Audioburst Search

19 Burst results for "Nate Wilcox"

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

03:27 min | 6 d ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Pantheon

"Let it roll host Nate Wilcox, and I have the distinct pleasure of welcoming back Ed Ward the author of the history of rock and roll volume, two, nine, hundred, sixty, four to nineteen, seventy, seven, the Beatles the stones and the rise of classic rock today we're going to be discussing Chapter Seven Long Live Rock, which opens with discussion about the Big Beatles versus the stones debates. Tell us about that. Well! I eventually figured out was the Beatles versus stones. Thing was the same as the. Commercial versus Authentic argument in other words is mostly not. Not An argument I mean these things have always coexisted and Continue to do so the thing is that the difference was the Beatles. Increasingly became a band that could only function in studio rather time of revolver. They got to the point where they couldn't blessed of live so they. Just made records and didn't tour whereas stones. Were more authentic Kinda guys, and they played. Music could be reduced live and continue to do so. And also, if like, if you listen to say the stones got live. If you wanted album on, attract like under my thumb, which Miranda's and multiple layers of acoustic guitars in extra base, then just covered it like there were a high school garage band and just didn't deal with any of that crap. They were not paralyzed by Ino Oh my. We've got to have that extra keyboard partner anything. They're just like we're. We're a garage rock band where to go and blow it up, so yeah I mean, and this is why, because his sons were copy Abo-. Other bands why there was this divide. And they also were playing. Three court. Songs didn't have all those fancy. Beatles cords that gotTa Glen. Matlock fired from the sex pistols later on, but. It's also. There's a class divide here I mean the Beatles are are working. Class astounds or middle class, but as performers that kind of flip flopped and the Beatles had more of an upper class upper middle class audience in the stands, one more abandoned people. Well, it's the the real divide is between. And Rock. POB has always existed, and you can't make the Chart Celeste. You're popular and and there's A. Concession. Of manufactured music. which went became. And not anything wrong with that, but it's a different thing. And edged. The sons are easy to. was. On worried. Your band and try to play live. There's always been this kind of snobbery against properties. Because it isn't something that's easily done. And so therefore the author. Guys, you know the the Rock, guys. They're just thing it. Whereas you know if you're playing rock music and. It's not the thing that. People WanNa hear again. It's not popular music..

Big Beatles Beatles Nate Wilcox Ed Ward Miranda Chart Celeste Matlock partner Ta Glen
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:28 min | 6 d ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Of the, let it roll host, Nate Wilcox and I have the distinct pleasure of welcoming back Ed Ward the author of the history of rock and roll volume, two, nine, hundred, sixty, four to nineteen, seventy, seven, the Beatles, the stones and the rise of classic rock today. We're going to be discussing Chapter Seven long-lived which opens with discussion about the Big Beatles versus the stones debates. Tell us about that. Well. I eventually figured out was the Beatles versus stones. Thing was the same as the. Commercial versus Authentic argument in other words is mostly not. Not An argument I mean these things have always coexisted and Continue to do so. The thing is that the difference was the Beatles increasingly became a band that could only function in studio rather time of revolver. They got to the point where they couldn't blessed of live so they. Just made records and didn't tour whereas stones. Were more authentic Kinda guys and they played. Music could be reduced live and continue to do so. And also if like, if you listen to say the stones got live. If you wanted album on, attract like under my thumb, which Miranda's and multiple layers of acoustic guitars in extra fuzz Bass, then just covered it like there were a high school garage band, and just didn't deal with any of that crap. They were not paralyzed by Ino Oh my. We've got to have that extra keyboard partner anything. They're just like we're. We're a garage rock band where to go and blow it up, so yeah I mean, and this is why, because his sons were copy Abo-. Other bands why there was this divide? And they also were playing. Three court. Songs didn't have all those fancy. Beatles cords that gotTa Glen Matlock fired from the sex pistols later on, but. It's also. There's a class divide here I mean the Beatles are are working. Class astounds or middle class, but as performers that kind of flip flopped, and the Beatles had more of an upper class upper middle class audience in the stands, one more abandoned people. Well, it's the the real divide is between. And Rock. POB has always existed, and you can't make the Chart Celeste you're popular, and and there's A. Concession. Of manufactured music. which went became. And not anything wrong with that, but it's a different thing. and. Edged? The sons are easy to. Was, I'm worried. Your band and try to play live. There's always been this kind of snobbery against properties. Because, it isn't something that's easily done. And, so therefore the author. Guys. You know the the rock guys. This thing it. Whereas you know if you're playing rock music and. It's not the thing that. People WanNa hear again. It's not popular music..

Beatles Big Beatles Nate Wilcox Ed Ward Glen Matlock Miranda partner
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

03:08 min | 3 weeks ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Today Ed Borden Nate Talk About one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, eight, the year of riots and revolution, the Year of newcomers like led Zeppelin and sly in the family stone and the band who led a musical counter revolution. Pop in those ear buds and enjoy. Let it roll on your host Nate Wilcox once again. We have on joined by Ed Ward to continue our series on his book. The history of rock and roll volume two, nineteen, sixty, four to nineteen, seventy, seven, actually nineteen, seventy, five, the bills, the stones, and the rise of classic rock today. We'll be talking about. Schefter four, two titled. It's nineteen sixty nine okay now. Why did you call us when science sixty nine? Okay, because it actually covers basically nineteen sixty eight. Well, I think mostly had had to do with the fact that. The big change that was happening. or A. Big Change that was in the worst was releasing students album, and was kind of similar location of what became a very complex music. The stages were prophetic and you didn't plug yourself, but you're of a few critics at the time in pages of rolling stone to give them a positive review. Yeah and I've been pilloried for it ever since by Brits. who think that rolling stone didn't like the record, however, Mr Oster. Has said to me. You got it so I'm happy. Somebody understands. The one thing that's interesting that you pointed out in this chapter is that the major labels were really struggling with how to adapt to the new rock era. They knew the baby boom was huge. They knew whether bread was buttered, but frankly had no idea what to sell to the kids, or what bands to pick and some labels like electric, which signed the stooges brought in what they call the house. Hippie and the case of electric Danny Fields signed the stooges, MC, five and others. How does some of the other labels try to deal with this situation? Well, they basically tried to figure out. What was selling even in small quantities in SI, they couldn't amplifies. and they did also have house hippies I I know. Jim For ad was in history and trying to think who else will extend Van Dyke Parks. was. Doing Warner Brothers selections. And you mentioned the anecdote about van. Dyke parks where they actually took out an ad about his song cycle. I guess bragging humble bragging how we lost thirty, five, thousand, five hundred nine dollars and fifty cents on quote, the album of the year damage. What was going.

Nate Wilcox Mr Oster Ed Borden Schefter Ed Ward Van Dyke Parks. Zeppelin Danny Fields Jim
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

03:07 min | 3 weeks ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Pantheon

"Ed Borden Nate talk about one thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, eight, the year of riots and revolution, the Year of newcomers like led Zeppelin and sly in the family stone and the band who led a musical counter revolution. Pop in those ear buds and enjoy. Let it. Roll on your host Nate Wilcox once again. We have on joined by Ed Ward to continue our series on his book, The history of Rock and roll volume, two, nineteen, sixty, four to nineteen, seventy, seven, actually nineteen, seventy, five, the bills, the stones and the rise of classic rock today we'll be talking about. Schefter four, two titled It's Nineteen Sixty Nine okay now. Why did you call us when science sixty nine? Okay, because it actually covers basically nineteen sixty eight. Well I think mostly had had to do with the fact that. The big change that was happening or A. Big Change that was in the worst was releasing students album, and was kind of similar location of what became a very complex music. The stages were prophetic, and you didn't plug yourself, but you're on a few critics at the time in pages of rolling stone to give them a positive review. Yeah and I've been pilloried for it ever since by Brits. who think that rolling stone didn't like the record however, Mr Oster. Has said to me. You got it so I'm happy somebody understands. The one thing that's interesting that you pointed out in this chapter is that the major labels were really struggling with how to adapt to the new rock era. They knew the baby boom was huge. They knew whether bread was buttered, but frankly had no idea what to sell to the kids, or what bands to pick and some labels like electric, which signed the stooges brought in what they call the House Hippie and the case of Electric Danny. Fields signed the stooges MC five and others. How does some of the other labels try to deal with this situation? Well they basically tried to figure out. What was selling even in small quantities in Si they they couldn't amplifies. and they did also have house hippies I. I, know! Jim For ad was in history and trying to think who else will to Zuni stent Van Dyke Parks. Was! Doing Warner Brothers selections. and. You mentioned the anecdote about van. Dyke parks where they actually took out an ad about his song cycle. I guess bragging humble bragging how we lost thirty, five, thousand, five hundred nine dollars and fifty cents on quote the album of the year. Dammit, what was going.

