6 Burst results for "Nathan Cummings Foundation"

"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on First Person

First Person

04:52 min | 7 months ago

"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on First Person

"Gonna in the interior of gonna after the end of the civil war much more to come but first funding for afropop worldwide comes from the national endowment for the humanities the national endowment for the arts which believes the great nation deserves great art the nathan cummings foundation and pri public radio international affiliate stations around the us. And thank you for supporting your public radio station. Additional support for afropop worldwide comes from the banda presenting osco recess premiering angolan qura music and then superstars with events in new york city and washington. Dc from december tenth to the twenty first mournful at school wrist us dot com. That's s. k. U. d. u. r. s. t. a. s. dot com and from f- roots the uk base monthly publication featuring roots music from around the world more info at f- roots mag dot com ghana went in search of music into angola's remote southeast. Where the worst of the fighting had been. He described the three elements that went into his composition. Three rivers in the sky. When i was there in ninety-seven with our is basically the same as in the eighties when the cubans left and win the south africans left and everything that had been the battlefield and what was left on the ground was still there. The tanks trucks the helicopters. Even fighter jets were pieces of broken being taken by nature already. This was about ten years later and so that history of the war was still very fresh in people's minds and i recorded a number of musicians then one of them was Master debut he was a peasant. There are no instruments just singing and it's basically a story that is telling in that piece three rivers in the sky. He's talking about the battle of critical avowal and these asking for help saying we're totally isolated. I think that was kind of an improvisation as a message in the bottle. Type of thing you know. Here's a message. Go and release it and hopefully somebody will do something. And later i went to johannesburg and i was particularly interested in hearing what people knew about the war. You know because the war with goal was largely kept silent. People didn't know what was going on. One of these people i interviewed was an actress That had happened to be in the capital of namibia with a theater company and they traveled up to rondo which is in the border with angola and the army. Was there one night. They were told that something was going to happen on the other side. People from the sadf and people from rundle put their chairs on the side of the river to watch the action that was going on on the other side of the river. And so it's a description of what was happening that almost nobody knew in south africa particularly the white south africans that thought their army was going to defend the country against the commies. And all of that stuff. Then the last little song that you can hear on three rivers in the sky is a guy that i found by chance in a psychiatric hospital near johnnesberg burke i went there to record the choir of workers and as i was setting up this guy running and he asked to record a song he had been a soldier in angola and he was basically living there the hospital for many years ten years or more but it was totally by chance. He didn't know who i was. What i was doing. Just simply wanted to record that. So in a way that peace is like a little puzzle that configured itself like making a trace or trajectory from a goal of from the very spot that was the most intensive spot of conflict between south africa and angolan and then into south african into the media in vienna. We go to one thirty one of the.

national endowment for the hum nathan cummings foundation angola pri ghana sadf new york city washington uk johannesburg army rundle namibia johnnesberg burke us south africa angolan vienna
"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on First Person

