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wild re-imaginings of other species

Science Friction

05:31 min | Last week

wild re-imaginings of other species

"LA, Natasha, Mitchell dropping into the science fiction podcast. When you don't, it is now I'm wacky that way, but I have a reason. I have an extra treat for you. We love traits so I record this conversation for what we call the big weekend of books on ABC, Radio, national and I think it will provoke you to see things in a very different way. I ask stories that certainly lay anytime soon especially in light of everything going on at this strange moment in history. Need three Australian authors who have fully milt the creative in crazy power of the novelists imagination, the lightest books really get us to look at the state of the world and the side of humanity. Through the eyes of other species so in Laura J. Mackay's book the animals in that country, a viral pandemic allows us to understand the language of other animals in James Bradley's ghost. Species scientists use ancient DNA to create a single neanderthal child, and in Flynn's hilarious book mammoth. He turns the job of narration. Over to you guessed it a third, thousand-year-old extinct mammoth. Jones increase. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. Hi Blow! It strikes me that this conversation was meant to be. Your novels are so bizarrely prescient right now they bring together these connected themes of extinction and apocalypse and pandemics and the state of humanity. I'm curious about what each of you feel. Landing these books at the present moment Laura. Oh It's been such a strange experience launching booking to a pandemic, and might even more strange by the fact that I think all of books. I know mine does deals with some aspect of those state of the world in my novel is a strange flu. That is called. Sue Flu that takes over the country and it's very very spreadable so having these things reflected in the book and playing out in the news cycle. It was just so bizarre like the three of them. They all speak to so powerfully. It's really weird. I mean Chris. Yours is like the prequel and the cool to. And the fact that we're all we're all. They're riding away. Not Talking to each other and the releasing these books and having these conversations is quite odd something in the air I'm thinking. I've quite enjoyed it to be honest. That's pretty perversive me. And I kind of think that all three of these books they all talk about our relationship with the natural world, and how we tend to elevate ourselves both the natural kingdom, and that has dr consequences for us, so you can ask for better timing. You're all using the voices of other spacey's to Talk To us about spacey's and Laura. Let's get a sense then of your characters story said in a wildlife animal park initially where we make the rough living alcoholic Jane Bennett. She's a part God. Her daughter-in-law Angela runs the park and then this bizarre. Pandemic hits. Zoo Flu. What does it cost to happen? Well? One of the main outcomes or symptoms of zoo flu is that once people get over the sniffle in the in the favor, they can understand what other animals saying not telepathically, but what all the animal bodies are communicating so at first especially for the main protagonist Jane. It seems like all who wishes have come true. She finds it really hard to get along with all the papal. She's very close to a Dingo cold sue. Sue and it feels like it's time, but of course once she hears what other animals have to say this the case with all the human characters. They realized that they're not saying that things that we want them to say they not saying. Hi, Hi I love you. Give me a snack. They've got deeper things at stake and the the way that they think about humans, the way that they are in the world is much bigger and much more frightening in humans would like. And I profanity challenge our role in their lives I. mean describe the chaos Connie judge. That unfolds as this pandemic spreads well as with the pandemic that we're witnessing now people reacting very very different ways. Some people take shelter and hideaway, and in the case of the novel, they often hiding from their hit so beloved fluffy, the cat who's lived with someone for years. Keep out on the straight in that time at other people, venture out and want to disparately. What animals have to cite them and often humans? Seeking an answer, we want animals animals to provide us with prophecy, a God, poetic vision of the future, but of course animals on he for us, and so much of the novel is about people realizing that the animals are are in the world for themselves, and they have they have their lives, and that humans aren't the center of the universe, and that's very very confronting to the human characters in the book. Yeah,

Sue Flu Laura J. Mackay Jane Bennett Zoo Flu Flynn Chris Angela LA ABC Milt Spacey SUE Natasha Jones Connie James Bradley Mitchell
wild re-imaginings of other species

Science Friction

05:31 min | Last week

wild re-imaginings of other species

"LA, Natasha, Mitchell dropping into the science fiction podcast. When you don't, it is now I'm wacky that way, but I have a reason. I have an extra treat for you. We love traits so I record this conversation for what we call the big weekend of books on ABC, Radio, national and I think it will provoke you to see things in a very different way. I ask stories that certainly lay anytime soon especially in light of everything going on at this strange moment in history. Need three Australian authors who have fully milt the creative in crazy power of the novelists imagination, the lightest books really get us to look at the state of the world and the side of humanity. Through the eyes of other species so in Laura J. Mackay's book the animals in that country, a viral pandemic allows us to understand the language of other animals in James Bradley's ghost. Species scientists use ancient DNA to create a single neanderthal child, and in Flynn's hilarious book mammoth. He turns the job of narration. Over to you guessed it a third, thousand-year-old extinct mammoth. Jones increase. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. Hi Blow! It strikes me that this conversation was meant to be. Your novels are so bizarrely prescient right now they bring together these connected themes of extinction and apocalypse and pandemics and the state of humanity. I'm curious about what each of you feel. Landing these books at the present moment Laura. Oh It's been such a strange experience launching booking to a pandemic, and might even more strange by the fact that I think all of books. I know mine does deals with some aspect of those state of the world in my novel is a strange flu. That is called. Sue Flu that takes over the country and it's very very spreadable so having these things reflected in the book and playing out in the news cycle. It was just so bizarre like the three of them. They all speak to so powerfully. It's really weird. I mean Chris. Yours is like the prequel and the cool to. And the fact that we're all we're all. They're riding away. Not Talking to each other and the releasing these books and having these conversations is quite odd something in the air I'm thinking. I've quite enjoyed it to be honest. That's pretty perversive me. And I kind of think that all three of these books they all talk about our relationship with the natural world, and how we tend to elevate ourselves both the natural kingdom, and that has dr consequences for us, so you can ask for better timing. You're all using the voices of other spacey's to Talk To us about spacey's and Laura. Let's get a sense then of your characters story said in a wildlife animal park initially where we make the rough living alcoholic Jane Bennett. She's a part God. Her daughter-in-law Angela runs the park and then this bizarre. Pandemic hits. Zoo Flu. What does it cost to happen? Well? One of the main outcomes or symptoms of zoo flu is that once people get over the sniffle in the in the favor, they can understand what other animals saying not telepathically, but what all the animal bodies are communicating so at first especially for the main protagonist Jane. It seems like all who wishes have come true. She finds it really hard to get along with all the papal. She's very close to a Dingo cold sue. Sue and it feels like it's time, but of course once she hears what other animals have to say this the case with all the human characters. They realized that they're not saying that things that we want them to say they not saying. Hi, Hi I love you. Give me a snack. They've got deeper things at stake and the the way that they think about humans, the way that they are in the world is much bigger and much more frightening in humans would like. And I profanity challenge our role in their lives I. mean describe the chaos Connie judge. That unfolds as this pandemic spreads well as with the pandemic that we're witnessing now people reacting very very different ways. Some people take shelter and hideaway, and in the case of the novel, they often hiding from their hit so beloved fluffy, the cat who's lived with someone for years. Keep out on the straight in that time at other people, venture out and want to disparately. What animals have to cite them and often humans? Seeking an answer, we want animals animals to provide us with prophecy, a God, poetic vision of the future, but of course animals on he for us, and so much of the novel is about people realizing that the animals are are in the world for themselves, and they have they have their lives, and that humans aren't the center of the universe, and that's very very confronting to the human characters in the book. Yeah,

Sue Flu Laura J. Mackay Jane Bennett Zoo Flu Flynn Chris Angela LA ABC Milt Spacey SUE Natasha Jones Connie James Bradley Mitchell
wild re-imaginings of other species

Science Friction

05:31 min | Last week

wild re-imaginings of other species

"LA, Natasha, Mitchell dropping into the science fiction podcast. When you don't, it is now I'm wacky that way, but I have a reason. I have an extra treat for you. We love traits so I record this conversation for what we call the big weekend of books on ABC, Radio, national and I think it will provoke you to see things in a very different way. I ask stories that certainly lay anytime soon especially in light of everything going on at this strange moment in history. Need three Australian authors who have fully milt the creative in crazy power of the novelists imagination, the lightest books really get us to look at the state of the world and the side of humanity. Through the eyes of other species so in Laura J. Mackay's book the animals in that country, a viral pandemic allows us to understand the language of other animals in James Bradley's ghost. Species scientists use ancient DNA to create a single neanderthal child, and in Flynn's hilarious book mammoth. He turns the job of narration. Over to you guessed it a third, thousand-year-old extinct mammoth. Jones increase. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. Hi Blow! It strikes me that this conversation was meant to be. Your novels are so bizarrely prescient right now they bring together these connected themes of extinction and apocalypse and pandemics and the state of humanity. I'm curious about what each of you feel. Landing these books at the present moment Laura. Oh It's been such a strange experience launching booking to a pandemic, and might even more strange by the fact that I think all of books. I know mine does deals with some aspect of those state of the world in my novel is a strange flu. That is called. Sue Flu that takes over the country and it's very very spreadable so having these things reflected in the book and playing out in the news cycle. It was just so bizarre like the three of them. They all speak to so powerfully. It's really weird. I mean Chris. Yours is like the prequel and the cool to. And the fact that we're all we're all. They're riding away. Not Talking to each other and the releasing these books and having these conversations is quite odd something in the air I'm thinking. I've quite enjoyed it to be honest. That's pretty perversive me. And I kind of think that all three of these books they all talk about our relationship with the natural world, and how we tend to elevate ourselves both the natural kingdom, and that has dr consequences for us, so you can ask for better timing. You're all using the voices of other spacey's to Talk To us about spacey's and Laura. Let's get a sense then of your characters story said in a wildlife animal park initially where we make the rough living alcoholic Jane Bennett. She's a part God. Her daughter-in-law Angela runs the park and then this bizarre. Pandemic hits. Zoo Flu. What does it cost to happen? Well? One of the main outcomes or symptoms of zoo flu is that once people get over the sniffle in the in the favor, they can understand what other animals saying not telepathically, but what all the animal bodies are communicating so at first especially for the main protagonist Jane. It seems like all who wishes have come true. She finds it really hard to get along with all the papal. She's very close to a Dingo cold sue. Sue and it feels like it's time, but of course once she hears what other animals have to say this the case with all the human characters. They realized that they're not saying that things that we want them to say they not saying. Hi, Hi I love you. Give me a snack. They've got deeper things at stake and the the way that they think about humans, the way that they are in the world is much bigger and much more frightening in humans would like. And I profanity challenge our role in their lives I. mean describe the chaos Connie judge. That unfolds as this pandemic spreads well as with the pandemic that we're witnessing now people reacting very very different ways. Some people take shelter and hideaway, and in the case of the novel, they often hiding from their hit so beloved fluffy, the cat who's lived with someone for years. Keep out on the straight in that time at other people, venture out and want to disparately. What animals have to cite them and often humans? Seeking an answer, we want animals animals to provide us with prophecy, a God, poetic vision of the future, but of course animals on he for us, and so much of the novel is about people realizing that the animals are are in the world for themselves, and they have they have their lives, and that humans aren't the center of the universe, and that's very very confronting to the human characters in the book. Yeah,

Sue Flu Laura J. Mackay Jane Bennett Zoo Flu Flynn Chris Angela LA ABC Milt Spacey SUE Natasha Jones Connie James Bradley Mitchell
Tech companies are asking their black employee groups to fix Silicon Valley’s race problem--often for free

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

03:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Tech companies are asking their black employee groups to fix Silicon Valley’s race problem--often for free

"Employee resource groups or B. R. G.'s are doing a great deal of heavy lifting within tech companies right now advocating for diversity and advising management on how to increase diversity within firms that are largely white Asian and male but it's not glamorous sometimes it's not paid Washington post technology reporter Natasha TQ quotes a member of one of these groups are saying we joined to the E. R. G. because we needed help but we became the help Bahasa joins us now on the come on his line the touch it with the examples you give of Twitter slacking get hub they'll say they value these groups but what sort of burdens are these employee resource groups taking on right will be fine you know these employee led groups are also volunteers so it's not as though this is anyone's job but in recent weeks we've seen on the interconnected like your to use that experience tech companies have you put together programming for June thirteenth and he has that executive statements about black lives matters put together programs on race and you know along with some of the youths are helping with some of these new diverse the effort click which puts them in a unique position because they've been pushing for a lot of these issues for years and now companies want to pay attention but you know that means like additional hours on top of your existing job and in most companies it's not something that you know come performance review time when you're looking for a raise or promotion this kind of work is not counted as part of your job so I would think that maybe one of the risks of being part of an employee resource group is that if your regular job starts to died falter I guess that you could be retaliated against yes certainly and and I I spoke to a number of leads that these groups he said you know they do the work knowing that it could hurt their career and it you know or much worse than you know it's it's always hard to tell with retaliation what what the direct because why is that but many believed that they had been held back from promotion or raise that they expected because of this work in you know some even had managers tell them to you to stop it and you know that's very different from what they're hearing in some cases ten best seo who might be saying you know this is great and taking pictures with them retweeting their efforts but but it's not counted you know on their career ladder are these E. R. G. is the primary way tech companies have been trying to better diversify their rosters I mean you know I think that there I am thinking that them is like the glue in their diversity strategies companies are certainly you know investing a lot of money in on the expanding on how much they prioritize the issue in hiring executives you work on diversity and inclusion yeah giving money to organizations educational groups that will help build the pipeline for talent in the future and we have three mmhm you know those those are two of their preferred method yeah they also give training to you you are their existing employees on unconscious bias so that you know when it comes to hiring they are you know they're making sure they're not being discriminatory however you simply groups you know they're they're the ones that like push these issues when when they're not in the news you know they're often really visible employees so you know you might have a leader of a black E. R. G. B. that the primary reason that a company is attracting a lot of black engineers so so in that way they play kind of an outside school for a volunteer organization