Mr Oster Ed Borden Nate Zuni stent Van Dyke Parks Nate Wilcox Ed Ward Zeppelin Warner Brothers Schefter Fields Jim
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

06:33 min | Last month

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Some role I'm your host. Nate Wilcox I'm joined again by Ed Ward for the third of our AAC conversations about his book, the history of Rock and roll volume, two, nineteen, sixty, four, nine, hundred, seventy, seven, the Beatles, the stones, and the rise of classic rock and welcome back. Thank, you could be here. Yes, it's good to have you and this is a fun one. This is chapter three. Call it. This is the love crowd right and we'll get to that quote before the end, but there's another image in the chapter I want to start with, and that's the rat entering the snake. Tell us what you meant by that. After World War, two there was A. A large increase in the amount of birth. In the United States and There were a lot more. Babies born. The babies of course mostly grew up. And so. Their presence in the demographic. was significant in terms of the entertainment they were after they were after rock and roll and. They were present in. Large enough numbers that they were able to. Enforce that that desire for a particular kind of music and. That meant that that particular music was selling better than other forms. And then The image is of A. Snake, swallowing rat and the bulge. Appearing in the snake's body as a red moose down towards the digestive process. And fittingly for nineteen sixty seven. It's close to the head of the snake. So there's a lot of of head, manipulation and mind. Expansion gone onto this period, but record company executives. They see this coming up. They don't quite know what to do with it. Absolutely the The great thing about record industries, it was never. Able to? Understand what it was doing, and because of that a lot of good stuff, snuck in. Under the wire and surprises, the powers of be by selling. But at the same time, a lot of stuff that was sort of powers that be approved was selling at the same time. You had herb Alpert. What you call his new brand of middle of the road. Are you had the association? The pop machinery was in gear, and sometimes it was clicking. Oh Yeah. It was important that the business as a whole. was. was making money and able to continue to spend money on new talent. But even though the records are selling, and you know a lot of the machinery is is oiled up and clicking am radio is really starting to struggle with these new songs and new lyrics. Well. The problem is a lot of. It was really long you had you know. Dylan, did like a rolling stone, which was the longest single ever? Released and then along the doors light, my fire, which was like eight minutes long, and the thing is that both of those performances? The fans wanted to hear the the entirety of of the performance The doors record didn't sound right. Cut into three minute excerpt. And then for some arteries like the rolling stones their lyrics they had to switch to. Decide of major single at the beginning of the year. Old They. The. The songs were. Definitely changing and and the kind of lyrics if people were writing. were. More Frank and were abstract which I guess. The two. Trends at this point and that's what the consumers one. And, so you know you'd have something like the rolling stones having to go on Ed. Sullivan and change let's spend the night together to. Let's spend some time together. Even though Mick Jagger's rolling in his eyes, he still makes a change. And they flipped the record so instead of that being a single in America, it's it's you know the Brian Jones recorder showpiece Ruby, Tuesday which is A. Very Mellow Song, but still with lots of messages I feel a certain amount of sympathy for the AM radio programmer that time, because even something like the associations along comes. Mary is chock full of drug references. Right, it's true I mean it almost became a game of hide and seek listening to the radio and trying to figure out. Who was turning on? And even somebody like Paul Revere and the raiders. Doing kicks. You know Brill building teen anthem all the way climbing to be an anti-drug song whatsoever just even talking about drugs. Set off the sensor so. You know is just a crazy time and and. AM's difficulty in processing the Rock Revolution Creates Opportunity for FM radio. That was part of the part of the impulse. Serve the other part. Was that a lot? STATIONS MAINTAINED FM part of the spectrum. And They didn't really use it or else. They used his duplicate. Their am broadcasting, but. During the One thousand nine hundred fifties, the possibility of of Broadcasting Stereo multiplex. Came along and also the nature of the. A signal of FM. made it more high finale, so you got better fidelity and the possibility broadcasting in Stereo. Tempting and then the FCC. Screwed everything up by skilled me by saying that. If you owned and FM. Analog to your your spectrum,.

raiders Mick Jagger Nate Wilcox herb Alpert Ed Ward Beatles United States FCC Paul Revere Mary Dylan Brian Jones Brill Sullivan Frank America programmer
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

10:46 min | Last month

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Sixty five pop in those ear buds and enjoy. Let it roll. I'm your host Nate Wilcox and once again the Prodigal Son has returned Ed Ward the original Co host and the show is back with the history of rock and roll volume two nineteen sixty four to nineteen seventy three purposes although the titles nineteen seventy seven and welcome back. Thank you very much. It's good to be here good and so do you want explain the nineteen seventy seven thing up front or dive right in I. This will be corrected in two years when they do the paperback I couldn't convince the editor to change. That title really do this. Goes to essentially the last waltz which I believe is nine hundred. Seventy four The end of the band but earlier in the book I have talked about the Elvis. Nineteen sixty eight comeback special. His just Christmas TV show which was an unprecedented thing in popular music. Never before undefeated star come roaring back and become hugely popular once again and I ended that chapter by saying who would have guessed working how young and vital he loved. They will be dead before ten years he was up. I realize writing on you know you drop that there. You've got to pick it up so I wrote a chapter about Elvis's death in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven as an addendum and I marked as such. But the editor didn't seem to understand. There was a whole lot more between where the main narrative left off. And there's one little ending. It's nice to put it there because it is the end of Elvis. The end of an era and very definitely seals often a little rock and roll history. But unfortunately I haven't yet been slammed by the type of critic likes to do that sort of thing but Yeah what's the big deal? But I wanted to give you a chance to clarify that and I think the band actually the last concert. The last Waltz concert was November. Nineteen seventy six so he can make a case that it goes up to seventy seven and and you know one of the things to do when I read. This is as wait for you to miss something and Every time I think I've got yet. There's a paragraph mentioning Queen or You know I thought I had John on upbringing up land of the rising Sun House of the rising some of the animals in this first chapter. We're going to discuss today. And it's there. I found it so you know you're a slippery one ED. You're a slippery one. So let's start with the purpose of the book. An introduction said at the purpose of the book is to show how movements arise how they interact with their intended audiences and how they die. What does that mean? Well it means that rock and roll having become the The pretty much default way of expressing popular music it then tribalize. You know there were there. Were people will begin with there. Were Beatles people stone people and none of those people but now as it goes into the sixties and seventies there are Jonah's within Roger all that they're here it's our Come out of scenes you know there. There's this New York scene. There's a there. Well that's getting a Henry said the Austin scene and there was a California seeing definitely And there was a scene up enough in the Pacific northwest and these all had their distinctive modes of clothing speaking words and In some of them there were also would beyond music. There were painters and writers and artists of various sorts. That We're all working alongside of the musicians. They might meet when the musicians played. Were in a club that the musicians were favored in. But it was a much larger thing. And just you know a bunch of guys with cars and the open you start the title of Chapter Your Sons and daughters are beyond your command of a Bob Dylan quote from his time the The Times. They are changing in which you discussed the chapter. Why did you pick that quote for this chapter? Probably just been to see Bill Courage in performing bills has a remarkable words that song it is said that shows that it's completely contemporary but the The another reason is the song is taking notice something pretty much after it's happened Teenagers are now their own society. Even if they're living their parents still they are moving away from being obedient will kids This was heightened by rock and roll. The there were kids who listen to admittedly were older than they are making music. That said you know the old rules don't apply and now they're about to start hearing music made by people increasingly close to their own age starting with the Beatles you you start chapter with the date. December twenty six nineteen sixty three. What happened on that day the date of the DJ place? I WanNa hold your hand was in the. Wc Am okay. That was interesting. There was a disc jockey in Washington. Dc who had a friend who was a flight attendant British Overseas Airways Corporation Est. Those days and she came into. Washington with a copy of the Beatles. Single I WANNA hold your head and gave it to this guy said you know you might want to play on your on your radio show and he did and it basically ignited Beatle Mania the folks capitol records who had been not real crazy. `Bout putting out a record by four guitar wielding guys from Women Pool but maybe this will work and of course fans meant what was that explosion was on and and the because capital turned down the single the previous singles to American small labels swan had gotten the rights to she loves you and had not been able to to make it hit and vj had put out Please please me and then passed on. She loves you. And so as soon as as the hits. Vj capital goes to the record presses. You mentioned that. Rca They actually had to borrow as pressing plants to print up enough copies. I want to hold your hand at print up a million copies of the thing and two hundred those were far out to RCA but VJ swan immediately get back in the act and release their Beatles licensed tracks and it's a flying so yeah All of a sudden you're more records than you could keep track of. There's also a label. Called Tali had a Beatles reggae river stock my head what it was but I guess it'd be love me do. Vj had to Musso fancy misspelled the word Word Beatles on the first pressings of their their bills record and also it played a heavy part in putting them out of business. Veteran lose and the soul label So so many records that they went out of business which is seems to be paradoxical until you understand the way credit works for individuals. Yeah they get an Hawk for all the records that they print Can't collect from distributors time to pay their bills and if they don't have another Beatles album coming the distributors don't feel any inclination to pay so it's A. It's a story. We discuss the first part of rock history. Something that's GonNa continue to happen to smaller labels Throughout the rest of the twentieth century but the Beatles just explode and I think that your point about this depth of catalog suddenly becoming available was a big factor. And just how big they got because it wasn't a matter of. Here's one enormous hit single with no catalogue behind it suddenly. There's an enormous hit single and there's another enormous hit single and a third one and there's a whole album of beal stuff and if you will the diggers to albums of beadle stuff and so kids kids were just flooded with Beatles product and it was all gray and they were all buying There there was a record store reported to billboard about how little kids would come into the store ads for Beatles record and not even look at anything else payments meals record and leave. That was all they were interested in but it did have some spillover effects. And you know that same Ed Sullivan. The day debuted on time for me to play our first song. Which is the very first Beatles. Song played on American national television. This is the Beatles doing all my loving on the Ed Sullivan. Show nineteen sixty four.

