13 Burst results for "Nate Henley"

"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

Gangland Wire

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

"Broke down off what we really want him do. Breakdown on his buddies were burglarizing everybody in the neighborhood. They'd have these little. You know nine ten eleven year old gangs would start burglarizing all the neighbor's homes and getting you know, but change out of their Change Jar, maybe maybe a TV usually not even that just little things, and and then once you caught two or three of them. Juvenile Court and they never really went away, but at that age, but it made. The neighbors a lot better so i. that's how I justified doing that kind of interrogation. We had the major over the US unit. We were in the youth and the major studies head in, and he said I don't even want to know what's going on and shut the door. But we broke up a little gang, but you know in in a murder and things like that. It's got to be done. Right is just has to be done, right? And absolutely if we got caught doing that today, they'd probably fire. So. Things are different today. Well. This has been great, really really interesting story, folks. I'd recommend if if you like that kind of thing and all that you get that boyle on the bicycle by Nate Henley and Mates a pretty prolific writer you've you've got the big con. Great frauds, gifts, and swindles in American history where. You need to do I love those CON Games. Those more complex kind of crimes we need to do. Pick out a couple of those in and. Out Tell me about some of those one of these days. You. You've got to kind of an overview of the Mafia. The mafia guide to an American subculture. You got gangsters then and now. Steven Trescott. Decades injustice, what what is that? That's another wrongful conviction carries okay I was interesting because he is well known because he was fourteen tried for murder in the fifties. And Nineteen fifties and he was tried as an adult, so his name was in the paper. So that's why everybody knows about Steven Truscott but no one sort of Ron Moffitt even though the crimes and the suspects, both of them and fourteen cases, Nike fifties very similar interests, and then you've got Dutch Schultz the beer. Brazen beer baron of new. York. He's a character in..

Steven Trescott murder Steven Truscott Juvenile Court US Nike Nate Henley Ron Moffitt boyle York Schultz writer
"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

Gangland Wire

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

"Who are catheters. Just want to thank a whole lot of people here in front of the exciting story of the boy on a bicycle. It's a little bit different story. Sometimes you get tired of doing just mafia stuff my friend Nate Henley. Has It really great story about a wrongful conviction up in Toronto Canada first of all I wanNA thank the other Michael mccollum. For Making a nice donation on Michael mccollum, the former hells angels has been on the show, but this is another man named Michael McCullough Mu. Lessons, that big fan and made a nice donation. BLEEP through pay pal and pay pal donation as a double thanks to Dan Bay for down in Australia triple or quadruple I'm not sure how many now Dan I really appreciate. Your support drew Nonni Bene- Papousek border. Thanks. A Lot drew a couple times for him. I believe maybe three Marines Stinnett. I got a nice donation from him and then off of. Actually Rick Jones and Richard Sullivan. Continue staying in their guys. I appreciate what you've done for the podcast Bergeron stay right in their Bo obamacare key pronouncing your name right. Give me, lots of shots and beer here, Zack's Watson, Mark Ryan Casey Walls Brett Giuliano just all kinds of people I don't I can only thank so many people at a time. My friend feral down in down under Australia thanks a lot I've got a couple of Australian stories coming up for you guys, you and Dan and other Australian fans down there. We're kind of kind of scary. It's like I'm all over the world. No thing I've got coming up I got in touch with Joe pistone. The DONNIE BRASCO dude and he's GonNa. Give me a sound bite I i. don't really want to tell his whole story. Everybody knows that story and seeing the movie and all that, but he has particularly interesting levels of comments about lefty. Now have my friend Steve. Say John was actually was a cellmate, and in the penitentiary with zero, so he will give us his take on that also as well as Joepags Dome so got many more exciting podcast coming up. keep less than and sit back and enjoy this one. That's just a little bit different than your usual podcasts. Thanks folks. You're listening to gangland wire hosted by former Kansas City, police intelligence unit detective Gary Gene..

Dan Michael mccollum Nonni Bene- Papousek border Australia Michael McCullough Mu Dan Bay Nate Henley Joe pistone DONNIE BRASCO Toronto Bergeron Joepags Dome Rick Jones Gary Gene Kansas City Mark Ryan Casey John Brett Giuliano Canada Steve
"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

Gangland Wire

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

"You are listening to gangland hosted by former Kansas, city, police, intelligence unit, detective, Gary Jenkins Welcome while you wire-tappers out there back on the. I don't know how many weeks of isolation or self quarantine or whatever we're doing here in Kansas. City like the rest of your throughout the whole world. Actually, which is what is, it was amazing to me. And as you know I'm putting up some extra podcast and and reaching outside the United States again to my friend. Nate Henley from. Toronto Canada. Night Welcome. Hi, it's a great to be back here. Gary great that you're still healthy and I'm still healthy. Have Really I know I'll are you? wire-tappers out there healthy to We've gotten our friend of Basle tear from down in Dallas Texas Nate helps me with social media marketing. He's really basically a fan, but but he'll get on my main administrator. My Fam-, my facebook page and he'll put extra photos and Arctic link articles, and and things like that quite often well, he. Any laxly record a movie review with me every once in a while a mob movie review and Last time I got hold on Record Wani. Double shifts down in Dallas Texas in a hospital. He's Vacation so. This was like he texted me at four knee after noon. He said well. He said I can't do it. They're vestment or keep working. And then he tacks texted me the next morning said he just got off, so he was working. That was almost twenty hours from the time that I talked to him the first time and so I I haven't talked to him. Saying it's just I'm. Pretty much cited on social media, and he did put up a picture of one of his fellow employees with Superman mask the other dates other. kind of making their own mass down there to. you know. In my friend Casey. Walsh's wife is ahead of surgery at general term in medical center, used to be general hospital, and and so those guys are all working crazy over there. That's kind of the local hospital. That takes the indigent people people insurance. So it's you know I'll tell you..

