17 Burst results for "Nathan Crowley"

"nathan crowley" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"But they've got all that hammered out and where they were color correct and so yeah basically. Behind every panels there was a lot of cool white. Led back there to give it a little natural kind of scientific old school green. Because you know in our department would come through with a wax. Basically make everything inside. The ship's look dirty and use real. Nothing was pristine white. Everything was placed in this environment of the earth dying. Yeah and also eisley looking up into the top here like your tape. It looks like there might be some tubes in here to. Did you guys use any tubes as well. Yeah there were some fluorescent tubes You know that were built into ships Nathan crowley the production designer talks about where those would go where those should be than. Uh yeah those were all which is as well and you know back. In the day we would have to use a neutral density tubes basically around the tube itself. 'cause they weren't aren't demel before us tubes saw now with the couldn't they were. They were fluorescent. They were not led. That's correct yeah. Each one to knock light every tube and then have you had to take an educated Guests before you shot to where they should be exposure wise inhabit already rigged in there because it takes a read to all of the hit to put new indian all of them. It was like a wrong. Guess oh yeah you you don't wanna be wrong. You don't wanna be why wrong. That costs production time and money. And that's the big big big no no But now with the aspera tubes quasars. It's it's come along quite nicely. Yeah yeah mostly. It's kinda like you're taping here. What was the the goal of the lighting inside of the spaceships. I mean was it really just rig lights everywhere or was it was strategic in terms of where you wanted the placement to go well very for someone trying to light a spaceship. Where do you put these. Well you know. In some cases you had obviously through the windows whether it was atmosphere or the sun itself or you know just the star field. You know you had that motivation and then also..

Nathan crowley eisley
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"And without which I I don't think we would have been able to make the movie because if you can't do it authentically if you can't try to do it accurately felt like it wasn't worth doing it. At all. I think the thing that struck me in watching the film was both the capture of the human elements in the human drama in the intimacy and the emotion, but at the same time, the the hardware the risk. I mean, it was both this reality in special effects in reality. And in the human reality. I don't know if that makes sense or not. But hopefully, yet I mean that that that was actually kind of in many ways, the the goal was we sort of know we had two movies in a way we had the movie that was on the ground the family portrait, essentially of the Armstrong's at this incredible time in their life. And then of course, we had the space movie, we have the movies missions. And we wanted them to feel like the same movie. So we shot everything in the same documentary style, we were taking a lot of inspiration from documentaries. The period and archival footage. You know that the astronauts themselves shod in the life magazine, photography, the Armstrong's and other astronaut families at that time, you know, just a tremendous amount of resources visually that we had to just draw inspiration from. But we wanted the audience to feel like they were there. Whether it was in the house, or in the soul, like the audience themselves were, you know, right there in the rooms with Neil Janet right there in the capsule with Neil, and Dave Scott or Neilan, Mike, and buzz and. So again to get that. Right. You know, a took a lot of research, but but we were really lucky to have. Collaborator of mine. The production designer Nathan Crowley and Lena sand grain into the camera work and Mary's offerings into the costumes. Just everyone was so on the same page about board. It was he at this. Right. Did not just wing it it. So I think that helped a lot. Yes. Or no question, would you go? When I go to space, would you offer the opportunity, I would love to my worry is that why I might fear towards no is that I might just be too damn afraid. Fair enough. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. You know, the first thing that came to mind when I heard that the two of you were doing this together was how you bridge the gap between a historian who is capturing the facts of what had happened and a screenwriter who's trying to plug into the emotion had how did you guys actually work it out?.