Beatles editor The Times Ed Sullivan Ed Ward Washington Nate Wilcox Vj capital Elvis Sun House British Overseas Airways Corpo New York Bob Dylan Jonah Vj Bill Courage John
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:43 min | Last month

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Nate kicks off our eighth season with special guest scholar and musician jury Campbell to review the key lessons. We learned from mates discussions with Edward about his first volume of rock and roll. History wards approach of following the audience and looking at the broader cultural. History of the music has informed every podcast in this series and made in Yuri Review. The key elements of words approach pop in those ear buds and enjoy strong role. I'm your host Nate Wilcox a special episode kind of Meta episode of let it roll it you will. I'm joined by my friend a Campbell. Phd In American history and musician and longtime very knowledgeable music fan and I have forced him to re listen to all of my episode interviews with Ed Ward and we both read Edwards History of rock and roll volume one. And so this is kind of a recap and an attempt to digest what we learned from my twelve hours of conversations with Edward or shit. It's more like sixteen hours of conversations with Edward about this book. So welcome Yuri a my pleasure and so what did we learn from this endless sixteen hours of podcasting? Well you know. There's a lot of A lot of information In in the book and then that information in the book is blown up in these conversations that you had with Ed In know the book is kind of A. It's a time line right. It kind of goes in chronological order. Yeah it spills out you know these characters and their artistic output and the businesses that they started to forward you know the the Mas Ation of this artistic output etcetera and so there's a lot of specific information that you can learn from these books about the people who created you know these various musical genres leading up to and including rock and roll. But I you know you mentioned that I have a PhD. I'm kind of you know academically oriented person and I tend to look at these kinds of things through a sort of a framework or structure like try to like get high above it so I can kind of look down on what's going on and then filter my my view of it or filter my reading ever three successively might closer levels all the way down to the to the granular. And so when I think about I learned from this I think of it in terms of you know starting with the fact that you know people are social and that the cultural output that people create happens you know under the umbrella of sort of overall social structure that also includes politics and includes economics Each of those human endeavors. Let's say has grown qualities politics. There's about managing power. Those types of things You have culture which is kind of how we do things how we produce items for each other. The economic is how we managed the value of work for each other and those kind of things. And so when I? I think it's worthwhile just making three mention of that. To kind of put rock and roll and these business endeavors and the technological advances etcetera in that sort of a framework and note that it's kind of tucked away over here in this in in the cultural production section of Human Endeavor in cultural production. You know section the history of of America but it does have ended up having some economic connections. Obviously you have some political stuff that ended up being thrown in there with the Paola thing. Class was a big element of this that the as part of preparing for this I went back and listen to all the episodes with ad which was probably much more painful for me to hear my voice that much then I hope it was for anybody else but the Ala backlash is something that I think is becoming a theme of the of the series the Paola scandal. And you know if you look at the actuarial tables of the first wave of rock and rollers. Their dismal lot of the deaths were accidental. Obviously but you know this jail sentences. There's religious conversions being elvis being pressed into the army. And when you look at other episodes we've done about people like the weavers and and you know look moby grape for example. This element of the authorities cracking down on new music is is a recurring theme so Sorry to interrupt. I wanted to bring that up. Sure sure and and you know when when you start to consider rock and roll within the framework of these these social and cultural and political lines and economic you know activities. It helps us to be able to start to identify you know Themes and patterns. You can use to think about other you know forms of cultural lot years of of American experience CETERA history. It's like change over time. You know so you need to kind of a framework to look at changing times. Yeah and and get an opportunity to talk to add at length about this was such an honor because the dude has lived it from the early fifties as a child all the way through you know as a rock critic and writer and historian from the seventies on a fan in the sixties as much firsthand knowledge plus all his research decades on the air with NPR. And so it's the kind of thing where you're reading a book any generalized history. Like this is going to have mistakes. I I think in the original Disney called A. C. A. P. Carter. Ac Carter and you know. I saw some country. Music Francis flip out about but like that's not the fucking point you know with this thing is that he's woven this incredibly complicated history into a pretty concise volume and manage to stay on point and be readable. You know I sort of had this fantasy going in that I would challenge him on these things. I I kind of learned the hard way you now. If you challenge that be prepared to get slapped down a united sound like the basic like. I think the goal was to sort of answer. The question. How did rock and roll happen. Which I didn't even really comprehend was a answerable question when I started this. I was just like Oh history rockin all talk to Edward. This'll be fine and I'd been into increasingly into early R. and B. in particular I I've been pretty literate on country I've been pretty literate on rock and roll history but that early rb stuff. I really had gotten into as a byproduct of like Mark Lawrenson Beatles Massive Beatles biography and realizing the key thing for me going into this was realizing that the Beatles had one version of rock and roll history that's much more aligned with what Elvis understood to be rock and roll history as far as we know were already Charles and in the rolling stones at everybody after the rolling stones has a different view of rock and history. And so you know like I think when people right Rachael history now. They tend to start with the blues. And then jump to Elvis and you know maybe add in some country but that's really not a very linear progression. Is that a fair statement. Yeah I mean you know. I think the book makes it clear that that is the reach of rock and roll. Go back into a number of different musical genres and suggest that It's not easy to separate rock and roll from just popular music as it is arose during the you know the inception of what ends up being the music industry so You know when you said I. I'm not exactly sure what you mean by the difference between the Beatles and Elvis and the rolling stones and the rolling stones are typically considered to be the sort of blues your for lack of a better term the blacker like the the Beatles. Yeah I mean what I mean is like the Beatles literally didn't give a shit about electric blues like as far as it's known John Lennon hadn't heard Jimmy Reeves for example until the night he went home and the Beatles went home with rolling stones and hung out together for the first time. In Brian Jones starts playing it's Jimmy Reeves records like whereas when I grew up rock and roll history of you. We would talk about.

Edward Beatles jury Campbell Nate Wilcox Human Endeavor Elvis Yuri Review Mas Ation Yuri Jimmy Reeves A. C. A. P. Carter Ed Ward Brian Jones America Disney NPR Mark Lawrenson writer Francis John Lennon
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

10:51 min | 2 months ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Gioia to continue their discussion of his book music. A subversive history maiden Ted talk about the less than perfect realities of the lives of the great composers from the murderous makers of Madrigal's to the sometimes sorted antics of Johann Sebastian Bach to the very problematic. Richard Wagner Ted brings a very different perspective to the men we see as paragon of the establishment pop in those ear buds and enjoy some. Let it roll. Let me host Nate Wilcox. They will have the pleasure of welcoming back Ted Gioia to discuss again his book a subversive history of music. Today we're going to talk about a section of the book focusing on what we probably call classical music European concert tradition and starting off with chapters like musicians behaving badly so it's kind of a different take on classical music ted. Welcome back to the show right. Thanks for having me back. It's a pleasure and I wanted to do this because you know we talked about the book before and and it's it's a paradigm shifting book for me. It's one that really expanded my mind and and clarify things that have been wrestling with and you put it into words brilliantly and it it helped me focus on the whole scope of the show but the section in particular was one. I skipped over last time because I considered outside the breadth of the show which has covered things like the history of rock and roll music and Pop Music in the twentieth century. And I realized reading this book and do more research that the history of popular music as a business really goes back to the renaissance while absolutely on a lot of the behavior patterns of the musicians as well date back to that people often ask me what I learned researching this book and it was many years of research. But one of the quickest summaries. I have is. I found out that the music of might time and the music I grew up with which was jazz. Blues and rock and roll really the musicians back in the glory. Years of classical music weren't all that different and we have a tendency to sanitized that whole record to treat these people with great esteem. But they were just disruptive in many ways more disruptive than later rock musicians so. There's a lot of things that we take for granted in the current day that in fact for justice vibrate noticeable two hundred years ago. Yeah and you talk about this phenomenon that repeats throughout the history of music in the book which is a transition from disruption to respectability from outsiders to insiders and so often musical. Innovations are driven by people on the outside of the system but then there as they succeed as they impact the popular consciousness. They're pulled in to the inside. Sometimes they themselves become insiders other times. They're co opted. You know postmortem talk about that phenomenon. Logan that's right and we're very familiar with this in our own lifetime. We've all seen it when I was growing up The the Beatles and the Rolling Stones Bob Dylan. These dangerous. Figures feared by the establishment. But nowadays Bob Dylan is Nobel. Laureate Mick Jagger Sir Mick Jagger Paul McCartney Sir Paul McCartney and even the most extreme examples I mean take hip hop. Nwea the FBI tried to shut down the record label when they came on board nowadays. That same record has been enshrined in the National Archive of historic recordings of Congress. You have the Smithsonian out there putting together an official Smithsonian Guide to hip hop with fifty hip hop professors. Very idea about professor would have seen the contradiction in terms but they got fifty of them putting together this Canon of hip hop song. So we know about this from our own life and we've seen how these styles has been a good sized what we don't realize the same thing happened hundreds of years ago. The classic example is Bach. You Know Balk is considered now the poster child for respectability classical music is great composer. Who composed for God and country devout booth and run it Cetera et CETERA. You go back and do his own times and you find. That balk grew up with juvenile delinquents. Went to a school famous for gang. Culture was mentored by one of the worst gang members all his early jobs. Disciplinary problems At a young age to spend a month in jail He was called to task for cavorting with a young lady in the organ. Loft had prodigious beer-drinking every possible violation of rules and discipline he exemplified. None of that is is remembered nowadays. He's just the Lutheran composer so this recurring. We could talk about other composers. But there's one point I do WanNa make though I raise these issues in my book. Not because I'm trying to be gossipy or salaciously and it makes for great reading to read all these sexy anecdotes. I have the point. I'm trying to make though is these. Figures could not have created disruptive music they invented if they hadn't been disruptive in their own lifetimes you know almost all the commentary on Bach. We have from back then people complaining about him. You know people complaining about how show he was. He was called the task before the city council had to submit a written document explaining why he was using such new progressive and strange musical techniques. So this thing is conducted disruption in their private life and the disruption. Their music is connected. And that's why well upon it because if you don't understand that you will never understand the evolution of music and going back a little further. You talk about a couple of composers from the Italian renaissance. Who went way beyond Bach in terms of violations of social norms? I'm Talkin about two particular Rotella Mayo Trump Esino and Carlo Jesualdo and bothered these guys. Were involved in love. Triangles that resulted in murders committed by them. Oh this is right. It's interesting if you start with the music of these two individuals trauma Chino and swallow. Its gentle music and they will have songs. These pretty gentle love songs. Mandra goes in front of us but in their private life they were violent angry people and both of them not only did they commit murders but it was obvious to everybody that they were guilty and they were never punished and this is interesting because it shows you that. Starting around the renaissance it became the norm or musicians to go outside the norm. They were allowed indiscretions that other people were not and in fact. I'm convinced in both those instances their fame and reputation was increased by committing murder. I think people felt well. If this guy is such a passionate lover that he he he. He kills somebody in a fit of jealous rage. Who you know. There must be a similar intensity of passion in the song and we laugh at that. But that's the same way. People look at rock bands and the sex pistols. And we've seen this in our lifetime. If the musician out of control we suspect there must be a certain intensity in the music as well so it all came back to that time I mean just one more example I find this fascinating people that want to understand what it was like to be an artist during the Renaissance. The most famous book. They read the autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini. He was a renaissance artist famous as a silversmith sculptor but he was also a musician played the flute and he wrote his life story. And it makes fascinating reading but I went through that book page by page and I just marked off every time. Shalini committed a violent crime and and I think I came up potentially with at least fourteen. Violent crimes committed in his life. And this is not including the the the just the vandalism or the varsity these are actually violent crimes where he murdered somebody or beat them up and none of them was punished for he was. He was actually put in jail couple times. It was only because of arguments with his patrons over payment and artworks and my favorite anecdote from the whole book comes from a conversation when someone would approach the Pope instead of the jubilee. WanNa hire this Guy Shalini. You know he's committed murder and all this and the pope said you don't understand for people like Ben to Chile. Different rules apply that came directly from the mouth of the Pope and the renaissance. And this was a new idea and I would say we still live with this idea to even though even in the midst of the metoo movement and all the scandals. They're still this expectation that great musicians with by their own rules and they violate rules and and For good or bad that's part of the whole Agassi Western music. And what was the change around that? Time that empowered musicians to become above the law. Well the real changes for the first time we have an audience. Now people just take for granted now back when I say. The audience was invented around the time of the Renaissance and Medieval period. People look at me. As though I'm crazy you know Ted. They're always was an audience And factor in many times places. There's no there is no audience where the music making is so embedded into the community and the rituals that say some people are audience and some people performance is misguided but even when there was a good at the ancient Rome that what these great spectacles to pantomine where these public performances and obviously there was an audience there but no one took them seriously. If you were one of the leaders from you look down upon those people in the US. The rabble they were not the source of the static judgment. You laughed at them. You mocked them. All of a sudden. The renaissance idea emerged that the audience actually validates. The quality of the song started with the troubadours. But by the time you get to the renaissance. There's this idea that if the audience doesn't like it it's not good music and we take that for granted now but before that. That wasn't the case. Your audience didn't validate the music. The music was country it was for God. It was for the nobility the idea that the audience could decide so this whole idea of audience driven aesthetics is what keeps power.