Gary Jenkins Dallas Kansas Texas Nate Henley general hospital Arctic link United States administrator Walsh Canada Toronto Casey
"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

Gangland Wire

12:53 min | 1 year ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

"Through up in the fifties and sixties and seventies through the war and everything. It's just kinda amazing. Hebron lucky left and the whole structure that he said APP lasted well. Lucky was a good leader in that you know. He did two things that were very smart and that he was smart enough to recruit good people around him. He wasn't one of these guys was jealous of his subordinate. So as you mentioned like he had this whole crew around him of very talented gangsters And he didn't just focus on Italian American mafia that one of his closest friends and sometime business partner was Meyer Lansky. Jewish was not part of this organized mafia structure. He had who is just like you. Know the Creme de la Creme of Hitman that he was a rather repugnant individual. But he's the type of guy you definitely want on your side. And he had this whole crew of very very talented smart gangsters and for the most part well. Albert was shot dead in a barbershop but for the most part these guys lasted a lot of Lucca. Channels associates lasted for quite a long time because they followed his second leadership principle. Which was that wasn't flashy. He wasn't showing. You wasn't eliciting hog like out the palm. Al Capone would talk any reporter. You would actually have press. Conferences would go to city hall in Chicago. Basically show throw his weight around. That attracted a huge amount of attention from the police and the federal government. Lucky very much stuck shadows when he was interviewed he'd say Oh yeah. I'm rich but I made that from gambling and bookkeeping would always be below profile. He actually crashed fairly conservative. Did Not dress like a flashy Hollywood gangster in a purple suit or something. He liked the good life like he he stayed in opulent surroundings. But he did not show off his well. He did not drive around town and a gold plated. Rolls Royce or something that it was all sort of like trying to keep to the shadows and that's generally the longest lasting mafia bosses. That's how they behaved they of after the background. Don't attract much press you know. Keep a low profile. That's really sort of a good good way for longevity in these kind of circles and he was as a game distressed. That you know lucky was just smart. Canny Kinda Guy. He didn't tend to lose his Hamburg freak out and get obsessive about some slight or some stupid incident that really annoyed. Emerson something and he probably would have lasted longer Although he did it attract the attention prosecutor do. Let's go back and speculating bit about this. When Manzano killed that night. I told I've read in a book once and they called it tonight Sicilian vespers and supposedly. They killed a whole lot of people that night. They set up a bunch of his mustache. Pete's that were they were afraid would come back and take revenge on them for Manzano's death and I looked that up and originally the night is ASEAN vespers happened back in twelve eighty two now. Did you know that in Sicily? There's a lot of French people in in Sicily and there was a Frenchman that was master trying to mess around with another sessaion man's wife and the same man came out with a knife and killed him in the crowds got together and they started killing French. People that were imported down to Sicily. For some reason I'm not sure why at the time. But they started killing them like crazy. They called that neither Sicilian vespers. But I what I found out about this where this is true or not. I don't think we'll ever be known because the police in New York City especially did not keep breaking records on this guy that thing back there they may have some individuals murders said. Yeah there's a lot of murders and they were all Italian but they just. Oh well you know that's how they are. That's right that's right. You hit the nail on the head Nail on the head Jerry. That than the night of the Sicilian vespers. It's kind of one of these things. It's got a kernel of truth and a whole lot of myth. Making that you know Manzano was killed in September. Nineteen thirty one and apparently some of his candidates were also killed so there were there was definitely some murder a going on it has however on his grandiose and in maybe pop culture. Hollywood kind of image of like you know hundred people killed in various horrible ways across the country. That really isn't borne out by statistics. When you asked about this topic I looked up. Selwyn Raw. Who's one of my favorite organized crime authors? He wrote a book XIV families. It did very good one. I looked up what he said. And he cites thanking seventy six a historian actually did a study where he looked up all the records he could find of areas. You know hits in New York and all this. And he didn't find that many connected with the Marines Zanele murder it's tempered nineteen thirty one and the ones he did find as you say. Gary it was a little hard you know. An Italian American gangster would be found dead was he. Part of the Mariner Zano gang or some freelancer or was he really part of the mafia or some thugs. A lot of it is very murky. I think it's safe to say there were some killings but it was very exaggerated like you know the the Hollywood versions more interested one bath dozens of people. She's gone down the street. That didn't have the really wasn't the style that he was perfectly happy to have your boss and then marriage Zanele murdered and maybe a couple of their tenants killed too but he wasn't like a sadist who disliked white people allow severally. Wasn't his style rather win them over having worked at and his whole life Indicated that you know era of kind of follow along live. He he would have meetings. He was big on having meetings. He had the meeting in Sicily in nineteen forty six right after right after the war then he had a bunch of them come down to Cuba and have a meeting and an iron things out. He was even the guys that organized the first commission further Sicilian Mafia's according to what I read so he he was big into that now. How this took on this. This is probably where I read this Job Lachey of course testified in one thousand nine hundred sixty three and and I don't think he testified about. This probably didn't even ask him about something that old. But when Peter Moss wrote the book the LACI papers which that was that a hit just hit huge. That book was huge and that guy was a really good writer in well respected but he. He reported that the LACI says claims there was a that night of Manzano murder. I have to quote here was part of an intricate painstakingly. Executed mass extermination engineered by check. Charles Lucky Luciano and they claimed that there was forty coast. Notre leaders allied with Manzano slain. All across the country so that you know that kind of guy with that reputation using his source you know it's hard to it's hard to overcome lucky Luciano. He he co-authored that book the last testament of Lucky Luciano and he. He claims it didn't happen. And so you know I have to agree with you. That lucky Luciano was not that kind of guy and and it just you know it would. It would hit the newspapers all over the country. Even the COP and the dumbest agent and the dumbest require start putting that together and reported at the time. You know you know anything that when it's reported at the time the closer to the incident that you can find some source that talks about it but nobody talked about it back then did they. There's a great quote and it actually might have been lucky to channel himself in which she talked about job illogic and he said The testimony he gave he said it was. Kinda like Somebody from New Guinea all of a sudden was converted to the Catholic Church Catholicism giving an in depth explanation of the workings of the Vatican. I've never heard that that's a good one might have been lucky. Who said that because from what I understand you know job. Lachey was actually you know he was a Mafia the mafia they wanNA understand the FBI fed him a lot of information that they wanted reveal. Yeah Yeah and says he didn't really know a lot of like these intricate leadership battles and stuff like know anything about that. He was not in the know on anything like that or rumor at best but but he offered it just like as sworn testimony and dislike. He was standing there from what I understand. Yeah Yeah it's Quite illuminating greeting. I read the papers. Okay well we're we're at thirty minutes. I think I'll just I'm GonNa get you seem like you got plenty of time on. Just get you to come back over the next couple of three weeks the things I wanNA talk absolutely hell and and I really like your ID on this On the Mafia was not as much fun or as success. See when I was working these guys as I used to think? Well they're supposed to be big mobsters but yet they live at home that they may have a two or three year old car but they you know and they may have cash in their pocket but it just doesn't seem like they really have anything Interesting flying and they weren't too kind of people that were invested in the stock market and they weren't a pie kind of people that that had much rental property out there of most now the boss he had rental property and he and he was invested in the stock market. Are Our bus. Next invalid was brother Carl. They were pretty sharp and they did. Those kinds of things said most of the others you know they were just kind of one had record store but he sold boost records. We made a pretty good money off of that but mainly they didn't You know they didn't really have that much. Had the family home. They didn't even have a big new home interesting. Yeah that was one of the more using things in Book Gum Donnie. Brasco and from Joseph The Stone Estonia Stumble over these names in his testimony. He was talking about how he was biggest thing. That surprised in was held boring a lot of this war. Gods you know he'd hang out with these mafia guys basically in the back of this crappy restaurant or saying they play cards all day and then somebody would say oh. Hey I got a great idea for some scam. We can do or come back. They don't run out you something and then they go back. Play Cards Allen Fish really entertaining offers job like any talk any mentioned exactly what you just said Gary that a lot of these lower level guys were not living the high life like the guy they had. They had a lot of like money in their wallet. Have a big dinner. And then they broke the next day. It was one score to the next. If they got gotta score then they were they were fat and happy for a while and then they had just started scuffling for another score. There's no money put away at all and an eight that romantic. I know that but that's interesting. That's fascinating okay. Thank you thank you bye bye bye. Folks that was nate. Henley true crime writer mob rider from up in Toronto Canada from his Kobe Nineteen fortress of solitude. I'm in mind cove in nineteen job. Eighteen whenever it is nineteen fortress of solitude. So there's another podcast for you. Another interesting look at Lucky Luciano in the night at Sicilian vespers. Which I'd always heard about and I always wanted to get that clear in my mind if you're a veteran and you believe you have.