Armstrong Neil Janet Mike life magazine Nathan Crowley Dave Scott Mary
"nathan crowley" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Strange kind of event or or part of our history where the more I found the more I learned about it, the more details I got about at the more incredulous I became like the more astounding the feet became, I guess it makes sense. 'cause you see TV's from the nineteen sixties compared to now? Yeah. And then you think, oh, man, we tried to send people to not base this technology knowledge that we had six calculations with pencil and paper, you know? Yeah, time they're using slide rules and like I always remember the first time I saw. Some of these crafts, you know, in real life, whether it was probably the first one I saw was in the museum, but you know, especially getting to come close to them and they are so unreal assuring. If you're in a place where you're gonna fly them. Oh, yeah, yeah. And so small. I mean, I think that was one of the big things that Nathan Crowley was the production designer in one of the big things we talk a lot about was because it can be hard to communicate scale in in a film. It's hard to communicate how big something is, and it's hard to sometimes communicate how small something is. And so trying to because I felt like I had never in all the space films I'd seen. I never, actually. I still myself surprised when I saw the craft or some of the crafts person. They still were smaller the night expected even seen some of the footage and it's just because you know the frame the angles, it's hard for you to sense, the three dimensionality of of surrounding you always kind of imagine it a little bit bigger. Things always come out a little bit bigger on screen. So we we tried to find ways to to create those crafts to scale and and and fully enclosed the camera in them as much as possible. So shoot a lot of POV kind of straight POV angles. Sometimes sometimes the DP himself, which is kind of crawling. In a spacesuit into the craft and just shoot a little sixty million camera out the window and panting around. And it just helped give you a sense of just how close your faces to the console to the window to the other guy to the door that comes down over your head. We just try to emphasize all the things that would make it feel as claustrophobic because I think it really was everything was rickety back then. 'cause I was watching love story a couple of months ago with Ron or Neo, and he takes her to his parents like those aid comp for us. He's in that. Always. He said that awesome Porsche from like, you know, he just like the classic. You know, you see this online, but he's driving the things shaking and it's it's, that's just what we had back then. It's crazy too risky was because you point out in the movie which I think we forget there are a lot of people who are not excited about this and thought it was a really bad idea again, waste of money. And I think we kind of forget that and we and honestly, we only I mean, it was really important to me to get into that in the movie, but we could have spent even more time on that because it's it's. There. There's this misconception. I think of like of of that era, having been all about space travel and everyone being gung ho about this idealistic notion of it, and you know it with the exception of the very beginning of the sixties when when we were still sort of in that fresh Cold War with Russia mentality. And then I'd say with the other exception of literally just the moon landing itself, not even lead up to launch, but literally just the landing that like those few days in the summer of sixty nine approval for the program in general hovered around fifty percent. If not below, is that what you put in the movie the way yet. So that song that's a real song by Gil, Scott Heron's and the period..

Ron Nathan Crowley Russia Gil Porsche Scott Heron fifty percent
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:42 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Meets Detroit. You know, often you'll driven by tax bills, and that's what the money said. Gonna get London might Tim buns. Men in. I didn't seem, we went to Chicago and it was like, okay, this city has these on the ground roadways. And if we can do all the stunts for real on the roads and we could use oppa Wacker and low wacko and get some of that, the danger holes a sauced Ronin type conscious in real streets that would up the ante and if we can make this car, we can build it for real and get it up to one hundred miles per hour. Gonna go up to ninety miles per hour, but you know, put a real full fifty Chevy engine in and. Really Kush that that realism. And that would be fantastic by mcgann's in Chicago, we should've discovered a love of going to locations. I think hers and she said, this is I suspect the reason we burn everything down. Batman begins like we've been white man down there full the backaches gone, and therefore always matches gone. We've destroyed everything's their full dog. Nine could be a city film, and I think women gone to Chicago because we might not primarily in Chicago. It was like, okay, this is the launch pad for who he might become. And then we could really go towards a sort of almost modernists city city councils, you know, that holes modernist federalism building when federal federal building, modern six federal building, we can now play goal som in that place. And the fact that we've destroyed everything through the story of Batman begins. If there's a fresh ten years on from the dock night, it's legacy is a complicated one, a perfectly paced story threaded with complex moral things, coupled with a brilliant performance from Haith ledger shortly before his tragic death. Gave the film, legendary even classic status and like stalls all the godfather. It's a trilogy that will be rewatching by generations to come. But just as batmans of rival in Gulf city spawned costumed criminal copycats the success of the film's lead to many others trying to emulate its darkness and in the age of DC and marvel universes. The idea of a trilogy of connected films seems perfectly quaint, Nathan, Crowley's, Batman, was the perfect fit for Christopher Nolan's vision of the character, but stories are unique and individual, and hey cautions against applying that template to other superhero stories as DC has tried to do with characters such as superman I think it'd be wanted. I think it'd be very hard to as you work on another superhero film ame- mainly because I moved pasta. I mean, I think we have to, you know, as you make. More and more murders complex films with someone like Christiane and I feel I feel like you go on that journey with the film and you gain knowledge and you take to the next film. And I don't think I could have go back to that Schillinger just because I feel like we've done it and and what we've learned from it is sort of unemployable to any to bear of. And we have to apply to films like into stellar, which does no way we could have made into stellar without having done the Batman Soames unlearn from how you make grand scale. So and so back to your question, I think every film every story every script has to be in saying, in my opinion. So as no point in touching ground to find a new ground because superman does have superpowers, that man does know. So you have to sort of like, I mean, I liked what they did with superman film where they a. Treat it as more than alien invasion. So which I thought was, you know, the recent superman films, which I thought was very clever, Batman. As once again, said to sweep across the screen in a solo film, it's unclear if Ben Affleck will revive his role that's previously being met with some showy, say, mixed reviews, direct, Matt rave says, the script will most likely take its cues from classic mom, a return behalves to batmans days as the world greatest detective since it was created by Bob Kane and Bill finger in nineteen thirty nine Batman has been reinvented and reinterpreted full every decade for children and for adults. The character has.