B. R. G.
The trouble with embryos

Science Friction

06:43 min | 3 weeks ago

The trouble with embryos

"Welcome to science fiction. Years coming to you from the Home Studio Bunker, still. Can't seem to get the doves and waterbirds to be quite when I need them to be, but look in today's show. It's a wild story about biology ethics, politics and to millionaires on a personal mission that went horribly. Why would on the case is reported John Lee? Who joins me for this show? Hi Natasha Yeah. This starts in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, one with Mario and elsevier. They would to property developers from Los Angeles and they really wanted to have a child together, but they were an older couple. Yeah, that's right also was forty and Mario was fifty seven, and they couldn't do it on their own. So in one thousand, nine, hundred one. They decided to come all the way to Australia to try this brand new thing in fertilize. Fertilize Ation Ivf I mean today creating a baby using his totally commonplace, and it's a big industry over familiar. But this was the early eighties when the technology and the science was so new that this just was we'd this idea that you could create a human embryo outside of a woman's womb, and suspend its development in time to it was blowing people's minds. The moment of conception. An event that has taken place in its natural environment, the womb since the doing of human existence. Now it comes in gloss. And with a host of problems, moral, ethical and legal. So Australia was leading the way in fact with the science of RV. If that when the real couple come here, the techniques still very much being Susta, this is experimental stuff. Yeah, and one of the people who knows just how difficult those early days were is Gab, Kovacs he's a professor of obstetric gynecology at Monash University, but back then he was the clinical. Director of the IVF program at the Queen Victoria Hospital in Melbourne. was very difficult to Queen Victoria hospitals over General Hospital and everyone sort that. Is Just a phase. He wasn't going to work. It wasn't a last and we wasting. Everybody's time. When we started doing collections. We have to me. Natural Song goes on spontaneous relation, so it's not unusual to have to collect exit to I. Am for am six I am. So we had a lot of opposition. All IV of treatment started out using the so-called natural cycle method, which meant doctors had to wait for the perfect moment in a woman's natural ovulation cycle to retrieve that one egg. She created every month. If they collected at the right time, it could go on to be fertilized to make an embryo. If they time too late, they'd miss the egg and have to wait another month too early and the egg wasn't mature. Mature enough to be fertilized outside the chances here of actually getting a baby out of IV, if treatment would have been extremely low when the Rayo says rock up in Australia yet, but a talented trio at the Queen. Victoria, hospital was changing all of that, and they were about to put Australia. In the history books so I wanted to do the IV. If in a totally different way to the way they were doing it because I wanted to utilize. Methods developed in animals, scientists Alan, trounson originally trained as a bit and he was to the hospital by IVF. Pioneer cal would car would he allowed me to work with John? Laden to develop a totally different system, which was using fertility drugs to stimulate than women, so we could get more eggs and hence more embryos. Well what happened is is that actually worked? It was the system that actually work. It was a huge leap forward. They found a way to create multiple viable embryos at a time and freeze them, and every extra embryo meant another chance of creating a baby for a couple who couldn't otherwise have one is, but every stage in artificial production is still precarious. So in those early days, a significant proportion of those embers just were lost in the phrasing. Prices will only about thirteen percent five treatments ended with a live baby back then today that figure stands at about thirty percent, but even so this scientific breakthrough was life changing for Wannabe Parents Alan Trounson. An iphone they could cope with disappointment. Absolutely, you know very well essentially because. They understood. This was a very early in in terms of the research, so the chances of getting outcomes would very low if anything happened when somebody got pregnant and is is it was astonishing and so when we go to Ronald pregnancies from the methods with using John in the whole world Sunday stood up and so what what the Heck did you do? Do that. Okay, so let's meet the American couple at the heart of the story Jane. They land in Australia headed. Elsa Riaz respond to treatment will Gab Kovacs was one of the doctors at the Queen Victoria Hospital remember I said they were millionaires. That's important to this story, but back then Gab Kovacs had no idea. Just Shiva's is trashed and she spoke. In Mississippi we didn't look very well off. You ever probably struggling to spend the money to Florida squad expensive to fly back in the ninety ninety eight foods relatively much more than what they are now and with quality deal to come over here and leave over here. We felt sorry for him and most secretary always. suggestively discounted faithful porpoises Riaz who've had no idea that they were quite wealthy. He Remembers Elsa being very dramatic and difficult to deal with, but she had good reason to be all. She was very strong that a terrible history. I'll guess you've gone through Easter beforehand and they've were pretty strengthening to fly over here. They had one child who they'd lost. He was murdered. I think or an accident. Remember the D. Tough, and that's why they're really chained to have another child and off. If they're only hype, that's why to throw you. Both Mario and L.. Serena's had had children with previous partners, but they'd been a tragedy. Else's ten year old daughter had only recently died should been playing with a gun and it went off killing her that he's absolutely horrific are so that means that there was so much emotion entangled with this whole process. That's right. There was, but the process started well. Three embryos were created for the couple using else's eggs and donor sperm, so they had three chances of success. And I don't think we did about eleven o'clock midnight on a Saturday evening and she was very dramatic. Everything was sound. What's the drama? So she would her ex collected to street is beforehand a fertilize, and they would have developed and. Would have chosen the best probably wanting to Australian bureaus back, which would then be tempted to be

Australia Gab Kovacs Queen Victoria Hospital John Lee Elsa Riaz Mario Alan Trounson Natasha Yeah Elsevier Monash University Los Angeles Victoria Laden Director Jane Mississippi Serena
Protests in Atlanta continue after officer shoots and kills black man

Jim Bohannon

00:57 sec | 3 weeks ago

Protests in Atlanta continue after officer shoots and kills black man

"At Lana police protests following the death of the twenty seven year old black man who was shot by an Atlanta officer while fleeing during the struggle at a Wendy's drive through Friday night the city's police chief has stepped down the officer who fired the fatal shot has been fired and the other officer at the scene has been placed on leave hours later correspondent Natasha chances some people in the crowds at the fast food restaurant on fire following clashes with police and National Guard troops we stop people throwing things through the window breaking the glass another person just starting to set fire to an umbrella on the patio outside correspondent Diane Gallagher tells us what the protesters want they want real change and real action they want police officers in their community to be held accountable a family member over a shard Brooks says he understands the protesters are angry and hurt but made it clear violence does not

Officer National Guard Diane Gallagher Brooks Atlanta Natasha
Molly's Back In Therapy

Therapy for Black Girls

04:44 min | Last month

Molly's Back In Therapy

"All right we are back again sooner than expected. We thought we might have a week all, but clearly the raiders. Player. Kerry Washington. Is it possible that each week. It's better than a landslide. I don't know I just. Hung all to each other at all that. Lovely energy more run just converges. To the most amazing episodes. Yes, yes, I, don't know I need to kind of go back and read the see what other things I feel like. Maybe carry head also directed some episodes of scandal. I'm not sure but definitely she did a beautiful job with this episode, and it was her first time missing this, and if I go back in every search and find out this was her first foray into directing like Natasha was last week. I mean clearly they the more high. One and maybe get into that, but they you know they don't mean habit I can't achieve. Some youtube videos we go, just you know. Start right here. Start in our own bandwidth. So we see the scene opened up now. Tell me if I was alone in thinking that. This was a dream sequence. You are not alone budget. People say they thought it was a dream sequence. I'm member. Sydney hoping that it was. Right so from the bed. They totally like Nick's all of our predictions from last week. Because we all thought this was a closure getting together, we didn't. See them back together and they let us know very early on that. We were all. Well Okay Yes, I don't even know how long it has been probably not very long since we last. Lawrence Easter together missile. Now it is basically like they are spending tons of their free time together. But what I liked that saw like despite the fact that you know, I have not this team. You're not team larvae, so not really. I'm Isa uh-huh. But. What I really did enjoy seeing is that they have the computer side by side. He working you, they can. Look like they finally found this space where they are able to sort of be in space with one another enjoy each other joke with each other love on. And at the same time work with each other and that was that was just beautiful love sequence, and how much needed it until I? It yeah, it felt like a perfect continuation, even though he didn't expect it. It felt like a very perfect continuation of last week's episode. I mean I couldn't even be mad. Yeah! I couldn't I was like okay. Okay I see where you're trying to go with this, but. They have clearly really just fall into this very comfortable space with one another ride. It really does feel like they kind of picked up where they left off. And, even more than that just like. Their own able to show up. In a way that maybe they had not been able to show up previously. So like just you know, she's herself. She's the. She's the the improvements that she's been able to make. Since they broke up that same Same love the drive the passion all of that now. Lawrence gets to experience it in a completely different way than where they were before is she also gets experienced him differently because he has driving purpose and desire in the work that he is doing. yes, they are unlikely, said last week very different places we do see kind of towards the end of this scene. This very awkward Kinda. You know combat to use as more at our moments. This very awkward conversation about. What. What's going on here? What are we you know? Then she kinda throws canola into the mix like okay. What's upper that the will your thoughts about that? I like the she was asking questions I, think sometimes we can very easily move into assumptions with somebody because we sleeping together or hanging out together that Oh, it must mean that we are both exclusive with one another as opposed to having the conversation leading be awkward. Be That space just so that you know exactly where it is that you say because we can't move can't continue to move into a space where we make assumptions about our standing in his life, and how it is that they are interacting with others based on their interaction with

Raiders Kerry Washington Natasha Lawrence Easter Youtube Sydney Nick
The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

