17 Burst results for "Nathan Chan"

"nathan chan" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

Raw Talk Podcast

01:51 min | 9 months ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on Raw Talk Podcast

"That falls within the realm of medicine. I think that doesn't need to be if the government is going to allow for. That doesn't really need to invoke medicine for people who just don't enjoy the life that they have so the farther you are dying. The less actually assistant dying and the less comfortable in it goes without saying that discussions about death and dying universally challenging to navigate conversations about end of life care in healthcare have evolved over time as the field of palliative care has grown and with the introduction of made in canada the landscape of made continues to evolve with bill c seven. We hope our conversation today helped promote much-needed open dialogue about made an end of life care in canada from diverse perspectives. Thank you to our guests. Steve leisure and christine leisure. Dr madeline lee dr almond and sally being their perspectives. Were incredibly insightful. And we appreciate the diverse and honest perspective shared by all guests regarding medical assistance in dying. This episode was hosted by jenner park. And me nathan chan. Interviews were conducted by aaron tong. Neural cabbie larkin divert higher. Jenna emmy our creator was larkin. Our audio engineer was helen yang. Our advisor was aaron and gag. Niche lattimore was executive producer tune into next week's episode on genetic counseling. Podcast is excuse. Presentation of the institute of medical science and medicine at the university of toronto opinions expressed on the show are not necessarily those of the faculty of medicine or the university to learn more about the show visit. Our website brought talk dot com. Stay up to date by following us on twitter. Instagram facebook rox podcasts. Support the link on our website when amazon. Also don't forget to subscribe on spotify or wherever else was podcast and greatest stars..

aaron helen yang aaron tong amazon spotify twitter Jenna emmy today canada madeline lee next week jenner park Steve leisure Instagram Niche lattimore larkin nathan chan christine sally facebook
"nathan chan" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

Psychology of Entrepreneurship

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

"Astray lian. I'd like to start by acknowledging the traditional custodians throughout australia and recognize that continuing connection to land waters and community i pay my respects to them and cultures and to the eldest poss- present and imagining of the land. I am standing on today. I extend my respect to the aboriginal and torres strait islander who listen to this today on the psychology of entrepreneurship wagon to revisiting volume. Twenty one of the series. But we talked with the self-help gurry. Melissa ambrosioni about her johnny rock bottom to success. If you haven't been with us for any of these kinds of volumes pretty much gonna play volume twenty one and tying clips from other incredible guests from previous volumes to see if we can connect the dots and unravel the entrepreneur. Mind a little mole. Melissa is an amazing entrepreneur. Her story is inspiring and the lessons that she's loud along the way have not only saved her life but helped plenty of others around the world as she continues to educate people today. If you're someone who might be making some big changes or decisions in your life right now this volumes view not only does melissa give us her tips and strategies on how to help navigate your way out of a hard place or into a new and challenging role. We also have the wisdom of some of other extraordinary guests as well along the way the stay tuned for that. And i'll be back later in the volume to guide you three. Hi it's roughly. If this is your first volume welcome. This is a weekly series. Where i go inside. The mind of an entrepreneur artist athlete academic to decipher. What is the psychology of our decisions. Why script this volume. It is seven in february twenty twenty and this volume will go live in eleven days today. High also announced that for the first time in five years. Our podcast conference. We are podcast. We'll have a female headline. Oh i am so excited about that. Because i've been trying to achieve that for the last three years for sure. See we podcast. The first podcasting conference in the southern hemisphere. We started back in twenty fifteen east specifically for business owners podcasters and brands. That have podcasts. And we've had amazing speakers. Like john. Lee dumas dan rows george harbinger pat. Flynn nathan chan headline of previous years. So i'm excited to say that this year we are. Podcast will be headlined by this amazing so my name is melissa. Amber seaney and i'm a bestselling author. I've got books that are at the moment. Mastering your mingle and wide. I'm podcast her and speaker. And everything i do is with the intention to empower people to unlock their full potential and live their best life today. We go inside the mind of a bestselling author podcast of kanye speaker teacher but more importantly friend dancer an actor with our own. Imdb page. I was lucky to have this interview experience. Because i drove a couple of hours from studios in brisbane to the national park. Noosa to be welcomed into a home for lunch that a husband nick cooked for us. That was special indeed so to help you with context. I wanted to start with melissa motto. In life. When i interviewed david wolf on my podcast. He's a beautiful human being. He said to me today is the best day ever. Ah and he says it like that and he says why did on your mira and he said treat every day like the best day ever. And i literally that is my motto. I mike and i asked myself. What can i do to make this the best day of like what can i do. And sometimes it's like the may today. I want to go for a swim. Or it's like i want to catch up with a girlfriend like that's i really or i wanna have a good conversation with my husband or i want to make a picnic and go and have lunch with him or something like that but every day wake up and ask yourself what will bring me the most joy and what will make today the best day ever. It will make today the best day ever. Sometimes it's question is a bit much. Our minds make all sorts of reasons why that is in the relevant question to ask because i actually have to worry about a whole bunch of things including the bills. The people that rely on me. The korea will car to build the life. I currently have. The list is endless but stopping to ask this question. Every day would help. I suppose because that would mean that after a while the mind would run out of excuses i suppose. Because here's the kicker we all know what would make lives the macy and we unconsciously engineers scenarios to make sure. We feel enough pain to make that change. That also really desires because to every high point. There is a backstory twenty. Ten was when. I had my awakening so to speak before that i was actually a professional dance. I danced at the moulin rouge in paris. I did acting and tv presenting and a little bit of modeling. And that's what i'd done. I started dancing. When i was three years old so all i knew was performing. All i knew was dancing and acting and all that all of that stuff and then After living in london two years in paris for a year. I moved home and i didn't wanna come home. My visa expired a hat to be back here Because there was no no other option. My friends dumped me. The guy was saying dumped me to move home so i had to leave my thriving career in the uk. My health was plummeting. I was in and out of emergency. I had no money. I was sleeping on my friends. Single foldout hospital bed in her lounge room. And i was like what has my life come to like. Is this really it. Is this really it. So i did. What a lot of people do. And i drowned in partying. So i spent a year partying and being in and out of emergency and the hospital because my body was just telling me to stop and slow down and what you're doing is no good for you melissa. I ignored it and i ignored it and ignored it The universe kept on trying to give me these little warning signs and then the universe literally pulled the rug from underneath me and i ended up in hospital for a week just over a week and i had a whole host of health issues like basically my entire immune system shut down so i had so many physical health issues. I had Like chronic fatigue fatigue. I got the worst case of the cold sore virus that the doctors had ever seen. I had them all over my face like in my mouth and down my throat. Couldn't eight drink couldn't even talk like my mouth was closed. Shot because there was sores. Eleven my face. And if i went to open my mouth i'd hold a source and they would bleed like it was so painful so i was dealing with all these physical stuff and then on top of that dealing with the emotional side of things so i was dealing with depression anxiety and panic attacks. Everyone else's wakeup call just seems like great stories until we decide to re looked at the wakeup calls. We've already had in life. The ones that repeat themselves ever so subtly.

