are seeing a dramatic drop in patients seeking emergency help. Here's Tom Costello. It happens every forty seconds. Someone somewhere in the US has a heart attack while ninety people suffer a stroke, our yet the number of non corona virus, er. Visits dropped off a cliff as pandemic swept the country down a stunning forty two percent, as many people simply avoided the Er we kissed. and to say goodbye, and he said I love you and. And, then he went down concerned about Kobe. Exposure Cordoba tells husband. Dominic was reluctant to go to the Er when he finally agreed, he collapsed and died of a heart attack as paramedics were at the house emergency rooms nationwide reported a twenty three percent drop and heart attack cases through may twenty percent drop in strokes and a ten percent drop in diabetic emergencies if you're having A. A heart attack. If you're having a stroke, you absolutely need to seek care and earns. The departments are safe. Hospital protocols now in place designed to isolate Cova cases from other patients. Dr Brendan Car runs emergency. Medicine at Mount Sinai. We have reinvented Oliver workflows to make sure that when people come in the front door, we can do everything possible to keep them distance to keep them. In a mask to keep them covered same emery. At Atlanta now encouraging patients to keep the regular dentist and doctors appointments and use telemedicine when possible people can still get. Their prescriptions refilled virtually. And then we can do you know sort of a typical I'll be limited physical exam on patients, sort of look at them on a video screen, meanwhile, with Dominic Gone Courtney Battelle is now left to raise their two kids alone. Shouldn't have happened. He was thirty eight years old and. Our story was an offer. The other victims about pandemic still in its first wave Tom Costello. NBC News Washington. In sixty seconds our conversation with a special prosecutor taking over the amount ordinary case. Back now with a fireworks mishap, a man in new. York, city, shooting off legal pyrotechnics when one flies through an open window. Check this out later. Flames erupting inside the man was arrested for arson. The NY warning don't play with illegal fireworks this Fourth of July. Now, to the unrest, in Hong Kong protesters outraged over a new law could stamp out the pro democracy movement there. Here's Richard Engel. While much of the world was watching Kobe China. This week passed a strict and sweeping national security law illegal. Now any act of sedition, treason, terrorism and secession charges open to wide interpretation. Hundreds of activists have been arrested since the law was implemented Wednesday and the new security service answerable to Beijing Noth- The local government in Hong Kong is responsible for enforcement. The US has protested. The rule of law has been eviscerated too young the Chinese foreign. Ministry, spokesman responded saying Beijing cares more about territorial integrity foreign relations until now Hong, Kong has been ruled by a policy called one country. Two. Systems with Hong Kong. Enjoying more freedom of expression and atonomy those days are over. Nathan Law. A protest leader recently escaped Hong Kong, speaking to NBC News Tonight from an undisclosed location. MANHAT- being proposing that Churton slogan, versus so you've anyone is chanting slogans, and they will be prosecuted and we already quite well. With what we had! The British government has offered to take in as many as three million. Hong Kong residents as an act of protest China has denounced the offer and British officials. Admit there's not much they can do. If China won't allow people to leave the city in large numbers, Craig. Richard Thank you back home. The Special Prosecutor in the amount Aubrey case speaking out about the responsibility that she feels as a black woman seeking justice. She talked to Blaine Alexander. please. It's a case that has stoked nationwide protests and calls for justice. The death of Ahmad arbitrary joy at home is leading the prosecution. When this case landed on your desk, you feel a particular responsibility Oh absolutely. The responsibility was just one of what we do with our cases I. Certainly have a sense of community in know what the expectation is of me, not because am the district attorney on the case, but because also because an African American female homes is the fourth prosecutor on the case appointed by Georgia's attorney general after two previous. DA's recused themselves over potential conflicts of interest armory was unarmed jogging south Georgia neighborhood has family says when he was followed and killed, one of the suspects told police they pursued because they thought Arbor, was a burglary suspect and that Travis McMichael fired when arbitrary began to. To violently attack three men now indicted for murder arrests came ten weeks after armories death only after video became public. You get upset when you watch it, but as a prosecutor in the case I have to make sure that I'm following the evidence that is brought to me. A former chief magistrate judge now one of just a few black. Da's in all of Georgia deeply that were at a moment of change of racial reckoning in this country I. do I I think everybody's open and ready for the conversation now playing a key role with the world watching Blaine Alexander NBC News Atlanta any. Of next hitting the road everything you need to know in this summer of Cuvette. Hitting the road this holiday weekend. Gotti Schwartz has what you need to know. It's a question looming ahead of the holiday weekend. Is it safe to travel during a pandemic and the honest answer? Even if you're headed out to the grand, Canyon or yellowstone can still be risky, but if your mind is made up, experts say that hitting the road can actually be a lot safer than flying. AAA expecting Americans to make more than six hundred eighty million road trips this summer as far fewer plan to or take trains a big number, but still three percents from last year, and if you're GONNA head out, it's best to pack a bag with the things that you're going to need to stay clean, so you've got some hand sanitizers, some wipes, gloves, and you're. You're going to need a mask for everybody in your car and had to go. Meals are a safe bet, so you want to plan your route accordingly, also make sure you check ahead for travel restrictions and closures with no single policy. The rules vary from state to state some asking you to quarantine for fourteen days especially if you're coming from a hot spot. And even states not requiring a mask. It's a good idea to always travel with one just in case you're going to be around people. You also want to make sure that you were wiping down any. Contact Surface, and if there's any silver lining in all of this, it's a gas. Prices are the lowest they've been in years. Also research carefully before you go for now, some popular attractions like Disneyland closed and many campsites are open. You might have to book ahead. And finally remember experts say avoid crowds outside is better than inside, but staying home beats both. Own New rules of the road to help keep you and others safe got Schwartz NBC News Los Angeles. And we will be right back. Finally on this Fourth of July weekend a surprise connection going all the way back to the battle for independence. Here's Kristen Dog. Growing up Independence Day always felt a little different to Karen Bachelor. A little black girl come fourth of July I actually always kind of thought I was A. Click short of being really American then she learned just how deep her American roots ran a revolutionary relative, a young man named William Hood Living on the frontier with his father and mother, and the call came to be part of this new tipping point called the American Revolution evenly air found her family. Patriot through centuries. Old Pension Records John Redman he was a free black man of from Virginia both women are now members of the daughters of the American revolution, a group for women who can prove a direct lineage to the revolutionary war. War It began in the eighteen nineties, and has had more than a million members, a group that only began embracing a more diverse membership in the last fifty years Karen, broke the color barrier in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, seven, when I first came in I was the only person I ever saw that looked like me, and now I was just on a zoom with seventy other women of color through the pandemic zoom calls a become routine. My revelation, every war Patriot is my rage ran. Bother Jack enlisted in the continental army. And became a private wearing pearls and sharing everything we talk about our attorney. We talk about black lives. Matter I mean it's a special sisterhood through the calls. They've discovered summer quite literally related, but even if they don't share blood, they share a bond work growing everyone's story and seeing how much really connected connected to each other. And their country. I feel more American than Apple Pie Kristen Dahlgren NBC News. That's a cool story. And that is NBC. Nightly News Craig Melvin. Thank you for watching? Enjoy this holiday weekend and good night. Hey. It's Chris as this week on my podcast, wise is happening. I'll be talking with philosopher and former police chief Brennan del Pozzo about. Police Accountability and reform when you physically struggle with someone, even if you can overcome them, and they don't hurt you and you win that fight so to speak. You have Adrenalin and chemicals in you that make you unsympathetic to the person you're dealing with is a human being and puts you in a different place than the bystander an policing his ignored that. That and policing hasn't taken seriously the fact that it has to build in safeguards to stop those emotions from being what leads to the decisions I. The army does a better job. The army knows its soldiers in combat like are filled with crazy uncontrollable emotions, and they build indiscipline and checks as much as possible to stop it from leading to war crimes. Policing has yet to take that seriously. That's this week on happening. Search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe.