Science Friction

06:25 min | Last month

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

"They gleason gleason and and CREPE CREPE and and climb climb and and snap snap end. end. They They feed feed off off flesh. flesh. Flies Flies Matz Matz any any culinary culinary delight delight by intrepid? by intrepid? Natasha Natasha Mitchell Mitchell back back in the in world's the world's hotspot hotspot for for carnivorous carnivorous plants plants or Western or Western Australia Australia last last week. Show week. Show sit sit sane. sane. Well Well today. today. It's a It's tile a tile full full of twists of twists and and tendrils. tendrils. Yes Yes Trust Trust Sarah. Sarah. I can I all can over all the over world. the world. I just bought I just another bought another one. Sorry one. Sorry wearies wearies Navan. Navan. I I have devoted have devoted much much time time to a to class a class of plants of plants that seemed that seemed to have to reversed have reversed regular regular order order of nature of nature and and like avengers like avengers of of Kingdom Kingdom have turned have turned upon upon animals animals incarcerating incarcerating and finally and finally killing killing them them whether whether the plants the plants are really are really hungry hungry and entrapped and entrapped the animals the animals for food for food or whether or whether it is only it is only an example an example of the of wanton the wanton destructiveness destructiveness of nature. of nature. I leave I leave the Rita the Rita to judge. to judge. Mary Mary treat treat eighteen eighteen eighty eighty five five throughout throughout history. history. The great The great botanical botanical artists artists have have often often been been women women but but many many of them of them infect infect scientists scientists to to just just without without the endorsement the endorsement of of the botanical the botanical establishment establishment which which often often shunned shunned or or ignored ignored them. them. The pint The pint brush brush deemed deemed more more appropriate appropriate tool tool for for lady lady than a than microscope. a microscope. I guess I botany guess botany has always has always being being an interesting an interesting one one because because I suppose I suppose that that the study the study of of flowers flowers and plants and plants historically historically was was maybe maybe seen seen in a bit in more a bit more of a of a suitable suitable for for for women for women feminine feminine because because of flowers of flowers and that and sort that of sort thing of thing but still but still it it it was it still was still also also quite quite male dominated. male dominated. I guess I in guess terms in terms of the of the scholars scholars in that in field that field throughout throughout history. history. Well Well one one determined determined woman woman on a farm on a farm in in way way belt Western. belt Western. Australia Australia defied defied the the odds odds and changed and changed the world the world sore. sore. Australia's Australia's incredible incredible carnivorous carnivorous plants plants and and listened listened to artists to artists so so with Laura with Laura Skates Skates botanical botanical scientists scientists doing doing her PhD her PhD on canvas on canvas plants. plants. Right Right now now I am I taking am taking you down. you down. Bush Bush trial trial in in pursuit pursuit of her of story. her story. Oh Oh is that is that it. it. Yup Yup Oh Oh cute cute so this so is this actually is actually one of one the climbing of the climbing ones ones that I was that just I was talking just talking about about so so new new sixty sixty centimeters centimeters long long and it's and just it's just spreading spreading out of out embankment. of embankment. He He and a and lot more a lot of more them of them seem seem to have to caught have caught prey prey on this on one. this I one. think I think it might it be might dresser. be dresser. A Men's A Men's Eli Eli address address or or Krant Krant though. though. Draw Draw ceramic ceramic cram cram throw throw or or the bridal the bridal rainbow rainbow with its with little its little sunlight sunlight sticky sticky leaves leaves hence hence the name. the Sanju name. Sanju it it was a man was a man English English naturalist naturalist and Biologist and Biologist Charles Charles Darwin Darwin nonetheless nonetheless who is who a first is a first credited credited with helping with helping us understand us understand that that coniferous coniferous plants plants lived lived off off flesh. flesh. His His particularly particularly interested interested in in is a is a European European species. species. Coatdress Coatdress ERA ERA TON. Two TON. folio Two folio which which he did he a lot did of a lot his of experiments his experiments on on so he so would he put would different put different things things on the on leaves the leaves like like for example for example he would he put would put a a piece of piece sand of sand orbit orbit of gloss of gloss and not and really not really see see any any reaction reaction but if but you put if you something put something like like little little piece piece of EG of EG or or some some meat meat juices juices suddenly suddenly the plant the plant would have would reaction have reaction to that to that and and the tentacles the tentacles would start would start to wrap to around wrap around so so what he what basically he basically showed. showed. Is that Is these that plants these plants are reacting are reacting to to is that is that have have not not gene or gene protein or protein in in them them so so the plants. the plants. I I almost almost instantaneously. instantaneously. They know They know not. not. That's a That's be the a sand be the sand economy economy that that cheese. cheese. I I eight that eight that yeah yeah exactly exactly so so you know. you They know. don't They don't waste waste any energy any energy wrapping wrapping around around something. something. That's not That's going not to be going nutritious to be nutritious day instead. day instead. Wraparound Wraparound when when it's going it's to be going something to be something that will give that will give them them a good a good boost boost of nitrogen. of nitrogen. I mean I even mean in even my in my PhD PhD thesis. thesis. I I go go back back to to Dahlan's Dahlan's original original studies studies and and some of some his of original his original thoughts thoughts and ideas and ideas things things that that with with testing testing to this to day this day and and so he so really he really liked the liked groundwork the groundwork for for set the set foundation the foundation full full of Verse of Plant Verse Plant Research Research But one But American one American woman woman was on was the on case the case of carnivorous of carnivorous plants. plants. Around Around the same the time same time as Darwin. as Darwin. I will I give will you give my you observations my observations on draw. on draw. Sarah Sarah would would have escaped have escaped the notice the notice of botanists of botanists and she and she struck struck up a up correspondence a correspondence with Darwin with Darwin in a in series a series of letters of letters from from eighteen. eighteen. Seventy Seventy one one four four years years before before he got he to got publishing to publishing his his influential influential on on insect insect diverse diverse plants. plants. I had I two had two or three or three species species of of plants plants growing growing window window ornaments ornaments and soon and soon saw saw the deal the deal on the on folio the folio was a was flytrap a flytrap of considerable. of considerable. Palo Palo when it comes when it to comes to reverse reverse plants plants one of the one best of the women best women that I that I kind kind of came of came across across in my in my studies studies was was Mary Mary trait trait and I and came I across came across her her because because he he in Child in Child Allen's Allen's book book insectivores insectivores plants. plants. There was There a little was a foot little foot art art that talked that talked about about what what Mary Mary Trait Trait had done had done to to contribute contribute to to that particular that particular chapter chapter and I and thought I thought wow. wow. Who's Who's Mrs Mrs Trait? Trait? I WANNA I find WANNA find out more out about more about her her de Madame. de Madame. Your observations Your observations and experiments and experiments on the on sexes the sexes of butterflies. of butterflies. Far Far the best the best as far as far as known as known to me to me which which have have ever ever been been made made said. There's said. a great There's a great letter. letter. Where Where don don thanks? thanks? Mary Mary trait trait for some for some observations observations on dresser. on dresser. I am I glad am glad to hear to hear your observations. your observations. On Dresser On Dresser will will be be published. The unlucky fly a common housefly. Would no sooner be caught by the sticky? Glands of it would've once commenced to fold about its victims. It folded from the apex to the stem of the lake. After the manner of its nation closer and closer it held the poor flying embrace until it ceased its struggles when it soon became partly absorbed by the plant. Professor Gray will give my observations on this planned in his new edition of how plants grow was most respectfully Mrs Mary. Treat New Jersey December. Twenty eight hundred seventy one. I have attended to this subject during several years and have almost manuscript enough to make a volume but have never yet found time to publish. I am very much obliged. You'RE COURTEOUS LEGEND AND REMAIN DIM Adam yours faithfully. Charles Darwin January five eighteen seventy two.

Mary Mary Australia Sarah Sarah Charles Charles Darwin Darwin Dresser On Dresser Mrs Mrs Trait Natasha Natasha Mitchell Mitch Charles Darwin Matz Matz Western Australia Australia Sanju Eli Eli Bush Bush Kingdom Kingdom Dahlan Krant Krant Palo Palo
The carnivorous woman  a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

Science Friction

05:35 min | Last month

The carnivorous woman a saga from Charles Darwin to Wheatbelt Western Australia (Part 2)

"They gleason and CREPE and climb and snap end. They feed off flesh. Flies Matz any culinary delight by intrepid? Natasha Mitchell back in the world's hotspot for carnivorous plants or Western Australia last week. Show sit sane. Well today. It's a tile full of twists and tendrils. Yes Trust Sarah. I can all over the world. I just bought another one. Sorry wearies Navan. I have devoted much time to a class of plants that seemed to have reversed regular order of nature and like avengers of Kingdom have turned upon animals incarcerating and finally killing them whether the plants are really hungry and entrapped the animals for food or whether it is only an example of the wanton destructiveness of nature. I leave the Rita to judge. Mary treat eighteen eighty five throughout history. The great botanical artists have often been women but many of them infect scientists to just without the endorsement of the botanical establishment which often shunned or ignored them. The pint brush deemed more appropriate tool for lady than a microscope. I guess botany has always being an interesting one because I suppose that the study of flowers and plants historically was maybe seen in a bit more of a suitable for for women feminine because of flowers and that sort of thing but still it it was still also quite male dominated. I guess in terms of the scholars in that field throughout history. Well one determined woman on a farm in way belt Western. Australia defied the odds and changed the world sore. Australia's incredible carnivorous plants and listened to artists so with Laura Skates botanical scientists doing her PhD on canvas plants. Right now I am taking you down. Bush trial in pursuit of her story. Oh is that it. Yup Oh cute so this is actually one of the climbing ones that I was just talking about so new sixty centimeters long and it's just spreading out of embankment. He and a lot more of them seem to have caught prey on this one. I think it might be dresser. A Men's Eli address or Krant though. Draw ceramic cram throw or the bridal rainbow with its little sunlight sticky leaves hence the name. Sanju it was a man English naturalist and Biologist Charles Darwin nonetheless who is a first credited with helping us understand that coniferous plants lived off flesh. His particularly interested in is a European species. Coatdress ERA TON. Two folio which he did a lot of his experiments on so he would put different things on the leaves like for example he would put a piece of sand orbit of gloss and not really see any reaction but if you put something like little piece of EG or some meat juices suddenly the plant would have reaction to that and the tentacles would start to wrap around so what he basically showed. Is that these plants are reacting to is that have not gene or protein in them so the plants. I almost instantaneously. They know not. That's a be the sand economy that cheese. I eight that yeah exactly so you know. They don't waste any energy wrapping around something. That's not going to be nutritious day instead. Wraparound when it's going to be something that will give them a good boost of nitrogen. I mean even in my PhD thesis. I go back to Dahlan's original studies and some of his original thoughts and ideas things that with testing to this day and so he really liked the groundwork for set the foundation full of Verse Plant Research But one American woman was on the case of carnivorous plants. Around the same time as Darwin. I will give you my observations on draw. Sarah would have escaped the notice of botanists and she struck up a correspondence with Darwin in a series of letters from eighteen. Seventy one four years before he got to publishing his influential on insect diverse plants. I had two or three species of plants growing window ornaments and soon saw the deal on the folio was a flytrap of considerable. Palo when it comes to reverse plants one of the best women that I kind of came across in my studies was Mary trait and I came across her because he in Child Allen's book insectivores plants. There was a little foot art that talked about what Mary Trait had done to contribute to that particular chapter and I thought wow. Who's Mrs Trait? I WANNA find out more about her de Madame. Your observations and experiments on the sexes of butterflies. Far the best as far as known to me which have ever been made said. There's a great letter. Where don thanks? Mary trait for some observations on dresser. I am glad to hear your observations. On Dresser will be

Mary Trait Charles Darwin Australia Sarah Western Australia Natasha Mitchell Gleason Matz Rita Bush ELI DON Dahlan Verse Plant Research Krant Palo Child Allen
How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

03:43 min | Last month

How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

"According to preliminary results of a study of sixteen hundred people from sixty countries, forty six percents of people reported poor sleep during the pandemic. That's up from just twenty five percent before the pandemic insomnia and vivid weird dreams, both caused by the increased stress of the time we're living through has been evident anecdotally and as indicated by a fourteen percent uptick in sleep. Medication Prescriptions Melatonin sales in over the counter supplement for the natural hormone that induces sleepiness are up forty four percents. Philip Musket a professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center said he's avoiding prescribing medications to patients preferring to offer sleep hygiene tips. He's seen that actually staying asleep is the biggest problem for most people and says some of the primary factors causing that is that people are lacking in structure and exercise. Stain active can help you sleep more soundly and boost your immune system Dr Musk's also advises sticking to a regular sleep schedule and avoiding naps during the day. The good news according to Kathy Goldstein physician at the University of Michigan and an associate professor of neurology at the Schools Sleep Disorders Center is that what most people are experiencing is acute insomnia or quitting the Wall Street Journal having difficulty for or staying asleep a few times a week for three months or less and quotes, the third of people will experience acute insomnia at some point in their lives usually caused by some stressor. stressor in their life like say a pandemic the key doctor. Goldstein says though is not letting the issue. Become a chronic one quote. It's important to avoid associating your bed or bedroom with a place where you were awake. Experts recommend that if you can't fall asleep or wake up in the middle of the night and are unable to go back to sleep after twenty minutes get out of bed and do something, relaxing and quotes. Natasha Bouillon a Phoenix based family physician at one medical, says most people's sleep problems right now either stem from a lack of normal schedule or general anxiety about the pandemic. Some tips she recommends mindfulness through meditation, exercise or cognitive behavioral therapy. To maintain a consistent sleep schedule, turn devices off an hour before going to sleep and make your sleeping space a device free zone, consider even ditching your smartphones alarm and getting an actual alarm clock, as for anyone, experiencing vivid dreams or nightmares Melinda Jackson, a senior lecturer at the Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health at Monash University in Melbourne, says quote. During Times of stress, there's a release of narrow chemicals that can trigger these vivid dreams and nightmares in some people end quotes. And, Dearly Barrett a dream researcher at Harvard Medical School notes that waking up frequently throughout the night can also cause people to remember their dreams better. Contribute to the sense that your dreams are more vivid than usual. guardless of how? Your sleep has been disrupted. Or why here are a few more sleep? Hygiene tips to leave with quoting the Wall Street Journal eat at regular times than snacking day. Avoid, napping or compensating for poor night of sleep by going to bed, unusually early limit caffeine and avoid alcohol avoid electronic devices one to two hours before going to sleep, but if you do use a blue light filter and try to look at content that is not stressful. Get Bright Light in the morning. Try to find a workspace that isn't in your bedroom and stop working at a specific our and make time for relaxing activities end quote.