Melissa ambrosioni paris torres strait australia Noosa brisbane macy Amber seaney nathan chan Lee dumas korea kanye High david wolf uk john moulin rouge mike london
"nathan chan" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

Psychology of Entrepreneurship

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on Psychology of Entrepreneurship

"You are the decision maker. It's Rawnsley if this is your first volume welcome. This is a weekly series where I go inside the mind of an entrepreneur and artist athletes. I to decipher. What is the psychology of our decisions while I script this volume? It is the seventeenth of February twenty twenty and this volume will go live in eleven days today high also announced that for the first time in five years our podcast conference we podcast. We'll have a female headlined. I am so excited about that. Because I've been trying to achieve back for the last three years for sure. See we are podcast podcasting conference in the Southern Hemisphere? We started it back. In two thousand fifteen. It is specifically for business owners podcasters and brands. That have podcasts. And we've had amazing speakers like John Lee Dumas Dan Rows Harbinger Pat. Flynn and Nathan Chan headline up previous years. So I'm excited to say that this year we are podcast will be headlined by this amazing solve. My name is Melissa Ambrosioni and bestselling author. I've got two books that are out at the moment. Mastering your mingle and open wide I'm a podcast. Her and speaker and everything I do is with the intention to empower people to unlock their full potential and live their best life. Today we go inside the mind of a bestselling author pasta keynote speaker. Tito but more importantly a wife friend dancer and actor with our own. I M page. I was lucky to have this interview experience because I drove a couple of hours from our studios in Brisbane to the National Park in Noosa to be welcomed into a home for lunch that a husband Nick cooked for.

Melissa Ambrosioni John Lee Dumas Tito Noosa Brisbane Nathan Chan Flynn National Park Nick
"nathan chan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Did I now I now Nathan chan can play yeah he would have probably been in the final if he hadn't faced ping pong Johnny so early yeah he played though it wasn't that bad I it is kind of fun though uncle Doug indeed the uncle Doug who created form jail the concept because your region you originally really pushed me to think about farm rehab and I took an extra step of saying well why don't we create for me have you can't leave that's under option over going to jail and and that's I think that's why events like that matter so much to me because you can't have conversation you can't build bridges you can't start to find solutions until you have friends of different political opinions that are willing to let that conversation happened another huge shot out of the teamsters union and Pete lamb I came out and brought bought folks it was just a great gathering of all of the members of the rational opposition on all sides of the aisle something that I I'm just deeply appreciative for if you were a member of the rational opposition who came out and I didn't get a chance to talk to you in full my apologies it just was a special night I really really do all of our listeners who made it possible all right let's make this next section of the front page possible from Seattle Seattle slash Seattle the suburbs are getting more diverse this is a message after the latest elections and then of course in the city of Seattle well we we just elect a lot of white people into the city council doesn't mean it matters whether I don't think race really matters on the quality of the politician that you are going to look at it's just an an interesting food for thought I would love to new dare and what's your thoughts on diverse city one of my thoughts on diversity will write will still affirmative action is an interesting conversation right like so yeah should we make sure that we give everyone an opportunity all genders all races for for jobs but then you have this other issue right where the maybe only Jewish people apply to be radio shows that K. did you each arm did you go to get what it and so what do we have to do to try to make sure.

Nathan chan Doug teamsters union Pete lamb Seattle
"nathan chan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

08:55 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Segment of the week. I'm joined by my entrepreneur of the week and close friend Nathan Chan who's in studio. He's the youngest member of the Seattle symphony. And he is a cellist Nathan. Thank you for. Joining us. Solace is a big big pleasure for me. It's nice and early. And so I'm very out of my element for musician. You know, we always are playing concerts and things at night. But so excited to be here. Thank you for having me. Well, and this is great. Because actually this came out of an argument you and I had over drinks. Where have you asked me if I thought you were an entrepreneur and actually off the top a bit rude. And I was like, no, you're not an entrepreneur Nathan, we have a very interesting discussion about and you made me really think about it. And you change my mind, and I brought you in. I think I'll start out by asking you. I don't know a lot about your entrepreneurial background. I know you gotta. The econ degree from Columbia. Right. You went to Juilliard is there like a secret business that you ran when you were a kid like you were like literally conducting Mozart at three. But like, what's your what's your business acumen? It's a great question. You know, I think most people don't really associate musicians as being a business oriented by. I had a very interesting predicament growing up in that I was a very Big Apple fan. Boy, like many of us. Yeah. I have my iphone in my pocket. I mean, it's the greatest greatest thing ever. And I think what was really interesting is. I had the money up front to buy what was considered the most affordable iphone at the time. Which is the iphone three g. And I I asked my parents like like any good boy, you know. Hey, mom, dad. I I have the money for this iphone, and I really like to purchase it because I was fascinated with the technology at the time. But my parents were quite smart. And that they've realized that the true cost of iphone ownership was not in the up front cost. But it was actually from the cellphone the date data data plan. You remember that? Yeah. And so I really kind of was thinking, what are all the ways I could really make this work. And so I had a of the original plastic map book at the time and I pulled up garage fan. And I said, you know, what I have. Some skill as a musician. And so I have recorded a Super Mario brothers theme song remixed for cello. And I put that on I tunes, and I actually created a data spreadsheet and sold enough of that song ninety nine cents at a time. And I brought it to my parents. I say okay, you wanted some proof that I could afford the state plan. Will here you go. And it was after that that I realized. Wow. If you go from idea to execution, you can really kind of get what you want. If you take your skill set and put it together in a way that works. Well, that's that's the moment where you decided like, oh, I'm a professional musician people will buy stuff. That's right. If you if you put it in a way, that's compelling and people really really wanted wanted her interested in. So this is a great question for me. Cello is your. Photon gig somebody pays you kind of a salary to do it. How do you keep that entrepreneurial edge as a musician because you look similar to you? I've made it as a talker. Right. Like, how do I how do I keep my edge as a radio show host the same way that you keep your edge as a cellist will. I think the thing that's really freeing about being a professional musician. Now is I'm less motivated by the financial incentives off doing a certain project or or gig weather, if you will and moreover I'm motivated by the artistic fulfillment that I can get out of something. And so I'm always weighing the benefits of the financial game. But also what really makes me happy as a musician, and that's playing for folks like you addicts driving or or or or something like that. You know that that really makes me happy. Well in something about that. I think is important is you play at Ben Arroyo hall if someone one of our list. Owners wanted to catch you they'd have to go to the Seattle symphony. But then they could also follow you on Instagram. They can follow you on YouTube and use some YouTube videos that have reach, you know, hundreds of thousands of views in some ways you've played to audiences of hundreds of thousands of people. What do you think about that in the digital execution of classical music in the twenty first century? That's a great question. You know, I think more and more now nowadays you're going to see each musician. That's pursuing this career path. Really tackling an individualized type of of of plan. And I think now if you look on the internet, you'll see a real new renaissance age for many young classical musicians who are really taking advantage of the full benefits of what the internet has to offering something I really realized at the beginning and kind of maybe stem from that Super Mario brothers theme song right in the beginning back. What we have at our disposal nowadays can. Exponentially magnify reach outside the concert hall. And so I've always been fascinated by creating my own artistic little new gets of of content. It's all about content creation. And that really I think it's interesting because what we've been so trained to do as classical musicians as play in the moment, which is so vital for creating that special in real time magic. But now with the internet you can make that magic last forever. And and that's kind of something you, and I have shared your a musician who actually came to my experience at south by south west. That's right. And you you kind of understand that same idea because you walk around south by you, see all these bands performing to one hundred two hundred people, and then you come to the, you know, I would say the low key Dick's drive in stage, and you do a performance on the cello, and that might reach ten thousand fifteen thousand people back home, and it's that type of creativity that I think it's so important what would you suggest to a young musician? How can they find their entrepreneurial edge because I think it's always about practice being told practice, but I think you would say, it's the creativity. That makes a difference that helps you succeed. Absolutely. I think nowadays you have to re shift your mindset a little bit. If you're a musician in that instead of practicing for performance, I think you should really be practicing for content creation because nowadays most people won't just hand you a performance if they don't really know who you are. And so nowadays, I'm much more intrigue. Bye. There's almost no barrier to entry for getting your name out there as a musician, and if you can create pieces of content that are compelling and relevant that really incentivizes innovation in this space, which is. Hypercritical? I'd say for for what we do. So I'm with Nathan Shany's the youngest tenured member of the Seattle symphony. He plays cello. Nathan. How can our show support you? How can we follow you? How can we find your music? Oh, wow. That's very kind of you. We have some really interesting things going on at the symphony for example, this weekend starting on Saturday and Sunday, we're having a twenty four hour music marathon at our new space called octave nine which is this new technologically advanced. System that employs a series of microphones that are hanging in the ceiling and are capable of creating live in real time reverberation. So even though the spacer in might not be big you can make it sound like a cathedral, and so we're creating curing a lot of interesting performances that take advantage of this technology, and I think it's going to be really interesting, especially given all the technological talent. We have here in Seattle to see how people are hopefully captivated by going to have to come out. And visit is there any way you can sneak me into that? Yeah. Man. Just just just text me out. I'll hook you up. I'm with Nathan Chan he's our entrepreneur of the week. He's a member of the Seattle symphony in you mentioned content creation. I thought why not what let's do a little content creation in this show. I've been rumoring how I've been telling Nathan that. We have our our Seattle city council game of thrones. And he has his cello in here. And I thought I might get you to play maybe a minute of game of thrones in the we can turn this into our bed that we run on this show every week. Absolutely. I'm very excited. All right here. We have it Nathan Chan playing game of thrones..