Craig Melvin NBC United States Elijah McLean NBC News prosecutor NFL president Aurora Hong Kong NBC Georgia Kristen Welker Gutierrez Washington officer Richard Engel Tom Costello Angeles President Trump
Therein Lais a tale: Hong Kongs revealing arrests

The Economist: The Intelligence

22:44 min | 3 months ago

Therein Lais a tale: Hong Kongs revealing arrests

"Hello and welcome to the intelligence on economist radio. I'm your host Jason Palmer. Every weekday, we provide a fresh perspective on the events shaping your world. Egyptians see the life giving Nile River as a gift from God their birthright. Problem is so do the Ethiopians up river. As. An enormous new damn takes shape in. Ethiopia negotiations on how to manage water flow are proving damn hard to resolve. And for many adventurers all that back to nature stuff his passe. Our correspondent heads out with the urban explorers of England's abandoned buildings. New Plumbing Law proposals made these derelict sites and an obsessive hobby or a great risk. I up though. On Monday police in Hong, Kong marched through the offices of a local tabloid called Apple Daily and arrested its influential owner Jimmy Lai. He was charged with colluding with foreign forces crime. The carries a potential life sentence. Agnes. Chow prominent youth activist and eight others were also arrested under the same law. All were released on bail yesterday. The arrests confirmed the fears of Pro Democracy campaigners that Hong Kong's freedoms are disappearing. On July first the territory's Chief Executive Carrie Lam unveiled a new national security law imposed by Beijing activists worried about a broader clampdown on a city that has recently seen so much feverish activism protests and riots. But Mrs Lamb promised Hongkongers would still be free to express themselves and clearly stated in Article Four that people. Hong. Kong, they should be able. To enjoy the freedom of speech freedom of press publications. Protests are really and so I'm sorry increasingly that promise rings hollow Jimmy. Light was arrested with some high drama David Rennie right struggling the economists call on Chinese Affairs and it's based in Beijing. We saw police searching his very expensive home and then he was led with his hands handcuffed behind his back around his own newspaper offices. Accompanied by two hundred police officers in uniform who doesn't boxes and material and threaten journalists who were live streaming. The whole very dramatic scenes he's been charged with collusion with foreign forces, seditious words, and fraud, and all of those crimes are crimes under the new National Security Law which Beijing imposed on Hong Kong six weeks ago and why is his arrest so remarkable? Well, in many ways, he's a kind of typical heroic rags to riches Hong Kong tycoon he like many Hongkongers. Was Born on the mainland in the province just across the Border Guandong he was a stowaway on a boat into Hong Kong age twelve he got a job in a government factory. He worked his way up he traded stocks got rich. Stores the company that eventually became the fashion company Giordano, but he also got politics along the way and so in particular, very brutal suppression of the democracy protests in Iran Channel Men Square in June nineteen, eighty nine really kind of changed his worldview and he became much more political once he became much more political he starts to suffer business losses at eventually sold. His fashion company because the Chinese shops were were being factually boy causes he has used his raucous tabloid newspaper Empire to launch very severe political attacks on his opponents in. Hong. Kong on political leaders in the mainland, and he is also, and this is why he's now facing these charges. He has gone to places like Washington and said to senior political figures and the trump administration are the capitals that they should sanction the. Government in Hong Kong that it's foreign pressure that can make a difference and that since the new National Security Law was passed is deemed a serious crime of collusion with foreign powers. He faces potential life in prison and he's not the only one who's fallen foul of the law. No, that's right. In addition to his own sons of being charged with fraud. We've seen some prominent members of the pro-democracy movement in particular Agnes. Child. WHO's twenty-three? She's kind of really a very popular figure among pro-democracy activists also, very popular in Japan because she speaks Japanese and so she's been front page news in Japan. Again, what is so shocking is that the party she co Demos's Sisto was wound up specifically in order to try and give them some immunity against the National Security Law. But the police who arrested her told her that apparently, the fact that she's been saying on social media that foreigners should help Hong Kong was in itself, a breach of the law one of the other co founders of dentists, Stone Nathan Law who is in exile now in the UK he also apparently being charged if you went back to Hong, Kong would would clearly be locked up. Joshua Wong. Perhaps, the most famous of that young generation of of. Very, activists still remains on arrested for the moment although he faces other charges, but he's still at large and tweeting and getting interviews, and in the meantime, how have these arrests gone down among Hong Kong's people there's been a big response in Hong Kong and not that long ago you could have expected public protests. Remember we had hundreds of thousands of people on the streets for weeks last summer since the new national security move being caused that kind of public activity is much too dangerous people even too scared to say what they feel on social media. So we're seeing a subtle signs of support. One of the most obvious ones is that Apple Daily the tabloid owned. By Jimmy, Lai has been increasing its print run of nine fold to more than half million copies which instantly sold out his share price has shot up because people are buying the shares to show support. A restaurant owned by his family has had long queues outside people basically too frightened to voice political opinions but they're showing that there are still a lot of people who want to show their support. So it sounds as if Beijing's new law is is having the intended effect. It's a very depressing moment. Really I mean all of us who covered the protests lost year were very very struck by the Cross section of Hong Kong society who were expressing real contempt. For the mainland government real hostilities. The idea of Hong Kong is potentially facing trial in mainland Cortsen and there was a sense that the hearts and minds of Hong, Kong were being lost last year and Hong Kong was showing extraordinary defiance. What kind of depressing now is that this new national security law shows that Beijing is willing to. Use. Really. Extraordinary visible tools of illegal repression to shutdown that kind of opposition spirit in Hong Kong and you know in terms of public protests, it's probably going to work because this law has been incredibly carefully drafted. It's incredibly vague. It's incredibly broad and itself enforcing in this very sinister wh. Wh what do you mean by that was seeing members of the opposition, the pro-democracy opposition for example, from running for public office because they said Lewis, bad idea and that apparently to say that Laura is not needed against the law to say that as a pro-democracy politician if elected, you would vote against government policies is now enough to get you banned. So we're seeing really that old promise of one country. Two Systems that the mainland government held out after Britain handed Hong Kong back in one thousand, nine, hundred, seven at incredible speed. That is becoming much one country, one system, and that rule cause noisy freedom of the press freedom of expression. The right to protest that people remember the hundreds of thousands he presented all summer. All of that is now illegal and punishable by a brand new secret police force, and in the case of people Jimmy. Lai potentially being hold across the border to the mainland. To face trial in a communist controlled court, and then potentially life imprisonment simply for saying that foreigners should put pressure on the government that Hong Kong's freedoms. That's how far we've gone in such a short time but I'm just wondering when this law was first announced there was talk of how it might spark actually more resistance that enforcing it might draw in the international community, but it's quiet as you say inside and certainly outside Hong Kong it's been smooth sailing for this law. Yeah. Because this masses Mosul Beijing than it matters to us. And it's like when the Soviets invaded Czechoslovakia and Hungary massive mortar than it did the world we weren't gonNA fight a war over it. So I mean I we'll see we'll Britain hold out the welcome how many Hong Kong's will leave how many will take up the possible to offer but no, it will work because that's the thing about being a brutal dictatorship is is willing to shrug off international condemnation work in an international bankers probably lots the silently quite pleased to see these troublemakers top thanks very much for joining US David thank you. You. WanNa. Get safely back to business during covert nineteen. There's an APP for that I offer by safety culture will help keep your co workers