Schools Sleep Disorders Center Philip Musket Wall Street Journal Natasha Bouillon Kathy Goldstein Melatonin Columbia University Medical Ce Associate Professor Of Neurolo Professor Of Psychiatry Harvard Medical School Dr Musk University Of Michigan Dearly Barrett Caffeine Phoenix Melinda Jackson Family Physician
The Gendered Brain - Gina Rippon and myth shattering neuroscience

Science Friction

06:25 min | Last month

The Gendered Brain - Gina Rippon and myth shattering neuroscience

"It's Natasha Mitchell here. With science friction with a question. Are you a two headed guerrilla? Now I ask this question. Because in eighteen seventy nine the founder of social psychology so an important guy right. The scientists gust of Lebron right these influential words in the most intelligent rices. There are a large number of women whose brains are closer in size to those of guerrillas them to the most developed mile. Brian's this inferiority is so obvious that no one can contest it for a moment. Only degree is worth discussion. Without a doubt there exists sump distinguish women very superior to the average man but they are as exceptional as the birth of any monstrosity as for example of a guerrilla with two heads. Consequently we may neglect them entirely. Well that was iding seventy nine but so it is today. Also it seems because cognitive neuroscientist Professor Jane Rippin from Aston University in Birmingham digs into the history of scientists efforts to pin sex differences on the brain in her light is book the Gender Brine the New Science that shatters the myth of the Female Brian. And just before Australia. Waiting to lockdown and boards closed. She join me on stage at the Sydney Opera House for this is all about women festival. Thank you very much everybody. My Life's work has really been looking at what makes brains different any brains different and in fact book started much more about the exploration of how brains to be different because I am an autism researcher. And there's a great thing in the autism community that if you've met one person with autism you've met one person with autism so we really thought we need to understand the variability. Everybody's brain is is different from everybody else's brain and in fact. I WANT TO CALL THE BOOK. Fifty shades of gray matter but publishers thought perhaps air. I needed to kind of tone down the brains of areas I was looking at a bit more Gravitas so the book is called the gendered brain. And it's really about how brains get to be different particularly with respect to whether they're male brains or they're female brains and actually it turns out once I got into the research and really investigating this given. Everybody knows that men's brains different from women's brains and that's why men behave different. Trim women and men are from Mars women from Venus? All of those wonderful sort of tropes that we've all come across so I went back and I had a look at the research. I thought let's really get into where these differences are can get a handle on how brains and different and I saw thinking I think time looking in the wrong place because I really can't find that much evidence and so eventually when I really gone through the research up brains and behavior. I came to the apparently startling conclusion that the differences between the sexes. A much smaller than we ever thought even with respect to brains so the question. Have you got a male brain or have you female brain? My answer was actually. I think a we're looking in the wrong place and be with probably asking the wrong question so I would say actually having come to that conclusion and our will warn you this in case you feel the need to leave. It wasn't universally accepted. I came across this really profound belief that we really have to acknowledge that scientists like me just you know get a life get out into the real world. You really don't know what's going on there. He comes conclusions like that and the kind of discussions. I was getting from the press when I was saying enthusiastically explaining the similarity between brains for example the Telegraph Telegraph in the UK. Quieter conservative newspaper. When Christina? Doni said this theory smacks of feminism with an equality fetish so. I love the idea that if you're interested equality some kind of perverse practice say this is the kind of response. I got to mind futuristic. My finding but this is my favorite full of carp which. I'm assuming this mistake anyway. So if anybody feels the need. This is dangerous information. They're about to hear time to go. But let's just move on this. Of course it is a very old question. Are Male brains different from female brains? But we need to remember that. This didn't used to be a question more than one hundred years ago when this research started when I started to realize that brains were in some some way the source of all the kind of human behavior we were interested in and even human places in society you found that the researchers at the time who strangely enough for male a distinctive view about what they were looking at they looked at the society. They looked to the status quo and they said women have an inferior place in society which they were actually right because they didn't have access to educational financial independence or political of power. So they said what we is. Brain. Scientists need to explain is the fact that women's brains are inferior so this was actually the beginning of what I call the hunt. The Difference Crusade where scientists were saying men's brains different women's brains. Let's why another coach from the two headed gorilla man. Lebron women represent the most inferior forms of human evolution and are closer to children and savages than to an adult civilized man. So if you kind of harbor ideas. This was allies objective scientific campaign to measure differences between two different groups of people lead to bear in mind. Some thoughts bit later on the idea. This complementarity trump being a bit rude saying that women are inferior. What we should say is that they have these wonderful skills. Which will of course complement those of men who are going to be ruling the world so we must start with the realization. That's as much as women want to be good scientists or engineers. They want first and foremost to be womanly companions of men and to be good

Lebron Natasha Mitchell Sydney Opera House Founder Aston University Professor Jane Rippin Australia Birmingham Brian Researcher Doni Christina UK
Sioux tribe rejects governor's request to remove checkpoints

Bloomberg Opinion

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Sioux tribe rejects governor's request to remove checkpoints

"South Dakota's governor gave an ultimatum to to native American tribes to remove checkpoints on stated U. S. highways or risk legal action correspondent Natasha Chen reports the tribes have said no South Dakota state where the governor never officially issued a stay at home order but the tribes have been very strict about stay at home and curfews they are allowing the reservation members to leave the reservation for essential activities but they have to fill out a questionnaire when they leave and come back and

South Dakota Natasha Chen
Mall reopens as rural California counties defy virus order

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Mall reopens as rural California counties defy virus order

"State officials in California are preparing to release new guidelines to allow some communities to relax stay at home orders and re open businesses but to northern California counties have already started to the dismay of the top health official for the area we were able to get the full support of the Yuba Sutter county public health director and the counties to fully open so long as it's called a public health recommendations Cuba center mall general manager Natasha Shelton said ours would be limited high touch areas sanitized hand sanitizers available for shoppers and retailers would be using a traffic counters to measure how many people are in their store so that they follow social practices but when the doors opened hundreds of shoppers many not wearing masks streamed in that prompted a warning from the Yuba Sutter public health officer that failure to follow the rules could bring a return of the virus end of stricter regulations on Ben Thomas

California Official Director Natasha Shelton Officer Ben Thomas Yuba Sutter County Cuba Center General Manager Yuba Sutter
Mall reopens as rural California counties defy virus order

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Mall reopens as rural California counties defy virus order

"We were able to get the full support of the Yuba Sutter county public health director and the counties to fully open so long as it's called a public health recommendations Cuba center mall general manager Natasha Shelton said ours would be limited high touch areas sanitized hand sanitizers available for shoppers and retailers would be using a traffic counters to measure how many people are in their store so that they follow social practices but when the doors opened hundreds of shoppers many not wearing masks streamed in that prompted a warning from the Yuba Sutter public health officer that failure to follow the rules could bring a return of the virus end of stricter regulations on Ben Thomas

Director Natasha Shelton Officer Ben Thomas Yuba Sutter County Cuba Center General Manager Yuba Sutter
The Ruins of Science - astoryof misdirected medical power

Science Friction

10:15 min | 2 months ago

The Ruins of Science - astoryof misdirected medical power

"Hello Natasha Mitchell. With you for science friction. Thanks for joining me. I WANNA offer you to. Dive is really moving story from the history of science and medicine. It comes from will. Let's call it. A Scott had recent past where medical power got misused to fuel the social prejudices of the era and I were prejudices that people still live with the scars of today. Let's not forget that my guest host is professor Claire. Reid acclaimed Australian historian and award winning author. She's host of the shooting the past podcast. Okay so the thing is. I'm staring at this photograph and I have absolutely no idea what I'm looking at. And we are starting with a mystery in the form of a photograph. So I'm going to describe it to you. The chances are you'll be just as clueless. The object is made up of what appears to be a plastic medicine bottle on the bottle. It says log actal fifty mega grams. Poison and cascading from the bottom is a long. Khloe a tube the to be saw long. It's coiled around itself like a Pretzel and at the end of the tube is a tiny metal bell. And that's it. That's why I can't stop staring at these fighter. The more I look at it the more curious becomes is the object device for smoking drugs. Tobacco a backyard bomb maybe or homemade hooker or is this a police exhibit. Perhaps the long tube was used to strangle a victim or administer a deadly narcotic. I could reel off possibilities till the cows come home but I suspect I will never guess. I'm going to need to call in the expert. The woman who showed me the photograph in the First Place Historian K Davidson. What it is is a penile. Politics mcgraff a penalities. Mcgraff is a machine that could be used to measure volume changes in the penis and this is a diagnostic tool. It's basically designed to test responses to erotic stimuli. What you see in the photo so we can see the bottle. We can say the rubber feeding on the top. We can see the long plastic tube. The metal fitting on the other end of that tube would go into a machine which is called a transducer and a transducer is a is an electric machine that measures volume change and that transducer would be connected to people might be familiar with the image of a polygraph. So you have a sort of a Pencil. Attached to a lever that that records changes on a piece of paper and the piece of paper moves through the machine. So get at. The end is a nice lawn which indicates win volume has increased and win. It has decreased. This particular pufus mcgraff in this photo was made by Australians. Archivist Neil McCarthy and this particular photo comes from his personal archive so the object in the photo is a penile. Plethora mcgraff something. I've never heard of before. Let Alone Sane K. Davison has the photo because she's researching the work of Dr Neal mcconnachie as part of her PhD into the history of aversion therapy. In Australia. Aversion therapy cared explained to me was a form of treatment for homosexuality. Remember that in the nineteen sixties when mcconnachie was practicing homosexuality was not only classified as a mental disorder but was infected legal to find out more of the story behind this bizarre diagnostic device. I've come to the Sydney of retired archivist Fabian. Lo Schiavo in Nineteen seventy-one Fabian. Was a patient of Dr mcconnachie. Fabian is warm and inviting but I have to admit he's home is one of the most curious places I've ever been. There's a massive wooden church altar next to the bathroom and every inch of wall and surface base is covered in images of Jesus various popes and random sites. Some classical other satirical fabens house is like a gallery of religious iconography. So how did his life intersect with Dr mcconnachie? And the object in this photo this to Fabian. Is the one that love that intimacy off and then the other one that high status and wanted to get rid of my sexuality in pain told it was his doctor who would do that and professor maccormick. He said to me what we are going to do for. You is Gut. We're going to be out of the inhibit your sexuality and that will mean you might be compelled to go and do the things that are upsetting you visit saw Thought might be able to get rid of my sexuality altogether and maybe go back to the seminary late law with these troubling desires. Look innocent enough. Not Young People Hitchhike but sometimes a homosexual who prey on those least able to defend themselves. And it's looking but then during lunch row showed him some pornographic one never knows when the homosexuals about you may appear. Norman may be too late when you discover he is mentally ill so it's very strong message that you're receiving from your family from society from the medical establishment that you have a problem and you can overcome this problem through treatment. Yes yes but they were. Country Voices My biggest and longest friend from third class. He was in a relationship in Melbourne. He begged me to come and visit him. Then he said Hit with his. Papal is now the church across Lawrence said it's not necessary to do this They were country voices but chose not to heal them anyway. I went as strong as the ones that was saying to me. I could start a whole new life now without this. The winning the next thing that exposes me to sadness in Heart. I can sickness to say thing bashed up everything. Tell me what you say when you look at these fodder. We'll see container. Scott Araba stretched over. That is exactly the thing that I had to put. My pain assumed to win. Always having a version therapy when our look at it brings back a certain embarrassment? Because I had to. I'm doing my trousers and pulled down to put that thing on and Felt very uncomfortable embarrassed but most of the time finding myself in another person who was operating the thing in the room but on Asian a group of Medical Students Kinda mean and really felt very distressed embarrassed. So when I look at this photo I know that that's the thing that pay used. And can you describe that treatment tune your they put the wires on your fingers and then put your penis in that thing that is ineffective graph They knew set down and you wanted and sometimes a slide would come up and you get a shock. Sometimes you wouldn't get a shock. Old Saturday was strange. Very strange what we called it. I video I guess of trains coming. In and out of stations and raid spots ingrain spots on screen also very evenly into main shaky looking film of a lot. Nike Guidi toweling in a Nike. Man's hailing and in the tryon would come in again and people be getting on the train and often Redfin station all the all reckless as we cold. Now and then you'd white and in a slide which it you'd selected so he before the treatment are into look at hundreds and hundreds of sides and make a night of the ones who were exciting to look at as exciting or think so but I think I said Erotic very coy and still an adult language. But certainly they were three or four at the most out of hundreds Were really lovely. And were NAS to look at NAS to fantasize With the way say and so does with the Wednesday came up but sometimes go to shock sometimes not and you had to tilde assistant or professor what level of Pine. It was from north to ten. And the whole time. This is happening. You're sitting there with your pants down. Here's hooked up to thing with the the middle end attached to the Shane years or any understood that at the end of ninety vaguely when the assistant showed me the graph an showed that the you said this is the pain response. You say say how. It's going down like that. Now you're doing okay and so I look are locked looking at the stars but they know I didn't because sweated terribly a win I thought when the shock and winning my not going to get the shock. Because she didn't get a shock every time like with the slide up and this happened three times times dive just for the week as I remember. And you're an inpatient during the status Ed. The sock Catholic would

Dr Neal Mcconnachie Fabian Scott Araba Mcgraff Professor Professor Claire Natasha Mitchell Reid Australia Nike Khloe Sydney Lo Schiavo K Davidson Neil Mccarthy Redfin Shane Thought K. Davison
Nature, or nurtured? A politicised virus-origin hunt