Seattle Nathan Nathan Chan Nathan Shany YouTube Ben Arroyo hall Mozart Columbia Apple Dick twenty four hour
"nathan chan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

08:58 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"H and this is my favor favorite segment of the week. I'm joined by my entrepeneurship the week and close friend Nathan Chan who's in studio. He's the youngest member of the Seattle symphony. And he is a cellist Nathan. Thank you for joining us, solid. This is a big big pleasure for me. It's nice and early and so very out of my element for musician. You know, we always are playing concerts and things at night. But so excited to be here. Thank you for having me. Well, and this is great. Because actually this came out of an argument you, and I had over drinks where you asked me if I thought you were an entrepreneur and actually off the top. I was a bit rude. And I was like, no, you're not an entrepreneur Nathan, we did have a very interesting discussion about and you made me really think about it. And you change my mind, and I brought you in. I think I'll start out by asking you. I don't know a lot about your entrepreneurial background. I know you got to the econ degree from Columbia. Right. You went to Juilliard. Yes. Is there like a secret business that you ran when you were a kid like you're like literally conducting Mozart at three, but like, what's your what's your business acumen? It's a great question. You know, I think most people don't really associate musicians as being a business oriented by. I had a very interesting predicament growing up in that I was a very Big Apple fan. Boy, like many of us. Yeah. I have my iphone in my pocket. I mean, it's the greatest greatest thing ever. And you know, I think what was really interesting is. I had the money up front to buy what was considered the most affordable iphone at the time. Which is the iphone three g. And I you know, I asked my parents like like any good boy. Hey, mom, dad. I have the money for this iphone, and I'd really like to purchase it because I was fascinated with technology at the time. But my parents were quite smart in that they realized that the true cost of iphone ownership was not in the up front cost. But it was actually from the cellphone the data data plan. You remember that? And so I really kind of was thinking, what are all the ways I could really make this work. And so I had a of what the original plastic MAC book at the time, and I pulled up garage band. And I said, you know, what I have some skill as a musician. And so I have recorded a Super Mario brothers song remixed for cello. And I put that on I tunes, and I actually created a data spreadsheet and sold enough of that song ninety nine cents at a time. And I brought it to my parents. I said, okay, you wanted some proof that I could afford to state a plan. Well, here you go. And it was after that that I realized wow. If you go from idea to execution, you can really kind of get what you want. If you take your skill set and put it together in a way that works. Well, that's that's the moment where you decided. Oh, I'm a professional musician. People will buy stuff. That's right. If you if you put it in a way, that's compelling and people really really want to want are interested in it. So this is a great question for me. Cello is your your full time gig somebody pays you kind of a salary to do it. How do you keep that entrepreneurial edge as a musician because you look similar to you? I made it as a talker. Right. Like, how do I how do I keep my age as a radio show host the same way that you keep your edge as a cellist will. I think the thing that's really freeing about being a professional musician. Now is I'm less motivated by the financial incentives of doing a certain project or or gig weather, if you will and moreover I'm motivated by the artistic fulfillment that I can get out of something. And so I'm always weighing the benefits. Of the financial game. But also what really makes me happy as a musician, and that's playing for folks like you at Dick's jive in or or or or something like that, you know, that that really makes me happy something about that. I think is important is you play bene- ROY hall. If someone one of our listeners wanted to catch you have to go to the Seattle symphony. But then they could also follow you on Instagram. They can follow you on YouTube and use some YouTube videos that have reached hundreds of thousands of views in some ways you've played to audiences of hundreds of thousands of people. What do you think about that in the digital execution of classical music in the twenty first century? That's a great question. You know, I think more and more now nowadays you're going to see each musician. Let's pursuing this career path. Really tackling an individualized type of of of plan. And I think now if you look on the internet, you'll see a real new renaissance age for many young classical musicians who are really taking advantage of the full benefits of what the internet has offering. That's something I really realized at the beginning and kind of maybe stem from that super. Mario brothers theme song right in the beginning that. What we have at our disposal nowadays can. Exponentially magnify our reach outside the concert hall until I've always been fascinated by creating my own artistic little new gets of of of content. It's all about content creation. And that really I think it's interesting because we've been so trained to do as classical musicians as play in the moment, which is so vital for creating that special in real time magic. But now with the internet you can make that magic last forever. And that's something you, and I have shared your a musician who actually came to my experience at south by south west. That's right. And you you kind of understand that same idea because you walk around south by you, see all these bands performing to one hundred two hundred people, and then you come to the. I would say the the low key Dix drivers age, and you do a performance on the cello. And that might reach ten thousand fifteen thousand people back home, and that type of creativity that I think it's so important, what would you suggest to a young musician? How can they find their entrepreneurial edge? Because I think it's always about practicing told practice, but I think you would say, it's the creativity. That makes a difference that helps you succeed. Absolutely. I think nowadays you have to re shift your mindset a little bit. If you're a musician in that, you know, instead of practicing for performance, I think you should really be practicing for content creation because nowadays most people won't just hand you a performance if they don't really know who you are. And so now a days I'm much more intrigued by there's almost no barrier to entry for getting your name out there as a musician, and if you can create pieces of content that are compelling and relevant that really incentive. Is innovation in this space, which is? Hypercritical? I'd say for for what we do. So I'm with Nathan Shany's the youngest ten year to member of the Seattle symphony. He plays cello. Nathan. How can our show support you? How can we follow you? How can we find your music? Oh, wow. That's very kind of you. We have some really interesting things going on at the symphony. For example, this weekend starting on Saturday and Sunday, we're having a twenty four hour music marathon at our new space called octave nine which is this new technologically advanced. System that employs a series of microphones that are hanging in the ceiling and are capable of creating live in real time reverberation. So even though the spacer in might not be. Big you can make it sound like a cathedral, and so we're creating curing a lot of interesting performances that take advantage of this technology, and I think it's gonna be really interesting, especially given all the technological talent. We have here in Seattle to see how people are hopefully captivated by. I'm going to have to come out. And visit you is there any way you can sneak into your just text me out. I'll hook you up. Nathan Chan he's our entrepreneur of the week. He's a member of the Seattle symphony in you mentioned content creation. I thought why not what let's do a little content creation in this show. I've been rumoring how I've been telling Nathan that. We have our our Seattle city council game of thrones. And he has his cello in here. And I thought I might get you to play maybe a minute of game of thrones. And then we can turn this into our bed that we run on this show every week. Absolutely. I'm very excited. All right. Oh here we have it. Nathan Chan playing game of thrones..