murder Bach Richard Wagner Ted Ted Gioia Bob Dylan Johann Sebastian Bach Nate Wilcox Mick Jagger US Smithsonian Rotella Mayo Trump Esino Benvenuto Cellini FBI Madrigal Chino Logan Sir Paul McCartney Congress professor
Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:40 min | 2 months ago

Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

"Some. Let it roll. Let me host Nate Wilcox. They will have the pleasure of welcoming back Ted Gioia to discuss again his book a subversive history of music. Today we're going to talk about a section of the book focusing on what we probably call classical music European concert tradition and starting off with chapters like musicians behaving badly so it's kind of a different take on classical music ted. Welcome back to the show right. Thanks for having me back. It's a pleasure and I wanted to do this because you know we talked about the book before and and it's it's a paradigm shifting book for me. It's one that really expanded my mind and and clarify things that have been wrestling with and you put it into words brilliantly and it it helped me focus on the whole scope of the show but the section in particular was one. I skipped over last time because I considered outside the breadth of the show which has covered things like the history of rock and roll music and Pop Music in the twentieth century. And I realized reading this book and do more research that the history of popular music as a business really goes back to the renaissance while absolutely on a lot of the behavior patterns of the musicians as well date back to that people often ask me what I learned researching this book and it was many years of research. But one of the quickest summaries. I have is. I found out that the music of might time and the music I grew up with which was jazz. Blues and rock and roll really the musicians back in the glory. Years of classical music weren't all that different and we have a tendency to sanitized that whole record to treat these people with great esteem. But they were just disruptive in many ways more disruptive than later rock musicians so. There's a lot of things that we take for granted in the current day that in fact for justice vibrate noticeable two hundred years ago. Yeah and you talk about this phenomenon that repeats throughout the history of music in the book which is a transition from disruption to respectability from outsiders to insiders and so often musical. Innovations are driven by people on the outside of the system but then there as they succeed as they impact the popular consciousness. They're pulled in to the inside. Sometimes they themselves become insiders other times. They're co opted. You know postmortem talk about that phenomenon. Logan that's right and we're very familiar with this in our own lifetime. We've all seen it when I was growing up The the Beatles and the Rolling Stones Bob Dylan. These dangerous. Figures feared by the establishment. But nowadays Bob Dylan is Nobel. Laureate Mick Jagger Sir Mick Jagger Paul McCartney Sir Paul McCartney and even the most extreme examples I mean take hip hop. Nwea the FBI tried to shut down the record label when they came on board nowadays. That same record has been enshrined in the National Archive of historic recordings of Congress. You have the Smithsonian out there putting together an official Smithsonian Guide to hip hop with fifty hip hop professors. Very idea about professor would have seen the contradiction in terms but they got fifty of them putting together this Canon of hip hop song. So we know about this from our own life and we've seen how these styles has been a good sized what we don't realize the same thing happened hundreds of years ago. The classic example is Bach. You Know Balk is considered now the poster child for respectability classical music is great composer. Who composed for God and country devout booth and run it Cetera et CETERA. You go back and do his own times and you find. That balk grew up with juvenile delinquents. Went to a school famous for gang. Culture was mentored by one of the worst gang members all his early jobs. Disciplinary problems At a young age to spend a month in jail He was called to task for cavorting with a young lady in the organ. Loft had prodigious beer-drinking every possible violation of rules and discipline he exemplified. None of that is is remembered nowadays. He's just the Lutheran composer so this recurring. We could talk about other composers. But there's one point I do WanNa make though I raise these issues in my book. Not because I'm trying to be gossipy or salaciously and it makes for great reading to read all these sexy anecdotes. I have the point. I'm trying to make though is these. Figures could not have created disruptive music they invented if they hadn't been disruptive in their own lifetimes you know almost all the commentary on Bach. We have from back then people complaining about him. You know people complaining about how show he was. He was called the task before the city council had to submit a written document explaining why he was using such new progressive and strange musical techniques. So this thing is conducted disruption in their private life and the disruption. Their music is connected. And that's why well upon it because if you don't understand that you will never understand the evolution of music and going back a little further. You talk about a couple of composers from the Italian renaissance. Who went way beyond Bach in terms of violations of social norms? I'm Talkin about two particular Rotella Mayo Trump Esino and Carlo Jesualdo and bothered these guys. Were involved in love. Triangles that resulted in murders committed by them. Oh this is right. It's interesting if you start with the music of these two individuals trauma Chino and swallow. Its gentle music and they will have songs. These pretty gentle love songs. Mandra goes in front of us but in their private life they were violent angry people and both of them not only did they commit murders but it was obvious to everybody that they were guilty and they were never punished and this is interesting because it shows you that. Starting around the renaissance it became the norm or musicians to go outside the norm. They were allowed indiscretions that other people were not and in fact. I'm convinced in both those instances their fame and reputation was increased by committing murder. I think people felt well. If this guy is such a passionate lover that he he he. He kills somebody in a fit of jealous rage. Who you know. There must be a similar intensity of passion in the song and we laugh at that. But that's the same way. People look at rock bands and the sex pistols. And we've seen this in our lifetime. If the musician out of control we suspect there must be a certain intensity in the music as well so it all came back to that time I mean just one more example I find this fascinating people that want to understand what it was like to be an artist during the Renaissance. The most famous book. They read the autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini. He was a renaissance artist famous as a silversmith sculptor but he was also a musician played the flute and he wrote his life story. And it makes fascinating reading but I went through that book page by page and I just marked off every time. Shalini committed a violent crime and and I think I came up potentially with at least fourteen. Violent crimes committed in his life. And this is not including the the the just the vandalism or the varsity these are actually violent crimes where he murdered somebody or beat them up and none of them was punished for he was. He was actually put in jail couple times. It was only because of arguments with his patrons over payment and artworks and my favorite anecdote from the whole book comes from a conversation when someone would approach the Pope instead of the jubilee. WanNa hire this Guy Shalini. You know he's committed murder and all this and the pope said you don't understand for people like Ben to Chile. Different rules apply that came directly from the mouth of the Pope and the renaissance. And this was a new idea and I would say we still live with this idea to even though even in the midst of the metoo movement and all the scandals. They're still this expectation that great musicians with by their own rules and they violate rules and and For good or bad that's part of the whole Agassi Western music.

Murder Bach Bob Dylan Ted Gioia Nate Wilcox Mick Jagger Smithsonian Rotella Mayo Trump Esino FBI Benvenuto Cellini Chino Sir Paul Mccartney Shalini Logan Sir Mick Jagger Paul Mccartney Vandalism Congress The Beatles Professor
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:04 min | 3 months ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Read. A story needs to be a lot of rollers walks into quiet everybody. Welcome to another edition of the rock and Roll Librarian With me Christian Swain. The Rock and roll archaeologist. Here is the one the only the world heavyweight champion actually much more heavy much more lightweight. I guess well world lightweight champion middleweight. You mean they may be Bantam. May Be back in the World Bantamweight Champion of rock and Roll Librarians. Shelly Sorenson. Hey how you doing? I coach somebody now. Yeah well you should have about some smack in you do some W. w. e. smack. I'm sorry you can't do that. That's why I'm a lightweight. Oh yeah okay all right. We don't want you to get too far out of your comfort zone. Yeah all right so this is kind of a bit of a continuation for something that we started with another Pantheon. Podcast host. Let it rolls. Nate Wilcox Shelley and I were on. Nate's show here to talk about Well Celli tell us what we talked about. We talked about this book. I have here in front of me which I'm going to dive into much deeper today. That's right it's called. No one here gets out alive which I always want to say. No one gets out of here alive so I have a problem with the title already. Anyway you don't like the poetic license of Doan here here gets out alive lows much better. It's the biography of Jim. Morrison the doors as told by his young plucky. Assistant Danny sugarman. Yes and a rolling stone writer Jerry Hopkins who brought the credibility in the bud. Typing chops his typist. No I don't think he'd appreciate that. I know But you know what I mean. So yeah him in Danny together Dan. Danny's a firsthand experiences of Working from the doors from a very young age And seeing all of the rock and roll mayhem In disturbances in just plain wacky doodle craziness that occurred with. Mr Morrison in his Short twenty-seven years on this planet Yeah and when you say young than and people know that day at Twelve Oh us twelve twelve when he started working for them opening fan mail. Yeah I wish I could get that job and I don't think I would have been a safe job for me anyway. Yeah so you know. It's certainly an interestingly written book I would say yeah And we will dive into it but let's Let's give everybody a flavor of Mr Morrison and of course You know The band the doors At consisting of robby. Krieger Guitar John. Dinsmore on drums. And the man who needs no introduction the backbone of the the act of Raymond Ceric yes. That's how you say his name by the way man's Rick Manzarek. Yeah okay. Yeah or man's Eric. I guess some people but I always I. I was always taught. It was man's Eric. I'd like to hear him. Say it though. Well that's not gonNA happen. 'cause he's dead. Yeah I'm sure I could find something on Youtube pure young. Well what what is it that to me? That's always the test is how do you of course go right? So let's get into it and start with a song. Just one's pretty well known it may not be their most famous and we'll get to those in a bit but it definitely Puts them on the map from the first album. Led US here little love back door man by the doors.