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:43 min | 2 months ago

Nature, or nurtured? A politicised virus-origin hunt

"The origin of the novel Corona Virus Wear and POW. Actually I infected. Human has become more than a scientific question yesterday. President Donald Trump claimed he had seen evidence that the virus came from a laboratory in China will look at exactly where it came from who it came from how it happened. Separately and also scientifically. So we're going to be able to find at my question is. Have you seen anything at this point that gives you a high degree of confidence that the Wuhan Institute of Urology was the origins virus? Yes that's not what Mr Trump's own intelligence services have suggested they say they've seen no evidence of genetic engineering and that's what scientists are saying so far too but the story is nowhere near complete before the initial outbreak. In a Chinese city of Wuhan. The trail goes cold. There's much more than a blame game at stake here. Finding out exactly how. This latest corona virus made the leap into humans is vital putting a stop to future outbreaks over the last twenty years. Humans have been hit three times by Corona viruses that cools fatalities. Natasha Luder is our health policy editor. The first signs of trouble were in two thousand two. When saws entered human population. The second sign of trouble was in two thousand twelve when mesmerized somewhere in the Middle East and now the question everybody in the Raji and epidemiology wants answered is where exactly Saws Kobe. To the virus that causes coded nineteen came from are the potential origins of this corona virus. Well the main theory is that this virus jumped from an animal probably in the city of Wuhan towards the end of last year another theory. Is that the spillover event as they're called happened somewhere else and the virus actually has been spreading in humans unnoticed for some time and it arrived in the food markets on was simply kind of amplified in the unsanitary conditions that the Wuhan Market was Warren of little shops. The animals are being gutted that kept in cages on top of each other and it sounds really kind of unsanitary. The third theory which is seen as less likely is that it leaked from Lavar trade. That was handling viruses. And why is it so important to address that question specifically the origin question? A number of reasons the most important being that if there's a precursor virus that is circulating currently in an animal now in China it could jump over into humans again and could cause another outbreak if we can find out how this virus jumped over into humans the maybe we can stop these kind of things happening again in the future. Where does the research point so far with the current state of play in terms of an origin most human corona viruses like saws covy to have animal origins both saws original saws on murders that ancestral virus was about that bat virus then transferred into an intermediate animal and then jumped into humans? We already know that there is a bat virus that look similar to size covy too so we have some clues that are pointing in that direction too. Why is the hunt on for an intermediate animal? Why is it so certain? Hasn't come directly from bats. Well it is possible that it came directly from bats but the fact is the humans. Don't have much contact with bats. And so the way that we have had viruses before that have ultimately oath origin tobacconists through an intermediate species with Mas. The Bat virus jumped into camels in the case of Sauce. Kofi we don't know what the intermediate species is this being a lot of speculation people wondering about penguins. We know that it's the virus could transfer into cats. It could be any of a number of animals. You keep saying jumping and transference. How exactly does that happen? I is it changing all the time. And so if you imagine you've got a virus in a bat and every time it reproduces though be an era a genetic mutation and so they changed. Just slowly through random mutation. That's one way but if there are two different viruses in the SAIMAA animal on Bass do carry a number of different current viruses. What happens is the two different viruses can exchange genetic information through something called recombination and recombination allows for kind of big shifts in the way that a virus works and so you can exchange loss of genetic material between two devices will unavoidable questions. Here is the line of inquiry about not having been a complete random event about it being engineered in a lab some conspiracy theorists would suggest scientists have looked at at theory Eliana and they dismissed quite quickly and said it just doesn't like it's been genetically engineered if you were going to genetically engineered virus you would take bits of. Barr says that exist you Bolton together to create something new and that isn't the case this sequences completely novel. It looks like it's the product of some sort of naturally evolutionary process. So we can rule out the genetic engineering but we can't rule out is a laboratory release a tall. There's no doubt that to laboratories in will hand were working with back Corona viruses. But some people have pointed out that with lots of people handling bats in these laboratories. Isn't it possible that the bat virus jump straight from the baton to human who is infected in some kind of laboratory accident and who then carried it into the city of Wuhan Festival? It's very difficult. Proven negative and so one of the concerns about this hypothesis is while it's a completely reasonable question to ask. The question has become quite political. Nasty Way I'm not ready to rule out the possibility of a laboratory origin but I think it has to be one of the less likely options that we are pursuing. If we'RE GONNA get distracted by essentially politicians trying to score points win. Lose sight of the science questions which important public health will permit to be distracted. Though you say people are in these high security labs that is to say these leaks. Don't happen I mean truly they do. Yeah I mean we get leagues all the time. You have leaks from arteries around the world. The math outbreak in Britain came from laboratory. You've had saws escape in China twice. You've had outbreaks in US laboratories. I mean remember the Dod. It managed to send live anthrax in the post to over two hundred countries around the world. I think you need to take a step back Jason. When saws broke out when I broke out when AIDS broke out there. Were PEOPLE READY WITH SERIOUS. These genetically engineered viruses and they all turned out not to be true and so it is a very human thing to speculate that that's swear novel virus comes from but all I can turn back to is science and say while it doesn't look like one. Do you have a sense of science will ever pin this down? We'll we know what the intermediate animal was or or indeed could be or where we might expect to see future corona viruses pop out and be able control that in some way. So I'm not to mistake. I think we will get to all of these questions. One thing we do is we can start looking at blood samples from humans going back into November and figuring out if they have antibodies to saws copay. And that would give us some idea of whether this virus really did start on that focal point of the Wuhan market which it may not have done or were circulating more widely in Wuhan off further beyond what scientists also need to do is interview in detail. The early cases for that. Some cooperation from the Chinese would be very useful. I do have concerns the that the charge nature of the debate is making it more difficult for the Chinese to be supportive open and welcoming to outside scientific inquiry exchange of information between scientists happened before this and it will happen after this. I would guess it would be happening. A little bit more consistently and openly. Were not for the fact that this has become such a political hot potato

Wuhan Wuhan Market China Wuhan Institute Of Urology President Donald Trump Wuhan Festival Middle East Natasha Luder Lavar Aids Kofi Editor United States Eliana Barr Britain Jason
Los Angeles study suggests virus much more widespread

Forum

11:29 min | 2 months ago

Los Angeles study suggests virus much more widespread

"George Rosenberg epidemiologist UC San Francisco is with us Natasha cheetah is also with us infectious disease expert at Johns Hopkins medicine and science reporter Lesley McClurg and we've been talking a lot about the Stanford study which found that far more what is far more widespread coronavirus infection rates in previously thought Leslie McCurdy was gonna run down from you about the U. S. C. study how it differs and what it actually tells us in conjunction with a separate study or against we're talking about that the USC study looking at Los Angeles county yes yes there in in Los Angeles county I mean both studies basically find that the antibody rate is much higher indicated many more people had antibodies than than previously thought so in Los Angeles county researchers looked at about eight hundred and forty six people and they found that up to five point six percent of the county's adult population carried antibodies to the corona virus if that's accurate that would mean that more than four hundred thousand residents have been exposed to the virus and you know for comparison only eight thousand cases have been confirmed and you know around that around eighty eight thousand cases here in early April so when this when this study was done it was like a thousand cases so you know we're looking at four hundred forty two thousand verses eight thousand so if these test results are accurate which you know as the other guests have pointed out there's a lot of questions about our ability to know if antibody testing is really working but either way there may be many more cases than we thought and the prevalence of the virus in the community is likely much higher than we think in a tweet George was very from a listener named Michael says the criticism I heard as a Stanford study wasn't the people tested were not a random sampling of county residents well that is a criticism they tried to adjust for the advertisement the recruitment was through Facebook interesting idea but there's you know there's always there's there's sort of nagging suspicion that people who participated may have had like a like a previous like a previous caller discussed you may have had symptoms of thought they might have been infected and and went to participate in the study for that reason so that would skewer towards higher results obviously you need a perfect you know you'd come up with the perfect estimate for the county you need a perfect example and you know that that's just the problems of epidemiology it's a it's a a trade off between efficiency and cost and get imperfection on the other hand and you know what yeah well I just answer a question from a listener who says there must be antibodies formed or there wouldn't be a peak and decline afterwards an incidence well antibodies yeah that is it if they're older there's old infection antibodies are measuring older infection as Dr cheetah says it's you know they peak at around eleven twelve we first can measure antibodies around eleven or twelve days post initial infection so yeah they reflect what's happened in the past in the and to the extent that we see out of bodies it's question not up with whether they're there or not but how many are there what's the what proportion of the study population at positive antibody test we know that your antibodies we know that job bad days probably peaked here last week and we know that we're gonna have you know that there's been a faction circulating let me go to another caller and Jill is joining us next from Oakland show you're on the air welcome thank you for taking my call so I'm wondering when antibody testing is going to be available to the public I believe that I have both made back in late January and I contracted it from going to the pharmacy I was sick for over ten days had all the symptoms other than ammonia didn't go it down inspiratory system and I've been asking my doctor and health care provider for an antibody cast and they keep saying out loud not approved by the FDA do we have any idea when they're coming out let's have a clear sense of life here I think I think that the reason I'm I'm pausing is that you know because these antibody test are not necessarily accurate we're gonna get a lot of marketing I think we're gonna get point of sales and direct consumer tests on the market you know I think there's like ninety something available as George pointed out so but using those tests to determine whether or not you had the virus is questionable at this point because the thirties test are not necessarily reliable and there are a few that the FDA has approved but even those were really pushed through much quicker than we normally would we are really in an interesting moment you know for some contacts as a science reporter at these two studies that we're talking about this morning we never would have gone to print onto pre publications in a past era you know a few months ago if you if I was given a press release about two studies that were not in an esteemed journal and had been here if you would we never would have brought that information forward to the public but we're in a very different era so to address the caller's question antibody testing could be available you know very soon but whether or not the test results are accurate and really tell you whether or not you have the virus is you know really still yet to be determined and again if you have questions or would like to join us you can do so at eight six six seven three three six seven eight six let me go back to unitas cheetah a good question from Joe's question is the relevance of antibody testing what is relevant to have the test for figuring out when to end or loosen shelter in place well that's a great question and I think there's been a little bit of confusion and conflation around the wall of serologic antibody testing with regards to public health measures to you know ease up restrictions so it's one part of the arsenal of helping us control and the pandemic what what anybody can do for us is you know what we know is there something called her to me which is once another people in a population are immune to a specific infection it tends to keep infections at bay whether or not there's enough herd immunity is partially dependent on how infections and infection is so for example with measles which is I think one of the most infectious diseases out there you have to we will reach levels above ninety percent immunity to prevent outbreaks of happening some experts have estimated that given that the transmissibility and effectiveness of sars could be too we probably need somewhere between fifty and sixty percent of the population to be infected to upgrade amenities so what what's your article testing computer in terms of clinical easing of restrictions is give us a snapshot of where we are as a community in terms of how many people could potentially have immunity and again this this is provided that the tests are actually testing for true in unity but without other measures like aggressive contact tracing these meaning you know a health department here is about a case they go they find that case they test them and then make sure that that person is quarantining themselves and then test all the people who work closely connected to that person find more cases Quintino sites without those kinds of measures we cannot mitigate the epidemic and just knowing so logic testing is not going to help us in terms of opening back up easing restrictions etcetera unless we have that other piece of things which is aggressive contact tracing I do after a few days but I think we're a few months out from the reader program we did a whole hour contact racing I think it's interval just as you're saying it is but science is moving very quickly or at least trying to I'm wondering though since you mention her community what you would say in response to a listener name Angela who writes I've heard that Sweden is about to return immunity status my concern is that by isolating are we not creating a situation we are less likely to develop community and one of other viruses out there that we could also be susceptible to because of isolation and lack of community development thank you Judy I mean in terms of other viruses I don't I don't know if there is other viruses that we necessarily need to worry about people not getting immune to I mean most respiratory viruses circulate annually and those most viruses you do not have long term protective immunity in terms of respiratory viruses you know I think the question of should we just let everybody going to there's more immunity how to do the bit about that idea flattening the curve and so if if everyone gets stars Kobe to we're going to have the health system completely overwhelmed because even if you know the the the mortality rates are you know lower than what's been anticipated you're still going to have a lot of people going to the hospital needing to be an icy use etcetera and then even if we're talking about they were saying the fifty to sixty percent of the population of the United States needs to be immune to have herd immunity that is fifty to sixty percent of millions of people and then even if you have a mortality rate that's lower than what's been projected you're still looking at around you know sixty thousand or more people dying from sars Kobe to and I think the question is are we as a country ready to look each other in the eye and say that you know that's a that's a consequence willing to take and again I think what we focus a lot of mortality rate but we're not looking at again hospitalizations people going to the intensive care unit the stock quote les of people's health from having those experiences and what that does I think it's hard to incorporate all of that I think it's safe to say there's a major chasm between to detecting antibodies and interpreting them I think I've learned that from the stating that I've been doing index rose were do you have a comment about Sweden's approach no shelter in place order relying on people use common sense for more calorie rate six times out of Norway I think it's a failed experiment as far as I can tell a doctor doctors she was totally right we could do this assuming we know what antibody positivity mac but it would be that that the cost you remember the original projections are two point to one point seventy two point two million deaths in the US yes seems like pretty big cost to me water you can just hang tight and wait for vaccines also yeah I don't think it's a I don't think it's a great idea well since you mentioned that scene this is a little bit ominous question from a listener and polishes its antibodies formed or not neutralizing doesn't that mean that any vaccine might not be protective no I don't think so I we it has to be directed to I think an act of a vaccine directed against the part of the of the covert nineteen virus the stars Kobe to virus that attach is to the to epithelial cells through the Asian hub is to enable our receptor site you directed antibodies against that part of the that part of the virus the so called spike protein I think that has a high likelihood of producing immunity and that's in fact when we do look for neutralizing antibodies that's those are the types of antibodies that come that come up that are specific for that piece of the virus the part that attach as they were not saying then that sorry we're not saying that the infection isn't producing a body or you talking about it I think we're just saying we don't know if that's the case yet and can you answer a question from another listener doctor to entice you cheat against infectious disease expert Johns Hopkins medicine listen once in