Manzano Charles Lucky Luciano murder Sicily Hollywood New York City Lachey Gary writer Meyer Lansky Hebron Al Capone Albert partner Chicago Royce ASEAN Hamburg city hall
"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

Gangland Wire

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Gangland Wire

"You are listening to gangland wire hosted by former Kansas City. Police Intelligence Unit detective. Jerry Jenkins Welcome. All you are out there. I'm here in the gang. Land Wire Studio and the home not going out with his Co. virus thing and and I know you guys are stuck at home too. So you know. I'm putting out some extra episodes. I've been interviewing somebody almost every day. I'm running through all the people in the United States who had to reach out to my friend up in Canada and there's a lot of of true crime fans in Canada. I've noticed that man there is a bunch of you guys up there. I guess those long cold winter exactly so folks this is. This is nate Henley a well-known true crime author and scriptwriter and and has done about everything you know he's really had a as a whole career in in this business. You know this is Kinda my third career so the ease at ochre and welcome nate. Thank you very much. Gary appreciate this and I was just saying that. Hopefully we'll be able to provide some nice content for the self vice lading. True crime fans were sitting at home wanting something to do. I live in Toronto. Gary said I was actually born in the US. My family is Background or in Connecticut and have lived in Canada all my life though I right or various business and trade magazines and I do true crime books as sort of my fun writing so I've written about wrongful murder convictions and gangsters and organized crime. Same thing illegal drugs on incline all sorts of different topics. I just enjoy the genre very much shannon joy talking about it and looking forward to talking to you. Gary I great well now you have folks get hold of you and see your work as like an author page on Amazon. Plus I see you've got a Own Website a couple of websites. Yeah the easiest way for people to check out either. My books or my background.