Seattle Nathan Nathan Chan Nathan Shany Apple YouTube ROY hall Mozart Columbia Dick twenty four hour ten year
"nathan chan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

09:02 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Vacuum on the sauce Fadi show. It's an seven seventy K T t h and this is my favor favorite segment of the week. I'm joined by my entrepreneur of the week and close friend Nathan Chan who's in studio. He's the youngest member of the Seattle symphony. And he is a cellist Nathan. Thank you for. Joining us. Solace is a big big pleasure for me. It's nights and early. And so I very out of my element for musician. You know, we always playing concerts and things at night. But so excited to be here. Thank you for having me. And this is great. Because actually this came out of an argument you and I had over drinks. Where have you asked me if I thought you were an entrepreneur and actually off the top. I was a bit rude. And I was like, no, you're not an entrepreneur Nathan. We have a very interesting discussion about and you made me really think about it. And you change my mind, and I brought you and I think I'll start out by asking you. I don't know a lot about your entrepreneurial background. I know you got a econ degree from Columbia. Right. You went to Juilliard is there like a secret business that you ran when you were a kid like you're like literally conducting Mozart at three. But like, what's your what's your business acumen? It's a great question. You know, I think most people don't really associate musicians as being a business oriented, but I had a very interesting predicament growing up in that I was very Big Apple fan. Boy, like many of us. Yeah. I have my iphone in my pocket. I mean, it's the greatest greatest thing ever. And you know, I think what was really interesting is. I had the money up front to buy what was considered the most affordable iphone at the time. Which is the iphone three g. And I, you know, I asked my parents like like any good boy, you know. Hey, mom, dad. I I have the money for this iphone, and I really liked to purchase it because I was fascinated with technology at the time. But my parents were quite smart in that they realized that the true cost of iphone ownership was not in the upfront cost, but it was actually from the cellphone download the data planet data plan. You remember that? And so I really kind of was thinking, what are all the ways I could really make this work. And so I had a of what the original plastic mat book at the time, and I pulled up garage band. And I said, you know, what I have some skill as a musician. And so I have recorded a Super Mario brothers theme song remixed for cello. And I put that on I tunes, and I actually created a data spreadsheet and sold enough. Of that song ninety nine cents at a time. And I brought it to my parents. I say okay, you wanted some proof that I could afford to state a plan. Well, here you go. And it was after that that I realized. Wow. If you go from idea to execution, you can really kind of get what you want. If you take your skill set and put it together in a way that works. Well, that's amazing. That's the moment where you decided. Oh, I'm a professional musician. People will buy my stuff. That's right. If you if you put it in a way, that's compelling and people really really wanted wanted, you know are interested in. So this is a great question for me. Cello is your your full time gig somebody pays you kind of a salary to do it. How do you keep that entrepreneurial edge as a musician because you look similar to you? I I've made it as a talker. Right. Like, how do I how do I keep my edge as a radio show host the same way that you keep your edge as a cellist? Well, I think the thing that's really freeing about being a professional musician. Now is I'm less motivated by the financial incentives of doing a certain project or or gig weather, if you will and moreover I'm motivated by the artistic fulfillment that I can get out of something. And so I'm always weighing the benefits of the financial game. But also what really makes me happy as a musician. And that's, you know, playing for folks like you at Dick's jiving or or or something like that, you know, that that really makes me happy. Well, and something about that. I think is important is you play at Ben Arroyo hall. If someone one of our listeners wanted to catch you they'd have to go to the Seattle symphony. But then they can also follow you on Instagram. They can follow you on YouTube and use some YouTube videos that have reach you hundreds of thousands of us in some ways you've played to audiences of hundreds of thousands of people. What do you think about that in the digital execution of classical music in the twenty first century? That's a great question. You know, I think more and more now nowadays you're gonna see each musician. Let's pursuing this career path. Really tackling an individualized type of of plan. And I think now if you look on the internet, you'll see a real new renaissance age for many young classical musicians who are really taking advantage of the full benefits of what the internet has offering at something. I really realized that the beginning and kind of maybe stem from that Super Mario brothers Steve song right in the beginning that. What we have at our disposal nowadays can. Exponentially magnify reach outside the concert hall until I've always been fascinated by creating my own artistic little new gets of of of content. It's all about content creation. And that really I think it's interesting because what we've been so trained to do as classical musicians as play in the moment, which is so vital for creating that special in real time magic. But now with the internet you can make that magic last forever. And that's kind of something you, and I have shared your a musician who actually came to my experience at south by south west. That's right. And you you kind of understand that same idea because you walk around south by you, see all these bands performing two hundred two hundred people, and then you come to the, you know, I I would say that the low key Dick's drive in stage, and you do performance on the cello, and that might reach ten thousand fifteen thousand people back home, and it's that type of creativity. I think it's so important. What would you suggest to a young musician? How can they find their entrepreneurial edge because I think it's always about practice being told practice, but I think you'd say, it's the creativity. That makes a difference that helps you succeed. Absolutely. I think nowadays you have to re shift your mindset a little bit. If you're musician in that, you know, instead of practicing for performance, I think you should really be practicing for content creation because nowadays most people won't just hand you a performance if they don't really know who you are. And so now a days I'm much more intrigue. Bye. There's this almost no barrier to entry for getting your name out there as a musician, and if you can create pieces of content that are compelling and relevant that really incentivizes innovation in the space, which is. Hypercritical? I'd say for for what we do. So I'm with Nathan Shany's the youngest tenured member of the Seattle symphony. He plays cello. Nathan. How can our show support you? How can we follow you? How can we find your music? Oh, wow. That's very kind of you. We have some really interesting things going on at the symphony for example, this weekend starting on Saturday and Sunday, we're having a twenty four hour music marathon at our new space called octave nine which is this new technologically advanced. System that employs a series of microphones that are hanging in the ceiling and are capable of creating live in real time reverberation. So even though the spacer in might not be. Big you can make it sound like a cathedral, and so we're creating curing a lot of interesting performances that take advantage of this technology, and I think it's going to be really interesting, especially given all the technological talent. We have here in Seattle to see how people are hopefully captivated by. I'm going to have to come out and visit is there any way you can sneak me into too? Yeah. Just text me on a hook you up. I'm with Nathan Chan is our entrepreneur of the week. He's a member of the Seattle symphony and in mentioned content creation. I thought why not what let's do a little content Chretien in this show. I've been rumoring how I've been telling Nathan that. We have our our Seattle city council game of thrones. And he has his cello in here. And I thought I might get you to play maybe a minute of game of thrones in the we can turn this into our bed that we run on the show every week. Absolutely. I'm very excited. All right here. We have it Nathan Chan playing game of thrones..