San Francisco Natasha Cheetah Johns Hopkins Medicine Lesley Mcclurg Leslie Mccurdy George Rosenberg Reporter Stanford
Emergency room doctors facing pay cuts and understaffing

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

02:00 min | 2 months ago

Emergency room doctors facing pay cuts and understaffing

"Tonight we're learning more about how the pandemic is affecting some of this country's most important health care workers we spoke with the ER doctors in nearly a dozen states who say they're taking pay cuts of up to forty percent the American college of emergency physicians says cutting benefits and ships could for some emergency rooms to shut down nicotine's has more on the financial fallout E. R. Dr Leslie Simon is chair of the emergency medicine department at the Mayo Clinic and is seeing patients with COPD symptoms daily when you go through the stages of grief and you get paid kind of melted under team just took a ten percent salary reduction a consequence of the hospital's anticipated three billion dollar revenue loss we still have two loans we have kids to send to college we have mortgages Mayo Clinic is among thousands of hospitals across the country losing money fast most make half or more of their revenue from elective procedures which have been put on hold add to those losses at least a thirty percent decline in emergency room visits since the pandemic started due to patients staying at home out of fear of contracting the corona virus do you worry that somebody our rooms across the country are so inadequately staffed back lines may not be at risk I think it's possible I also think a lot of them aren't rests for closing one ER doctor who would not speak on camera told us her hours were cut by about fifty percent and that she is now the only E. R. doctor during her shift down from four making her responsible for up to forty beds Dr Natasha Kay who tested seventeen patients for covert just yesterday agreed to speak if we didn't use her last name we are for afraid to come in to work in the ER and now she says also afraid to lose her job we feel like our jobs are more valuable now than ever it's a little difficult to really digest what happened it doesn't really change our attitude going into work Niki Batiste CBS news New York

American College Nicotine Dr Leslie Simon Mayo Clinic Dr Natasha Kay ER New York Copd E. R. Niki Batiste CBS
"natasha" Discussed on What I Wore When

What I Wore When

01:41 min | 3 months ago

"natasha" Discussed on What I Wore When

"I WANNA ask a couple of really quick questions kind of like speed rounds or just the first thing that comes into your head. And what's the last thing you bought doesn't have to be closed? But what is the last thing that you bought in Sephora bore some eyeliner and a bunch of like like perfume? I don't remember what it's called Bo. Hime the Perfume School Baheen and the eyeliner was Kaplan de. How'd you fall asleep at night? Do you have a ritual? Is there something specific that you do? Do you have to watch a certain show or listen to a certain Song I love? I listened to Juanita like pushed me really in his own. Like I love it and I also meditate yoga glow at a US and I like. Yeah I it's not like a ritual. There's just like like something I can hear. What was your first concert? I think it was. U2 that's a good one yeah so last book you read I'm reading about cold. Had Baby makes three which is about how to. Kinda like. Make sure you keep you put relationship. I when you're when you have a baby what's the last thing you ate salad in the car on the way so if you could go back in time right now and tell Natasha you know in two thousand three writing unwritten if you could go back and give her some advice something that you've learned now would you. What would you tell that girl in the two tank tops? Yes well say you're in for a crazy ride but enjoy it breath and don't worry.

Perfume School Baheen Natasha Juanita US
"natasha" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

04:52 min | 4 months ago

"natasha" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"I WANNA make more shows. I really like it. It's fun for me. I don't know I mean maybe I was just wondering if it's like something else is driving you but anyway regardless it's very inspiring you don't have the money hit me up for like anything you need. I WANNA I WANNA be a part you know I. I WANNA help as much as I can. But I'm not good at the the research part like I am very bad we've got I love it. I'LL START I WANNA come on your trade start sending you articles. I watch out also I. It's funny because we all feel like we have things to learn from each other. I I WANNA LEARN I. There's so much about comedy that I love and I know there's a science to it and there's things that I don't understand about it and I want to learn that so maybe I'll come in watch timing yet We're like just how how stand up works. 'cause I understand comedic timing inteviews standup. I don't get it and I love it and I wanNA know how I WANNA know. How would you stand up? I don't know if I want to do it. I just WANNA understand the mechanics of it. It feels very scary. How to do it honey? That feels so scary. I can tell you WanNa do it. On label rice jokes. We'll get we'll get your those three minutes together. I just love that as a stand up you get to just like get up and talk shit. Eleven idea really fun and thought provoking. How about your next rally? You just literally made every zoo Allen. My Body's tighten up like this like I know I know it's hard but I just think it's so cool. Talk about a sensitive crowd Might be hard to might be the planes. But I don't know it's cool anyway. We're getting we're getting off topic. We're not off topic but I I do have to ask you my my last favorite question and I feel like I've held you hostage here for a really long time and you probably WanNa go home and US going to get my nails done. I mean honestly. I'm so proud of myself. This has I've never had this before. And it's a really. Oh yeah no I'm like I'm like a couple of months into treating my nails well and I feel like a different person and sometimes I look at my hands and I'm like Whoa. What happens when they start pay shipping? So I broke these two which is sad. But I'm sorry I know it's just such as the Vera problem given all the things happening in the world. Yeah I don't know we'll see so. What's my question geared? No it's a it's good. It's an easy question. But I ask of everyone. Because I like hearing their answers. And it's my podcasts NYC. And do what I want. The podcast is called work in progress. And when that when you hear that phrase what comes to mind as a work in progress in your life I mean the obvious one us. Does everyone say that? No really what do you mean us like like like humanity well like? Don't you feel like you're a work in progress? Oh yeah I mean I feel like I said stupid things on on this show and the next one will be better. I mean I don't know I feel like we're all kind of our. Isn't that what we're doing? Every day is trying to like get information and learn things and you know get to higher places I guess. Yeah that seems like is this a trick question feels right at all. I mean my house needs work. That's a work in progress. That's the thing to do love decorating. God I know the Rosebowl as like my Kryptonite. That's really fun. Well all right so you and me and your house and your I get to come along with you to the next rally houses wash coming and if I think of any jokes or something I'll tax them right do you. Do you have like a notes file of jokes in your phone? I'll text myself. God Not a good system. I always wonder how all lake forget to look and then like all of a sudden they're like in the cloud and then I got to figure out how to like access them because they're from two long ago to still be on my phone you know. But there's different systems but I do find texting myself as the quickest way. There's something that I definitely don't WanNa forget because then I'm like if it was important then I'll go home and transfer it into my computer. Got It all right the more you know. Thanks so much for coming today. Thank you for having me. This show is executive produced by me. Sophia Bush an Sims Arna. Our supervising producer is Alison Bresnik. Our associate producer is Caitlin Lee. This episode was edited by Matt's Asaki and our music was written by Jack Garrett and produced by Mark Foster this show is brought to you by cloud ten and brilliant adamy powered by simple cast..

US Sophia Bush NYC supervising producer Vera producer executive Alison Bresnik Caitlin Lee Matt Jack Garrett Mark Foster
"natasha" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

13:04 min | 4 months ago

"natasha" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Answers or calling in if you if you put yourself in your twenty year old shoes or twenty five year old shoes now doing what you're doing knowing what you know. Is there advice? You'd yourself if you if young. Natasha called into your show. That is what we mean about relationships or about anything. Whatever comes I was not. I was not focused on relationships really because like I was so career oriented and everything was so challenging. I felt like I didn't relationships. Were like a sidebar. You know but that's so hard because I feel like so much of my struggle led me to funny stories and things that I all of a sudden came to like realizations that came at the right time. You know. That's so hard is there. I mean I know. That's what's what's yours ooh It is really hard I think about it. It's interesting when you say that because yeah I was always. I think I naively assumed that if you were good and work hard you really could just have it all and that people would would take you at your real face value and it took me a getting knocked around to realize that the the misogyny and the way that we treat women in our business in particular is really real and that a guy can do something like if a girl does something fifty percent of the way and a guy does it. Seventy five percent of the way same thing. She'll still be criticized for the fifty percent. You know that I was really naive to all of that and I think that if I could look back at my twenty year old self. I warned her about some shit. You know to to not feel obligated to answer every question that was asked of her in an interview or be open about her life or I would have. I now would want to protect my younger self a lot more. Because I didn't have anybody protecting me. That's really nice. Then I think like also you know the thing you're asking me is like I have to teach my kid that he stuff you know so I think the thing that held me back is I needed to become like a nicer person. Because I'm telling you if I would have got your break I would have been. I would have been like you know. Mommy dearest like I'd be like young mommy dearest I would have been like because I just was like not aware of other people you know like. Kinda took me a long time and I had to like read. The road less traveled. And get like so much rejection. That like you know it's like that was just my trajectory for whatever reason you know and then I remember I met this guy and he was like told because I was on the set with him like early on in my career and he was like talking to everybody and I was like what. Why do you like you? You're talking to like every single person on the cell. He knew everyone's name and he's like Oh. My Dad taught me that every human interaction is sacred and I was like. Whoa like you've taught your kid that like like I mean. I'm sure like my mom would agree with that but she was too busy to let you know like people that's like wisdom that not a lot of people are able to impart on their children's so it's like you you know. I think that I really needed to be shaken up a little bit because I was very self involved you know and and I thought that like all that mattered was me getting an agent. You know or whatever it was or commercial or you know so I think that hopefully I'm able to always be a positive force you know as you know like then you start working. You're like oh all I can do in the world right now. Is You know like that's one thing I hate like. I have some friends who are like very into issues but then they're assholes to their friends you know it's like all you can really control as your behavior you know and if you can make all your interactions like make people in a at least don't lower their mood from being around them if you can at least keep it how it is or raise it as much as you can and I know that takes a lot of energy but like that to me should be like a personal goal. It's called interpersonal environmentalism. It is a movement. I'm starting to notice something I discussed on like an old podcast but it is like a thing where it's like you know at least it gives you something that you can control. Yeah because I don't you feel very out of control right now like I feel like it's very hard to even turn on your your computer. Because it's like you know it's it's it's a battlefield you know and then everything is such bad news and I don't know how to well. I think what you do is really inspiring because I looked at your wikipedia and like you are a part of like how many charities fifty I mean how that takes so much energy like I feel like that would be a goal for me like I'm so like how. How are you able to do that? Why I think it's about for me. It's about showing up where I can really be useful. I'm interesting so adventuring. Yeah Yeah but I'm I'm genuinely interested in everything and so what I realized years ago was for us with these big platforms. In these big audiences. People will tell entertainers pick a cause and stick to it. I'm like well that's fucking stupid. The doctor would never like look at your biceps and no other part of your body. If you're sick everything's interconnected in the body and interconnected in the world. Oh they always tell actresses that pick constituents like go fuck yourself and so what I realized was. Let's say I picked one thing and let's say it was cancer not everyone who follows me on instagram or twitter or listens to this. Podcast is going to be into cancer and not everyone's going to be into women's rights and not everyone's going to care about extravagant and not everyone's going to care about the environment but everyone cares about something. And if I take my platform as a privilege and pay it forward and try to disseminate as much quality information on as many topics as I can and try to lend my voice and my audience too many good causes out there as I can. The more likely it is that collectively will raise all these issues up. I mean that's so true in so inspiring but like that takes so much of your energy doesn't it? Yeah I mean. I'm I'm researching and reading the news and information on this stuff probably five hours a day. What it's a lot. Do you need just like bodies to help. We just call me and then help you feel like I'm helping to also I was a nanny and account. Counselor I will play with your baby and it'll be really. We really five hours. A day. Researching causes or like and the news and current events and politics. And but yeah I mean and how do you? How do you get like doesn't make you feel like depressed some days as I'm like I don't want to tell the Internet what I'm doing. I don't want to post any pictures. I don't Wanna read any out replies. Don't WanNa look at twitter. Like I just WanNa go away for like two week. No Yeah. There's days when I take a break and twitter's like I have a panic attack yet noticeable but it's also a really important place to do you know just a lot of information sharing and so I take it in that way and it's interesting. I put some guards on my twitter. You know when they made available the tool where you can block certain words and the amount the amount. The percentage by which my replies have decreased is shocking. But I'm like great. I don't WANNA I don't WanNa read insult and rape threats. I don't WanNa read them so I don't anymore and it's awesome. You get rape threats. Oh yeah people really don't like political women and I'm just not here for it you know and when people say well if you block someone then they don't get to learn from you anymore. I'm like yeah I don't care you know there there are there's a way to have a disagreement and then there's a way to be just patently rude and insulting and I'm not here for that so there are people who when they're really disgusting. I erase and I have A. I actually have a photo stream on my phone. That is like a violent and harassing sort of hub. Which is sad but anytime anything crazy comes in. I screen shot it and it goes into the photo stream and then three different lawyers and two police officers get a notification so they can constantly be looking into stuff. And it's like a super shitty way. Do you find that the more you try to put yourself out there. The more threats you get oh for sure and the more you put yourself out there about quote unquote controversial controversial. Things and I don't think that civil rights are controversial. I don't think that women's rights are controversial. I don't think that reproductive health is controversial. And I don't think the fact that seventy eight percent of Americans want to see a criminal president who runs America like an organized crime organization removed from office as controversial either. And if you don't agree with me that's fine that's your prerogative but you don't have a right to threaten my safety and so it's a shitty thing that I have to have a photo stream that law enforcement is on but I do and so I do and you know for me. I'm I'm just like if you think that that these bullshit messages are GonNa make me back down like you. You've never sat with me and you don't know me that well and you're that happens to you. That seems very stressful. Thanks it is and I can handle that. That's why I take some days off. The Internet like Season to have sex. Education just came on Netflix February seventeenth. Don't worry I wasn't counting or was it January. It was January seventeenth. What am I saying and I? I gave myself a day and literally. Just binged watched the entire season. I didn't look at my phone. I turned it off. Actually I liked didn't answer emails or phone calls and email. Um Trash that. And Oh my God it was. It was divided and I just watch these kids like living living their lives in the way that the writers of that show are so brilliant like honestly it makes me cry and there is. I'm GONNA do this. I WanNa do this tomorrow. You need a day just sex education telling you God that show is so good and there's an episode in season two that really one of the characters has an experience with unwanted sexual touching. Which is you know sexual assault the way. It affects her through the season. And then this episode. Where all these girls kind of rally around their friend to change her energy around it. I was laughing and clapping and sobbing. My dog was running circles barking. He didn't know what was going on. And I just was like this is so important. Yeah and you know you need days like that. Well anyway you're very inspiring and potties. I I love Snow Group. Let's do it. Yeah and God. I think you're so used so many people. Just give them money. That's what I'm saying like you're not just happy giving money. You want to actually be the front of it. And that's that's where you belong but it's just like that just takes. I just didn't like afraid to stick my neck out in that way sometime. I get it because it's scary because it's scary especially listening to your talk about these death threats. It's scary to walk around in the world is a woman let alone to like. Make yourself a target but yeah especially when you think about ways to participate and to your point like giving versus race giving money whatever I always think about it and I'm like yeah I mean cool I can. I can write a check. I can't write checks that are GonNa make that much of a difference like some people. Can you know again like around Jennifer Aniston yet? But the way I think about it too. Is You know if I donate money. That's great but I already know about it. So what if I use the platform and run a fundraiser? And then a million other people learn about this and we do it together and together. We're GONNA raise so much more money than any of US could give a loan and that feels really exciting to you. Know it's like the whole point for me is to figure out how we as a collective learn to advocate for each other in better ways. Do you see your activism. As like one day you want to run for office or something or do you see it more as like this is just my baseline duty. It's my baseline duty. And the the increase in the number of times per week I get asked that question ship. Maybe I should run for office because everybody's shooting five hours a day reading the new literally like everybody's like Oh you're going to run for office on my game I ran for office but then also doctoring you. Maybe but like selfishly. Good to be stories. I WanNa tell no I wanna.