and customers safe. It's as simple safety checklist and inspection APP that anyone can learn within minutes. It allows you to do things like follow CDC guidelines complete covert nineteen safety inspections maintain an audit trail and stay safe. There are hundreds of preloaded checklists available to download for free eye auditor is the world's largest safety checklist APP with more than six hundred, million checks per year visit safety culture, dot com to download your free checklist today. For Ethiopia, the Grand Renaissance Dam isn't just a source of hydro-electricity. It's a source of national pride. When it's finished, it'll be Africa's largest twice as tall as the statue of Liberty as wide as the Brooklyn Bridge is long. It'll hold over seventy billion cubic meters of water in its reservoir, more than the volume of the Blue Nile River upon which it sits. Soon. It should be producing six GIGAWATTS of power enough to sell some on the cheap to neighboring Sudan. Now it's over seventy percent complete and that reservoir is starting to fill up. In Ethiopia that's cause for celebration and street parties. But some of their neighbors downstream are less excited. Well, the damn has loomed over Ethiopian and Egyptian politics for decades. Tom Gardner is the economists Addis Ababa correspondent. It's a source of immense national pride for almost always pins and seen as absolutely essential pulling the country out of poverty. It's expected to double the country's electricity supply and by exporting it to the neighboring countries, it will generate much-needed revenues foreign exchange. That's how Ethiopia views it. How about Egypt. Well Egypt ninety percent of whose population live along the Nile or in the delta it's seen as the country's lifeblood. It's birthright and gift from God, which funnily enough is also the Yagudin sit Egypt is a worry because they believe the damn will reduce the country's supply. Egypt is already short of water. Its population has risen the water supply per person has. Fallen this is partly Egypt's full to use his eighty percent of water for agriculture. Jordan. Israel nearby awful place to fifty percent by contrast. Egypt's irrigation ill maintained and leaky, and it's fom is grow very dusty crops. So the situation in Egypt is particularly tricky that has not been helped. I should say by the fact that Ethiopia has today blocked prompted impact studies. For its part insists the will only be used to generate. US. Agriculture on the Ethiopian side at least. So therefore will not reduce Egypt supply, but the Gypsies these assurances have never been enough one president even considered a bombing it. An June of this year therapy accused Egypt of sponsoring cyber attacks to disrupt. and. So why isn't they haven't been able to to strike a deal to find a diplomatic solution to this before this time? Well being basically since construction began a decade ago talks over how therapy would fill in operate the diamond, how to resolve any future disagreements these have more or less unsuccessful, particularly the most recent ones and most recently the African Union tried to mediate it should be said, most of the issues outstanding have been resolved in Egypt. Once Ethiopia to fill the reservoir slowly release enough water. So the rivers flow isn't disrupted with quite close to agreements around that. Essentially, the two sides can agree to do when there's enough rain. The question is what do when there isn't an Egypt Ethiopia to promise to release certain amounts of water talk up the Nile. It also wants binding international arbitration in case of future disagreements. Ethiopia doesn't wanNA promise anything wants to take things year by year and settle any disagreements negotiation so that basically the nub of the problem but more generally over the last ten years, the damage has been used by governments of both sides really to bolster nationalist politics they used flag-waving jingoism around the issue to bolster domestic political positions. This is particularly evident recently in Ethiopia lost weekend in the mass deliberations here. Now, this up above the capital of Ethiopia mocking the completion of the first stage of filling the reservoir the dam itself is mostly done filling has already begun I mean what happens if these talks just fail? Well to start with, it should be Egyptian. Times will not run dry. There's enough water in the reservoir behind Egypt's s one High Dam to make up for any shortfall this year, which in any case should be minimal. The July filling of the reservoir took place during really heavy above average rain fool but the mood is getting toxic last month near nation of usually populated European musician and activists sparked mass protests and violence across the country, the Theo government, the prime minister as good as blamed the Egyptians for this so that certainly contributed to to souring relations. Talks were supposed to come to an end last month before the beginning of the the filling of the reservoir that deadline came and went. We are now looking at another round of talks this month but Egypt Sudan have both pulled out the supposed to start again next week. But at the moment relations between the two sides. So tricky positions. So fixed that it's hard to see how the talks will progress productively in the coming weeks or months. And what about in the other direction if the rhetoric is heating up this much if this is an existential issue for for for both, could it come to to real conflict? I think it's best to be cautious on this point. Egypt has long been wary of foreign wars since its ill-fated intervention in Yemen in the nineteen sixties. President SISI has enough on his plate regionally anyway, Egypt's already contemplating involvement in the war in in Libya next door ought to get. Simile Abby Ethiopia's prime, Minister Does not have a deep well of political capital is in a tight spot whilst there is a certain political utility to drumming up national jingoistic further around the dime he doesn't want to reach no war either most analysts experts a SEC, a real conflict over this is unlikely but if talks continued to drag on and the continues to fill this reservoir unilaterally without a comprehensive agreement being struck then at the very least tensions in the region are going to worsen substantially and what to your mind would it would have to compromise look like what could actually solve this. Do you think? The. Technical details can just about be worked out I, think it should be said that the fact that all sides have agreed in principle to continue talking despite ethier the beginning to fill the reservoir last month before a deal was struck that shows that not all is lost wiser policies are needed wall round subsidies which encouraged Egyptians to waste water should be phased out as slowly beginning to be everyone should invest in solar power to take pressure off. The Ice Tom and for the deal Ethiopia should pledge to let more water through in long dry spells and letton international. But Egypt could compromise by letting the African Union play that role officials and Kara have long believed that the African Union favors Ethiopia where the African Union has its headquarters but the group has done a pretty good job in a difficult situation in recent weeks in attempting to lead the effort towards finding a deal that works for everyone. Thanks very much free time Tom Thank you Jason. For plenty more analysis like this from our international network of correspondents, subscribe to the Economist to find best introductory offer wherever you are just go to economist dot com slash intelligence offer. Squeezing through the window of a Boorda derelict building to have a look around might not sound like your kind of fun. But there are some hobbyists out there who find it absolutely thrilling and they'll travel far and wide to experience it. I've done every meal in buffet unless including Commission on. Snake. Simon slugged and isn't urban explorer and the author of an upcoming book on the subject. Why I do it? She'll table while I was like back then. What these buildings can offer. Still you know the do of a second beauty to them in hospitals been in the mark against some of these places a lot of people would say, so it's nice to people consume an appreciate that the do of beauty to to these places. This trend of flooring is finding wider audience online but there are concerns. These Modern Day adventurers will run out. Dilapidated buildings to explore. While I'm not sure how much can go into relief for legal reasons other than it took an exploration looking at satellite photographs and maps and scouting out whether people were working on the site. Elliott writes about. Britain. For The economist, he recently went on urban exploring trip to an undisclosed location. We prepared entrance through the back end of the site which involved crawling under fence game for fields of stinging nettles, and it's an old barracks, an old military barracks. So there were lots of military architecture around pill boxes and watch towers. There's also lots of buildings, most of which lacked roofs and some lack floors as I discovered when I got to the top of the flight of stairs and stepped into the joining room only to find that was nothing but fin- beneath my feet and had to quickly leave back on hold onto a door frame to avoid the sun job. So why did you