Batman Chicago mcgann Tim buns DC Gulf city Detroit oppa Wacker Chevy Ben Affleck Haith Christopher Nolan Schillinger Christiane Bob Kane Bill finger Matt rave Nathan Crowley
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"That was one of the first things we tried to explain. So had to be more like a military humvee. We would mix Lamma gaining into it eventually, and it would have that technology. It was designed to the army, and that'll I see in camouflage, it's is in army camouflage colors, and that was a fascinating things designer. We should've tiptoed into the whole film myself and Krista very early just while he's all rewriting, he wants visual import. So we start before we end up with these massive cruise, we stopped very early in his house and trying tip Taiwa away through the visuals of the film wall where we wanna go with it. Really the Bama Bill was the first thing we should've is like, okay. Okay. Well, let's tackle the big the big thing and probably one of the design people love the batmobiles. We have to somehow find a way through it from that. You still saying offing is realism, and this man really exists that we have to apply that cross the bowl to everything. So you have the fly that two cities to architecture too old, his gadgets. We have to explain his one by one by one way to join dock base, and then eventually tackle his suit which now is we have a man running around the city of Blat rubber suit. We have to sort of make baking okay to do that in daytime and daytime was key for us like, how do we as one thing that night when you can hide him in the shadows visually, but how do we, how do we deal with daytime? Because it might look fossil trading coming movies. Seriously has four a longtime bane, a tricky tough in Hollywood way back in the nineteen seventies when. Rector, Richard Donna began work on the original superhero movie, superman starring Christopher Reeve. He was quickly frustrated by an early draft of the script that Seoul, the man of steel dealing jerks in an almost pale imitation of Adam west wisely. Donna decided that the k. to bring a coming book hero off the page and onto the screen was living up to the promise of his films tagline, you'll really believe a man. Got you. For Nathan, Crowley. That meant pairing things back a little. The villains scarecrow in the first film played by Killian Murphy. The joke in the dock night, legendary performance by Hayes ledger and bang in the dock Knight rises played by Tom haughty ped- with Anne Hathaway as woman that all existed in batmans world for decades on the pages of comic books in movies and on television. The question now became, if these characters existed in our world, how might they look? You have to find us of a reference exists in our world. Like the joke was the punks said, vicious, Johnny, rotten. I believe him, you know, walking out the kings road in the eighties, I believe that character being there. You know. So you just needed to grab hold of of something that we could ground each of those characters in each places in and I think all attack, surely we ground ourselves into Kowloon the wolf city of Kowloon on that reference because he's like, it was so crazy. The textured grown over each other's being demolished sometime gun Abbott. And so it was like, okay, this is a reference for the narrows I can touch this. No, that this is a future possibility comes at me. Tonight. Why? So serious. Sticks. The blade in my mouth. But a smile on that face. And. Why? So serious. Seeing his early beginnings in the late nineteen thirties, batmans home has been a fictional on go from sitting architecturally. However, Crowley's vision of Gotham is an unmistakable blend of Chicago.

Lamma Crowley Richard Donna Christopher Reeve Kowloon Johnny Krista Blat Killian Murphy batmans Gotham Seoul Hayes ledger Hollywood Anne Hathaway Chicago Adam west Nathan Tom
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"He had to take things in an entirely new direction. Production designer, Nathan Crowley. That already worked with Nolan on the film. Insomnia in two thousand and two, but a big budget action movie was a completely new challenge, but both of them. I know Chris had always been a fan of Batman. As you look at memento you can see a Batman poster as a piece of set dressing in the background. As I think he's always been a big fan. I think anyone's growing up from generation in London. You're a fan of the Tim Batman stalls and giants bone. That's what we got less square to go see, started early on. We, you know, I was relatively unknown productions designer Christmas relatively unknown, but still make, but was gaining success. And he had said to me, you know, I wanna make Batman. I'm not sure it was very difficult in those days because he wasn't chill whether he could get both. His cinematographer and production designer, whether he the COO with allow those two picks because it was such a large, big budget film. Do me a favor. Tell all your friends about me. I'm batman. Directa timber and had already been credited with giving Batman a duck tone scrubbing out any memories of campy Huma leftover from the nineteen sixties television series. But Burton's films, the nineteen Eighty-nine original and its sequel Batman returns had never aimed for realism button had taken his views from early German cinema. Both films have a very clear and very intentional sense of being inside a Catholic constructed make believe world, but revising that style had already taken some unfortunate tons nineteen ninety-five Batman forever with glossy art deco and bright green ped- with a garish purple brought in some solid box office but didn't win many fans. The next installment sancta series completely. Needless to say the stakes, I think Chris approach or approach to trying this realism. We've been trying to touch upon by going into the landscape going on occasions, failing the weather, which we've taken to. We've continued taking on an autumn's now that's where it started. It was like, well, we don't necessarily wanna make it solely on sound stages and we don't really wanna do the actual version. We off ever films big, but scale, immersive, films, David leans. So yeah, of course, you have staged bills will we need to into mix that with locations and the reality that the location gives us the could this city really exists? What would it look like? So you know, I'll point of view was we are trying to gain new point of view, but I think certainly for my own view, naievety of why wouldn't be popular. Was a little shocking when it came out and people thought asking me, why? Why did you make another one? And it was like, well, it's not another one. It's it's the first one for us. How did it work than for you creating the look of that? Because of course you being the production designer of the films you fillings fairly big shoes left by directors, Tim Burton, who really took Batman from the realm of sixty television and made him doc and returned him to what many solos, the roots of the character. But of course, he's films were very heavily influenced by German expressionism that were designed to make it clear that you weren't in reality. You were in another tion of a place that was very haunting and clearly inside. But it was fun because it was very cinematic autistic. Whereas you'll films in many ways the polar opposite to that, you'll giving it a whole new look. What was it like to approach that? And just really supposed to drag everything off the desk that had been that before was the lowest theory. It was like, okay, this guy really could exist in. All cities in somewhere like New York old, Chicago, London. Like how does it work like has he get a cow house? He fly housi- fight. He doesn't have any superpowers. Let's let's try and explain and figure out visually how he manages to do everything. So you know, saying the batmobile and the idea that Wayne industries had ministry on which has become a very realistic proposition now, and this would have been a spec car. Aw, that maybe wasn't these big companies decided not the mic like Notre up on all these guys, but it was on the wraps as a was a sort of prototypes, he adapt the prototype..