Mr Morrison Danny sugarman Eric Nate Wilcox Shelley US Christian Swain Shelly Sorenson Youtube Jerry Hopkins Rick Manzarek Doan Raymond Ceric writer Dinsmore W. w. Jim robby
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

02:15 min | 3 months ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Nate Wilcox and today I've got the distinct pleasure been joined by two of my colleagues in the Pantheon podcasting network. We've got the rock and Roll Librarian. Shelly Sorenson in Christian Swain the major Domo of the whole network and the rocket archaeologist. Welcome thank state and today we're GonNa talk about a classic of Rock Literature. No one here gets out alive by Jerry. Hopkins and Danny sugarman bother. Were deceased so. This is a perfect way to cover a real cornerstone of rock music literature. When we don't have the authors to go to so thanks so much for coming on and helping us discuss Jim Morrison and the doors. I love that we get to make up whatever we want. Because there's no dispute from the author's well you know some people say that Danny sugarman and Jerry Hopkins did just that is by FIA of their dead former acquaintance in tournaments case former client. But we'll get to that at the end. Let's just jump right in there. I mean this is a biography of a Jim Morrison Came out in nineteen eighty two. I believe about eleven years after he died was an enormous bestseller. I mean this was an the racks at the airports at seven. Elevens this was a trade paperback. It had a picture of Jim. Morrison not from nineteen sixty seven shirtless and beautiful. Just immortal at triggered rolling stone cover story said he's hot. He sexy he's dead. And kind of triggered the whole sixties revival that was a big pop culture factor in the eighties. What was it about mid sixties? La that made it such a great place to launch a rock career shelley. Well you know at that time. An La was big of course a big TV and movie capital and was increasingly becoming news capitol as well and at that time in nineteen sixty four Jim Started Jim. Morrison started studies at the UCLA film school and this was what they called the professors called the Golden Age of film at Ucla and and in Los Angeles the Faculty included top directors. And the students.

Jim Morrison Danny sugarman Jerry Hopkins Rock Literature Shelly Sorenson Nate Wilcox Roll Librarian Christian Swain Ucla Los Angeles FIA
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

11:36 min | 3 months ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Fun to let it. Roll host Nate Wilcox today. I'm joined by James Kaplan author of Irving Berlin New York Genius James. Welcome light to be here. Thanks for having sure and this is a really nice book on a big topic. I mean Irving Berlin astrum. Kern said doesn't have a place in American music. He is American music and at least up to the nineteen fifties. That is absolutely the case. I mean this guy had a career from nineteen o nine still active all the way up to nineteen sixty six had a hit play in the early fifties an incredible random and nobody in the modern era except may be. Paul McCartney could even be comparable. Yes I draw. A lot of comparisons actually between Lennon McCartney and Irving Berlin very similar work ethics ver very similar of brilliance at constructing songs and a lot of similarities in the way that constructed songs and yet unlike. Mccartney who had never ten incredible years and and you know Lennon had another five years or so and McCartney's maybe had another ten. I mean Burland kept it up and was at the top of his game through the teens through the twenties answered the challenge of Gershwin Kern and the the modern Broadway musical that integrates his story with the songs all the way up. You know into 'em beyond World War Two. It's it's just an incredible achievement. And he's just a Roy. Likable Guy and reading. This book really brings that across. I mean this is a guy with what you call an innate moral compass and avoid the temptation of most of the temptations of fame and money to an unbelievable degree. How do you explain? It's true And but I would I would I I. I would like to be very very careful about About emphasizing is yes his his high degree of morality and ethics and Pointing out at the same time that he was in a business a business that remains extremely competitive full of sharp elbows and nobody was more competitive and sharp elbowed then Berlin. He had a keen eye for the best business opportunities. He was sharply competitive and he could be very tough. Absolutely analysis. You know found his own music company very early on in his career. I think he had maybe two or three hits by the time he finds found his own company and there was a founding member of ask cap the publishing union that you know brought all the songwriters together and collect the royalties and BMI comes along in the forties to compete with it. But essentially you know Irving Berlin found co-founded modern music publishing yes. He was really present at the creation of the American songbook. And in your book. You talk about your own personal sort of discovery of Berlin and ties in with with the The New York theme that you were working as an intern for the New Yorker I'm out of the title wrong. But you're on the junior capacity at the New Yorker. When I I used to I used to handle a now. Outmoded machine called a typewriter I. I was an editorial typist at the New Yorker and Kids today don't know what they're missing with those IBM Z. Oh and but this was one song. The first song that you bring up in the book was one. I hadn't been familiar with which was very early. Irving Berlin strong and I hadn't realized he had recorded performances. But you found a record going back to nineteen o nine of Irving Berlin Singha Sonko called. Oh how that could love what what you know. What fascinates you about that recording. Well the first thing that fascinated me about that recording was how unbelievably old it was. I didn't even know. They made records in nineteen nine anti ear. This record that despite the hisses and pops inevitably that came through in the reproduction process and let us not forget that That went phonograph. Records were first made in that very early. Nineteen hundreds there was. No such thing is elect electronic microphone. These were made Singer sang or orchestras played through the bell of a gigantic speaking horn. Beg a Cone Light Assembly. That translated the vibrations of the boys are the music To a needle that etched the vibrations into a wax disc That was then That was then converted into a SHELLAC discs. That could be played on. This new fangled instrument called a phonograph. So all of this process was necessary and yet piercing through. This process was the unbelievably light. Witty engaging voice of a kind of genius who is coming up with this very funny popular songs very funny take on the silly ethnic songs of the early nineteen hundreds. The title itself gives you a hand. How German could love was about a very curvy? German lady who is singer was infatuated with and it's such a such a beguiling performance and in the book you call it modernism on the hoof startling. Formal innovation smuggled into into a seemingly banal idiom elaborate on that a little bit. What does that mean modernisers? This twenty years twenty one year old. He's twenty one years old and I ask you or any of the listeners. To think of themselves at twenty one I think of myself at twenty one when I could just about time I shooed. This is a guy who's twenty one years old who is not only a fully engaging with the art of songwriting. But he's he is making fun of it. He is both. He is both succeeding in it and Satirizing it at the same time and so again back in the very early twentieth century you had these waves. Upon ways of immigrants arriving in America Ellis Island and as a result of that kind of in reaction to it and also paying homage to it there was a great fad for ethnic songs songs written in the voice Voices OF GERMAN AMERICANS ITALIAN AMERICANS JEWISH JEWISH AMERICANS AFRICAN AMERICANS Kind of making fun of these minorities but Celebrating them at the same time. And this was a song that was sort of done in imposs- style with an own pas band playing in the background but at the same time Mel Brooks could have written the song. It is is just hilarious. So it's Berlin not only writing ethnic song but having his way with it and showing how brilliant He promises to be. And let's hear a little bit of it. This is Irving Berlin singing German. Could WHOA got speed German at all by the Durban key? Franklin off for me getting more yet was irving Berlin himself singing Ohio that German could love very song in a very rare recording of irving Berlin as a performer. And I thought it was important to include that because frequently we start the Irving Berlin story restart talking about Irving Berlin with Alexander's ragtime band and it's notable to me that he had multiple hits notably So when my wife goes to the country and my wife has gone to the country that fit more into that sort of after the ball or sidewalks of New York era or the George Cohen. Yet Yankee doodle Dandy solid saying that he would supersede and sort of blow away with Alexander's ragtime band. Can you talk about that transition from the early Tin Pan Alley to the ragtime era and how Berlin pity is that well? I think the first thing we want to do is is say. Very carefully and emphatically that ragtime was rank. Time is a lot of controversy. About ragtime and ragtime has a lot of a number of definitions but by the definition of The great genius Scott Joplin who was kind of the The procreate the originator of ragtime Alexander's ragtime band is not a ragtime song at all. It's a rather it is a song about. Ragtime is a song about a band leader named Alexander an African American bandleader named Alexander. And it's a sort of. It's a march really. It's IT IT IS A. It is a call to participate to enjoy to sing along to dance along to ragtime and it is kind of A. It's kind of A. It has a quantum leap from anything Berlin or anybody else had written floor. It comes along at precisely the right moment. One thousand nine eleven only two years after. Oh how that German could love for. Loon is now an old man of twenty three rather than just twenty one and he has been writing songs for a few years. He is making very good money writing songs. Such grant money that he's now able to go on vacation to Florida. He's on his way to Penn Station to take the The Orange Blossom Limited down to Florida a train down to Florida. That's how you traveled in those days but he has a couple of hours before train time so he stops by the office and he has a snatch of song that's playing in his head and here. We should note that Berlin Aerobic Music in quotation marks. He didn't know how to write music or read music. He had songs in his head. He would work with a musical secretary. Somebody A man. Who would sit at piano? Berlin would stand next to him. In the -TUNI- had in mind and the guide the piano would play the notes and begin to harmonize it play chords that Berlin would either approve or disapprove of. Tell the guy that change. He went to the office and he wrote down the lyrics to a song that it had in his head and he had the musical secretary. Play it and memorialize. It many went on vacation to Florida. This whole thing. This stop by the office to write down the song to take down the notes in the words of it took maybe twenty minutes. He goes on vacation. He comes back and this song is put into sheet music and it is then recorded On the brand new technology of phonograph records. Just coming just coming in in Nineteen Oh eight. Nineteen Nine. Nineteen ten and nineteen eleven. And because of the sheet music of Alexander's ragtime band and they'd phonograph record of Alexander's ragtime band. They twenty-three-year-old Irving Berlin becomes not just a national sewa celebrity but an international.