Seattle Nathan Nathan Chan Dick Nathan Shany K T YouTube Ben Arroyo hall Mozart Columbia Apple Chretien Steve twenty four hour seven seventy K
"nathan chan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:38 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"American Nathan Chan is competing for a second world title to American ice dance teams are considered contenders. Alas the American women's singles skaters are not. But all the lettuce schism the puberty the sequence what will they wear. And. What would they have more in the eighteen hundreds skating, perhaps to the skaters walls? Our next guest knows right down to the undergarments. And let's just say they are at least one reason why female skaters back then did not perform quadruple, jumps Quin Burgess isn't historical costumer. She makes the costumes for Plymouth plantation where historical recreates live like the pilgrims. You cannot get them out of character. She also gives talks about historically, accurate, women's clothing. She's giving one soon in Rhode Island and gave it to us. She brought several outfits in and started by modeling some of that Victorian underwear tame by today's standards, but scandalously underst- for the era. Yes. Quite so I sent here right now in my base layers, which are Chamisa shapeless cotton thing near my body, and my corset, which I will never show to people. If I was a real true lady in may. So let's describing we're gonna have tons of pictures of here now dot org. You made all of this. I did make everything that I'm wearing I love history and I love selling. And so when I can combine those two things that make historical clothing. That's what really brings me joy. So I did make both the shamisen. And this course that and all the other close we'll talk about today, we have tons of Alvis laid on table here in a in a room at the station where we've sought some privacy as you stand here half naked. But the course it how does it feel? So of course, it does feel a little bit not restrictive, but supportive, so I to real purposes, and there are a lot of myths around course, it so I just want to talk about the two purposes that really are what it's for one is to provide a smooth foundation for the garments that go on top. So the. Fitted garments that go on top won't fit. Right. If I don't have the right foundation, and they won't fit smoothly either. And the other reason is of course, it is boned. This one is actually done with steel. So no whalebone was involved in the making. This course, exactly it would have been in the nineteenth century mine. Does not involve whalebone, but the steals help support the weight of the clothing that goes over them. It helps distributed evenly around my waist. So it makes it more comfortable to wear historical clothing than if I didn't have my course on will. This is what I was alluding to these outfits are so heavy so women needed as you said a foundation sort of an infrastructure to help hold it up, and that brings us to the skating outfit that you made and do you mind like putting it on right now for us? And so you're going to Don it right now. And we'll see what kind of an effort. This is start with this gorgeous under cloth. What is this? This is silk. This is my third Petco if a luxurious petticoat it has eight or nine yards of silk fabric in it has over fifteen yards of Leith in the ruffles. And it feels like a Princess or a Queen. When you're wearing one consider the silk. Luckily, found again, you could sell this for a lot of money, but it's a historical recreation. So you slip that on do you need a dresser myself, actually for this particular garment, and you're tightening the straps around. The course it at your waist, and then I've got my petticoat beautiful. But over that as if that weren't enough this gorgeous cream colored to peace skating outfit. Yes. So this is made of wall trimmed with fo far which was very popular for a skating outfits. And this also has braid all over at little braided motif, which was also popular it came from military influences. And also from colder weather locations around the world like Russia. There's braid decoration on the sleeves, but also the class or this beautiful braid and toggle fasteners that go down the front as well. So you can put the jacket on. Yeah. So the jacket does have these very large puffs lease the eighteen ninety s especially the middle eighteen nineties was known for huge sleep. And the fashionable looking back in nineteen hundred. Yes, the fashionable look for ice skating and other sports was the fashionable silhouette of the day. So we're not really making concessions for the fact that we're doing athletic activities in these clothes. So I very fashionable largely on this outfit. Beautiful. You've also got this month. I love in your blog. You actually went with a club that you belong to upon where y'all at skating, and some little kids came up to you and said, what's that swirly thing? Yes. I have a muff to keep my hands alarm, which is also for matches the fo for on the trim of the ensemble. And it's winding flannel to help me keep my hands. Nice and warm. I also have a hat to finish off the outfit because if I was dressed fashionably in the nineteenth century, I would need to have a hat to finish my outfit. So it is really fun that I've been ice skating in this outfit. I actually had no trouble. Moving around my feet in escaped had no problem. Not getting stuck in all my layers of skirts, but I found that trying to lace my boots up tight while wearing a corset. Was extremely difficult because I couldn't bend over fire for long enough. And let's talk about the time only five years before eighteen ninety Wyoming became the first state to grant women the right to vote in all elections in the state, the women's suffrage movement had been fighting for this for about a half century by then so it was a time of change for women. I mean, that's you can always see change for women reflected in sports, and you see that here you do. This is not the first decade in the century that women started to play sports. But it's the first decade where women started to do more sports silver. Most of the nineteenth century women were pretty sedate anywhere encouraged to do outdoor activities or anything that would really get their heart moving things like croquet developed earlier ice skating became popular earlier like in eighteen forties. Fifties sixties, but by the eighteen nineties, you get a lot of new things that women can do. And so it brings them out of the house and allows them to do more athletic activity change their clothing, which brings us to this beautiful camel colored outfit. This is a cycling off it. Yes. Because basically. Became a huge craze in the eighteen ninety s and really illustrated the freedom that women were developing in terms of some of the things that you just mentioned as well as the freedom to be able to bike to go places. They hadn't been before and to even possibly if they were very daring where bifurcated bottom, so trousers or pants, which is what you have here. So the jacket is is is very fitted beautiful Brown buttons down the front, those big puffy shoulders, again the pants. They're like pantaloons, they're they're split. And they're huge huge each leg is about sixty inches wide. The goal was to make pants wide enough that it didn't really look like you're wearing pants. It's still looked like a skirt wasn't really socially acceptable to just wear basically bloomers around. So a lot of women had other contraptions to hide them. They would wear a skirt like what I'm wearing my ice skating on samba on top until they were actually on the bike. And then they would take it off and put it on again when they were done, we'll because cycling could be dangerous in a long skirt. They've got these pants, but also these what are these called? So these are my Gators these are or bicycling leggings they cover the bottom part of my leg. So the calf I would saw my black stockings on, but these are protect my stockings from where there would also make sure that I wasn't showing. My stockings to the world. So they would keep the mud and dirt off my legs. And also help provide a little bit of modesty having forfeit. Yes. From scratch their cotton. They button down the side. So it takes a little bit of time to get into them wearing your core sex. You have to put them on after you've put on the bloomers got all the trouble. They went through. We've got a couple of their outfits we want to look at. But why did you want to put together the women in sports outfits? I just feel transported when I'm able to wear the clothes and do a certain activity in a place where it would have been done. So being able to play croquet on the Boston common in the clothes that would make sense for historical period is really quite magical, especially when you can sort of imagine that all the modern people around you are gone. Well, let's talk about the croquet outfit a beautiful pale green skirt with some lace on it, full skirt. And a again, a puffy sleeved white blouse and the hat with flowers on it. Just tell us you you, this is what you do your researcher. But was it from pictures? How did you not to do it this way? So I look at historical images of things could have been sold in a certain time to look for inspiration. The blouse is based on an advertisement for blouse from nineteen o four sometimes are fashion plates and other images paintings you can look at when you say fashion plates, you mean, all photographs so there's photographs and fashion plates, actually sort of drawings that would have gone into a fashionable magazine. So the skirt is taken from things like fashion plates in terms of where the trim is located the lace trim, and then the hat is also taken from fashion plates for the silhouette of the hats, all the trim. That's on top of it. Well, we gotta just quickly look at the bathing suits. Oh my goodness. They looked so uncomfortable. One of them. Is this a wall? Yeah. So by the nineteen twenty s bathing suit is nineteen twenty five, and let's describe it. It's a dark green. It's got a little like it's almost like a squirt over shorts. So has built in shorts for a little bit of modesty. It's like a long tank top. Basically, it comes down just below your backside, and it's made of wool jersey, which is what you could have found it. I some suit in eighteen twenty five and you could drown when it gets wet so heavily when they get wet. And this what happening for women? So by the nineteen twenty s we have changed a lot. We're no longer with hemlines with ankles at the knee. We've had World War One. Which changed a lot of worldviews women have gained a lot of rights in the last twenty twenty five years. So the clothing has changed for women were no longer when corsets we've freed up in terms of our undergarments are dresses are much less in terms.