Tim Batman Batman Chris Tim Burton Insomnia London Nathan Crowley Nolan COO Wayne industries David New York Chicago
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"For a visit. Today, accused of superhero fans, books of his perhaps surpassed by the keys of superhero films and their inevitable universe building offspring to match. But it wasn't always the case, long game of trying to create Honi world with like sprinkling of credibility rather than just one of cinematic events is relatively new concept, and it could certainly be argued that Christopher Nolan's dark Knight trilogy a reimagining of Batman with a grim tone and some brutal realism helped to set that modern template. The night film is ten years old this year, and recently multiples Ben Ryan met its production design. Nathan Crowley who's also helped create the look of such hits as interstellar and Dunkirk. They spoke about how the night's approach to the Cape crusader spoon tributes tent poles and copycats. You know who I am. Your friendly neighborhood, Spiderman misery, misery, misery. That's what you've chosen. I, uh, for new friendship, new spat in my face. How many times has man being adapted full? The big screen three, maybe four times the answer eleven times in twenty eighteen coming book. Movies have carved out their very own genre, and it's a lucrative one since the premise of iron man kicked off the marvel cinematic universe in two thousand and eight. That studio has raked in more than twelve billion dollars in box office takings back in two thousand and five. However, things were a little bit different. One, brothers, Batman franchise had been laying dormant since nineteen ninety seven. When George Clooney's stand put a freeze on any future films, everyone..

Christopher Nolan George Clooney Ben Ryan Nathan Crowley Batman twelve billion dollars ten years
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"And this is very, very niece job that you yourself have. Can you just tell us how you came into this world? I mean, have you always been a comedy fan or were you of parachuted into the project and found yourself having to adapt to the the ways the comedy world works? What was your background before starting this? Well, it was a little of both when it comes to my passion for comedy, but also needing to really learn about the art form and industry. So I was hired about eight years ago by the board of directors. I had been consulting for the organization and come from the nonprofit world doing educational media production. So there was relevance in my background, but it was not a comedy background. And so for eight years, I've produced Lucille ball, comedy festival, and so working in comedy that has really. Really given me a front row seat to the unique aspects of the community of comedy, the art form itself, and thank goodness because that heavily informed the design every step of the way. And we also formed an advisory board of comedy, community members, artists, and innovators and business people in comedy again, to make sure that this attraction and this experience felt like it was of the voice of the industry. So even just as an example, the media pieces that you're seeing in the attraction when it's commentary about the art form, it's never a voice over of the museums. It's always the voice of an artist because we did dozens and dozens of interviews with members of the comedy community to make sure that authentic voice was.