put yourself through all of this peril? Then why do people want to do this well? It's not hobby that's for sure combines elements of social history and the journaling pumping addiction to trespassing on private property, which is always fun. The most serious off oven explorers often working class and approaching middle as they've been doing it for many many years they often grew up in class places where there were lots of industrial buildings had been empty to due to industrialization and they mix socially with skateboarders in graffiti artists. You know who have their own uses for abandoned buildings quite a lot of these buildings provide snapshots of kind of forgotten history. The lots of people don't necessarily know is there, but it's kind of almost intact as how it was when it was left or. The old floor missing but clearly, you're dancing around some legal questions here. How legal is any of this? Well, the pages on the forms of often contradictory advice on trespassing laws and what you can and can't Khandu although notes. If in doubt you do have to contact a solicitor urban explorers follow one sacred rule, which is take nothing but pictures leave nothing but footprints and they reject any claim that what they are doing is wrong particularly the claim the what they do is breaking and entering is not it's kind of trespassing at its worst possible point but. Kind of as Simon sucked in the leader to there's a bit sneaky sneaky involved in how how you go about it. But nonetheless, they they do on kind of mass reject the claim that what they're doing is illegal ruins have also become a cottage industry. So lots of latent landowners own these sites have been leasing them out to specialists live action role they companies who use them as a pocket backdrops for s off battles or fake Zombie attacks for stagnates and that kind of thing. But there are many concerns that some of these sites will soon. Disappear why do you say that a wire they more in peril now than before well, Boris Johnson the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom doesn't like them very much. She's decided that they should be demolished more quickly and more efficiently to make way for new housing that's upsetting a lot of urban explorers as one might expect who argued it is building should be converted rather than demolished and could easily make housing on their own in a much more stylish way that preserves the old way of life within the knee, and so I suppose it's a sort of existential. Question for urban exploring than if so many of these buildings are are now endanger. Yes. Urban explorer very passionate group I. Don't think they're going to give up completely on what they love doing. But at the end of the day, they have kind of fighting a losing battle. Now against these buildings to they've lost their calls in a way, they always wanted to these buildings to be preserved and that's gone now. So then name concern is kind of really letting people see the beauty and history of the abandoned buildings. Well, then most of that will probably just become. Terrific. Elliot thank you very much for joining. US. Thank you, Jason. That's all for this episode of the intelligence if you like give a rating on Apple podcasts and see back here, tomorrow.

Hong Kong Ethiopia Hong Kong Egypt Hong Beijing National Security Law Nile River Jimmy Lai Jason Palmer Britain Agnes Apple Daily US African Union fraud England United Kingdom Sudan Simon
Trump signs Hong Kong human rights act

PRI's The World

46:58 min | 1 year ago

Trump signs Hong Kong human rights act

"On This Day of thanks Hong Kong demonstrators are grateful for American support people. I feel like they need to thank the countries that have been helping home. Komen urge them to have more. Also today we're taking a trip down the Mississippi River on boats its planes and canoes paddling through muddy backwaters. Then they get torn up by the thorns. Eleven hundred Mile Journey to find out how this iconic waterway connects America to the rest of the world one in twelve people on Earth ingest food made from Mississippi River Basin produced products and that is dependent on a working ecologically healthy Mississippi River Basin by the rivers. Ecological health is a big question mark. I'm Marco Werman in today's top stories and the global stakes along the Mississippi on the world. I'm Marco Werman. This is the world good to have you with us today. This thanksgiving holiday spirit move president trump to pay a surprise visit to US troops in Afghanistan. There's nowhere I'd rather celebrate. This thanksgiving Thanksgiving then right here. With the toughest strongest best in bravest warriors on the face of the earth. You are indeed that the president arrived in a darkened airplane in and carried out a presidential tradition feeding Turkey and mashed potatoes to American troops. It was trump's first. Visit to Afghanistan is president. He said he'd restart peace negotiations creations with the Taliban. This comes three months after he cancelled talks with them. The Taliban wants to make a deal. We'll see if they WANNA make a deal. It's got to be a real deal but we'll see but they wanna make a deal and they only want to make a deal because you're doing a great job that's the only reason they wanna make a deal so I wanNA thank you I wanNA thank. The Afghan soldiers are really early today. And you say they're really fighting hard as very impressed with that. Actually so I wanNA thank you. Trump said the. US would stay until there is a deal or total victory. He also said he'd like to reduce a number of American troops. Trump also met with Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani today in an unusual we'll move Ghani join trump onstage with troops at Bug Romero Base Ghani praise trump as the architect of a strategy for wiping out al-Qaeda in Afghanistan. There are people also full of thanks in Hong Kong today. Although it looks more like the fourth of July throngs of protesters waving American flags others singing the Star spangled banner. The demonstrators are offering thanks to president trump for signing a bill that backs Hong Kong's pro democracy. Protesters Nathan Law is a key figure. In that Democracy Movement in two thousand sixteen he was elected to Hong Kong's legislature but was later expelled from the parliament under pressure from Beijing thing. He's now studying at Yale University. We talked about the videos posted online of the celebrations in the streets of Hong Kong. Last night people were gathering in the hoddle phone call hundreds and thousands of people holding up cell phone lights and training for victory. I'm also seeing a lot of flags. There are British lags of course a lot of American flags. And there's somebody with a statue of Liberty Hat with like little led lights. It's pretty amazing. What does it tell us about the connections between Hong Kong and the United United States? Do you think this is a leaderless movement. So people express the opinion freely inside family. Some a-hole American flags on the whole. Oh You Cape flats people feel like they need to sang the countries that have been helping and urged them to help all. I'm looking at one flag. That has has a picture of a tank that says trump on it and trump is standing with a An assault rifle on top of the tank very proudly the whole Assembly is not meant into like make trump's into hero of Hong Kong but a way that people express gratitude. President Trump signed a bill banning the export of tear gas rubber bullets bullets and stun guns to the police in Hong Kong. Do you think that's significant or mostly symbolic the police. Now that have been firing. The tear gas May in China which is is more dangerous to themselves Morton certain about what it contains so I think the ban actually released a message that according to international national centers does not agree on how the government or the police have been using this crowd. Control weapons hope that even in Europe the other countries who is being selling weapons to police force could follow that cow at the same time. Washington is trying to negotiate this trade deal with China and I'm wondering if you're concerned that a successful trade deal could reframe Hong Kong for Washington as a secondary concern to good economic ties with the Chinese mainland. The trade deal is just part of the picture. The most important thing is how we could restrained expansion of the authoritarianism and how we could stall China abusing the power our they have in order to suppress people so I think regardless of how the trade deal has been doing. I think we need to uphold. These principles does the Pro Democracy Movement in Hong Kong. Think it can trust Washington because president trump has been pretty noncommittal to your movement in the past he's also called China's leader Xi Jinping Ping an incredible guy so is trump a reliable ally. Well I think the Hong Kong issue in the US is having strong. Bipartisan support regardless of the personal character of president trump when not lying outlook trust or a face on one single person but we are relying on on a share community that with the same values of democracy to hold hands together we. I entrust of the bipartisan support in the US of course the fact in Hong Kong is also a global fight in front of the clashes values where the forefront of stop paying the expansion of terrorism and Bhagat mutual