skating croquet Rhode Island Quin Burgess Nathan Chan Chamisa Plymouth plantation Wyoming Alvis Russia Don researcher Boston twenty twenty five years fifteen yards sixty inches five years nine yards
"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:22 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"I hope people watch some Nathan. And but I at the answers added to it did a bunch of new answers. It's kind of crush to point out for anybody who's listening that seem read crush it. And it's definitely might print to the current state of entrepreneurship and management. And I have a feeling it's going to be huge. And I think one of the only reasons it wouldn't be bigger is because I made it really about the Ascari brand by call it the entrepreneurial blueprint to get get more legs. But I felt like I wanted to triple down on the brand right now. So give up sales that way. Either. Funny feeling this book is going to be the book that I get a lot of emails about twenty seventeen of this really put me over the top some ferry. Fuck excited about it will most moves in with the best place. The people can find out about the book purchase. Do you have any landing page linked up? All yet. I'm going to be dropping that very shortly. It's all done is probably gonna be Gary dot com slash Ascari book. But I don't know that to be true. I don't know when people are listening to this. But any my social channels were on Gary be E ON almost all Ben except Facebook, just Gary ability promoting that landing page pretty aggressive to be both by for access to me. So they'll be a lot. I'll be funny feeling. Everybody's listening to this right now is going to be very sick and fucking tired of me by bowl because I'm going to be empty. Dirt. Like, you look, you know, you you an Alex you guys, you guys know your biz Dev like you guys are really good job. I'm really impressed. One question once fun question. And this is something I always find interesting is in a water. What are some of the biggest sacrifices you've had to Mike to get way you out tonight? What if you had to give up in my twenties, I gave up having sex with girls. I mean, I completely pumped it my social life in my twenties and teenage years, I got a lot of emails on Facebook. When I started getting on TV in America, two thousand nine and ten and eleven and a lot of emphasis was just blowing up and a lot of my high school friends emailed me and on Facebook at because we haven't talked ten fifteen years, and they would say things like the opening line was always on my God. I just saw Conan O'Brien or Eleanor CNN. You're so lucky bub-bubba, right? Everyone of the back and say, I'm not lucky you remember high school in college. When he went to the jersey shore and hooked up with chicks and drank beer and had fun and got a tan, I was in a liquor store fifteen hours it working. So I pumped it my social life for a decade in the best decade like watching all these guys right now, we're of quantum quote entrepreneurs in pictures of money and private planes hooking up with Instagram hot chicks, like they're they work as hard as I did. They're not now, look, I'm not judging them fuck. I think they might be right in hindsight. A little fun wouldn't have heard. But. They're not gonna work me. Awesome. Love it or we'll look we'll wrap the Gary. Thank you so much for taking the time. I'm super mindful of your time, and we'll hit overtime now. But yet, look I'm really really excited and happy to connect with you. And he'd help support the bouquet of Cam. Thank you, brother. I really appreciate it. I wish you a ton of success or some. Thank you, could you tell you take care. Bye..

Gary dot Facebook Conan O'Brien Mike Ascari Nathan Instagram bowl Alex America Eleanor CNN ten fifteen years fifteen hours
"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"But I would give up profit to hire more people and spend were ad dollars on building up, Snapchat or Facebook or linked in or medium or other places that you have in concord to this whole master of none king of one thing. Whatever fucking the quotas. That's horseshoe. That's releasing people. You can do both like be great at three things. I am the you can. So you think you should work the old channels, of course, because there's a tension on all of them at attention is the asset. How the fuck did you Bill this your site been the attention from Instagram's execution into this world? World interesting 'cause I've always made told in ways, he like, you know, you should only stick to like one to two channels and just focus on that. If it's working to find those couple of channels and just scale those because that's vice for being see players. Can you may be that you may be you might be that? I don't know right now. I'm impressed. What you've done in the last year or so. And so I'm like fuck it gopher an age. Like, why do you know how long I've been doing this? I've been doing this building my personal brand any business really since. Oh nine I was seven. But then oh nine right. But what it is? Okay. Maybe oh, eight an all seven. Let's go with oh seven when I gave the talk, and it started, you know, so getting into like eight or nine years on Snapchat chat over the weekend. I had hundreds of people that said, hey, just discovered you really cool. Yeah. Wow. That because that's their primary play. You know, what I don't know how you get interaction from your fans on this podcast. But I'd love right now to ask. Question. And then you tell them where they should answer it. So they got him. The most Email, you the unknown. Whatever it is. I would love to know everybody to mention to founder, a Nathan, what are the social networks the platforms, including content Lincoln pulse. Medium. So kind of let's call content and social one of the platforms that have your attention. And if you only pay attention to Facebook, just right Facebook, and if you pay attention to Instagram Snapchat, Facebook in order to which has your attention the most whichever's the app, you open the most most attention attention only put them in order. Let's see what happens. I think you're going to be stunned. Actually, I think I've seen you do they somewhere. I kind of anytime with my audience doing it for you right now because you'll be like holy shit. I didn't realize so many people are reading medium. And now all of sudden you start writing or higher writer to write three pieces a month on medium, and then one goes viral because one of the few places where something go viral and boo like, so, you know, look, I I. I only follow attention. They said, it is the absolute asset that I'm obsessed with I will always be that creature. I will invest in those things I will support those things to my brand knows things and an Instagram in twenty fifteen was the number one place to do shit at you did that. But I do believe that Snapchat is going to be the number one place to do things in twenty seventeen and Tom just getting ahead star. Also, also running down it's a focused now to Fergus I love it. Also, we'll look we have to work towards wrapping out, man. Let's talk about your new book. Thank you comes out Marci super fucking pumped about it. It's called ask. Our you want entrepreneurs point of view on Iran, lock all these things. It's a lot of questions from the show. I've done one hundred seventy or so of them.

Facebook Snapchat Instagram concord Bill Marci Iran Fergus writer founder Nathan Lincoln Tom nine years
"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Ninety seven you need so Bs and CS to why we'll because what happens is organizations are struggled to grow fast enough to feed all business. Here's what happens if you're really grow. Beta media went from three to fourteen to twenty nine to forty six to sixty seven to one hundred million revenue, you know, fast that is if you don't grow that fast. You can't feed all those as and Bs. You're the literally explode because of your business going for one to two to three three to four. And if you're like, a small team of five or seven people, and you're trying to keep most of the money, if you're not able to feed the as and Bs and keep them interested by naturally, challenge wise, they're gonna leave at and you've got to restart and continuity matters people underestimate continuity, you know, I will continuity allows the ADA do the tend to do is go fast continuity allows me to go fast because I'm not worried on retraining. My direct reports in their direct reports got it. Yeah. Got it got to go to. And so I have a bunch of sees it allows me to be the super eight. Plus that I am whenever thought of it like that will of course, they're making. There's a reason I have been successful. There's reason other people have been successful were nominees. I don't think people understand. I give away all my vice for free people. Just don't execute on. It. I go crazy on these Snapchat secrets as you know. Really because you pay attention. All you're doing up for this interview over the last four days, I've been losing my mind to build up, my Snapchat. Right. Yeah. Yeah. I know you'd be Facebook your infects mentioned as I'm fully about it. Because I believe in it, and I've been trying to bring extra value in my content on Snapchat in my stories like my best advice, and I've been putting it out and stuff before but in fuller detail or new stuff, and it's the stuff saying forever using Twitter. Search cold calling for advertising, you know, it's been crazy for people to hit me up on Snapchat and be like holy shit. This works, right? Because for the first time you did it instead of just watch the GOP pumped motivated, and then not do it. They're actually bringing to really good question. Good transition like for like what we're doing with found. One of the best channels right now is Instagram growing that thing. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Growing that from zero to half a million of just just over a year about twelve months, and I'm very mindful to focus on any other channels like because I think it's just it's just good to just hit that channel hod. Like, we'll be in a million by April Newin falls. We generate ridiculous delays like tens, and tens of thousands of late every single month. And like, what are your thoughts on first of all moving in and focusing on all the channels, and that growth what I would do in this scenario, and I've been doing with myself because I was Facebook and Twitter less serious YouTube, an Instagram. I went from thirty thousand two hundred fifty thousand two hundred ten thousand last year myself while running huge agency and not just focusing on. I mean, ideally focused on my grandma share. So I am now mold out Snapchat and number to focus on periscope. And and live streaming. I think the answer to your question is. Both. And let me explain what I mean by that. I I went for dramatic caused by the way for a second there. I think I think that you need to crush Instagram like you've been doing it. Clearly, it's been a major factor for you. It's probably wind doing this interview. So let's call space Spade. That execution has helped you a lot. I do think that at the scale that you're growing in the momentum you have now I don't know how much money you're making your what's going on in your life..