First Person

04:52 min | 7 months ago

"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on First Person

"Gonna in the interior of gonna after the end of the civil war much more to come but first funding for afropop worldwide comes from the national endowment for the humanities the national endowment for the arts which believes the great nation deserves great art the nathan cummings foundation and pri public radio international affiliate stations around the us. And thank you for supporting your public radio station. Additional support for afropop worldwide comes from the banda presenting osco recess premiering angolan qura music and then superstars with events in new york city and washington. Dc from december tenth to the twenty first mournful at school wrist us dot com. That's s. k. U. d. u. r. s. t. a. s. dot com and from f- roots the uk base monthly publication featuring roots music from around the world more info at f- roots mag dot com ghana went in search of music into angola's remote southeast. Where the worst of the fighting had been. He described the three elements that went into his composition. Three rivers in the sky. When i was there in ninety-seven with our is basically the same as in the eighties when the cubans left and win the south africans left and everything that had been the battlefield and what was left on the ground was still there. The tanks trucks the helicopters. Even fighter jets were pieces of broken being taken by nature already. This was about ten years later and so that history of the war was still very fresh in people's minds and i recorded a number of musicians then one of them was Master debut he was a peasant. There are no instruments just singing and it's basically a story that is telling in that piece three rivers in the sky. He's talking about the battle of critical avowal and these asking for help saying we're totally isolated. I think that was kind of an improvisation as a message in the bottle. Type of thing you know. Here's a message. Go and release it and hopefully somebody will do something. And later i went to johannesburg and i was particularly interested in hearing what people knew about the war. You know because the war with goal was largely kept silent. People didn't know what was going on. One of these people i interviewed was an actress That had happened to be in the capital of namibia with a theater company and they traveled up to rondo which is in the border with angola and the army. Was there one night. They were told that something was going to happen on the other side. People from the sadf and people from rundle put their chairs on the side of the river to watch the action that was going on on the other side of the river. And so it's a description of what was happening that almost nobody knew in south africa particularly the white south africans that thought their army was going to defend the country against the commies. And all of that stuff. Then the last little song that you can hear on three rivers in the sky is a guy that i found by chance in a psychiatric hospital near johnnesberg burke i went there to record the choir of workers and as i was setting up this guy running and he asked to record a song he had been a soldier in angola and he was basically living there the hospital for many years ten years or more but it was totally by chance. He didn't know who i was. What i was doing. Just simply wanted to record that. So in a way that peace is like a little puzzle that configured itself like making a trace or trajectory from a goal of from the very spot that was the most intensive spot of conflict between south africa and angolan and then into south african into the media in vienna. We go to one thirty one of the.