benefits. Nathan law is a key figure in Hong Kong's democracy movement. He's now studying at Yale. Thanks for being with us. Happy thank you very much. There's another growing source of tension between the. US and China take talk in case. You don't know Tick Tock. They wildly popular APP to post short videos. It's owned by a Chinese company and critics say it's being censored not just things posted in China content posted anywhere critics six point one recent post here in the. US got taken down. It's a video that begins with some beauty tips. But you also get something extra. Here's the world's Lydia Amana mentally. Do this video starts out like any other beauty. To`real you'd find online is I'm gonNA teach you guys to get long lashes the seventeen year old. Who made this talk talk? Her name is Rosa is season. She recorded it where she lives in New Jersey. She sits close to the camera facing it. She has long dark hair draped draped over one of her shoulders. She's wearing a black shirt. Sporting a baby blue scrunchy around her right wrist and she's holding pink eyelash curler up to her face so the first thing you need to do is grab your Lash Curl your lashes obviously and then Feroza stone changes and the video takes turn. She tells people watching to put down their silence. curlers and use your phone using right now to search up what's happening in China and what's happening in. China is a brutal government. Crackdown on Muslims. In the country mainly ethnic leaguers the Chinese government is accused of rounding up as many as one million people over the past three years locking them up in internment camps and imprisons across the remote province of Xinjiang in northwest China separating their families from each other kidnapping them murdering them raping them forcing them to eat pork forcing them to drink. The Chinese government denies all of this Feroza. WHO's a high school junior? Told me over the phone that she found out about what's going on in Xinjiang through social media and I thought this cannot be true. This this kind of can't be doing this to their own. People and I searched strain of they are. It's it's been confirmed by the U N and it broke my heart and as a Muslim growing up in America as an Afghan. I thought it's it's my duty. It's my job to speak about this us into spread awareness. So last weekend she took to tick tock now. She didn't have a huge following. She wasn't well known but she thought maybe if she made the video look like a beauty tutorial it get more views it was bait and switch basically and it worked on Sunday. I woke up to a million views on there and I it was like wow I e to create two more videos on this issue because there's a lot of questions regarding what's happening so created that and then on Monday. I woke up to see the message that my account suspended. So here's what happened. Tick Tock made it so that Feroza couldn't access the APP from her phone and took down the video so many are saying this is because of tick talks connections to China remember. It's owned by the Chinese company. Bite Dance Feroza knew about those connections is when she got on Tick Tock. She also knew that the Chinese government has a tight grip on what people there can say online but she never expected that those it was rules would impact her teen thousands of miles away in New Jersey. There have been other accusations in the past. That tick tock sensors videos. Does that criticize the Chinese government accusations. The company strongly denies. They say that the way they moderate content here in the US is not at all influenced winced by Beijing former employees of tick tock say this is Senator Joshua Holly a Republican from Missouri at a Congressional hearing earlier this month. Take Talk. DOC was invited to the hearing but didn't show up and so- Senator Hawley facing the empty chair that had been set up for talk brought up news reports. It's that said that executives based in Beijing have the final say on what gets to go and take talk even if it's for users here in the US assure a different story than the one talk has told this committee. And that's a problem a problem because tick tock is super popular here in the US especially among teens and young adults. It's and it's becoming a place where they learn about current events so for example Feroza told me that when she posted that now viral video that many teens eighteen replied saying was the first time they ever heard about Xinjiang. Ask for that video it is now back up a tick tock spokesperson who I didn't want to be recorded told me that the takedown was basically an accident. They've since apologized and given feroza access to her account. I don't think I really WanNa coast onto talk anymore but the same time. I don't want this to silence me. I will still spread awareness about these issues and she says there are plenty of other social media. APPS Sushi could do that on for the world mainly due on yesterday's show we heard from members of the US military sharing stories about Thanksgiving spent overseas. He's Today it's the turn of a career Foreign Service officer there. The public servants who spend much of their working lives away from the. US often separated from family. And who up until the impeachment hearings this month. We're not really on the minds of the public. Happy Thanksgiving this is Laura Kennedy. I'm a was a career. Foreign Service officer spent it almost forty years with department of State Kennedy served as ambassador to Turkmenistan along with other posts in the foreign service but when it comes to Thanksgiving memories she goes straight right back to her first posting overseas. I'll never forget that first assignment in Moscow nine thousand nine hundred seventy seven. It was my first overseas assignment in three weeks. After I got their brand new foreign service are still trying to sort of find my way. The embassy burned was devastating. Fire knocked out our communications nations. All of our class are classified working area. Now after this terrible fire we were just engulfed with the effort to try to repair the damages. So so the whole priority went to getting back on our feet after the fire and I hadn't received my what we call household effects. Every all shipments that were not essential that we're not Geared to repairing the fire had been held at are staging. Point up in Helsinki. So here was the winner coming on. There was a period that winner where the temperature stayed in the minus thirties for three weeks. It was a really brutal winter. We were already getting snow. At the beginning of September his was with a burned roof on the of the embassy itself. I had nowhere close so not a fun time so the embassy very kindly gave me a break Over thanksgiving to go up. Retrieve some of my Goods including winter coats coats boots and things so it was a treat actually to be up in Finland on the other hand on your own first Thanksgiving away from family and so on and the American ambassador they're who is quite legendary Roz ridgway heard that I was in town. Invited may sight unseen to her Thanksgiving dinner so I sat down at her residence with our other guests which included the embassy marines. Other folks like me who might not have family at post and what. It was a lovely dinner but the real value of it was that the ambassador reaches out to people who don't have their own Thanksgiving but people just make do all over the world. There are increasingly around the world. Many people who are at Accompanied posts so they don't have the family to help appeal the potatoes and stuff to Turkey's really on their own then. I'm talking about the fact that we've had huge numbers of foreign service people assigned in Iraq in Afghanistan in war zones places where we have civil unrest all over the world foreign service people will face all sorts of different situations. The main thing is that whether they have a full-scale Turkey you're just frozen Turkey. Burger is the fact that they are overseas. They're delighted to be serving their country but it reminds them of what you give up and that is being away from your own friends and family and your country and that's why Foreign Service folks support each other. You look after your colleagues weather. There kiss it can. They are family former ambassador. Laura Kennedy remembering her first Thanksgiving abroad as a foreign service officer in the Soviet Union. You're you're listening to the world I'm Marco Werman and you're with the world for the rest of his Thanksgiving Day we're going to rebroadcast. One of our favorite stories from earlier this year and take you on a journey down the Mississippi River. The right side left side still backwards. If you WANNA take a canoe trip from Helena. Arkansas down the Mississippi in normal times you just put your boat in the river in go but these are not normal times normally not a water back here. A bunch of willow trees but right now waters. Yeah that's canoe guide. Tanner Al jets with the Cooper River Company. And I'm Jason Margolis reporter with the world this Spring and summer. Our cities farms homes and businesses near the river have been besieged by flooding. It was the wettest twelve month period ever recorded in the continental United States. It's driven by record precipitation throughout parts of the Midwest much of that rain water and snow melt made its way into the Mississippi drainage system and headed