Lucille ball advisory board eight years
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"The presence of the DNA of some of the greatest comedians of all time. You mentioned herald Ramos, and Jerry Seinfeld. We also have costumes from the Marx, brothers, Charlie, Chaplin's Kane. Phyllis Diller is dress. We have a whole display case featuring handwritten creative materials from Andy Kaufman Joan rivers. The list goes on and on our must highlight. I was reading about this believe there is a faulting bench. Can you describe this to place? I should lead with the fact that there are more than fifty exhibits on all things comedy. And some of them are again, some of the most complex Interactive's at any museum anywhere. But yes, also, we have a little nod to prank humor opposite a large wall mural about the history of the art form from Shakespeare vaudeville through today. There is one bench of the two that when you sit down on it has a will be cushion effect. Have you had visitors through? Have you seen how about one goes down? Yes, we've we did so intensive beta testing of the whole experience of the last few weeks with more than three hundred beta testers, and it was very fun to see the bench in action as well as things like the. The comedy continuum, which is right around the corner from the bench that is a seventy foot wide touch screen interface that allows for dynamic and expansive exploration of all connections in comedy. So you are really unfolding a spiderweb of professional collaboration and connections of influence between artists. It's a fascinating demonstration of that six degrees of separation, but in comedy, I'm interested in the geology there about how comedians construct routines 'cause they test jerks in smooth clubs if they're bec- media, and if they full flat, they oversee drop them and stuff. How much tested you mentioned there about testing the fault venture. I mean, just in general. I mean, what's the policy? Should this museum educator? Should it make you laugh? And if it doesn't make after something, get bumps out of the lineup, that was also a challenge in the design process and something we held the bar pretty high on which was we need to educate people and do more than just entertain. But we also. Oh, said people should be laughing in every wing and gallery, and if they're not doing something wrong. So versus a hall of fame, we have taken the approach of being more of an art museum where what you are seeing and appreciating within our walls is really the contributions to the art form. The focus is on the bodies of work versus the level of celebrity of the creators themselves. And the feedback that we've gotten from the industry has been overwhelmingly positive as far as that approach being really the higher road and one that does more Justice to the art form itself. I'm Commodores constantly evolving thing. Are you going to be trying to update to regularly because he may change, doesn't it things that we found funny, ten years ago, a re the inappropriate all the execution of how the company has made moves on? How are you looking to keep it feeling contemporary, or is it not really about? Is it more about the actual, his. History of of up and things that we are planning to keep it very up to date so that we always have our finger on the pulse of what's going on in comedy today. So as much as you're learning about Buster Keaton, you're also seeing alley Wong in the standup exhibit. So we really someone said from chaplain to Chapelle, and so the exhibits and the technology are designed so that they're easily up dateable. There's a content management system that serves as really the nervous system of the whole attraction, and that allows us to continue to update it annually people, praise my husband for coming to all of my doctor's appointments with me, oh my God, I can't believe he comes to all your doctor's appointments. He is so supportive guests go to those doctor appointment. Start the show. There's nothing for the camera to see if I'm not there, but he's the hero for playing candy crush while I got my blood drawn. Meanwhile, if I do mushroom seven months pregnant, I'm bad mommy..

Phyllis Diller Andy Kaufman Joan rivers Jerry Seinfeld Ramos Buster Keaton Marx Charlie Chapelle Wong seven months seventy foot six degrees ten years
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"So they are doing good, but then needs to be the funds that needs to be other support for autism. Because as I said, she what happens is you spending area and have even two years on a book and publishes cannot hope to give you that kind of advance. So there has to be some sort of governments investment. What's happened is that if you look in America, some of the most successful American artists and writers are British. Most Scottish actually look at somebody like Frank quietly grant Morrison, Warren Ellis, Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Pete Milligan. I mean, these people are all Brits who are working in America because they call it care because they're just on the royalties in. There's been a breakdown of publications. There's no deadline. There's no crisis. These will weekly and monthly that were going superior just being head hunted and kind of brain drain straight to the US. Also, what happened was I did this exhibition at the British library, and the reason that happened was because I discovered that people who had archives people, Dave Gibbons, and more and stuff. Basically, I don't know what most doing with his material, but certainly a lot of autism writers are having to give the material to collectors in Europe or America because no one here wants them particularly. So for me, a big part of that exhibition was making museums and cultural institutions aware of this wealth of comics which are just disappearing because nobody values them on that sort of cultural level to be fed. The British library absolutely came onside did huge amount without archive and bringing material and making that material available. So that has started to change. But. That's what I'm saying. It's extremely that we have this talent, and yet it's being bought the material overseas and also it's been commissioned of sees that should change and there's money to be made. Presumably these, he's shows you. Just sold his his ideas to net flix, maybe hundred million dollars. I mean, this is stuff that makes money look at the money that Alamos matern has made look at grant Morrison success on that, fix this stuff that turns why? Like the real massive money generating. So yeah, happy with the royalty. Yeah, completely. We'll complete. And some of them really ready like it, you know, and and have benefited very much from it. But for me, it's just why isn't that being drawn back to some kind of support? And I realize ation that this is actually very good breeding ground for material in terms of what you were saying about the Booker prize and all of those things. I do think it's a moment. My husband took a lot of convincing about COMEX and what he would always say to me was he'd never read comics kit, and then I said, but did you retention did you eat after? Of course, it. I think people don't really make the connection between the fact that they have read COMEX. They understand how to read comics, but then they grow out of it. And maybe that like superheroes and not into kind of big action films. Have that realize that this huge wealth of material and that actually if they come back to them that they can enter it because as always say, COMEX is a medium, not John right? And I think people confuse that. And actually I didn't feel like men in tights, John. Thank you so much for coming in. I'm congratulations on two modes is out now you, you mentioned something over till global or something can see some of the some of those raw work and stuff. Yeah, it's it's over to comics, which is just the square, and there's going to be an exhibition from the sixteenth of August onwards. It's for two weeks and it is going to be the artwork from Cinelli the Michael Kennedy and also worked from the graphic novel Apollo. And that's the artist, Mike Collins and the rightist, Chris Baker and Matt Fitch. Thanks again, John and John Harris dunning excellent. New graphic novel tumult is out. Now this is the Monica, weekly, monocle twenty four. Time for music now and his something from the play John dunning together as inspiration for illustrator. Michael Kennedy. This is David Lynch and Carreno with pink history. That was pinky stream David Lynch, Karen? Oh, this is the Monica weekly on twenty four..