Gary nate Henley Canada Jerry Jenkins United States Land Wire Studio Kansas City Amazon Connecticut Toronto murder
"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

"Has the world's largest selection of audiobooks audio entertainment including audible original also audible originals are stories created exclusively for audio including documentaries exclusive audiobooks and scripted shows that you can't hear anywhere else audible keeps you informed inspired and entertained you finish more stories when you listen with audible and always be part of the conversation with a convenient audible app you can listen anytime anywhere and on any device mobile Aw Alexa Enabled Bluetooth and more listen at the gym while shopping in the car while traveling anytime you can't read aid you can listen with audible audible members get more than ever before every month you can choose one audiobook godless price as well as to audible originals from a fresh selection members stay motivated and inspired with unlimited access to exclusive guided fitness and meditation programs sign up for free updates from the New York Times Wall Street Journal and Washington Post delivered daily in the APP audible members can easily exchange any title they don't love at any time members keep their library of listens for of gangster history why not check out some of the books from our contributors like Al Capone Chicago's crime king by Nate Henley or five have families by Selwyn Rab Start Listening with a thirty day audible trial choose one audiobook and to audible originals absolutely free visit audible dot com forward slash mafia or text mafia two five zero zero dash five zero zero.

New York Times Wall Street Jou Washington Post Al Capone Chicago Nate Henley Selwyn Rab two five zero zero dash thirty day
"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

"Chicago is the perfect environment for gangster on the rise to make a lot of money outfit for a long time too long he thought he had to eliminate the bugs Moran Gang so he could be if you WANNA call it the boss of bosses no competition in Chicago they tried and failed to take out Al Capone himself and capone lover of the spotlight had just made national headlines in all out massacre one that neither the law enforcement nor the other gangsters will stand for this is broad daylight this is not in some secretive a farm field at midnight in the middle of nowhere this is downtown Chicago middle of the day and ruthless assassination in a very clever way by the way this is Mafia while capone was busy fighting with Moran for Chicago supremacy the gangsters in New York had a different idea lucky Luciano cones counterpart wanted to find a way of having all of the street gangs worked together Luciano's idea was to put an end to the violent infighting and focus on the money and avoiding the law in the wake of the Valentine's Day massacre Luciano and other New York mobsters plan to conference in Atlantic city Lenna Guggenheim as an educator at the Museum of the American gangster in New York so the Atlantic City Conference of nineteen twenty nine was essentially a gangster conference and the first such of its time it was in part rosty idea to help reduce costs and conflict among east coast gangs have him sort of work things out but it was also as much Johnny Toro's idea to of course the founder of the South Side Gang and Capone's mentor we you know that it absolutely happened in Atlantic City in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine and you have major bosses and future bosses like capone Lansky they're all involved there the idea of conference was to get violence off the streets and run the mob as a professional business the meeting had been a long time coming originally aww Bhai both Luciano's Mentor Arnold Rothstein and capone's mentor Johnny Torio but the two proteges were not on the same page Capone had already set himself apart from the other gangsters and was known to be hot headed nonetheless Luciano invited him to the conference ah shit out nate Henley is the author of the Book Al Capone other gangsters either in Chicago or New York City kind of envious of capone because he was very powerful man in his in his mid twenties at the same time there were a little wary of him because he did regard him as a bit of a loose cannon and they really didn't like his publicity seeking personality that their idea was you know you stay out of the papers certainly don't hold the press conferences in your house you don't show off for the press Al Capone enjoyed going down to city hall in Chicago and just walking around and having bullet Meyer him and you know and supplicants coming up to him sucking up to try to get a job or something and there's no way that lucky Luciano would do that in New York City that Lucia was content to sort of stay behind and stay out of the limelight the other mob bosses were concerned that Capone's courting of the press would have severe consequences they knew the Saint Valentine's Day massacre would not be ignored even with the local police capone's pocket Eric doesn't hall is the author of the devil himself you know the it was very rational for racketeer's as much as people think that there are these big tough guys who are afraid nothing they're very afraid of the government and the last thing they want is to bring down the full force of the New York and the nine states government on them at first capone was thrilled to be included with the likes of gangsters like nutty Johnson and Meyer Lansky but soon capone took issue with his competitors telling him how to run his business anti stormed out Lawrenceburg Green is the author of capone the man and Eero after the Atlantic City conference when he was part of a national commission the same to me of eight compelled but actually had the opposite effect he realized that he had to carve up the pie with some other very important gangsters who would just as soon shoot him as happened business partner I spend all day talking about and searching the mafia family life racketeering and of course the hit jobs so sometimes I need a break from all of that my to mental pallet cleanser is best beans it's a casual game you can play on your phone which means anyone can play but the puzzles are challenging even for adults and can spend as much or as little time as I have playing the game between researching Capos it's a nice break from the dark mafia underworld the over world is really beautiful and everything is nice bright colors I love the style of the puzzles it's a new take on this kind of game there are a ton of characters and they're all bugs because you have to pick your characters to match the goals in each level Oh there's a lot of strategy involved it's like picking the best suited characters for your own little gang but for me it's all about the side quests secret level ups and special powers and try to get ahead of your friends fiends is really different from other puzzle games there are so many characters it doesn't get old and there are monthly updates with new levels and defense it's free to download and you don't need cell service so I can play.