south so finding a canoe path to the Mississippi River in Arkansas paddling through thickets of trees that would normally be on dry land. Well it's a mess. Then they got torn up by the. The challenge of our canoe ride will be the twenty first century challenge confronting the river too much water order eventually. After an hour of struggle covering a mile and a half as the crow flies we punched through to the main channel of the Mississippi. Joe Keep it going. Welcome to the Mississippi River the Marco Werman back with you again today. We're taking a trip down. The Mississippi. The Mississippi of today barely resembles a water system Mark Twain described in the eighteen eighties in his book life on the Mississippi Considering the Missouri its main branch. It is the longest river in the world for thousand three hundred miles. It seems safe to say that it is also the crooked river in the world. But since that time engineers have shaped contained and dredge the river transforming it into an efficient hydro superhighway to ship American products across the globe my customers for my corner all overseas. They're all overseas. He's everyone of them. And if our transportation efficiency falls shackling the river is also brought some steep cost to the environment wildlife and cities and towns along along the Mississippi and the challenges are only growing as climate. Change is added to the Max wetter weather in the Midwest. More intense hurricanes and sea level rise. The flooding on the Mississippi is sure to cost billions of dollars in damage and also lost business massive running underwater in fact this morning the Mississippi is buckling under the strain. The world's Jason Margolis brings us this story of a river system caught between competing interests the water that trains trains into the Mississippi comes from thirty two states and two Canadian provinces. It all eventually pours out into the Gulf of Mexico is called gravity. All got a pay US here. Here is bureau Louisiana about sixty miles southeast of New Orleans Ryan Lambert runs duck hunting and fishing tours. His Black Lab Logan sits by his side and a flat bottom boat a century ago the Mississippi River Delta was an area of vast coastal marshes but in the battle between between land and water. Water is killing it. We've lost two thousand square miles in last seventy years. which is you know the Grand Grand Canyon in one thousand nine hundred ninety six square miles? We've lost two thousand put another way. It'd be like wiping an area the size of Delaware off the map. Then there's the football field stat. Everybody down here talks about the football field stat. Every one hundred minutes of football fields worth of land is his swallowed by the sea. While we're out here we'll lose three football's land while we're out here. And he goes on twenty four hours a day seven days a week every single angled day we lose an land. These wetlands aren't just critical to people who live work and play here when hurricanes reach land. They lose strength and Peter out the coastal marshes serve as a crucial buffer a shock absorber as storms barrel their way to the urban areas up north the counter Albertine Kimball the message for the folks sixty miles away in New Orleans. No wetlands equals no people. Just remember that we protect all. And so if you don't save us you next with climate change. Scientists are predicting stronger and wetter. Hurricanes as ocean temperatures rise Kimball says the impacts are already here. If you see a Mexican American black billy treat up here. I think things are changing absolutely Anna storms and get more wicked to kick in us. I'm not scientists. Still let me state that fact but she says she knows the solution. The land here needs to be replenished. We WanNa live here so how we do that. We gotta compromise that's it. We don't compromise. None of us will be here. So what exactly happened to Louisiana's coastal wetlands. Where did they go the sand and dirt? They replenishes Louisiana is still hundreds of miles up. North will die further into that a bit later. The transformation of Mississippi truly begins in the mid nineteenth century. RETREA explains Bob Chris. Professor Emeritus of Hydro Geology at Washington University in St. Louis if we look at an old lithograph from eighteen eighteen fifty nine. Here's the fledgling said eah Saint Louis and look at the steamboats. Look at this thing. Well we're not have been great to travel in luxury unless you crashed which happened frequently back. Then I'm Chris shows a map from the mid nineteenth century. hearer steamboat REX. Every mile. Auto for probably thousand miles. I think of the commercial losses. The untamed river also put military vessels at risk and so the Army Corps of engineers was brought in to shackle the Mississippi. They did their job but not quite well. Enough Cliff Dean runs the Delta Cultural Royal Center Museum in Helena Arkansas. My first name is actually James. I switched over to my middle name because when I started teaching James Dean was pretty famous. The Jimmy Dean smoked sausage and dean grew up in the Mississippi Delta hearing about the great flood of one thousand nine hundred twenty seven an area roughly the size of Ireland Lind was underwater. Some five hundred people died and more than six hundred thousand were displaced the Red Cross called it. One of America's greatest peacetime disasters offers Dean's grandparents lived through it. He says one morning they woke up surrounded by water. And the sheriff came by deputies. Made everybody getting boats you you you had to leave. And the men are all had to go to try to shore up the ladies or to build new ditches or something to try to stop the water. And if you didn't go I mean you yeah. People actually shot that didn't go to the lady latter rain When the levee breaks by Kansas Joe McCoy and Memphis Minnie from nine hundred twenty nine? The Mississippi River connects the American heartland to the rest of the globe. It also shares a lot of the world's environmental problems and people on the by. You want them fixed. Oh all we should have done it fifty years ago. Today's the first day of my grandchildren's fifty years that started off. Let's get going. Do they do eleven hundred mile journey down. The Mississippi continues just ahead all night in the in in the world. The Mississippi River broke all sorts of flood records this year. People think we're nuts for living down here. I mean I mean how many people spend that much money to build. Oh that beautiful home. Knowing that the bottom's GONNA fill up with water US learning to live with more water. We continue our journey down the Mississippi ahead here on the world. I'm Marco Werman and you're with the world we're a CO production of the BBC World Service W. G. B. H. Boston Pri NPR acts when the levee breaks led Zeppelin from the nineteen seventy s earlier. We were talking about the great flood of Nineteen Twenty seven which inspired the song. We're devoting much of the show today to the Mississippi River an iconic waterway that connects US trade to the rest of the globe. Here's the world's Jason Margolis after Nineteen Twenty Ninety seven the US army core ramped up its efforts to contain the lower Mississippi. They built higher and deeper levees along with flood control structures and spill ways to relieve stress. Rest during high water events. It was one of the most ambitious engineering projects on earth. And it's largely worked to protect river city's and keep trade flowing but with climate change many people along the river like cliff dean a worry about how much longer the intricate system can hold. It used to be like the twenty-seven flood. Would you might have one hundred years before you have in the next look. Well now. We're beginning to get them every few years. It's been a rough stretch along. Mississippi since Hurricane Katrina struck fourteen eighteen years ago. Hydro Geologist Bob. Chris isn't surprised by all the flooding. Modern rivers is featureless strand of Spaghetti and this has been done for navigation. Thank you your blood pressure. This is your point system. Go into your body you eat a bunch of gunk and clog up all your arteries you're on life. Support this rivers on life support. For many policymakers the solution is expensive pumps and and more levees or higher ones. They make good photo ops but increasingly many people now think more levees and walls aren't the solution. The city of Davenport Iowa Iowa is nine hundred and fifty miles north of New Orleans. Devonport decided that it isn't going to fight the river that can come with a steep cost. Though this spring several several blocks of downtown were consumed by four to six feet of floodwater. We would have been an water if we were driving where we are right now another. It's we couldn't have driven here. Drove around downtown Davenport with city council member. Mary mcguiness the city. Did put up temporary floodwalls but they breached. Water gushed in inundating. Buildings and cars is within minutes. When the Mississippi's waters eventually retreated they left behind caked mud and dead fish in the streets? This is water filled with all kinds of unspeakable despicable things. Because it's coming out of SEWARD's it's coming out of everywhere so it's not something you want to go Frolicking through at all Devonport has no permanent levy system system to protect its waterfront. And