Irving Berlin ragtime Alexander Berlin Irving Berlin astrum Irving Berlin New York Irving Berlin Singha Sonko Berlin Aerobic Music Paul McCartney Lennon McCartney Florida James Kaplan Nate Wilcox Kern Guy Burland Gershwin Kern secretary
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:05 min | 4 months ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Nate Wilcox and today. We're joined by. Debbie Cantwell author of Merle Haggard. The running kind David. Welcome to the show. Hi Nate and start this. Additionally has focused on sort of the cultural technological and business aspects of music with a lot of emphasis on you know what factors made somebody a superstar. What can things inhibited? Somebody from being a superstar and your books a little different in that. It's a critical analysis of Merle haggard as an artist with a heavy focus on the lyrics. But the reason I think this book is perfect for our show is that Merle. Haggard is somebody who achieved country music superstardom and had a real shot at pop superstardom but didn't make it arguably because of his lyrics that a fair assessment. I think that's mostly I ask. Yeah he's Definitely did not become a pop superstar because of records like fighting side of me. But I think that there was a moment in the early seventies late sixties early seventies when his lyrics and here's records one of the things just as an aside like I do a lot of you know lyrical analysis of Hagrid body of work in the running kind but I also try really hard to not forget that the music matters as much not more so I think he he. He was making records at that moment to they put him on. You know on the list of people who might become a pop superstar. He had a chance. So there's a lot of countries superstars in that moment Who crossed over Grand Campbell? Johnny cash so on So yeah but then but then fighting side yeah but then fight inside but and I'm glad you mentioned the music but you know James Burton among others offices famous Elvis side man in the Las Vegas years as well as Ricky Nelson's guitarist played a role in rural haggard and the records great of a great bands. Great Arrangements. And I definitely don't want to give that did that. You're only talking about 'cause you definitely paid out subsitute respect but right there in the opening in the Intro to the book you talk about one damned song as a dominating the Merle haggard legacy in the popular consciousness. Tell us about Okie from Muskogee and how it came to overshadow the rest of morals work. Yes Oh if we're if we're thinking about is in terms of how it overshadows why can't before so think about what came before Merle haggard is just had a series of Country Number One And songs that have kind of a country pop Real to them. That could've been pop hits but weren't songs like Mommy tribe especially seeing back home Mama's hungry eyes working man blues It's besides silver wings which is one of the most beautiful country pop records You'll ever hearing your life and all of these things are sort of you know establishing haggard as a songwriter and record maker that people who aren't country fans they're paying attention to even I think both rolling stone and life magazine at the time made the argument that you know if pop stations would placing back home. Then it would be a huge it. They didn't And then okay came out which did become a very minor. Pop hit so. I don't know how much you want me to go into the history of that particular song. I WANNA come back to that but I just wanted to get that point in there. That Merle's opera is overshadowed by one song. I WanNa get to the whole genesis of that song. Run and the right time and place and let's pull back a little bit and and there's one more question I asked before we get into this sort of historical narrative and start going in chronological order and the second question is the books called the running kind. Why did you pick that song? And what is it about that song that you feel is definitive or the right song? I picked to title a Merle Haggard analysis when I think that particular phrase right. The running kind is Really just an ideal sort of summation of what Merle haggard about the line in that Song Where he says Every front door down the hoping that I'd find a back door open. There just had to be exit for the running kind and then idea of wherever you're at you want to be somewhere else is a an idea that shows up in haggard lyric over and over and over again. I think it's a It's associated with his ideas of what he thinks. Freedom is We can get into at a few GAL. Let's go ahead and hit a hidden on the freedom point before we get into the life story. Yeah so I so one of the things just for example. He associated with frequently associated with train song. He's constantly trains. He loves trains You know he catches catches trains to get him to get him gone somewhere else to get him away from responsibility in working man blues He's a sometimes. I WANNA throw my bills out the window. Catch a train to another town kind of a classic idea that if I stay here I'm trapped with in a relationship. I don't like a job. I hate Just expectations from any demanding. Anything up me and so the way to be free of them is to sort of reject them does is a very common kind of rock and roll trope. I think there's lots and lots of rock songs they do. The singing presented very romantically br example. Free Bird No. Where the where. Where he's he's. He's leaving. That woman behind there are other Eagles songs and Allman brothers songs all round men and such and it's all about rejecting these obligations and freedom. Is that rejection? It's moving on for Haggar. When the things that interested me about him is that he does that too but he tends not to presented romantically. It comes off as its own sort of trapped so for example in his in his train song he's constantly saying trains of or the things that are going to give him his escape route to freedom but one of the things about trains is that there you can only go on the tracks. You only go to the one place. It's a predetermined outcome as to what you're going to end up This happens This is comes up again and again and haggard lyrics You Know He. He sings one song that he has rambling fever He's talks and many many songs about how he was born to be running kind. It was born to have rambling. He he's got. He's got a disease and his blood keeps moving on so what is presented initially as freedom is also understood is sort of this thing that he can't get out of that's another trap another prison and one of the things. I value about haggard is that he definitely presents book. Those two ideas not as action. Definitely intention Intention with one another dome necessary complements like up and down good and evil city country which poor prison those two things are constantly always there present out romantically just the way lot is. Yeah and that's one of the things that's fun about Merle haggard fascinating about Merle haggard and earlier this season. We talked to Randy Poe about moral Bucko autobiography and Buck and moral both. Come out of the Bakersfield scene but proceeds moral and buck achieves countries to superstardom. I but other Than Hee haw which is a different thing. Never really comes. Close to the kind of breakthrough into the cultural consciousness. That haggard makes my theory. Is that that buck. Never created a legend. He made a Lotta great songs but they don't add up to anything. They don't tell a story whereas haggard is constantly from the beginning telling a story you've got the theme of freedom which you mentioned and we've already talked about the political thing and we're going to get into the. Mama tried in Hungary is he. He sort of becomes a poet for the Oki's The diaspora of Oki's that move West to California during the depression. And but I WANNA hear we're GONNA play one song and then I'm going to ask you about Merle's relationship to the to the oak and this is hungry eyes. Merle haggard one of the songs where he established himself as the poet laureate of the Oak Diaspora in California covered. Cabin crowded. Davor can stand in this memory..

Merle Haggard Nate Wilcox Debbie Cantwell David Grand Campbell Johnny cash Oki California Hungary Ricky Nelson Muskogee James Burton Las Vegas Mama Bakersfield Davor Haggar Oak Diaspora Eagles Elvis
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:22 min | 4 months ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"It roll. I'm your host Nate Wilcox and today I'm joined by Gary Gooden's author of Bing crosby a pocketful of dreams the early years nineteen three to nineteen forty and bing crosby swing on a star the war years nineteen forty to nineteen forty six gary. Welcome thank you good to be here and so this is a mammoth undertaking because bing crosby a mammoth figure this guy was an enormous star from nineteen thirty four to nineteen fifty four and he was a big star from nineteen twenty seven to his death in nineteen seventy seven. What inspired you to tackle project. This massive well. I didn't anticipate it taking twenty five years of my life And counting What happened was I had done a short biography of Louis Armstrong called SATCHMO and That was published by Doubleday in In nineteen eighty seven or eight and my editor. Excuse me At the time Asked me if I would He thought that there was a market for a bag of Bing crosby and he asked me to do it many times over the next year or two and I just said pull on not interested. I I'M GONNA do. I had something else that I wanted to do and This offer a while and every once in a while he call up and say well. I think I've got somebody so interested in doing crosby thinking that would Make me competitive and I've to great 'cause I really you know I loved Bing's jazz recordings I lived with them forever. didn't really know the film's very well. Didn't even know the Father o'malley movies wasn't that interested in his later work So then what happened was I was I was going to do. Ellington and My agent got a letter that The Ellington State had given all of its papers to the Smithsonian to inventory and that they would be boy Embargoed for three years. Well that took the wind out of my sails and my agency look Paul wants to do crosby. I think I can get you a good advance. You do it in three years. Just three hundred page book and then we'll be ready to go back to Ellington so I agree. The money was good. I but then I realized something you know is one thing to do is short brief life. But if you're GONNA do biography you can't rush it you can't. There are no shortcuts. You do it right or you don't do it and I I had read There was a terrible book that came out called the hollow man which was real hatchet job. But I you know I. It didn't have anything about his music but I thought as a portrait of him before I knew it could be true. And then I read Gary Crosby's Book and you know I didn't know any better than that. So the theme that I was developing. Was that this guy. Was You know behind closed? Doors something of a monster but that to the public he was the sole of warmth. And and all this time. Now I'm listening to everything I can find if I mean I insist when I tackle the book to get every single record he ever made and and every film that took a couple of years to do and the more. I'm getting into it The more I'm admiring him and then I started to do. I put in calls to do interviews Which is a whole other thing because I had never really gone into the Hollywood world anyway. It made my first job out to Hollywood and I and I had done about ten or twelve interviews and there was a guy at Disney studio. Who's doing a documentary on Crosby? He'd been very helpful and we've been talking so I called him up one night and I said am I talking to the wrong people because crosby. I'm getting from all these people is the greatest leading man. I ever worked with the nicest kindest the most generous the most helpful you know. Roy Remember Ray Walston telling me a story that he said there was no other actor. Who's more generous to other actors than Crosby and You know you have to go with your research so once I started really digging in. I found out things about crosby had no idea about. I always heard that he was Republican. Which was but I had no idea how good he was on. How ahead of the Kirby was on Civil Rights? Which is the most important issue to me? he was really great. I had no idea how close he was to Armstrong. I had no idea of is influence on technology. The fact that he was the first guy to take the microphone out of the radio and put it on a stand and use it as an instrument on stage the fact that he was the first guy to finance tape and a tape based studio and And of course I had no idea of how how extraordinary and really heroic was during the Second World War because he never talked about it. It doesn't it. Gets half literally half a sentence in his memoir. Call Me Lucky. He thought it was. He thought it was You know a terrible thing to try to promote that or to watch These men gave up their lives. And you just you know. Unlike.