"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

07:33 min | 9 months ago

"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"Five. Oh one c. Three applications and the overwhelming majority of these applications sale through the paperwork may be a pain. But let's just say that. The united states government is not particularly selective. I found myself wondering if that was the right path for the folks who apply or just the obvious and then as they continue to wonder the question gets broader. Still this overall pass in the standard model. How's it holding up. Is that the right pass or do folks just do what others have done. You know the path your organization likely travelled this way an individual or a group of individuals found themselves fired up about something they saw gap. Todd crawford realized that there was no organization out there. Raising awareness of the symptoms of a brain aneurysm. Have there been one his wife. Lisa call grassi. Might be alive today. How others see a new approach to solving a societal problem. Like robin steinberg at bronx defenders. These folks were relentless and they brought people to the cause before they knew it. Perhaps folks were offering funding and this ignited the need for five. Oh one c. Three to accept the donations and grow the work. The work grows it gets visibility and poof. It's an institution a beast that needs to be fed if you will board members staff and the quest for funding. We do this because that is how we do it. And yet we're seeing other models different ones. The most visible maybe black lives matter but there are many lindsay. Hoffman from my team is part of a group that has organized via slack to support people during covid. It started as a small group in brooklyn of about twenty people. They wanted to help neighbors who could not get out during the pandemic. it's now over. Five thousand folks who have raised over one million dollars that's been passed through to over twenty two thousand households. I'm working with this organization. Oklahoma city called free. Mom hugs sarah cunningham. Deep christian faith led her to reject her gay son when he came out. Her journey brought her to acceptance during her first pride march. She made and wore a button. It said simply. Free mom hooks. She strolled through. She strolled through the parade and a young woman walked up to her and asked for hug a warm hug. And then this. I have not gotten a hug from my mom in four years and so it began if you viral social media posts and today over eighty thousand people from all over the country are hungry to get involved but the question is how to do what could it just be an organization that hugs lgbt people from non affirming households or does it have to be an organization at all. Maybe it's a movement of folks who self organize and make choices to hug literally or metaphorically however they choose we're working through this with them and hoping they will be open to considering different bottles to help in our work. I thought i should seek out some expertise on this topic. Tell me seeing through questions like is the current model working us. What other models are out there. How do they work. What are the pros and cons building institutions. Well today i found myself one hell of a good source. And then i realized that all of you would benefit from this expertise to so. I thought i'd have the conversation here on this podcast with that expert so you can hear a to greetings. Welcome to nonprofits her messy. I'm your host joan. Gary founder the nonprofit leadership lab where we help smaller nonprofits thrive. I'm also a strategic advisor for executive directors and boards of larger nonprofits. I'm a frequent keynote speaker. Blogger and an author on all things. Leadership and management learn. More at joan gary dot com. I'm a one with a mission to fuel. The leadership of the nonprofit sector my goal was each episode is to dig deep into an issue. I know that nonprofit leaders grappling with. I find just the right person to offer advice and insights. Today is no exception. Rinku sen is a writer. Social justice strategist. She is formerly the executive director of race forward and was publisher of their award. Winning news site color lines under her leadership race forward generated some of the most impactful racial justice successes of recent years including drop. The i word it compan- from media outlets to stop referring to immigrants as illegal resulting in the associated press usa today the l. a. times and many more outlets changing their practice she was also the architect of the shattered families report which identified the number of kids in foster care whose parents had been deported. Her books stir it up and the accidental. American sierra is a model of community organizing that integrates a political analysis of race gender class poverty sexuality and other systems as a consultant rinku has worked on narrative and political strategy with numerous organizations at foundations including policy link. The aclu and the nathan cummings foundation. She serves on numerous boards including the women's march where she co president and the foundation for national progress publisher of mother jones magazine. And i don't even think we've told folks what you do today so rinku. Thank you so much for joining us for helping me think through. I'm glad you're here and welcome. Thank you so much joe. It's a real thrill to talk with you today. So and well actually. You just listened to me for the last several minutes so the goal here is to get you talking so i re as i read your bio. I realized that we actually didn't talk about what you do today. So you wanna you wanna give folks sense of that. The new adventure. You're on now. Sure i in early december. I became the executive director of narrative initiative. Which is an organization that puts different kinds of creative people together to make interventions In the big stories we tell and live into so We do a lot of work with right now. The green new deal network to help them. Think through what what kinds of messages and frames they need to move out until the world that will build support for progressive policies and we We also provide a ghost writing service for grassroots organizations. That need help getting things written. So we're here to help. People change the big stories that shape so many of the institutions that in turn control our lives. What a what a fabulous organization and that is words words. Absolutely matter don't they. They do words matter and pictures matter to yes absolutely before we start a conversation about different models for having impact in the social sector. Let's start with the standard model that i described that we all know pretty well. Is it working. i mean goodness knows. There are a lot of them but the model has limitations right. Let's talk through those looking at the. Let's talk through those. Yeah i think it's the five. Oh one c. Three model that we're talking about and the most important thing to remember is that that is a legal taps designation It doesn't say anything about the purpose of the organization other.

Todd crawford Gary brooklyn Lisa sarah cunningham Oklahoma robin steinberg early december four years Rinku sen five Hoffman Today joan each episode over eighty thousand people today about twenty people Three applications over twenty two thousand
Choosing the Right Nonprofit Business Model With Rinku Sen

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

02:28 min | 9 months ago

Choosing the Right Nonprofit Business Model With Rinku Sen

"Rinku sen is a writer. Social justice strategist. She is formerly the executive director of race forward and was publisher of their award. Winning news site color lines under her leadership race forward generated some of the most impactful racial justice successes of recent years including drop. The i word it compan- from media outlets to stop referring to immigrants as illegal resulting in the associated press usa today the l. a. times and many more outlets changing their practice she was also the architect of the shattered families report which identified the number of kids in foster care whose parents had been deported. Her books stir it up and the accidental. American sierra is a model of community organizing that integrates a political analysis of race gender class poverty sexuality and other systems as a consultant rinku has worked on narrative and political strategy with numerous organizations at foundations including policy link. The aclu and the nathan cummings foundation. She serves on numerous boards including the women's march where she co president and the foundation for national progress publisher of mother jones magazine. And i don't even think we've told folks what you do today so rinku. Thank you so much for joining us for helping me think through. I'm glad you're here and welcome. Thank you so much joe. It's a real thrill to talk with you today. So and well actually. You just listened to me for the last several minutes so the goal here is to get you talking so i re as i read your bio. I realized that we actually didn't talk about what you do today. So you wanna you wanna give folks sense of that. The new adventure. You're on now. Sure i in early december. I became the executive director of narrative initiative. Which is an organization that puts different kinds of creative people together to make interventions In the big stories we tell and live into so We do a lot of work with right now. The green new deal network to help them. Think through what what kinds of messages and frames they need to move out until the world that will build support for progressive policies and we We also provide a ghost writing service for grassroots organizations. That need help getting things written.