that's by choice riverview wing one or river Ye. We love her. Wherever we can handle? Devonport isn't ignoring the risks again again. It did erect temporary floodwalls this spring but it also develops some natural solutions to deal with flooding. We drive along Davenport's nine mile riverfront past several several long stretching waterfront parks. The city had made decisions in the eighties and nineties to clear property along the riverfront and let the river come men to a park. The idea is let the water come in and let it go back out. The city has also restored some marshes to take in floodwaters it mimics a widely the admired flood control system in the Netherlands called room for the River Davenport City leaders and even flooded out business. Owners say this helped minimize the damage this spring and that flooding wasn't actually that bad it was contained to just a few blocks Davenport's mayor. Frank Clips takes a holistic view of the river. Excess water has to go somewhere and it will find the next vulnerable spot downstream. We don't build walls and push problems down to Arkansas Louisiana and Missouri. Sorry and yesterday I was on a national conference call and the Mayor of Grafton Illinois said thanked us for doing that because their city might have been totally inundated in in and destroyed natural. Solutions like wetlands restoration are also generally more cost effective than permanent walls and levees. Of course there's a a big caveat walls and levees offer greater protection in Davenport. It's a risk to build near the river. Shawnee homes gets that. She's she's one of a handful of people who lives right along the banks of the Mississippi two months after the floods the city was still removing debris and slime from the road to get to homes. Awesome place were about to go into mud city. What is mud city the road the grading goes lower and as the grading goes lower? It filled up with more mud. How long have you lived on the river? All my life off and on people think we're nuts for living down here. I mean yeah I mean how many people spend that much money to build that beautiful home. Knowing that the bottom's GONNA fill up with water us to protect your home. She lifted it up more than twenty feet feet and it worked this spring. I received no water inside my house whatsoever. You can't win against Mother Nature You you can't you can't win with the river it's going to do what is GonNa do and you just live with it and you conform to what it needs but as severe river flooding becomes more frequent and is expected to get worse with climate change. I asked homes. Is it fair for her fellow taxpayers to pay to fix riverfront roads and services to accommodate a handful of residents who want to live right on the river. I pay taxes also so so I look at it as though my taxes just cleaned my road but I do believe that if you come and you live on the river that you do it with open eyes and know that it's going to flood and you can't constantly be saying help me help me. While the Mississippi River has always flooded Davenport court and nearby cities were at flood stage this year for ninety eight days for our south of Devonport I met with Colin Welland. Camp were in the the city of Arnold Missouri just north along the Mississippi River. We stand next to a flooded city park next to the Merrimack River. It flows into the Mississippi but because the Mississippi has been running so high the water in the merrimack is backing up and it's spilling over its banks the floodwaters come within a few feet of the road. We're at we're just. A few homes are left standing since nineteen ninety-three they have been buying this property out. The city wants people out of harm's way and land in to absorb floodwaters. It's an idea. Woolen camp supports up and down the river. Countless acres of urban pavement have replaced spongy soil. Well in camp is the executive director of the Mississippi River and Towns Initiative Association of mayors across the ten states that border the Mississippi. He says Levy Levy serve a purpose but his organization is looking for ways to return the river shed to a more natural state in order to protect these communities but these cities need help and woman camp says Washington needs to wake up and address. What's going on if you WANNA call it climate change? You don't want to blame people fine. Don't that's that's your call but we've got to bring solutions to main street because our people are suffering we're going camp says. Weather related events are costing the Mississippi Zippy River corridor between three and eight percent annual economic growth. What does that mean dollar wise? That means we've sustained over two hundred billion dollars in actual losses in the corridor since two thousand and five and we'll and CAM estimates that this year's flooding could end up costing the river basin another four billion dollars he factors in property damage. Crops could be planted and stuck barges. That can't move products up and down the river and he says make no mistake. These costs Are passed along to all of us. One in twelve people on Earth ingest food made from Mississippi River basin produced products all the manufacturing all the agriculture and then all the equipment that goes into that into that economy impacts all the cities in the country from New Jersey to California and that is dependent on a working ecologically healthy Mississippi River basin crossed the river. Go a few miles north. And you're an East Saint Louis Illinois a stand behind a thick pane of glass with Tyler Berbie who manages the cargill plant can't hear a truck dumps corn into a grain elevator. So it's a it's a vertical belt conveyor with a bunch of buckets on it and gets up to the top and then dumps in and then based based on wherever the the corners being moved just a few hundred yards two barges waiting on the river. River transport is the most efficient way to get corn soybeans and wheat from the Midwest to to the port of New Orleans then shipped across the globe. One river tugboat pulling barges can transport the same amount as two thousand five hundred trucks. You couldn't take twenty five hundred semis from Saint Louis in New Orleans and four days You just couldn't do it. You know the fuel the Labor it would take how it would crowd the highway infrastructure. According to research from Texas an barges are four times as efficient as trucks and about twenty five percent more fuel efficient officiant and trains. It's not just corn and soy floating down the river furniture clothes oil products steel and chemicals. You name it. They all flow in and out of the Gulf Gulf Coast for Illinois. Farmers Gregg Guenther access to cheap river transport is crucial to compete in the global marketplace. My customers I for my corner all overseas. They're all overseas everyone of them and we're in a highly competitive situation now. With South America Brazil resil- Argentina China does a little exporting corn. And all these other countries are competing for the same customers were competing for and if our transportation efficiency falls to where we're not the lowest cost supplier we don't get the business and trade flows both ways exporters in Asia. Europe and South America also need a healthy port of New Orleans. Sean Duffy is with the big river. Coalition a group that seeks to protect commerce along the Mississippi he says when people in the maritime industry see a photo of a flooded Mississippi River city where we see that photo we think holy crap I mean that's truthfully truthfully what we see. It's scary because the height of the riverine occur. I mean when the rivers high the flow is faster and that makes it treacherous for pilots to navigate through New Orleans Matt Gresham with the New Orleans. Port Authority took me on yet another Mississippi River boat ride so the city is built around that that big turn turn the river right there and that's one of the most difficult or challenging navigation spots in in the United States really because you have basically a ninety degree we turn in the river. You'll see when we get down there. The eddies that form in the river currents that that that are pushing in different directions so it can be challenging for mayors. Imagine a boat pilot like a race car driver. It's hard enough rounding a turn. Then throw some slick rain on the track not easy still. It's the best way to get goods across the globe but being so close to this trade corridor can come with a cost this year up and down. The river for hundreds of thousands of acres of farmland were impacted by floods near Quincy Illinois soybean farmer. Michael Klingner isn't growing any crops this season season. That's why you buy insurance. That will cover about seventy five percent of what he lost. He laughs things off but he's not laughing about what's happening in Washington. What's that's not happening? Klingner is also a civil engineer in the northern stretch of the Mississippi locks and dams manage the river but the controls here are far are less comprehensive than in the south so the Midwest floods like it did this spring. We get on national news every few years we have another disaster. We'd like to do something to avoid these disasters back. In nineteen ninety-three after flooding near Quincy Display Seventy Thousand People Klingner and other farmers push Congress to establish a better Flood Management Plan for Upper