Bing crosby Louis Armstrong Bing Ellington Gary Gooden Nate Wilcox editor Father o'malley Hollywood Disney studio Ray Walston Paul Roy
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

10:21 min | 5 months ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Pop Culture's addiction to its own path. The book came out ten years ago and nate and Simon debate whether or not the weight of Pop Music History is this heavy and twenty twenty as it wasn't twenty ten pop in those ear buds and enjoy it will host Nate Wilcox and today we're joined by Simon Reynolds the author Retro Mania Pop Culture's addiction to its own past ask Simon Welcome. Thanks for having me on your podcast. It's a pleasure. This book made a big impression on me when it first came out and I'm looking forward to discussing it with you a decade after its publication or not quite a decade. I guess but Close now I can look back at the teens as well as the knots. But the fundamental argument every book which definitely jibed with. What I was feeling intuitively? was that in the beginning direction. You say I'm I'm what am imagining isn't a cataclysm. So much as a gradual wind down this is the white pop ends not with a bang but with a box set whose fourth disc never get around to plane and overprice a price ticket to the track by track. Re staging of the pixies pavement album. You play to death your first year at university if the pulse of now felt weaker with each passing year. That's because in the two thousands. The POP president became evermore crowded out by the past whether in the form of archive memories of yesteryear or retro. Rock leaching off ancient styles. So that's Kinda the thing we wanted to discuss is do you think that's still true I think everything that I write about in Richmond is still still going on Still a lot of reissuing as the festival lineups Overcrowded with people called legacy acts Either accident never a very old. Never stop playing Obama that re reunited because there is this sort of lucrative circuit now for reunion is There's a lot of younger bands who music is a kind of pastiche. Oh pick a mix of things will be all sides and beyond music as you know. TV reboot send and film franchise is based on you know quite old comic books. All beloved films from the seventies you know just endlessly get get anew the Prequel Aura. post-coup added to it So everytime I write about in the book is still going. It doesn't feel as oppressive to me. It feels like this quite a lot. More really contemporary sounding music and very digital sounding music. That feels two thousand and ten minutes. It's five so I wouldn't say I'm quite as gloomy as I was when I wrote the book but at the time writing the bogey felt we were inundated not by the past and it was this sense of. Yeah as I put it in the intro of being over the present been crowded out there. Were all these things competing for your attention and And a lot of emphasis sort of you know people dealing with these new online Al-Qods essentially repub kind of amateur amateur archives. Youtube is kind of amateur. Archive has very current. This minute kind of things in it as well but a lot of youtube content and was especially seemed to be the case in the early days of Youtube was old crap. You know that someone you know someone did a comp- you know someone's GonNa Compilation of beloved TV commercials from Nineteen Seventies UK. Kept some old pop shows as you know. Strange documentaries will never been shown since they were first ad in the in the seventies or eighties. So there it was always rich Israeli which is kind of rich as you could get lost in and That that's still going on but I feel I feel a bit more. I'm excited about music. At least I feel. There is me the fields current united feels like very now and this'll be a little bit past a ton this show airs but just yesterday. We had a controversy on twitter. Billy Irish Pretty young pop. Upswing are not knowing who van Halen was and boomer and Gen Xer van Halen fans just being a gas What did you make that you follow it out? Little Kerfluffle at all is funny on might sort of twitter feed and facebook. Everyone's like I haven't seen anyone like making fun of weather will like. Why should she know who are some of them are like old new wave? Like van Halen was shit anyway so I haven't seen anyone you know maybe moving different circles. I'm I was. I was surprised she had never heard jump. You know because that's on the radio still and it's like an old time American classic classic but Yeah why would she know. Who'd been having? I mean she probably heard and let me read the you know. The name has not stock forever reason. Yeah she's a completely different different generation. I think we probably will see tweet with someone. Says it's like someone in Van. HALEN's Day you know not knowing who Luke Benny Goodman or some sort of swing. Jazz was excise the time difference. You know that seems pretty on the money. Why would a seventeen year old when eighteen year old? Whatever she is now be aware of Finland Particularly didn't it didn't seem like You Know I. I haven't seen mcclay but I got the impression that she was kind of saying. That kind of amused self deprecating way. It wasn't like some got shallow. Shell like where you know So in quarter hour you know you say you're a musician get you've never heard of Eddie. Van Halen's legendary tap fret tapping pinged guitar technique. You know. She says she's the modern Vanhanen but she's from La I live in south South Pasadena and I think Bannon came from Pasadena. She sort of in the you know she's a modern. La Music making making music actually defunding with her brother. The van Halen had two brothers into nine and so she doing interesting new things that are very involved in the now. You know they they that success is is Is using the latest online media through a tick. Talking Elise ways kids find out things. My youngest kid is crazy into the EILLY. So you know it's it's a bright new tomorrow where Van Halen are a little footnote and wash you know. Why should they care? Yeah Yeah I took it as a good sign That your arguments not not that. I'm against your arguments with just that you worrying about in the book that the pass was right now the future and it seems like this current generation of kids who as a parent. It's it's interesting. They have such a different relationship with popular culture than we had as Gen xers a you are in Britain. I was in the states growing up but you know we were soaking and decades of reruns and old movies that were on. TV that we might have anywhere from three three to fifty channels. But still you're flipping through and you're going to see Humphrey Barton and you're gonNA see Benny Goodman. And you're going to see Frank Sinatra and kids today everything they Z.. Is Pretty much selected. And so I'm actually sort of worrying that the musical history is being lost for the new generation. But let's let's stick to the a book though and and how much different stories like for instance a often anecdotally through friends and seeing what their kids into you view is always about how a particular kid eleven ever is just crazy about the Beatles unknown and just just listen to the Beatles so I think it's all for them to discover I. I suspect what it is. Is this thing I write about in the book. kool-aid temporary where the chronology music is. All jumbled up and and on things that are very old that might pop into their world through whatever means sort of things that I'd presence and they don't necessarily have a sense of the chronology Iraq history when I was getting into music. It was a fairly simple chronology rock and roll the Beatles and the stones You Know Glam Rock Bowie Psychedelia before that and then punk and you could sort of understand is only three stages of history that you can get basic you know you can understand the paragraph Really and a few song examples but now the music history so sprawling and Dan things that have been left out of history of been readmitted you know like disco is very celebrated. Now is as an important era music and prog. Ross has been rehabilitated. Is No longer this thing that you know Pumpkin. You I've said was a complete waste land. I grew up with that idea. That was completely. You should go there. I think it's a much more complicated very sincere music history that you had to do a little bit of work if you won't understand it but people pick up on bits of music. Prep some fans will will She listened to Van Halen because of his whole this whole silly cophil full about it and maybe some van Halen fans listen to billy. Alice as well I I wanted to start our first musical snippet with a band from the knots. There are the are the knots. Maybe kind of a ninety Spanish. Well that to me is the last gasp of what I would formally consider enroll when the last time today Qatar base. No Bass Guitar. Drums Combo with vocals broke through into the pop mainstream and now song Seven Nation Army staple at stadiums around America. But I wanted to play arm the white stripes. We are going.

van Halen Halen Pop Culture Luke Benny Goodman twitter Youtube Simon Reynolds Billy Irish Nate Wilcox Beatles Obama president UK Finland Frank Sinatra Richmond twenty twenty Little Kerfluffle Seven Nation Army
Pop Music's Past Is Crowding Out Its Present