Instagram Snapchat Facebook ADA Twitter GOP YouTube twelve months four days
"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"My close. I mean financially. No, you know, talking about a three billion dollar enterprise that I'll probably have five to eight hundred million dollars liquid some quite short of that. But I feel closer than ever because they read is exploding in starting to become a very valuable asset of my personal brand continues to gain momentum, very important people want my. Advice and attention, and that's an enormously powerful place to be and over time. I can go in for the right hook or the ask. And so you man, I feel great when it comes to venue mania. Good question. I've been really came to ask you around working with gen Y. Hiring managing you can give us some insights around that like because that's something you guys do very, well what you growing really fast in you. You're gonna mazing team. I think that people make too big of a deal about gen Y millennials gen Z mobile generation like they're just people no different than I was you are held or you twenty nine. I don't see if I'm forty. I don't see the difference between me you or twenty two year old that just got out of school. Like, I just understand them, meaning the humans, and they're paying attention to what matters to them. And what matters to them is Dave been smarter than my generation that they will be classroom, TV's and Rolexes. But they need troops to Coachella an experiences, and and giving money to charity than that three. That's cliche, by the way. I've plenty of twenty four year olds in my company. They're acting like forty five year olds I want to save every penny in this the other thing. And so I'm not a big fan of that. Like, meaning I think the reason we're doing well is the twenty two year olds and a twenty seven year olds in the thirty two year olds in the thirty eight year olds and a forty two year olds in my company are all being treated the same which is work organization. That will listen to them if they're willing to talk to me because sometimes they're scared of talking to the boss, but we we listen, and we don't care if they want money, or if they want fame, or they will responsibility, or if they want work life balance, or if they want extremer life balance as long as they are able to articulate and are able to bring value in exchange for what I give them and as long as I can find a way to make it fifty one forty nine in their favor, which triggers me having the leverage because I'm making good for them. Then we're building something special. And so I think it's more human. That it is generations aspects such just carrying on Hugh on a human to human basis. It's more again Gill. It's more. You know Shelby. It's more Nick deal. It's more Dirac. It's more curing. It's more Tina Garcia than it is gen Y jen's e. Gotcha. Got it. And that's and that's a really important thing. And that's something a lot of people that are listening. Now, I'm gonna make the assumption. A lot of people listen now are not managing a six hundred person firm. You know, the probably managing a one person firm themselves or to three ten fifteen twenty and start building your company's librarians. Please remember that Lee asset you have is those people, and if you're able to provide them more value than they provide you you'll win and the problem. So many of you make is you want them to provide you more value than you provide them. I heard you say something really interesting around. How do you? How do you hire like tens? And you said you could never find tens ten's work for themselves. Yeah. I mean, tents real guys real is not you drank a bunch of beers. And you think she's a ten. Like, a real ten a real ten is going to work for themselves. And so if you're lucky, and I've got a couple if you can get some nine nine point seven, and by the way, we're talking about tens as entrepreneurs that owned thinks I have twenties as operators. They just don't have the stomach for the wrist or they don't wanna put it in the twenty two hours a day or they see how I roll them like fucking. I'll I'll make a lot less, but I'll be a lot happier. Looking black bags under his eyes? You know? And so I think that if you're lucky enough that nine point seven nine point nine point one eight hundred seventy point four Zinni pointers and big companies..

Coachella Tina Garcia Dave Gill Shelby Hugh Nick Lee twenty two year eight hundred million dollars three billion dollar thirty eight year twenty seven year twenty four year twenty two hours forty five year thirty two year forty two year
"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"How close are you like give us an update of had Gary v like do you sit goals deplane at you two thousand sixteen like heady structural that? I don't have yearly goals. I do think about little things like I need to network more be. I mean, the ability for me to like, I do believe that people and relationships are the game. And so I always push myself to do a little bit more of the big boy stuff versus the kind of micromanaging operational stuff that I love to do as well. I sometimes randomly come up with a goal two years ago cared about my health of definitely thinking about how to go home in the middle of the day and give my kids a bath. Or see them more often during the week batch there smoke there, but I don't use January first as the proxy, I'm constantly self about waiting in real time in parallel doing my norm. So I'm it can happen any day. It doesn't that? Just my health happened in July. Right. It doesn't happen. It doesn't happen. Because it's Jan one. And it's time to valuate I do about weight because usually I'll take the last two weeks of December often. So I'll normally have time to reflect and time to myself. And so that happens naturally around this time of year. But you know, my goal is, you know, what's funny out a break it down a little bit more arranger here. My goal isn't necessarily to buy the New York Jets. My goal is to continue to pursued the buying the jets, and that's a little bit different. I just love the game. And I am as pure bred entrepreneurs you'll ever find unplanned -ly obsessed with the game of business and trying to win and competing and.

New York Jets Gary two weeks two years
"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:24 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Do you think you can deal with that? And it's gotten worse. Not better as I get older. I get more voted hungrier so Khansa communication with her. But she enables it that's for sure to my kids were young there. Now six three especially after this weekend this week excuse me, these two weeks getting more and more interest. I want to spend more time with them. And the real answer is I just go with what feels right in my gut at that moment. There's no wall. I don't care what anybody else thinks about my work life balance for my my the way I spend time with my wife or kids. We know what the truth is another thing about the daily v that I'm starting to do as I know, it's important and Snapchat. I know it's important for me to show other aspects of 'cause I only show the hustling. I don't show that I've been off the grid for two weeks. I don't show that in the middle of the week. I'll go and run to my daughter's recital because I keep my family private, probably, you know, this because you follow this face. I don't have pictures of my family or use like family in my social media at all and far less than most people doing trust me. You know, I get why people think that I'm super extreme. Because I don't story tell the alternative times at all. So I'm trying to, you know, ineptitude daily be even though it didn't show where the very private. I had Dirac films me all day. We went to the school where I went to the recital just show like it's part of my life. But really, it's gut call and I've passed on some of the biggest meetings in my life. Some of the most famous ridges was powerful people because there was a recital, or I promise my wife dinner, or whatever it was and other times I've passed on what has seemed as maybe a seventy five to ninety percent porn family thing for a ninety one percent business thing. So I I just try, and I just know where my heart is. And I also like this long, and I know awesome quality over quantity. A lot of my friends that judge me sit at home and play XBox look at their phone all day in arkan- racking with their kids anyway. So you know, it's it's just that. And when it comes to your hustle, man. Like, do you ever get burnt out? You know, maybe once or twice a year. I'll say like fuck this. You know? But very infrequently. I know why I'm doing it. Meaning it's my destiny I enjoy it. I made my bed. I don't believe in complaining. A hey complaining. God do I hate complaining. And so I try not to complain a lot myself. I definitely don't complain about things that I've created. You'll never hear me complain that I wish I had more time with my family, right? Like woe is me. I wish would kids right now. So go be with your kids. You know, like like I hate when people complain about stuff where they made their decisions. I made my bed. I'm sleeping in it. I can change my bed. I have that power. And I just roll so. Yeah. Once in a while, they'll be tough, you know, seventy four consecutive bad things in a row chipped away. The getting me, right. You know, something like that. But for the most part, I'm very happy. I'm very aware that I have very little to complain about in the context of the world. And I try to keep it that way. It's good that you are human. Oh, I'm super human. The all tell you. I'm way more robot than the north. Listen. I'm curious menu. Goes like, what do you go to two thousand sixteen you're still buying the jets?.