Mississippi States it took from nineteen ninety three to nineteen ninety nine to get the plane authorized and it took two thousand eight for the the core to wrap up the plan and present it to Congress at the center of the plan a one time payment of just three million dollars to pay farmers to voluntarily fled lead their fields during times of high water but ultimately the federal government didn't fund the plan and it just sat there and died Klingner argues paying farmers to take an excess water would benefit everybody along the river system. We're not asking for a lot of dollars. Absolutely crazy to put leave a system. A place that was designed in nineteen fifty four and not allow us to make improvements to meet the current weather conditions that we see today you know. We've got a lot of data we can keep this from happening again now. Let's get back to coastal Louisiana south of New Orleans and dive into what what a disappearing coastal Louisiana looks like from high above are one Fox trawlers departing via far with Beck went for a flight and a four seat airplane with pilot Edwin Board along we left from the small New Orleans Lakefront airport. Our flying generally southward Long the East sending bank Michael as we leave New Orleans. The landscape looks like Swiss cheese. That's been cut up with scissors. Ponds streams and canals penetrate the the marshy swamps when the river was allowed to run its natural course mud clay and sand from up. North would flow down to the mouth of the Mississippi. Here runoff literally built and replenish the Gulf coast. No longer levies walls and dams keep water in the river but also keep mud and sand out or barriers push mud to new areas the impacts can be harsh as we keep flying south. We see something remarkable out of the window. Tiny communities unity's houses stranded in the middle of the water and audio recording produced by the group restore the Mississippi River Delta narrates what we're seeing below the area area immediately around grand by was made up of just ten percent water in Nineteen Sixteen and is now ninety percent water for this community and others across crossed the coast. Louisiana's land loss is a daily reality. A roofless succession of fierce hurricanes have further accelerated. Decay the state of Louisiana. DNA long with a lot of other invested parties is trying to turn back the clock by doing things like pumping in sand and planting more vegetation. They're also looking to punch out holes in levies vs and let the water along with mud and sand reached the swamps where it's badly needed. Seems like a relatively easy solution. But if he punched too many holes divert avert too much water you could alter the modern Mississippi which basically has become a long canal. Levees don't just protect river city's again they they keep world trade flowing fix one problem potentially create a new one. That's the World Jason Margolis. He's taking us down the Mississippi Today Day to understand how this one river connects the US to the rest of the world. As you've heard it's a place of competing interests as a river. It's a trade superhighway for much of the country country and the world but it's also a ticking environmental time bomb a lot of people say it's already exploded but try to fix that tip the balance in favor of the environment too much and you could put trade at risk. Solutions won't be easy but environmentalists and business interests are working together. The world's Jason Margolis finishes are river Trip looming over a massive model of the Mississippi River at Louisiana State University hang the words of Albert Einstein quote. We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Engineers environmentalists shippers farmers the oil and gas industry. They're all trying to find in a better solution for the modern Mississippi. And as we've said the challenge is only getting harder with climate change June shoe a professor of hydrology at Lsu Lsu is alarmed by the strain put on the river system in recent years the projections for the year. Twenty one hundred are worse. Water flows in the river are projected increase by between eleven and sixty percent. Professor Xu says consider even the middle scenario queasy. We'll be huge lever. I thought or maybe system survive. I'm not sure at NC level rise caused by climate change and he says more and more researchers features are skeptical about this state so called master plan it calls for fifty billion dollars in funding over fifty years so far at Louisiana has raised about ten a billion much of it coming from settlement money from the BP oil spill which devastated the Gulf nine years ago. Here's a New Orleans professor. Xu points to a map does some quick math factors and projected sea level rise and then concludes even if Louisiana can find the cash to fully fund. Its plan the state will still lose the battle. They're simply not enough river. Sediment out there to rebuild coastal Louisiana. You gotta stay. So we don't have resource to create UNANI. Then she says we need to face a hard truth restoring coastal Louisiana to what was there before or even completely halting the erosion. This simply isn't possible. We are loosened. Let's talk about the restoration. This talk about atop adaptation. We needed to sink this by the end of this century. We're we have a better chance to protect US put another way. Some communities indies are simply going to be swallowed by the sea. There is however another way to slow down land loss in Louisiana battle climate change at the start by decreasing increasing greenhouse gases that means getting off fossil fuels and building more solar panels and wind turbines the southern states the board of the Mississippi River Kentucky Arkansas Tennessee Mississippi Louisiana. Their legislatures just aren't moving. In that direction. In Louisiana the oil and gas industry drives lives the economy a powerful lobby with a history of downplaying the causes and risks of climate change. Angela Chalk lives in New Orleans. Seventh Ward I. I live in a house that my grandfather wanted. The car gain in five. Generations have lived in that house. I talk runs. The Group Healthy Community Services a nonprofit prophet. That's working to green the neighborhood that means things like planting trees and community gardens to absorb storm water runoff. I asked her if her work includes mobilizing ising people to battle climate change. She says it does. But it's hard I know folks who work in the petrochemical industry against industry and they realize the the effects that those industries are having environmentally but at the end of the day this is how people make their living in. So how'd how do you speak against your company when they provide you with so much. That's a reality. I wish it wasn't a reality. But Steve Cochran is with the Environmental Defense Fun. One he says environmentalists can't just pound the table and demand action like an immediate shift to solar and wind energy. Let's say we can do this tomorrow. We switch immediately Rafa Fossil fuels. What do we have in Louisiana? We have a huge stranded asset base in Scranton taxes but Cochran also says state and federal policy-makers acres need to understand some hard truths if we continue with business as usual. If climate change continues unchecked and sea levels continue to rise and more frequent stronger. Hurricanes Pummel the Gulf coast. It will cost all of us taxpayers a lot more money in the long run and it will become much harder to govern. Cochran asks is a future governor really prepared to deliver this message. Things are GONNA get bad and we can't exactly tell you how bad it's going to be. I bet it's probably going to be bad and you need to move and I've decided me the governor. Whoever that you're going to have to move so I don't don't think that's ever going to happen? I mean in in New Orleans after the storm. We couldn't do that. Cochran says businesses and environmentalists historical adversaries. Series are coming together for the common goal to protect and restore the coast and Mississippi River System. The clock is ticking. And they're simply too much at stake tonight work together. Is everybody going to be completely happy with the solutions. Never but out on his flat bottom boat with his dog. Logan Brian Lambert says the time for debate is over. If you look at what we've lost and you see what's left here the next fifty years. It'll all be going. We should have done it. Fifty years ago with today's the first day of my grandchildren's fifty years started off. Let's get going. It's not about me. I won't we'll see it. I'm going to be dead looking at giant alligator front as a big one for the world world. I'm Jason Margolis along the Mississippi reporting for this story was made possible in part by fellowship with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources Solace by Scott Joplin takes us out today to really grasp the full expanse of the Modern Mississippi. Check out some stunning shots of the river. From high above above as well as photos of some of the People Jason met along his journey all at the world dot. Org from the Bill Harris Studio at W. H.. In Boston I'm Marco Werman. Enjoy the rest of your thanksgiving. We'll see back here tomorrow. The world is a CO production of W. H. Boston the the B._B._C.. World Service P._R._I.. And Pierre Ex.

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