America John grant Morrison David Lynch Michael Kennedy John dunning Monica weekly Dave Gibbons US Neil Gaiman Warren Ellis Europe Frank Alan Moore Pete Milligan Booker Alamos Chris Baker Mike Collins John Harris
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"And I think that's again, I come back to blue velvet, but one of my favorite scenes in that film which I think is such a clever film in terms of it really drives the action. You really into this dialogue, but there's one scene where comic will down the street with Laura done. You see them on the street and then the shot is just of the trees above them passing as they talk. And then they're just quiet Woking in the dark. And that is such an amazing moment. And then you plunge back into action. These coaches in this dialogue. And for me, that's really key to activate the more complex sequences to allow the redesign. The view is debris slightly allows into almost inhabit the world more tests in respect Chuo John, how. Schooled in the lion shade in the subtleties of graphic novels, you mentioned Fukuchi me, death fish or whatever. How school people have to be in the cannon in order to get the most out of you will civically. Civically not at all. I mean, I'm a huge believer in that as well. I don't think you should have to know any of the stuff is not an academic exercise that to discuss to wallow interview. And actually it's there to give a better experience. You know, it was like, you'll see there's a lot of cut Cobain references which concentrated to fall in this the artist said like he had to get into to actually this book, but Kirkeby always say his best band was Queen and Bon Jovi because they were entertaining the audience. It's like you, you hope that what you can do is elevate the material. But for me, certainly the key thing was to actually entertain an audience, certainly seducing audience and give them some kind of pleasurable ride. And then do these other trickeries and hopefully feed into that. You mentioned the the artists, the straighter? I don't. I'm not sure on the correct labels. What's what's the preference that Michael might have? So how does that process begin then? And what's that collaboration light? Because I don't know. I guess the dynamic in a graphic novel or comic is probably different a any kind of in the sense that each of the two things, but that inextricably linked, how did it begin? You're absolutely right. It is kind of unlike. Anything else. I mean, if it works, it's like a happy Morrissey and Johnny mall situation. Certainly in this case it was, but it can be very unhappy as well, because the thing is you really are both sharing the crater responsibility. So if you're on the same page, literally excuse the pun, but it's amazing if it doesn't. It's extremely agonizing. What happened for this project for instances, I wrote the whole story and had the script and then went looking for artists finding that person was difficult and it's partly to do with a graphic novel..

Laura Woking Chuo John Morrissey Bon Jovi Cobain Michael Kirkeby
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"And again, it feeds into the central concept. This new, our concept of a woman in trouble and what I loved about those photographs, which seventy seven to eighty and New York such a great moment in York is you see this kind of sketched out narrative that you never really understand. And Lynch also said mysteries magnets. And there's something about this thing that if you leave gaps and you create these mysterious images, ready draws people in a started to see these images and putting the story together with these images felt like the right way to tell this particular story. So I quickly shifted out of pros and inter comic scripts, which then did it fascinates he stuff is a great question. I wonder whether it works the other way around as well, whether actually being able to thinking visual way makes you ask punchy questions when you're damned. Pros writing makes you write good, simple stuff. I mean stupid stuff. I mean, really good. Simple stone says that. Problem of thinking, you're a good writer and why he's one word when fifty two. And this is an of writing for the gothic. Novel style has to be punch that everything has to mean something. So it's interesting because if you look at people like Neil Gaiman and unin more who are seen credibly well respected comic book, writers and writers in prose and other ways as well. It's interesting more is known as somebody who writes the most outrageously long comic scripts. I didn't have you know that if you look at his script for the killing joke, it's hilarious teaching COMEX. I showed it to my students. The first three pages is the beginning of the first panels description, and he's describing is not in the panel. So you're just like, what are you doing? But actually the pages completely silent. So it's that it's that some of writing comic is I would put huge amounts of information to the script, but it could be a competing silent page. So it's a communication that really is in collaboration with the autism. And sometimes a lot of that writing is you say is not to do with the words that appear on the pages, almost making sure that done. Have to write anything interest, Ron, exactly. And allows you to strip down the captions and dialogue out of the silent page that that could be developed film. Honestly, again, that is one of the absolute central concerns I have is silent comics. I think it's so important to have that moment in COMEX that you can breathe, and it's almost the opposite of what Stanley and Kirby and those guys, although absolutely love their COMEX. Did we have one hundred eighty characters tenures happening one page all Tobin at the same time. I mean, it makes you have panic attack the Japanese on the other hand, had this really rich rich tradition of silent COMEX and there's some amazing reprints at the moment. There's actually one called for Kashimi death fish which has been released by breakdown press, and it's little short stories about people working nuclear plants in Japan from post war two now, and there are the most heartbreaking stories and they're so good at silence and also architecture. So they'll start a seeing where you're looking at a street light. A building, a garden, a window, and then you're inside the room and you start in it's a whole page of just setting the scene. That's the Japanese do very well. So I tried to do quite a lot of that in tumult as well, and then balance it with a story of Philly, a bit of narrative action..