Chicago
"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

09:26 min | 1 year ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

"Al capone was born in brooklyn new york on january seventeen eighteen ninety nine the young capone grew up in a poor tenements near the brooklyn navy yard his father was a barber barely keeping food on the table for al and his aides siblings deedrick capone al's grand-niece recalled her family's immigrant background my grandfather ralph james capone was al capone's older brother and his business partner and al capone was the fourth child born to his mother and father but he was the first child that was conceived and born in america so on his shoulders rested all of the expectations that his mother and father head for leaving their family in italy in coming to america he was the american dream and he wanted to be the best that he could be in the business that he was running am i believe he did that capone's were a hardworking law-abiding family but at the time italian americans faced discrimination as immigrants and there's wasn't something how would stand for even as a child the italians in america where the low people on the totem pole they were the last to be hired in the first to be fired teachers would complain about the italian school they call them smelly and dumb and greasy so there was that zest inside of l. capone to show the world that the italians really had some worth and that they could accomplish great things so he was fulfilling his mom and dad's dream so capone was looking for self respect for people like him and he gave them a sense of if not dignity than at least people's awareness or even fear of people like him at fourteen capone dropped out of school to work odd jobs he was a candy store clerk a bowling alley pin boy whatever he could find but it wasn't long before the world of crime came calling in nineteen nineteen the US government outlawed the sale of booze this was known as the bolted act or more widely the brody bishop mm-hmm selling alcohol of any kind was now a crime but that didn't mean that the american public was going to give it up street gangs cle- realized there was money to be made the illegal sales of alcohol lana guggenheim is an educator at the museum of the american gangster prohibition offered a new way to make more money there is something that was in demand on the market the market wasn't supplying enough of it and if you could get your hands on it you could charge the price you wanted and surprising nobody this became a major way to make some cash and capone was about to meet the man who would start him on his criminal career johnny torio al capone rusted into this business through somebody called johnny torio janitorial owned a bunch of brothels and the thing about the bra also says when the gentleman would come in there they were offered alcohol they were offered pierre beer and when prohibition came in in order to keep the ethel's going that opened up the paul business for l. koponen janitorial to bring alcohol in mainly to service the raffles torio convinced capone to move to chicago and help him turn alcohol into an underground business they would get bootleg booze and illegally apply it to the people of chicago nate henley is the author of the biography al capone prohibition the attempt to ban alcohol in united states was a complete failure in big cities like new york and chicago and in chicago already had a reputation for having a corrupt government and a thriving underworld even before prohibition chicago became the quintessential prohibition city because of its location it was close to canada just across lake michigan that meant that booze can freely come into the city as an entry point also because law enforcement infrastructure chicago was very thin and very hypocritical and very easy to bribe at by an that's what component other people liked him did chicago at the time was the perfect environment for bootlegging business and the mayor was not interested in enforcing prohibition law i'm wetter than the middle of the atlantic ocean and at the time of wet man's that you were in favour of alcohol dry meant you were opposed he had a wink wink tajammal towards gangsters he was arguably in the pocket of gangsters and so- chicago became really the epicenter of prohibition era violence months and you really had this sort of like almost slaughterhouse environment for a few years in chicago william big bill bill thompson became an early ally of capone's he was the mayor when capone i came to chicago and took donations from the mobster during his nineteen twenty eight reelection campaign this amounted not only to cash donations but like clinton's election before capone's gang rigged the voting roots and threatened opponents this was known as the violent pineapple primary even nineteen twenty the political landscape thomson ran and was corruption britain creating the ideal infrastructure for the criminal empire toyo and capone reforming capone senses that he's in the right place at the right time the chicago is the perfect environment for gangster on the rise to make a lot of money very quickly through prohibition and he's also smart enough to sort of brand mentioned other sort of rackets such as prostitution protection racket loansharking gambling all the usual sort of black market activity he's so he started perfectly situated you know to sort of make his mark in crime as it were though both were smart and ambitious torio and capone took two very different approaches to running a crime syndicate torio was in the camp that keeping your head low was the key staying on top like upon toria was a new yorker unlike opponent he was very adept at keeping himself out of the limelight but he quickly identified polled as a promising up and comer and protege at gradually let al capone had more and more responsibility johnny cario was al capone's mentor but he was completely different than capone in most ways that johnny toria was very much sort of worked from the shadows work from the background considered himself ataman perfectly happy to use violence but didn't commit violence himself has minions do it and sort of kept his hands more or less clean johnny tori uh-huh at heart is a businessman not a thug that's the big difference between him and capone that johnny tara wasn't obsessed with power and control he disliked the money coming in the money was good the world of bootlegging was booming and the outfit wasn't the only gang trying to make off it their principal rival gang the north side gang led by dino banyan thomas repetto is the author of american offi ah was a multi ethnic group of guys who had grown up as gangsters on the north side of chicago and they were we're always poaching onto bones territory or feuding with him torio ever the quiet businessman wanted to avoid all out war with the north side thing but it couldn't be avoided torio did try to broker a an uneasy peace with o'bannon and the north side gang which only lasted for a short while tori was trying to kind of keep it under wraps to avoid gang warfare but eventually abandoned she tour oriole out arrested and torio said all right i've had enough and ordered o'bannon killed and that was the end of the uneasy peace between the chicago on the south side and the north side gang who doesn't want less stress in their life if high interest credit the bills are adding to.

