3 Burst results for "Nate Dominy"

"nate dominy" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:06 min | 6 months ago

"nate dominy" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Bone turnover bone remodeling. So we know an awful lot about what it should look like when it's being taken out by living in growing bone and comparing the archaeological bones. The passing we see there with what we know. We see in modern bones when tetracycline is being used as a label gives us confidence that it is being laid down when these people were alive and do you think that it could have had some sort of health benefits. Is there enough tetracycline in there that it could have had a benefit to the person consuming it so having low grade antibiotics in your diet could have some benefits if people were having a bacterial infections but we really can't say they knew that it was a health benefit to them although we do know from texts the via dregs are often included as ingredient in medical prescriptions for a roundabout. It's time for thousand years ago and so it's possible that they knew it was some good things. They accidentally getting in beer and bread. So do we have any other evidence of eight and addictions or other civilizations taking antibiotics possibly on purpose. Not that they're taking it on purpose but we can see tetracycline in burns from other populations so it's been founded people who were living in herculaneum. The tom eruption of the serious. I would speculate that any population where grain has been stored and could have got moldy. We'd be able to see some tetracycline in that. Sounds vaguely disgusting. Thing called stick with the regular pill form for now but thanks very much. That was thomson. O'connell thanks to our other guests. This week. Tom higham sebastian. Procurer and nate dominy. And let's finish this week with an electrifying question of the week. Can katie hayler is leading the charge on this one for michael. Why batteries such as aa or aaa size be recharged. What's the difference between regular batteries. Rechargeable 's especially lithium ones. Is this a big battery conspiracy to sell more about trees or valid reasons. Big battery conspiracy her well hair. Three scientists who can root out this recharging riddle. Garreth hines from the national physical laboratory and david hall and dd wrinkle from cambridge university. Gareth fist there are two types of battery primary cells which are designed for single use and secondary cells which are rechargeable. Every single battery in the world consists of two electrodes. One we call the positive. The other is the negative separated by some sort of an electrolyte solution. That is a salt dissolved. In a solvent when a battery is discharged electric Reactions occur at each electrode converting chemical reactions to products on generating electricity. However there are many choices for the electrodes and for the salts and solvents only some of these choices can be recharged which scientists call secondary cells but for others like most aa and aaa batteries. Using the stored. Energy is a one way street. By the battery's rechargeable. depends on what the positive and negative electrodes and made of the most common a and aaa after. He is a cold alkaline. Batteries and these have zinc metro and manganese dioxide electrodes when you use the battery zinc methodist up any form zinc oxide and fortunately this reactions irreversible which means that you can get metal back if you recharge the battery in a secondary cell. The electrochemical reactions are reversible for example in a lithium ion battery. The very small lithium ions can easily insert into both electrode usually graphite and mixed metal oxide so the electric chemical reactions work equally. Well in both directions. This means that the battery can be charged and discharged many times. They're also rechargeable. Al aaa batteries. Such as the nickel metal hydride battery the reactions in this type of battery offer of us with me that you can recharge the battery and use it again.

katie hayler This week two electrodes thomson michael this week Three scientists two types Gareth fist Tom higham sebastian One nate dominy both cambridge university thousand years ago both directions O'connell david hall each electrode single use
"nate dominy" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

06:05 min | 6 months ago

"nate dominy" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"How modern science is helping. Scientists solve some of the mysteries of ancient egypt. And one of those mysteries concerns a long lost city called punt which was hugely significant as a trading partner with ancient egyptian civilization unfortunately while they wrote a lot about punt including poems and songs the egyptians didn't say exactly where it was so archaeologists have hit a bit of a dead end trying to understand how the ancient trading route operated. Now that might be about to change. Thanks to a breakthrough involving animals. The egyptians kept as pets and went to punt especially to purchase bobbins. They also mummified them. Meaning specimens off those pet baboon in museums and critically still carry a chemical fingerprint of where they came from. Originally putting dartmouth colleges nate dominy on the scent of punt. Might have been there. Are two mysteries. Mystery wrapped in a mystery and the first involves babboons because babboons have a very large distribution across sub saharan africa and generally across africa. Baboons are disliked new. Rarely boone's any kind of statuary or carving or any kind of handicraft egypt however is the big exception because when you look at the entire arc of egyptian history you see that boons have been revered. They've even been deified. Have been elevated into the pantheon of egyptian gods so it's really quite a striking reversal to the general patterns across sub saharan. Africa the puzzle for someone like me who studies. Primates is that bob moon never lived in egypt. The holocene fossil record which is the period of time of modern human habitation and agriculture and complex societies is entirely devoid of any evidence of any primate whatsoever. Let alone babboons have we go physical specimens of boone's from that geography nevertheless they must have encountered them because they deified them. That's right so we find babboons buried in human context. They were deliberately buried the oldest evidence Looks like it might have been zoo. One young boone is buried with a young person about twelve or thirteen suggesting status as a pet and then at later periods. We royal mummification. Where the animals were actually wrapped linens and interred in royal tombs in the valley of the kings and then still later period during the roman greek period. We get the period of animal. Colts were an babboons and many other animals were mummified on practically industrial scale. You get tens of thousands of animals being mummified during that period. So they're fool if you've got evidence of these animals being deified in that particular geography you've got evidence of specimens of them being brought to that geography. But there's no evidence that they were naturally there. This argues that any baboons that all there were brought there by human activity and therefore that the question must be from where precisely and they have written records of importing bevan's into egypt they have a paintings and reliefs on the temple walls and tombs showing the importation baboon from a distant place. And they tell us that place. The place was punt. And that's the other mysteries was punt. Oh so there's lots of references to place but but that place does not exist and we don't know where it is right Historians of argued about punt because it was terribly important because egyptians typically when they wanted resources they might Might go to war to get those resources we know. The egyptians went to war with the nubians. They went to war with the hittites. But with the pun tights they sent emissaries they sent ambassadors sent diplomats. This was a very important trading partner for the ancient egyptians primarily because the tides produced very valuable incense that the egyptians used for religious purposes so the egyptians were highly motivated to travel great distances to go to punt for these exotic luxury goods including bobbins can use our knowledgeable boons to workout wear panties. Then babboons are a really great animals system for this question because babboons drank water every day and the water in your environment reflects the rainfall and the chemical composition of water evaporates at different different rates. And so when animals are drinking water on the landscape they incorporate those chemical signatures the oxygen stable isotopes in the water and the incorporates the bones in their teeth and in their hair. And so you get this geographic fingerprint. Were animals been living based on the kind of water and food. It's been ingesting but what about if you do what you said. Which is that. There's evidence that they were animals being held in captivity in egypt you not then see the signature of egypt's rather than the signature of where the animal came from written into those ratios. Yes that was. A great risk of the project is that long term captivity would produce a geographic signature associated with living in captivity in egypt. And so we use different tissues hair bone teeth which integrate drinking water and food for different intervals of the animals life and a large number of animals for example the bobbins that we studied that were at the petri museum in london. Those animals uniformly showed us a signature that was consistent with a lifetime living in egypt and so we think the egyptians may have been They may have had a husbandry program. I they may have been breeding them in captivity. But we got very lucky. There was one animal at the british museum that showed us signature in the teeth. That showed us a distinctly foreign signatures unambiguously non-egyptian so would it to workout. Where punt must have been a you reasoning than that if you triangulate the origins as written down in the teeth and other specimens of these boons. That must be somewhere. Relatively equidistant from these places all close to where a lot of these animals were originating from that that would give you a narrowed geography for web. Punt was likely to be exactly so the egyptians tell us that punt was east and south of egypt and they tell us that you could reach it by land or sea problem is that eastern south of egypt still a lot of open possibilities and so what we can do is we can take bobbins..