Neil Gaiman Lynch COMEX New York Japan writer Philly Tobin Ron Stanley unin Kirby
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Later, we'll hear how super Harris have come to dominate the box office, but I will take calming. So they're no longer the driving force. They once were with graphic novel on the long list of the prestigious man Booker prize for the first time this year. It's fair to say that the medium has expanded beyond the realm of men in tights and into something altogether most serious Joan Harris stunning is of the Combet having co, curated exhibitions, the medium at the British library back in twenty fourteen. He's also a writer and his lungs. Graphic novel, Salem Brownstone attracted widespread acclaim is chew moats drills on a grand tradition of psychological thrillers to spin compelling tile and John is with us. Now, thank you for joining us. Graduations. Give us a bit of a presi if you will, of what happens. It's bit of Love's Labour's lost or it's a bit of a bit of a heartbreaker at least to begin with. I mean, I go day about this, but to try and make it a pricey for me. It started off with two ideas. The one thing was I- tombstone d- and jumped off a rock and broke my ankle and messed up my spine. And that was kind of a big shock. I'd never had anything wrong with me. I'd never had a sprained ankle and suddenly vats couple of years to recover from. So then I started examining study five at the time, and I started looking at mortality and having a midlife crisis essentially really young. So that's sort of making question myself. And that took me into the idea of questioning what it is to be a man what it is to be strong all of those things. So I really kind of extrapolated this out to really sort of extreme point with a story and you'll see it with things like the main characters. Best friend who's writing this book on man, movies all about action films and the meanings of action films and how. We derive images of of manhood from these films. So that was the one inspiration. But then the other inspiration was David Lynch shoe. You know, I really adores an artist. I'm have over the decades. He did what some people would think as an unwatchable piece of Tauch, which is one of my favorite films. I inland empire, which is three hours shot on a hand Cam with no so descript that one can really identify loved it. And when he tried to explain this indescribable film, he said it's about women in trouble. And that goes back to the classic film Noir trope. It goes back to twin peaks which he based on Merriman rose. Life is writing film by Marilyn Monroe, which is on film -able and then may twin peaks from that. So I had these two ideas of midlife crisis analyzing in masculinity and then a woman in trouble. And honestly, that's where I started from, and Venice went from that when you write stories. When you think about this story, did you see it in a. A more cinematic way a more visual way perhaps than other work done before. Is that how tumult comes about, say in pictures and the words coming, it's a stupid questions interested in that process. It's not at all, and it's really good question. And I guess it's also valid for filmmakers as well. I went to film school and that's what I studied, but I was obsessed with COMEX as a child. I was actually quite late pros Rita a, my sister is very, very smart lady, and she was reading very early. I was reading super friends and wonder, woman and stuff still love those. But comics really got me into reading, which is, I think, quite a common story for another boys. So I always had this very strong kind of visual sense. But I also write prose is well, I've just finished a novel now which is sitting with my agent. So I also love pros. And in fact, I was looking back at notebooks and I found a notebook that was the beginning of tumult as pros. And I just started writing like that, but started to have these really, really strong visual ideas for it. Going back to Lynch. Blue velvet was a huge influence for me, but certainly visually I kept getting these images and then Cindy Sherman series untitled film stills is something that's always interested me..