Al capone new york brooklyn brooklyn navy
"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

05:27 min | 3 years ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

"The employees of murder Inc were not only good at their jobs, but took pride in their work. Once again, here is author Nate Henley. There were members of murdering corporated who were genuine sadists that they, you know, they genuinely enjoyed torturing people in horrible ways and doing all sorts of awful things. Nothing was off limits for the murder Inc workforce. They used guns ice picks knives their bare fists, whatever got the job done and anesthesia. Harnessed these brutal killers to professionalize murder. Wholesale pits were organized and efficient. Ernest Volkmann. The idea was most murders carried out by people. Religion idea was these birds be carried out by people who strangers very difficult to track. And with a new way of killing came a whole new way of talking proper business talk. A Myrtle order was called a contract. Now, sometimes the body we left around what they call the advertising budget, somebody who had stolen money, he'd be founds ants cutoff. Somebody who talk too much of his tongue cut out. Somebody would become a squeal. They find him dead with Canaries stuffed in his mouth. These are all meant to send a message. In some cases, the body totally disappeared, which case they had people, they call evaporaters who did nothing, but make sure the body was never found Albert anesthesia managed everything, but not one to take a back seat. He was a hands on kind of leader. Asked Asia could've probably just, you know what? Here you go kill this guy, but he doesn't do that. He enjoys Killian taking part of it and they say they believe he was involved in personally and sixty murmurs himself. He was a guy that just could go out and kill no compunction about it. Despite his work as the merchant of death and a stage show also had a softer side only seen by a few. All these saying is the is the street devil in a house angel. Basically what it was, you know, he's one guy on streets of Oakland. He was another guy at fort Lee, New Jersey in nineteen. Thirty seven. He married Elsa, a Canadian immigrant sixteen years, his junior who loved him dearly. Here's Diana Blass once so mind boggling about Albert anesthesia is at from nine to five during his workday. He was out executing people creating this world of fear, but then back home in New Jersey and his big sprawling mansion he looked pretty quiet life. He didn't drink. He didn't party. He had a wife and kids, and he was home every night for dinner. So just so bizarre somebody. So ruthless and evil could go and be the ultimate family man after the workday as the head of murdering cooperated. Life was good for Anna statia Lucina dream of the perfect criminal organization was becoming a reality and Anna statia was at the heart of it. But stages murdering, cooperated was becoming a victim of its own success. The growing crime wave brought attention from the public and the beliefs and by nineteen thirty five, anesthesia found himself a target for the f. b. they were trying to clean up the streets and hotshots special prosecutor. Thomas Dewey was leading the gang busting assault. Top of his list was crime, Lord, Charles lucky, Luchino, and Julie had a mandate to get his man do at this point has become very powerful. He's probably the most powerful person in law enforcement, maybe even so more j. Edgar Hoover. He's focused on just these mobsters. He felt quite rightly that their powered grown point where the danger to the Republic and he designed, he was going to do something about though he was a very extrordinary man and a legal mind like. Nobody ever seen don't. We was the kind of guy he would sit there and somebody would relate to him a prosecution case. He will listen quietly and repeat it word for word, and then turn around and argue with equal brilliance, the defense case against it. That's good. He was. I, what he did was for the first time begin to organize. Anti-crime in the way the crime had been organized for Luchino in the rest of the commission. Dewey's investigation was clearly a problem, fearing for their livelihoods Luchino and stage and other mobsters met to discuss the emerging threat and a stage. You believed he could solve the Dewey problem forever. Albert onstage you're actually started to fly away to assassinate him, begins to stand outside his Fifth Avenue apartment posing as loving father. He even said to borrow h off a bike and Joan just play with them outside the.