Rinku Sen The Associated Press Usa Today American Sierra Rinku Nathan Cummings Foundation Foundation For National Progre Mother Jones Magazine Aclu JOE
"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

02:28 min | 9 months ago

"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

"Rinku sen is a writer. Social justice strategist. She is formerly the executive director of race forward and was publisher of their award. Winning news site color lines under her leadership race forward generated some of the most impactful racial justice successes of recent years including drop. The i word it compan- from media outlets to stop referring to immigrants as illegal resulting in the associated press usa today the l. a. times and many more outlets changing their practice she was also the architect of the shattered families report which identified the number of kids in foster care whose parents had been deported. Her books stir it up and the accidental. American sierra is a model of community organizing that integrates a political analysis of race gender class poverty sexuality and other systems as a consultant rinku has worked on narrative and political strategy with numerous organizations at foundations including policy link. The aclu and the nathan cummings foundation. She serves on numerous boards including the women's march where she co president and the foundation for national progress publisher of mother jones magazine. And i don't even think we've told folks what you do today so rinku. Thank you so much for joining us for helping me think through. I'm glad you're here and welcome. Thank you so much joe. It's a real thrill to talk with you today. So and well actually. You just listened to me for the last several minutes so the goal here is to get you talking so i re as i read your bio. I realized that we actually didn't talk about what you do today. So you wanna you wanna give folks sense of that. The new adventure. You're on now. Sure i in early december. I became the executive director of narrative initiative. Which is an organization that puts different kinds of creative people together to make interventions In the big stories we tell and live into so We do a lot of work with right now. The green new deal network to help them. Think through what what kinds of messages and frames they need to move out until the world that will build support for progressive policies and we We also provide a ghost writing service for grassroots organizations. That need help getting things written.

Todd crawford Gary brooklyn Lisa sarah cunningham Oklahoma robin steinberg early december four years Rinku sen five Hoffman Today joan each episode over eighty thousand people today about twenty people Three applications over twenty two thousand
"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