twitter cancer rape Natasha US Jennifer Aniston president instagram Snow Group assault America
"natasha" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

13:47 min | 4 months ago

"natasha" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Hi Everyone Sophia. Bush here welcomed a work in progress where I talked to people who inspire me about how they got to where they are and where. They think they're still going. Hi Guys. Today's podcast is especially fun. One because I am such a huge fan of our guests like such a huge fan that I started quoting her comedy album to her. It's fine it's fine. You actually manage to do an interview anyway. Natasha zero. She's one of my favorite comedians. And today we are getting into so many things what it was like to put out her first album working on her. Show another period per thoughts on the phrase. Thank you so much and so much more. Just.

Natasha zero Bush
"natasha" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

10:07 min | 5 months ago

"natasha" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Came and made delicious food today we have Natasha and again welcome to the show you guys thank you for having us well first of all V. X. three mobile food unit that sells like a military vehicle like you guys are gonna be stealing and stuff out of those big hands yeah where did that name come from so it's just we reduce the the original that it's of it's from restaurant her parents have owned Vietnamese bakery for like the last thirty years so it's not the one up on federal yes I got a bigger so much as so many times that I had no idea you were the same place I was at I literally drive up to your parents place to get the sandwiches they are so good but that explains the bread yes what is that everybody was like oh my god this bread yeah your parents have absolutely nailed the perfect French bread absolutely at altitude even yeah I'm it was a magic yeah I was a process and then we had a little bit of magic and a lot of love and that's what you have right now so how many kids are there because you have a brother who who has a different location to so how many kids are working in this business now so there's three kids yeah okay aha and her brother manages call manages both the restaurant as well as the one in Zeppelin station and then he also has it's own coffee shop within Zeppelin station as well very willing coffee so yep and then they have a younger sister but she's not in the restaurant business but she's all this craziness was like I'm out you might want the X. three is just the shortening of that name yes I could not tell you the name I know how to get there I know where it is but I just called upon me place right then sung yes thank you thank you I thought I'd be easier where did you guys decide to do a food truck two thousand seventeen so actually we've I mean we've been best friends since two thousand three to two thousand hour I long time we were out of the restaurant business we're in corporate America and in two thousand thirteen after eighteen years of working in corporate America is like you know I really want to do something else and their food is so delicious but there's nothing out here like southeast everything is concentrated in the Denver area and so I was like let's try this you know and so on my birthday and my nineteenth year at this corporate job I decided to leave that and then we went on this company here neither of you look old enough to have been at a corporate job for eighteen years so if it's thank you she is out of the bodies they would just do that then I strongly recommend a regular part of your diet how do you describe what the same which is to people who don't know it's kind of a combination of get right on that microphone yeah it's very the best way to describe it is it's very refreshing when you first buy into everything is you know we may we make everything we make the better to the potato we make that meets our cells and might we make up the bread of course so everything is always fresh and he's new and clean so but the thing which I did a U. turn out that take on the menu now that's for certain sandwiches so if you are a combination and petty to it though but I didn't know that I totally would because I that's why I started going to the to the bakery because that was the first place I found that had the Patty on the same which a lot of places are doing a Bahn mi but number one the bread no way in hell right is not good friend number two nobody puts Pat Taylor and that's to me like a big part of it that's where the mashup of French and Vietnamese really comes together so perfectly and we make it in house too so it's we purchased it so so good yeah so I have to now go get another one let's talk about the vegetables for second Dave my partner here he's an anti vegetable gosh I don't know okay so well here's what we had to do days like this is way too many vegetables and ice that will take the vegetables off and he took the vegetables often basically out of Vietnamese meatball sandwich yeah any injury that a great deal yes it was great I love the vegetables they're like my favorite part of the sandwich yeah they're all kind of pickle but not in a way that we think of tickling right how do you do that it's a very mild it's a very mild pickle has a lot of vinegar sugar but it's a lot of work because you have to we have to sit there and they can kill every single carrot red eye every time and then they actually hand threats the die kind of the case you did not find to be able to marinate it and its barrels huge barrels and all that well that's awesome it takes like a literally a day and a half just to make enough for like maybe a week's worth yeah holy Carolina labor so that's of that but that's why it's so delicious and and and you know there's interesting kind of flavor profiles in Vietnamese food that are different than other Asian cuisines and in my mind this combination of the pickled vegetables the jalapenos cilantro it's it's so distinctly Vietnamese had a delicious sandwich thank you I mean that's that's do you guys ever do other specialties and I was very bummed out you don't have Libya today I was like sorry my husband's gonna be so mad because he's like I can't come you have to give me some more de and bring it so I was a little bit bummed out about that but you do other Vietnamese specialties as well we do so on the weekends we do a it's hot or spicy duck amazing take three days for us to actually prepare this like a Peking duck but with ordinary chili oil sauce and it's amazing we could get from the bone and we get to the bone and make it to order every time somebody I want that I need to I don't know see why why did you tell me that now starting tomorrow where are you guys going to be this weekend well we the food truck will not the out okay I just you know visit the the restaurant location Alameda and SUNY where you know yes that's where we have the specials on the weekend we also have every once in awhile to above my knee which is a take on a French dip sandwich so if you ever had with the broth hence and uses it you got it so good the best part of the farm honestly I could just go and say just give me some brought her dad hands down makes the best folk rock I always joke that we should after they had opened up the restaurants that about me because I mean if I was his father's amazing people don't realize that that when you're talking about fall and for Americans it looks like fo yeah but that broth has a crap load of stuff in it cooks for ever again it's not something you can just whip up at home you can't do it if it's done right right I mean and that's the thing the broth is like the building block of everything yeah and now I'm thinking about dipping a sandwich in a yeah okay and it is that beef brisket to my god now I need all of this how did your parents start a restaurant here so because back it's actually third generation all my grandfather owned one off of up on the original location in Vietnam is still there and it does help they do most cakes primarily now and then my father actually came over here in eighty three and then actually open the first location off of a first in federal it was all he knew he had worked for my parents since he was like nine ten years old so he actually took what he knew I'm from Vietnam and came to the United States and he used to kind of make it a little bit and he would kind of deliver here and there and they were able to save up enough money to open up the location of aluminium aluminium federal that was the original first location and that's still there that's the one that's mostly the bakery right because I went there first in there like we're out of bread you gotta go to the other stores so that's how I I've been to every one of these locations because of that but what is so basically you live the great American dream yeah that's fantastic and now your brother's branching out now you guys have a food truck I love this I love the I love first of all that you guys are bringing it up an ethnic cuisine that a lot of people may not know about and you're doing it perfectly if there's nothing more disappointing to me when someone says only turned upon me at so and so and it wasn't good and I'm like no you didn't say in which it was called that that it's not the same and then they think that's what it is right you know they don't realize what they're missing right so do you find people kind of intrigued by what you're doing or do you have a lot of people that are specifically say now I know what the sandwiches I'm coming to get it I think the more we do it and people are more familiar with our food they recognize what upon me as but I still feel like it these days people shy away from it because they don't know what it is you know so but I mean at the more we do it the more exposure we get in that we have a lot of a return customers and you know word of mouth like this place is delicious I mean that's why the restaurant is so popular is because I there's no advertising I mean people just now because their weapons have I found it because I went on the internet and I I typed in a real bond I was actually looking for and your your your dad's place came up in your brother's place came up first and then I'll read a bunch of reviews and people were like yes this this is the real the real deal doesn't irritate you to see like a bond made you go into a restaurant like Barney's Sam my GF were very critical of this I think of it but I saw up on me so much and they're pickled vegetables were pickles and it was like no that's not even remotely in the ball park I I just you know just do you but let let other people do what they do Balfe exactly you just bought me inspired I know you know whatever just because I think you know like I said we're ruining it for people who have not had it so how long did it take your dad to perfect the bread I have to know this because I I've only been here six years and I finally made a cake that didn't fall that was last weekend this is an ongoing process Canadian altitude is hard and making great French bread is hard anyway yeah it's still a work in progress actually my dad does little tweaks here and there and it's not a it's not exact science too because sometimes depending of the the weather is a little bit drier he has to change the use the mountain he has to change the proofing time it to this day he is the only one.