Ernest Volkmann murder Thomas Dewey Edgar Hoover Albert murder Inc Luchino New Jersey Killian Nate Henley Anna statia Lucina fort Lee Anna statia Diana Blass Myrtle Asia Elsa prosecutor Oakland Joan
"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

05:35 min | 3 years ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

"Six months later, the plan was complete when Luchino head remaining boss, Sal, Maranzano, brutally murdered. He could now build a perfect criminal organization. I, he divided the five boroughs of New York to be run by five crime families who along with heads from buffalo and Chicago met as the commission, what they did was take the old society mafia idea and meld it with American business methods. That's really what the new mafia was all about. It would be a nationwide combine run strictly as a business and apprise the business would be crime. Basically, what they did was taken average American Corporation. The way it's run when the board of directors vice presidents executives, et cetera, and they simply copied that and made it into the overseer womanized crime. And. Amazing structure which lasted for many years. So when RAB is the author of five families when the lucky Luciano established Ahmad mafia nineteen, thirty one, he realized even though they were going to work on sort of a business profile business organization, they would try to do everything in organiz, regulated way. Killing still had to be done. Luchino also understood that they'd need a special division to enforce the newly created rules. It would become known as murder Inc. He decided we need a group of professional hitmen who could carry out whatever killings had to be done and Luchino needed, just the right person to run it. So who did he choose? None other than his favorite killer. Albert Anastacia album Anastasiou was the perfect model within mafia and stays here was recognized as. The ruthless unflinching killer. And that was why he got two two nicknames. One of them was the mad Hatter saying he was crazy. And if you wanted to kill, somebody was no way you could stop them. And the other one was Lord high executioner on the idea was he had no compunction about killing anybody. So with orders from the commission, all future murders would be conducted by these professional killers. It's were no longer personal vendettas. They were business Luchino imposed strict rules that oversaw how anesthesia and murder Inc were to operate. One of the chief oils that the commission establish was thou shalt not kill a boss. That's a no, no as to protect them all, obviously from humbling subtly killing them in the name of ambition, it's a no, no, you just don't do it. You don't kill civilians. And the reason for that, it's not a moral issues that it just brings too much heat and pointless. Not good for business. You don't kill ordinary citizens unless they've done something wrong. Here's Nate Henley. This was not because the mob was squeamish or were pacifists, but they were sort of an unwritten rule that you don't kill and out. Policemen journalists, judges politicians and prosecutors because of the intense reaction that those assassinations would cause if you killed, for example, a police officer, all of that police officers buddies, even if they're in the pay of a mobster would be guaranteed to crack down like crazy with these rules in mind and a stage. It was now set to kill whoever Luchino told him to gangsters Luciano. He can't get involved in murder. He can give an order, but he personally can't do it. That's Bernie Waylon, author of undisclosed files of the police and the old days the guy would do it himself. Now. They're gonna. Have someone else do the journey work from their office above the midnight rose candy store in Brooklyn Lucina vision of multi national cooperation started in earnest as the talian anesthesia along with Louis Leakey shelter who was Jewish, worked to carry out sanctioned murders, anesthesia turns out to be the perfect person for this job. He's the girl between who Seattle's Italian guy and a stages, talion guy, but lucky he's a Jewish guy and he's running disorganization. If you saw Burkhalter he was a thin guy. Nothing to really think of as bad guy by the apparently really was. So we'll see gives orders to stage who then works with hand in hand with Lepe and carrying out these aside. Scientists together. They hand picked team of Jewish and talion hitmen a lethal and affective combination. And the theory by using Jewish killers often was this is that somebody would finger whoever had to be marked the death and they would send over in Jewish hitman. And the idea was if the suspect was the victim was talion he wouldn't suspect somebody who didn't look at talion it. So this was part of this entire apparatus and stays you developed us to a fine craft murderer corporated..

Luchino Luciano murder Sal murder Inc New York Maranzano Hatter Albert Anastacia American Corporation Lepe Nate Henley Bernie Waylon Burkhalter Seattle officer buffalo Lord Louis Leakey
"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