Dirac jets two weeks ninety one percent ninety percent
"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Motivational entrepreneurship over the next twenty thirty years, and I don't wanna do it. Because I think there's some stigma along with just being a pundit and a motivator. And so I I four five I five years ago. Started running bainer media my agency a- now built it up to one hundred million dollar runway business out of meeting the into the anger of well, the reason people should listen to me because I actually go. His not because I'm charismatic or had done at once twenty years ago. And so I struggle with the friction of back and forth of trying to figure out where I sit on that. But I think that it came to me out of some storytelling talents and just global adversity from the beginning. I never knew a world where I could work for somebody else that was never my cards, even when my dad didn't own the this was the manager eventually bought it even a young age. I was slinging stuff blow pops. You know, baseball cards lemonade stands washing cars. I I think I over indexed tune extreme it just never even in my consideration set to get a safe job. You know, also when you talk about family, I don't know if you still have Twitter, but used to say, a family family, I love the hustle. I'm curious here when you when you have to choose between like work, really important like days. Live meetings, or what not how do you maintain that balance men and had he had he gave you MRs and family happy her over. You've got you've got a completely pegged. I so the end of the answer to you laugh at because, you know, it's a big thing is like because I look up to you like, how do you work with you know? Yep. I think first of all I mean, a really good decision early on with the MRs over-communicated to my wife from the first state and told her this is who I am. And I want to over communicate then I'm a hostile, and I'm an entrepreneur, and I want to buy the New York Jets, and you need to really, you know, you need to do you and realize you're only twenty three this was her time..

New York Jets Twitter one hundred million dollar twenty thirty years once twenty years five years
"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"I think of them just as equally as big deal as being beyond site or LeBron. It's just it's talent. And I don't wanna squander it. I know that I'm not average. I know that I got the gifts. I I suck it a lot of things I want everybody know that there's a lot of things I stink at. But I was given the gifts that allow for success. And I think the added aspect is the hard work. I like it. I like that. I took two flights last night from buffalo where my heart was broken by my New York Jets football team and they lost to make the playoffs. But I took two flights. I landed in L A to clock in the morning LA time. I like that everybody who I was with on the trip that was crazy. But I had a quick one hour meeting in LA, I could of blew it off. I'm in LA this Thursday. But I felt that I could do it. And it was. Within now, boom and biggest for CS. And I'm on this guy and got seven other meetings coming up the rest of the day the day before the event, just inmates ingrained, my hustle is. It's better than everybody else's. So I have to bet on it. I bet on my strengths. I feel that I cannot work everybody. And then that's just where it comes from. I guess. You know? What's funny? It's practical. It's the thing that I recognize that I'm better at and I've tripled down on it. Okay. I see because because you know, this is it's really interesting because this is something that I talked with twenty Romans about because I understand this hustle. And it's something that that other people want, but how do you get it like, and he said to me that you have to go through some sort of adversity. And that's what happened to me. Like, I was working in a shitty job. And I just had enough. And I just that's it. I'm going to do mind thing. Like, did you experience some sort of adversity that that change things for you? Or have you always been I like a little kid like my adversity was early on because I was shit student, and I was an immigrant and every regret it was a good student. But I that I was a businessman. My self awareness was off the charts early on at twelve thirteen. I was like on a businessman, and I would stay up to. As long my parents, let me back in sixth and seventh grade working on my baseball card business. It just always been there. I do believe adversity is the key. I think my adversity to be honest with you make was more global than yours. Meaning you let me phrase let me take a step back. There's plenty of people that have more diversity me. Mine was just from the beginning. Right. I didn't speak the language in the country that I lived in. I was short. I was a bad student like my six year old to eighteen year old nothing on paper said that I was going to dominate other than what my mom was telling me, and what I felt like in my head was telling me and the early successes of working my dad's store at sixteen seventeen eighteen that's when I hung my head on so. Yeah, I think Tony's right. And I think you're right. But I also think that motivation matters for a lot of people I'm for that. You got that up, but you were consuming in podcast or video form or from friends. Like, hey, there's an alternative pay those alternative one of the things that I. Duggal with is this is where we can get a little bit deep. I've kinda was away for two weeks on vacation of just hitting the road today. Back at lot family type matters to you when I can get Holloway holidays time. And this is my first interview office something that I think I walked walking on the beach back and forth. Which is I have a major struggle. I don't want Tony and Oprah. And all these things that I can be an I've been naturally gifted. I do believe that I could be one of four or two or one most important voices for.

LA Tony LeBron New York Jets I. Duggal Holloway eighteen year two weeks one hour six year
"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"nathan chan" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Me. In this episode, Gary talks to Nathan Chan of founder about how he manages his time between work and family. Whether he sets goals for himself and managing the expectations of employees at Vander media. I'm going to ask you the same question. Ask every single one of the guests that come on Schaar head you get your job. Well, my job came to me. You know depends on how how you define my job. My current job is predicated on my prior career, but my first job ever was working for my dad's liquor stores a stock boy. And so I I the fortunate aspect of being in a family business. I really think the true answer to your question as most people know me that listen to this or as most people discover me from this and get to know me, the answer's probably by starting a wine show on YouTube within the first year that you two came out called wine library TV which brought me into the web two point. Oh world and brought me exposure and started the journey of of having awareness with people about my thoughts and things that I did that really created the infrastructure for the content. I put out to the world when I I've been running founder for about two and a half years. And I remember watching these video never heard of you in the first video I ever watched was with that. I saw with you. Said something that was really striking to me as you looked at the cavern. You said the reason I am speaking to you. And you're looking at the camera saying the reason I am speaking to us because I've worked hot oven year. And you've just got these these ridiculous mentality around hustle and dry and really want to tap into that and find like where did that come from man? I think so thank you. And I I pulled that move once or twice on camera. So and it's a good one right because it strikes so deep it. I'll tell you why Nathan you doing what you do. You come across a lot of experts. Do rose thought leaders you probably at this point. I'm giving you a compliment I could be wrong. But I'm asking you. I'm sure at some level, you feel pretty good about your radar of who's completely full of shit. Who's got some level of CIA ABS and who's got more jobs. Right. I wouldn't assume that's something you probably pride yourself in. Yeah. Yeah. For sure. And the reason I asked that and we don't know each other that well, so the reason I actually just said that was not to give myself a Pat on the back and say, oh, and then you think I do it's actually because you clearly resonated with a very raw honest moment in me giving an interview which is what that moment is which is that's just the truth. Right. Like like, I'm probably equally talented to a lot of people out there. I think I have a lot of talent. But I think a lot of people do what I am completely convinced about and it's really why have started this new daily be kind of log on YouTube is I just don't think people cannot work me. I you know, when you're working fifteen and sixteen hours a day every day, and you're working every minute. There's no downtime. I mean, I literally just checked into a hotel room, you know, this because you just got a text from ISIS in analysis saying I might be fifteen minutes late because I was literally just landed. I literally ran to the to the hotel room. I'm sitting in it right now got the wifi. So this would be high quality enough, you know, sound. So you know, every minute is accounted for where it came from. It came from being an immigrant. You know, my family came to this country with nothing it came from watching my mom and dad worked their faces off my mom three kids. No extra help, you know, laundry cooking cleaning up after myself. My dad never round ever working always DNA. I think I have it in me. And then probably the things that are a little more. Interesting for everybody who's listening, which is makes it a little bit of gratitude and guilt. I know that I've been gifted with communication skills. I know that I've been gifted in ability to make money, I don't take them for granted..

Nathan Chan YouTube founder Schaar Vander media Gary CIA fifteen minutes sixteen hours