Rock N Roll Archaeology

09:28 min | 5 months ago

Pop Music's Past Is Crowding Out Its Present

"Will host Nate Wilcox and today we're joined by Simon Reynolds the author Retro Mania Pop Culture's addiction to its own past ask Simon Welcome. Thanks for having me on your podcast. It's a pleasure. This book made a big impression on me when it first came out and I'm looking forward to discussing it with you a decade after its publication or not quite a decade. I guess but Close now I can look back at the teens as well as the knots. But the fundamental argument every book which definitely jibed with. What I was feeling intuitively? was that in the beginning direction. You say I'm I'm what am imagining isn't a cataclysm. So much as a gradual wind down this is the white pop ends not with a bang but with a box set whose fourth disc never get around to plane and overprice a price ticket to the track by track. Re staging of the pixies pavement album. You play to death your first year at university if the pulse of now felt weaker with each passing year. That's because in the two thousands. The POP president became evermore crowded out by the past whether in the form of archive memories of yesteryear or retro. Rock leaching off ancient styles. So that's Kinda the thing we wanted to discuss is do you think that's still true I think everything that I write about in Richmond is still still going on Still a lot of reissuing as the festival lineups Overcrowded with people called legacy acts Either accident never a very old. Never stop playing Obama that re reunited because there is this sort of lucrative circuit now for reunion is There's a lot of younger bands who music is a kind of pastiche. Oh pick a mix of things will be all sides and beyond music as you know. TV reboot send and film franchise is based on you know quite old comic books. All beloved films from the seventies you know just endlessly get get anew the Prequel Aura. post-coup added to it So everytime I write about in the book is still going. It doesn't feel as oppressive to me. It feels like this quite a lot. More really contemporary sounding music and very digital sounding music. That feels two thousand and ten minutes. It's five so I wouldn't say I'm quite as gloomy as I was when I wrote the book but at the time writing the bogey felt we were inundated not by the past and it was this sense of. Yeah as I put it in the intro of being over the present been crowded out there. Were all these things competing for your attention and And a lot of emphasis sort of you know people dealing with these new online Al-Qods essentially repub kind of amateur amateur archives. Youtube is kind of amateur. Archive has very current. This minute kind of things in it as well but a lot of youtube content and was especially seemed to be the case in the early days of Youtube was old crap. You know that someone you know someone did a comp- you know someone's GonNa Compilation of beloved TV commercials from Nineteen Seventies UK. Kept some old pop shows as you know. Strange documentaries will never been shown since they were first ad in the in the seventies or eighties. So there it was always rich Israeli which is kind of rich as you could get lost in and That that's still going on but I feel I feel a bit more. I'm excited about music. At least I feel. There is me the fields current united feels like very now and this'll be a little bit past a ton this show airs but just yesterday. We had a controversy on twitter. Billy Irish Pretty young pop. Upswing are not knowing who van Halen was and boomer and Gen Xer van Halen fans just being a gas What did you make that you follow it out? Little Kerfluffle at all is funny on might sort of twitter feed and facebook. Everyone's like I haven't seen anyone like making fun of weather will like. Why should she know who are some of them are like old new wave? Like van Halen was shit anyway so I haven't seen anyone you know maybe moving different circles. I'm I was. I was surprised she had never heard jump. You know because that's on the radio still and it's like an old time American classic classic but Yeah why would she know. Who'd been having? I mean she probably heard and let me read the you know. The name has not stock forever reason. Yeah she's a completely different different generation. I think we probably will see tweet with someone. Says it's like someone in Van. HALEN's Day you know not knowing who Luke Benny Goodman or some sort of swing. Jazz was excise the time difference. You know that seems pretty on the money. Why would a seventeen year old when eighteen year old? Whatever she is now be aware of Finland Particularly didn't it didn't seem like You Know I. I haven't seen mcclay but I got the impression that she was kind of saying. That kind of amused self deprecating way. It wasn't like some got shallow. Shell like where you know So in quarter hour you know you say you're a musician get you've never heard of Eddie. Van Halen's legendary tap fret tapping pinged guitar technique. You know. She says she's the modern Vanhanen but she's from La I live in south South Pasadena and I think Bannon came from Pasadena. She sort of in the you know she's a modern. La Music making making music actually defunding with her brother. The van Halen had two brothers into nine and so she doing interesting new things that are very involved in the now. You know they they that success is is Is using the latest online media through a tick. Talking Elise ways kids find out things. My youngest kid is crazy into the EILLY. So you know it's it's a bright new tomorrow where Van Halen are a little footnote and wash you know. Why should they care? Yeah Yeah I took it as a good sign That your arguments not not that. I'm against your arguments with just that you worrying about in the book that the pass was right now the future and it seems like this current generation of kids who as a parent. It's it's interesting. They have such a different relationship with popular culture than we had as Gen xers a you are in Britain. I was in the states growing up but you know we were soaking and decades of reruns and old movies that were on. TV that we might have anywhere from three three to fifty channels. But still you're flipping through and you're going to see Humphrey Barton and you're gonNA see Benny Goodman. And you're going to see Frank Sinatra and kids today everything they Z.. Is Pretty much selected. And so I'm actually sort of worrying that the musical history is being lost for the new generation. But let's let's stick to the a book though and and how much different stories like for instance a often anecdotally through friends and seeing what their kids into you view is always about how a particular kid eleven ever is just crazy about the Beatles unknown and just just listen to the Beatles so I think it's all for them to discover I. I suspect what it is. Is this thing I write about in the book. kool-aid temporary where the chronology music is. All jumbled up and and on things that are very old that might pop into their world through whatever means sort of things that I'd presence and they don't necessarily have a sense of the chronology Iraq history when I was getting into music. It was a fairly simple chronology rock and roll the Beatles and the stones You Know Glam Rock Bowie Psychedelia before that and then punk and you could sort of understand is only three stages of history that you can get basic you know you can understand the paragraph Really and a few song examples but now the music history so sprawling and Dan things that have been left out of history of been readmitted you know like disco is very celebrated. Now is as an important era music and prog. Ross has been rehabilitated. Is No longer this thing that you know Pumpkin. You I've said was a complete waste land. I grew up with that idea. That was completely. You should go there. I think it's a much more complicated very sincere music history that you had to do a little bit of work if you won't understand it but people pick up on bits of music. Prep some fans will will She listened to Van Halen because of his whole this whole silly cophil full about

Van Halen Halen Youtube Luke Benny Goodman Simon Reynolds Beatles Twitter Nate Wilcox Barack Obama President Trump UK Finland Richmond Frank Sinatra Little Kerfluffle Iraq Billy Irish Ross Eddie Humphrey Barton
"nate wilcox" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on The MMA Hour with Ariel Helwani

"Vox media, forgive me opportunity. You know, I came into this role without any producing experience, but, you know, I still took up the challenge. And I felt like I did. All right on, you know, things also to our editor, Brian Tokar, forgiving me. L paternity. Thanks for all the fighting team who's also helped out to get the show out there in. There's a lot of pieces about the show, you know, from social from the stories that we. Right. So a lot of work until a lot of work in everybody for the last year has been putting a lot of work. So obviously, you know, I appreciate very much. You know, lastly, thanks to the fans men, because I feel like we got really good reception. With the tools that we had in the resources we had I feel like we made this show, our own to, to the best of our abilities in feel like the fans really appreciated that in, let's it man, just just thinks I'm very thankful for for, for the opportunity in fence for Brian Tucker, who has been a continuous behavior in me. Continues to be again. You're going to see. I would say that, you know, people always ask me, like, oh, what's the key to ingredient are with Jesus? What's the what's the key ingredient in success? And I'm like, well, I'll let you know when I figure it out. But here's one thing I have noticed you don't need to get lucky all the time because that's not possible. You just need a couple of people to look out for you along the way. And then you gotta make it your own and you gotta figure it out from there. That's really what it all comes down to. So I've had a number of believers in box media, perhaps Nate Wilcox has been one and Brian soccer has been another people don't know because he works behind the scenes, but he's the guy who basically runs the whole site. He's everybody's balls. He has been a continuous believer in me in the lobby to do a lot of things here that I just ordinarily would not have gotten the opportunity to so Brian, thank you. Thank you very, very very, very much. That's not words like. People just don't get studio shows, you know, you have to work for him. And, and you have to get lucky and I did a little bit of both. All right. Ma'am. Well, you know what? Norm open, then we're moving time. Yeah. Turn that page think you'd any great work all your was nominated. All right. Thank you to all of you guys, who supported us. We can't. Thank you enough. You'll see what comes next and until then stay frosty..

Brian Tucker Nate Wilcox Brian Tokar Vox media Brian soccer editor Brian
"nate wilcox" Discussed on The MMA Beat

The MMA Beat

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on The MMA Beat

"Vox media, forgive me opportunity. You know, I came into this role without any producing experience, but, you know, I still took up the challenge. And I felt like I did. All right on, you know, things also to our editor, Brian Tokar, forgiving me. L paternity. Thanks for all the fighting team who's also helped out to get the show out there in. There's a lot of pieces about the show, you know, from social from the stories that we. Right. So a lot of work until a lot of work in everybody for the last year has been putting a lot of work. So obviously, you know, I appreciate very much. You know, lastly, thanks to the fans men, because I feel like we got really good reception. With the tools that we had in the resources we had I feel like we made this show, our own to, to the best of our abilities in feel like the fans really appreciated that in, let's it man, just just thinks I'm very thankful for for, for the opportunity in fence for Brian Tucker, who has been a continuous behavior in me. Continues to be again. You're going to see. I would say that, you know, people always ask me, like, oh, what's the key to ingredient are with Jesus? What's the what's the key ingredient in success? And I'm like, well, I'll let you know when I figure it out. But here's one thing I have noticed you don't need to get lucky all the time because that's not possible. You just need a couple of people to look out for you along the way. And then you gotta make it your own and you gotta figure it out from there. That's really what it all comes down to. So I've had a number of believers in box media, perhaps Nate Wilcox has been one and Brian soccer has been another people don't know because he works behind the scenes, but he's the guy who basically runs the whole site. He's everybody's balls. He has been a continuous believer in me in the lobby to do a lot of things here that I just ordinarily would not have gotten the opportunity to so Brian, thank you. Thank you very, very very, very much. That's not words like. People just don't get studio shows, you know, you have to work for him. And, and you have to get lucky and I did a little bit of both. All right. Ma'am. Well, you know what? Norm open, then we're moving time. Yeah. Turn that page think you'd any great work all your was nominated. All right. Thank you to all of you guys, who supported us. We can't. Thank you enough. You'll see what comes next and until then stay frosty..

Brian Tucker Nate Wilcox Brian Tokar Vox media Brian soccer editor Brian
"nate wilcox" Discussed on Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"nate wilcox" Discussed on Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

"IB at now in high school something that I'm doing that's new this year. I don't know that it's new this year. But when I give feedback I'm trying to give one on one feedback that I'm talking individually with students rather than writing comments on their essays on their project or in school g when they turn in assignments. And I feel like I do a lot of feedback before the assignment ever gets turned in because I want students to turn in their best work. I want them to be clear about the rubric in the expectations. So that there's no confusion on their part. So I do a lot of feedback before then feedback after the other thing that I'm really excited about is using technology in a more meaningful way to address different modalities of student learning. So that students are in doing a project, and they incorporate a video that they've made or they incorporate music or they incorporate artwork and students have been really surprising me with how they incorporate their own artwork students who say I'm not are to stick. I can't dry. Can't do anything. They end up taking a video a fast motion video of. Themselves drying over building something, and then that becomes their artwork that becomes their creativity. They share it gives him another sense of how they incorporate in process the information that we've learned in class. So that it's not just regurgitating information. But they're really understanding the information on I see a lot more from students, comprehension, and understanding and then making the connections. Mom is Nate Wilcox from Colorado, and you can follow me on Twitter with the username at Nate Wilcox. Might tip is to get your kids using the new shortcuts app with apple I've had dozens of kids setup shortcuts on their ipad as simple as quick emails and as complicated as asthma attack warning protocols the shortcuts app, formerly known as workflows allows you to utilize numerous apps to create one streamlined process. If you're the type of teacher that has very consistent routine every day, you can set up workflows. They the students started in that routine when they first walk into the classroom. My students start class off by setting a complex goal. On their digital portfolios. Almost every day. This can be a multi step process than involves opening multiple apps, and they can get bogged down by this at times with shortcuts. They can come in with all their apps cleared out in the background and just say, hey, Siri run my daily routine, and every Appleby opened and ready for them in an instance there also tons of shortcuts already created in the gallery section that will make your classroom more efficient. My name is animals in this year. I was offered an.

Nate Wilcox Appleby asthma apple Twitter Colorado