05:34 min | 3 years ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

"Was quickly arrested and brought to trial for Torino's murder. The sentence was deaf yet. Even the specter of the electric chair couldn't tame him in prison. He displayed his usual temper and frequently got into brawls, but for once and a stages viciousness would work in his favor. Bernie Wayland explains. He's a young guy on death row, it sinks that doesn't tampering at all. Most guys through that trying to make amends. I don't give the guards a hard time fell inmates a hard time. They almost a lot of repenting and said, I wish I wasn't here. He'd takes an opposite approach. He's still beating up people and their fellow inmates. And he comes to the attention of the Barbara in the prison. Guy would nickname Schiff, but that he was doing there is pretty certain from his nickname and how he became a Barbara who the heck knows. But the shift wasn't just a barber. He was also a scout for criminal gangs outside of the prison, and he thought an stages skillset would be ideal for a particular client. A rising Lieutenant in one of New York's most powerful, Italian, gangs, Charles lucky Luchino. Lucky Luciano was the ultimate mob boss. He was ruthless. He knew what he wanted. He wasn't afraid to go after it blows is a New York-based journalist who's written about the history of the mafia. Lucky Luchino was powerful. Nobody messed with him because if you did end up dead in nineteen twenties, New York Luchino gang was engaged in a violent war for control over the lucrative illegal alcohol market. Ernest Volkmann. The vol stock act also known as prohibition into effect in nineteen twenty. It barred, the production. Distribution and sale of alcohol. It had a youth loophole. Our at loophole was it didn't ban possession which meant people. If you get the hands on it, they would do to drink. This was the the great bonanza for all kinds of organized crime in order to keep up with demand, you needed a steady supply. So Lucina wanted to control the source where illegal alcohol flowed into the city, the Brooklyn docks. The shift believed anesthesia's violent reputation, and intimate knowledge of the dogs could be valuable for Luchino e conscious, hang. This guy's got some potential, and he gets the word back to Luciano says, got a guy in here. The you could really use like a baseball scout says, hey, I got Mickey Mantle here, but there's a problem he's facing that he's an facing the electric chair, Luciano connections, get the conviction thrown out, technicality, his lawyers, Luciano lawyers, and they spring and stager. And now in a stager owes Luciano big. Time he entered prison as a violent kid, but in nineteen twenty two with Luchino pulling the strings, transformed Albert and stages stepped off death row out of prison and into a new life. Here's Ernest Volkmann, which legend was born to the fury of alise. Albert outta be like all the case. Absolutely collapsed that instantly however, made out with a celebrity and the New York underworld. Everybody talked about Albert at his stats yet the guy who beat the electric, Jere, wow. Impossible yet he had done it owing his life to Luchino. It was time for anesthesia to repay the debt fresh out of sing-sing. He was sent to the front line in the Italian and Irish, booze wore the Brooklyn docks, and in no time at all, Anastasia was proving his worth for the Italians names, very valuable soldier. And as everybody discover very quickly, he's a psychopath it kill you at the drop of a hat. And somebody said to him, go kill this guy. He's okay. And he would go without any remorse whatsoever. Soon. The Italians were securing control of the waterfront and with it, the illegal, booze trade in New York, all with the help of Albert anesthesia with prohibition in full swing. Criminal gangs were making millions, but Luchino saw a problem. The racket of bootlegging was based on ethnic divisions. With each group in a violent struggle to maintain its share of the business author of American gangsters Nate Henley. So you've got this almost military like conflict, which is just unprecedented and completely sort of, you know, freaking people out with bodies littering, the streets. The gang wars were becoming a scandal, drawing attention from the police and hitting prophets in the end. It was bad for business Luchino envisioned a better way. We're gonna cooperate. I don't care these Jewish. He doesn't go from a diet. Guess what? Sita's dollar Bill here. Okay. Zelic Josiah talion to you. We sit down..

Charles lucky Luchino Luciano New York Albert Bernie Wayland Luchino Ernest Volkmann Barbara Nate Henley Brooklyn Torino murder Zelic Josiah talion Mickey Mantle baseball Sita Lucina alise Anastasia
"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

"In his autobiography dixie davis later wrote that a dodge scholtz kill jewels as casually as if he was picking his teeth even for scholtz this was reckless usually a top bring a gangster would have one of their underlings you know take out jewels in a very sort of quiet secretive way in a back alley or something or somewhere where people might not be listening or might not be watching so the fact scholtz reacts violently and reacts with personal violence is quite unusual you know jewels is killed on the spot and schultz's minions evidently take care of the body this according to dixie davis was a sign of scholtz's you know degeneration that he's you know killing somebody in front of a witness he's doing this crime himself is losing control of his ability to reign in his his anger or you know have something done rationally instead of having one of his hitmen takeout jewels and a nice quiet way way he runs the risk of arrest shooting them in a hotel there could have been other witnesses scholtz gets away with it but this is a sign that you know he's a slipping a gain and again people are only ripping them off because they think he's on his way out but nate henley believes it's also the personal betrayal that causes scholtz to lose control schultz reacts incredibly violently with jules martin for a couple reasons number one obviously there's the money issue that scholtz is notoriously tight with his money and is furious because he needs money right now and here's one of his close associates battling but he also reacts because he doesn't like personal rejection and you could trace that all the way back to his father living when he was fourteen but he does not react very well at all when his personal soci it's sort of turn on him he takes his personally and he takes his revenge personally it is a danger to be a friend of dutch scholtz and double cross him that.

dixie davis schultz scholtz nate henley jules martin
"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

Mafia

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"nate henley" Discussed on Mafia

"As long as only rival gang members were being hurt the war was tolerated but the situation changed quickly when the violence spread author nate henley has researched the life and times of dutch schultz in depth it's war it's very violent even by new york gangster standards that's just you know hell on the streets and both sides are not willing to negotiate through the shooting at each other and that led into the horrific incident in which vincent cole and his gangsters shot up a bunch of children by trying to hit one of scholtz associates on the street four children were hit five year old michael von golly later died in the hospital the newspapers are starting to pay a lot of attention to dutch schultz that all of a sudden you know he's rising from this sort of obscure thug in the bronx he's sort of getting a reputation in the media and he's starting to attract the eye of the police starting to attract the eye of politicians he's not quite on the radar as luckily gino is he's not quite on the radar as alka ponies in chicago but this is really starting to raise his profile and a very dangerous way and you've got people who are coming into power like mayor like wardi up who would be come mayor a couple years after the war and he really wants to clean up the city and he'd really targets people like dot scholtz so he's gaining reputation in a lot of ways it's a very negative reputation because he's getting attention from police from politicians from the press and a good gangster doesn't want that you want to be sort of in the background managing things you don't want to get your name in the paper and you don't want prosecutors and police sort of looking over your shoulder the war finally came to a bloody end shelters men tracked coal down and trapped him in a phone booth where they opened fire but it wasn't.

nate henley schultz vincent cole gino chicago new york michael von golly five year