london africa Africa eastern south of egypt sub saharan africa sub saharan east punt one animal south of egypt two mysteries egyptian tens of thousands of animals egypt one first One young boone petri museum roman greek period egyptians
"nate dominy" Discussed on Science... sort of

Science... sort of

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"nate dominy" Discussed on Science... sort of

"Have two major Clayton's the Arkansas which include crocodilians, anything crocodile, like terrorists, dinosaurs, and birds are dinosaurs. And then you have the lupita sors, which are snakes lizards to Atara 's and lizards include things like Muslims horses. Well, with some really cool fossil members of that group and turtles Testudo nays. We're kind of unclear where they fit in this schema if they fit neatly in there at all. Well, yeah. I mean, I think if you consider them at third group it's just unclear if they belong as being more closely related to delusions, his snakes more closely related to the architectures the dinosaurs. And crocodiles, what do you think? I don't. On record. I don't know. I I've been outta that game for so long now when I was a master student. I might have had a an opinion that I could have at least backed up with something. I heard somebody say some time. But now, I don't know. So the the other names for the the Arkansas or the Diop's it's are actually for for lots of that tells the. Diop's it's because they have to holds two arches in their skull, basically reptiles for the most part or Diop's sits and mammals are synapses and turtles are called NS because they had no holes in their school. So like, I said turtles had been every time you find a turtle. It's clearly a turtle. This is the one even the one that the previously most primitive turtle lake bound had the bottom of its shell. Even if it didn't have the top of it already in place. So every turtle you're like, yeah. That's a turtle. So it's really hard to figure out what turtles are related to. Because when you find on it. It just needs the the pizza in the ninja weapons you're saying without a missing link. The fossil record is a lie, and we should discredit evolution. Yeah. I don't think you'd putting words in my mouth when you say that. No. But this is a really cool find, and this is the sort of thing when people ask me about like, how do you know what to look for in the fossil record? It's discoveries like this where I don't know the exact circumstances by which this was found. I did read the title of the paper. But the authors of the paper were shouldn't Lee nNcholas Fraser, who's the researcher in Scotland Olivier repel and Jao Hsien Lou it is behind a paywall, but we will link to the nature paper as well. As BBC article in the show notes describing this. But it's this sort of thing where it's like, I don't know the exact context by which they found this particular animal, but it is discoveries. Like, this that tell you what to go look for next. And I think that is as valuable as the fossil find itself is that it gives you the next part of the story and gives you a search image of like, okay? This is the kind of thing we need to be looking for in related or slightly earlier fossil sites around the world. Do you? Remember, Nate Dominy? Yeah. Of course, he's he's now at Dartmouth. But he wants asked me it's like if you could go back to any time in history. When would it be what would you be going to look for than I thought about it for a little while? I think I'd go back to the triassic because I wanna see. I want to say that. But the turtle looks like before it becomes turtle. Now, we have an idea getting closer. Well, those turtles would have needed to go to the bathroom at some point while they were alive. Patrick both agree. So you sent in an article awhile ago this is from last year. It's a piece from the Atlantic written by Elizabeth Preston. And the title is a very intriguing and compelling title to me at least, and it's who's peeing in the global pool..

Diop turtle lake Arkansas Jao Hsien Lou Elizabeth Preston lupita sors Atara Clayton Nate Dominy BBC Lee nNcholas Fraser Patrick researcher Scotland Olivier