Judaism Unbound

07:29 min | 1 year ago

"nathan cummings foundation" Discussed on Judaism Unbound

"Durch schlock welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you thank you so much. I'm glad to be here. I remember. I think i was on a car ride with my family when your article came out about a year ago and somehow i remember sitting in the car and it popping up and saying oh this is going to be interesting and i read your article tablet and i was like. We're going to have to have you on the podcast because this is the conversation that that we want to have. And i mean there was a particular line where you say. The time demands that we as jews train our frank gays on our own discourse about ourselves and money and i was like yeah. Let's do that can create start by just asking a little bit about when you wrote that article. What what was it that you were trying to say. And what was it that you are trying to achieve. So i wrote the jewish one percent in part because the silence around jewish wealth is well earned an understandable but i think actually quite problematic obviously antisemitic conspiracy theories obsessively focus on kind of outlandish amounts of jewish affluence and influence. That's really the main trope of those hateful conspiracy theories and as a result you know our fear of even touching the subject is so seismic. Because we're really concerned that we will somehow validate those hateful fantasies that we just don't go there and to not go there on a subject as important has jews and money jews and capitalism <unk>. And how those things intersect with. The state is really a loss especially for a community that is so dedicated to questioning too tough discourse and culturally and this is something i reference in the peace. Tim bluntness you know. One of the things. I love about us. Culturally is that we're willing to go there even when the subject is hard or tough or scary to give you a sense of how tender this area is just the title of the essay jewish one percent. Got me push back. I was told by some you know. Obviously there's a big generational gap here. This tends to be older audiences. Where i get this kind of feedback. That title itself is anti-semitic just acknowledging. The jewish wealth exists is problematic. I i have felt all of this for years. Why did i want to write this article now. In this era a cousin. Jews are disproportionately present in this administration in running the country. You know in the white house and the jews who are there tend to be from quote unquote very successful families. Right which is the language is in our community to mean rich there from wealthy jewish families most of them so i thought it was a really important moment to talk about. What has success wrought you know. Is this what success fundamentally should and does look like in our community for those who made it this time for me to have that conversation so i'm curious from your own experience before we get into what you have to say about it. I'm curious about when you try to provoke that conversation through this article. Was it provoked like. Did you feel that people started to have the conversation that you wanted them to have or do you feel like that conversation is still not being had. I think it's mostly not being. Had you know i did get surprisingly kind of enthused response from people. Sort of i'm. I'm turning forty this winter people sort of my age and younger. I got a lot of feedback. That was great. Want to have this conversation. It has felt off limits for so long. It shouldn't be. I got some pushback from older generations. But fundamentally i think the the bring up the essay is still are not really being dealt into in a public way. We are so trepidation about touching these topics which is partly why as visual artists. They're really where i make. My space might really write creatively. Go because there's so much to say. And it's so vitally important and it's really there's a couple things that arise from me in a title like the jewish one percent one is it only makes sense to people that title only works to people at and communicate something because we have a concept of the one percent generally in society. That's not jewish specific. And so i'm actually thinking a lot about the ways in which the generational divide you describe is sort of specific to judaism like we could talk about trauma and fear connected to the holocaust. There's all sorts of ways that like older generations of jews absolutely has some distinctive relationships to wealth that that are important to talk about. And i think that there's a broader conversation beyond just jus about how different generations do and don't talk about wealth like honestly. I think my parents and especially like my grandparents forgetting the jewish friends there non-jewish in general. It was kind of off the table to talk about wealth. I think what you hint at with people under forty or wherever. We're gonna draw the line. Like i think i don't know the millennial generation in quotes part of it. Whatever but like. I think we have recognized that the lack of talking about money isn't just some like benign choice. It has an impact when employers for example. Don't want people talking about the amount of money. They make that actually serves a purpose and leads to the employers being able to have a lot of control and and serve injustice in a variety of ways. And so i'd love to ask sort of about those two pieces like what about. This is a very specific set of jewish questions like the jewish relationship to wealth. And what about. This is actually a broader set of faux pas taboos that we have as a society about talking about money. It's a great couple of points i would say. All americans struggle with open discourse about class. Right it's not what we're famous for is talking successfully and in a nuanced fashion about money so clearly. Jewish americans were part of that culture. There's a lot of fear general around kind of going there. I wanted inactivity <hes>. In a sort of arts group. That i was part of where we had to line up physically by class. So they said you know the poorest of the poor this side of the room the wealthiest of the wealthy opposite room. Everyone else figure it out and can you guess what everyone did probably went to the middle to start exactly right so i march off to wealth to people who were really strongly identified with and proud of having come from poverty. Go to the other side of the room and everyone else and this was probably a room full of like thirty forty people. They crowd in the middle and they are fighting it out over. How many. Tv's what kinds of tv's one car to kars any cars right. And so those of us on the extreme ends are watching. This really pained discourse as people try to place themselves and it takes a long time after we complete the exercise the people who lead it said to us in the uk. This takes ten minutes. Everyone knows where they are in the class. You talked about it. Their whole lives they line up and then we move on. That's a portrait. I think about a lot in terms of general. What your class discourse in this country

nathan cummings foundation danielle dir Schlub nathan cummings Danielle durch danielle dish Lila corwin berman ackland art museum Eleanor illinois Daniel durch new york Danielle dish danielle durch jewish museum brooklyn denny Toronto frank Tim