David Lynch writer Joan Harris British library Salem Brownstone Marilyn Monroe Merriman Cindy Sherman Venice Rita a John three hours
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Cracked Movie Club

Cracked Movie Club

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Cracked Movie Club

"So they really wet for this obiku but then there's no just randomly just like why is all the round gone at the rim but they did hint at the joker in in the end of that and begins he there was mr ries mr reese which if you say fast enough is mysterious which is not an yellow the hint at the ridler in the end of the red light yes i imagine they hinted at them speaking a leo dicaprio ryan gosling mark ruffalo we're all considered for robin for dark night rises before they went with jay jail the real also lost out to chris o'donnell in for batman forever 95 i can see the series up for twice and still didn't get it when will he get a win i know right like kinda chooses really good move is aimed at an idea that he kinda dodged a bullet with a batman forever susan the team now he's all the movies all three movies in in the nails it i didn't sound so much got another at least one other academy award nod for for his work on these film yes abetment begins the bans against maybe for dark night as well but i think so definitely for begins yeah nathan crowley an incredibly as production designer from prestige a lot of his films yeah yeah but that excellent work i was just uh while if festers may be my favorite tp but uh he's pretty awesome he's pretty awesome not a great director if at all no i was transcendence yeah no noah that was that was disappointing really valvarde was 90s thriller that he made in 2014 look good though it did it looked great uh.

robin batman director noah mark ruffalo jay chris o'donnell nathan crowley
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Cracked Movie Club

Cracked Movie Club

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Cracked Movie Club

"Where could we be better dutchswedish dutchswedish okay so you're both right yeah good on both eu recovered all our northern european basis give new room with a bunch of champions yediot nathan crowley's also bag set designer oh my god what could work or a yet at so much this is shocking amount of this movie is in camera meaning that they use cg minimally much of the effects are in camera they built just a crazy number of things that i guess we'll talk about me get to the via a notably just in this segment notably a he built threes base crafts for the film the endurance which is based on the international space as as the big one it's a big one it's though on that yet the it literally looks like a clock which is interesting because the movies about time the ranger which is how the descendant owns like the shuttle it is shuttle and then the lander which is how they get on planet so he built these three hunk of steel any based on actual like either sifi fiction or sciencefiction like books and movies or real life yeah it all looks like what nascar's going to do next year yeah yeah and the endurance the big one was a was a scale model but they made fullsize versions of the other two craft sad to which is insane to me yeah but yeah uh hans hans zimmer does the score in this one which is really interesting to me because.

nathan crowley nascar hans hans zimmer
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Cracked Movie Club

Cracked Movie Club

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Cracked Movie Club

"Our direction art direction with this a nathan crowley and julia much ugly budget pindi okay i was hey mess that unto but to crowley did a lot of the set design and building which he started doing apparently no one's garage before the you know that before they started making the sets and like a universal backlot and you can see one of the billboards in the background it says like sir nathan crowley's like miracle man or something so he put his own and his own name in there that's pretty common thing the veges air just a neat thing that i said they don't i didn't see it pointed out any in any of the special features i just happened to see it it's very i i'll sit as the other does the other thing about this movie dazzling man and then the incentive to get mad where there's ally steam punk imagery in this movie and that is it is especially when we get into the tesla's style yulia of like here's a vague machine we're not gonna fully explained let slap a couple of gears on it turned into a backpack was thrown a leather vest steam punk it up done production design were good uh saddam and on a kick someone's as better protection three wooden push them geeks down a staircase right now we kick any magician or steam pong adjacent persons as i just want to go on record as saying for sure i mean we're sliding into production which is like at this point this perfect because i want to talk about that a little bit too which is because no one has a quote that a wanted to read that it's like he's talking about exactly what you're talking about like the setting in the movie is as a quote victorian areas often mischaracterized as stuffing repressive when was actually incredibly exciting time in human development.

nathan crowley saddam julia
"nathan crowley" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"nathan crowley" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"Blockbusters personal projects are now actually let me give you the genesis of this okay mendes wanted to make this movie back when the book came at a kennewick 2000 okay uh but then he did was anderson were his producer brought it over to nolan and nolan gut was got into this book when he was promoting memento so he'd had it like four wow while and he took it to jonathan his brother and he was like we should do this and so they start writing the script so they had vis script ready before he makes and before he gets on the wb train before says rolling with the brecht said once a he's doing this he already starts moving up in the prestige while he's making bettman began that's what happened so fast i eyeglass like you know they had as they had a draft now and like he starts on the you know nathan crowley start building setzer you know at least like previous on any had two of his big actress now he's like alike bail i like cain well according to look you know i it's all i am to be wicked being impulsive bail asked to be in the movie he didn't even think about it his anger bail saw the screen plan was like i think i could be this guy and i think the same goes for jackman like it was like nolan and think of these people they came to him interesting under now these guys are really really while kassimis vr it's it's a really good hugh jackman role it yeah the best huge amien an is the wolverine yeah i think outside of that i'd like to say is as individual performed it is such a perfect use of him down to the drunk double yes i mean like sogard yes and another thing i feel like this is the best american accent he's at redone.

mendes producer nolan gut brecht bettman nathan crowley setzer kennewick anderson cain hugh jackman