Natasha
"natasha" Discussed on The Only Way is Through: The Under Armour Podcast

The Only Way is Through: The Under Armour Podcast

06:53 min | 5 months ago

"natasha" Discussed on The Only Way is Through: The Under Armour Podcast

"So here's appoint, you could at that point, said you know it's been nice. was run, into good. Okay you're running to head. What does that mean? Initially I did think that I would retire at thirty, and then I got to thirty and I was like well. Why did I put that limit on myself? You know I felt good a healthy. There was no reason not to you know so I kept going and two thousand seventeen was a good year, and then I went to nationals and. Three people ran faster than me to me. I was like Okay Natasha. You didn't run bad. You got beat today. And that happens you know, and then there's also now a different appreciation of you know. I have I have a bunch of metals and I'm like. That, stuff I'm not gonNA. Let that define me. We're just GONNA have a blast. Just drive this. Yeah, and then you went and got pregnant, then I went and got pregnant, and that was definitely not planned I. Mean we all know how you make babies? But you know and it was. It was a moment that it was hard for me to reconcile because I. I can say that I. Wanted to be mother just as much as I wanted Olympic gold. It was just the timing of it that I'd always myself retiring and then starting a family right? You're always in conflict. I you know. Thanks for pointing that out. I didn't really realize that, but it's true I mean I always thought that I would retire, and then start a family, and then when it didn't happen in that order. Took a while for me to come around, too. So what's going through you now when you're finding out? I'm pregnant, but I WANNA have a BLA-, CNN. Take this far as I can go, I literally fell to the floor. You fell to the floor and I was conflicted because again. I WANNA family I wanNA baby, but I also want to walk away from this on my own terms. Today I can tell you. I want my son to. Respect me and I want my son to look at me and say man. My mom had me at a time that. She I desperately wanted him. There was never a thought of not having him, but I was unsure. If now is the right time. and. No matter how this plays out, I can walk away, knowing that I've given it one hundred percent, and so I want my son to respect me. I want my son to respect women and understand that you know what I said. Earlier women, we are bad asses and so today. That's the answer. When I get to the trials, it might be something totally different I. Don't know what Alsace between now. And then. The big picture is definitely I'm looking at it I'm I'm feeling it. I'm dreaming. It I want it to be so badly, but I also know that. To get there, I have to stay in the moment to focus on the piece by piece I have to focus on the cato exercises. That are so annoying, but I have to do them. I got to focus on my hamstring assorted day, but I gotta get treatment on my you know. So. I don't know. Now I'm concerned. What is this look like for my sponsorship? My support, you know people think that I'm not taking my job seriously because I decided to start a family. What people would say that to you? Oh, yeah, yeah. Yeah I I hid my pregnancy for about five months. Of course I told my close friends and family, but. I didn't tell under armor until I was about five minutes, and at that point, you had no choice I had no choice. 'cause I'd already made the decision. That I'M GONNA train through this I'm going to come back for Tokyo. After awhile. You can't really hide a baby bump. SUNAU is like all right Natasha you gotTA. Do something here. So I, finally pick up the phone and make the phone call. There were like okay congratulations. We're going to support you through this. About a month later you know. All of the things started hitting the media about what other female runners going through. Dealing with being cut being reduced healthcare, all of this stuff and They actually called me back and said you know you told us that you were nervous. To share this news, but I wasn't aware of the pressure that you were under. And if that's what you were sitting there feeling, I'm sorry I apologize. This is something that even before I got pregnant that. When I talk about being a part of a brand that makes me proud to be. A part of the brand is seeing women in positions. That are making decisions for women. And the fact that when I made the phone call, it was to a woman. That she understood what I was going through, and that was her comment to me that you know I'm not a professional athlete, but I remember having the tell my employer that I'm pregnant and I was deathly afraid and my husband didn't understand. and. That's the thing that I'm even realizing in this journey that beyond the female athlete. It is a woman's problem. It is the American women's problem of. When do I start a family? How do I start a family? How is starting a family going to impact me if I, have a career? I'm grateful that my experience was one that I still have the support of my sponsors and I. Didn't you know the torture? That I went through with self inflicted and not. Them, and it actually seems like on the other side of that. Not only were they supportive, but Paul Mikey. Wanted to really understand what you're going through to learn from it. Might was Paul whispers right him. Before Natasha pregnant, she came to the Portland Facility and met with him to discuss ways. She could improve her performance. Here's Paul and Mike Senate Tasha's actually one of the first athletes. We had the performance center and under armour. She came through initially.

Paul Mikey Natasha TA CNN Alsace Portland Facility Tokyo Mike Senate
"natasha" Discussed on The Only Way is Through: The Under Armour Podcast

The Only Way is Through: The Under Armour Podcast

08:07 min | 5 months ago

"natasha" Discussed on The Only Way is Through: The Under Armour Podcast

"This is a story about motherhood the TASHA's mother. Joanne has been a constant fixture in her life as an athlete supporting her challenging Sharon her on his Joanne hasty. From a mother's point of view. She was always she just work hard no matter what workout you give her. She'll can't do that because she always do it. It wasn't just track and field. It was in her schoolwork. I've never really have to start to say. Let me see you home. Did you home with. She knew at that point. You know this is what she wanted to do in track and field and in order for her to do that she had to have degrade with it. She just woke still look at her now. And I'm like Oh my Gosh. Just had a baby. And she trained literally up until the day before she had him. I never felt pressure from my mom. My mom was always very adamant about me enjoying what I do even to this day. You know after having a kid it's still you know but is this what you want to do? And it's interesting because you know. I mentioned that. She made the eighty four Olympics. She also had the nerve to name me after her. Natasha's my mother's middle name so there was a moment when I was probably like thirteen or fourteen where I felt like. I'm getting to finish what my mom didn't finish. How did that moment? Come to you figuring out. Oh you made the eighty four team. You didn't go. You had me in eighty six. Things were a lot different back. Then where the opportunities in the sport period much less for a woman to make a living in a career out of it was a lot different than it is now. What stopped her at the time she had to provide for her kid. Ho Man Circle this story. Yeah was a struggle but it was a good struggle. Once again Joel Hastings. It was hot. I was a single parent. I mean I I honestly believe everything happens for a reason so it made me a better person. It made me stronger. It made me figure out how I had to just go from day to day today and make sure she had everything she needed and I had a good team around me. I'd never had that feeling of like my mom Shaina leafed through me. My Mom is China achieve what she didn't achieve their means. She has just been incredibly supportive. Just whatever you WANNA do. I'm here you does she. Do you ever have a conversation with her about this. Not that part. I think the the toughest conversation that we had though was in two thousand twelve when and she asked me so. Is this really what you WANNA do? Because if you don't I mean the sky's the limit you can do whatever you WanNa do. She didn't make the team in two thousand twelve. Just the way she ran the race was like when she realized that she wasn't necessarily in the top three she shut them like mentally. She was just like it's done in so when she came off the track. She didn't talk to anybody. She will back to the hotel she cried. We argued and I said okay. You gotta get it out to get it out on me. Then we move on from that so she cried and she cried and then as I said you just look like you want to be there and I lied to. I was like no. I'm good got into but she. She read that it was year after year of just kind of slowly going down and going backwards and then two thousand twelve was like the epitome of like okay. I didn't make the team at all. And that was when I had a real conversation with myself. Like okay girl. We going back to to be a chiropractor. What are we doing? My mom had that conversation with me. The part of that conversation that I left out while she was in the stands at the trial she was actually sitting next to a guy who happened to be a sport psychologist. An athlete has the consider so many aspects of training nutrition recovery sleep mental strength often gets overlooked. But it's what keeps everything else together without a strong foundation. It all falls apart whether it's working through demanding training cycle one event is life changing as a pregnancy. Having the mental strength can make all the difference his hastings once more. He gave me his card and I was like okay. You think she needs that and he said you know. I've been watching you run since she was a little kid and she's better than this when I told her that. You look like you don't believe you belong there. I said look. I don't know who this person is haven't done any research and I don't typically do stuff like that but I just said there's a reason why this guy just out of the blue gave me his called. What was it that flipped? It was your mind that was my mind. I remember the first conversation that we had and he asked me. You know so when you're out there on the track. What are you thinking about in literally? Everything told him was negative. Man The last hundred is GonNa hurt. I can't wait for this to be over. And he was like okay so the first thing we're going to do is change. How you talk to yourself and the second that you have a negative thought I want you to change it to something positive and when I tell this story I'm like man that just sounds so oversimplified but it was the thing that changed everything so I remember. There was a diamond league meet in New York City. It was cold it was raining and I live in lane seven. That's pretty good opening. It was raining and was it Lane Rainy Day and remembering the warmer by literally myself. It's warm it's not raining. The Sun is shining in lane. Seven literally repeated myself. The entire warm-up begun went off Iran fifty point twenty three. That was the fastest. I'd run since leaving college in two thousand seven just by flipping the switch in your mind. That's why old could your mom pick up at something to change. Yeah my mom was there. Of course she always there. She says the gun went off. I took out really fast. Which is that's just my thing i. I run my first two hundred fast when I got to. Maybe about two fifty. She was like she still going. She's still going and then when we came off the turn that's when she was like she lost it. What happens when you go on the track for performance like that lake moments before everybody gets in the block in that time seems to be elongated idea? That's interesting because when I watched other sports and WATCH OTHER TRACK EVENTS. That's the moment that actually like to watch because I think you can almost tell when someone's getting ready to kill it or bomb. It's like a fighter entering the ray exactly exactly for me. I guess I call it a hunting space. That lasts three minutes before the race is the longest three minutes ever. The air is so thick you can cut it with a knife every emotion that you could possibly feel all bottled up into one moment and then the gun goes off and it's like just this release.

Joanne Joel Hastings Olympics Natasha New York City Sharon Iran
"natasha" Discussed on The Only Way is Through: The Under Armour Podcast

The Only Way is Through: The Under Armour Podcast

01:54 min | 5 months ago

"natasha" Discussed on The Only Way is Through: The Under Armour Podcast

"Remember. Paul whispered from episode one. He's UNDERARMS director of athlete. Performance being able to study an elite pregnancy is a rarity so for Paul. This was an opportunity to see the changes in the female body first hand and provide Natasha with modifications to her training when a female is pregnant. They're almost like superwoman. What's going on in their bodies home? Only in strength. Wise and the connective tissue. And they're all windows of train ability that you really shouldn't miss this concept of postpartum two podium is really understanding. They're all stages that you need to go through to get back that all renew meeting positive. It's not a case of of how to baby stuff from scratch. Had A baby in there changes in the body now that are really advantageous to athletes. Hormone me connective tissue. How do we reassess the body reassess the movement and then? How do we take advantage of those changes? How do we take advantage of the increase in blood volume for example so we called it the science of she as the science and then as the things that make us human that you can never quantify and it just gives the female athlete? Just such a this emotional on this belief. This like I'm going to do if I can do that. It's like this walk in the park so if we could overlay all of that objective quantitive scientific data with his beautiful emotional and spiritual side of things of give them both and understand how it can come together and how we can use that new motivation to take trading to a whole new level. It's it really isn't advantage for the female athlete..

director Natasha Wise
"natasha" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

Breaking the Underdog Curse

10:45 min | 6 months ago

"natasha" Discussed on Breaking the Underdog Curse

"So they're just shadowing existing. Ah Practice number. Because that's huge and we're going to start doing this tour. We just do that throughout the year even as a season CA I think it's a good idea to kind of yeah. The doctor language took. I'm in a good way to kind of solidify our own languages as to Kinda continuously shadow day Wednesday to when I think that's that's huge huge because I know if a if a car has been at an office for quite a long time and if the chiropractor is constantly evolving and mastering their skills the I visited Usually change quite a bit over time and and so like we always highly recommended just to go in and actually canal even just roll plate so it is just the do it. I'll just I'll just kinda talk with my with my my languages and role play in front of them because we always talk in all rams about the the the systems there to support or what the what. The doctor has has made an agreement on closed loop It's supportive but if they don't really know what's going with they're saying in the room it's harder harder for the CIA to understand is harder for them to support the doctor. If they're not sure what they're actually saying absolutely and I think we agree how it changes I mean I the changing i. My I know Dr Hanson and Dr Pepper have changed their language and I I should change mine as well. I mean it should never be the same. If I'm saying the same thing I did five years ago. I haven't grown. I Haven't learned so I'm hopefully. People are constantly evolving school. So I'm going to talk a little bit of Ah Brandy always talks about. We always want our assistance to be to help them become better people because as you evolve as a human being You become better at everything. You Bet that you're better mom. You're better assistant. So it's kind of like a double whammy. Were you know as someone stays with us for six months or a year or or twenty years. Our goal is always always delete them better like late more evolved than when we first found them and I was just wondering I know you've done a lot of person vomit. I was wondering if you could just tell us a little bit about your journey through person development and some of the things that have been most impactful on your evolution gas at the Big One Bring the scroll like all fifty thing. I UH-HUH I brought my therapists with me. So I'll okay so I think prior to Chiropractic Personal missile development was important to me. But I don't think I had any clue about how important it would become I think that's partly because of what wipe physically hair practice has done for me I really think that there's like a precursor practically host one. My I literally opened with it started getting getting adjusted. I'm a completely different person. I think because of that and because my theology is different I'm able to do things in a totally different light. So I'm I put development icing bed. I'm aware of it more now. Just because my lifetime turned on relate to some extent so I you know we've done a couple. We'll different coaching programs. Have to say what I love about. The vitality shifts though is because it focused so much on developing you And the other thing that I think is so fascinating. Is that if you ever. You know there's all these programs out there and if you ever come across when they said like you know they know what they're doing then you run on the opposite direction because nobody stops learning right. Nobody stops learning about you. Know the vitality shift. Is that if you're always kind of talking about what didn't work. What did work with working? Now it's not going to work and that's it's still important that evolution You teach what you need to learn right. That's kind of one of my motto is so when I I'm teaching or rather coaching with employees. Pather presents it's usually something that I myself also figure out So that's been a huge thing for me And also just listening like you know that life with for that brought me to care practic. I mean who I have if I had listened to that with for sooner so I mean I so I kick myself now. I know I'm supposed to be where I am exactly where I am right now but it's just becoming more aware of the things ooh that's Are Important to me and my family and on my values as been a huge a huge thing for me and I try to work on myself all the time and Dr Hanson. It also very supportive of that. I mean had come into my office I call them my office. Sorry don't take ownership. I think that's amazing. Ended August so any time. Either in your or laughing my head off because I've come to some sort of the tiffany you know like where I realize that you know I I have no ailments. Even though my doctor says I may or whatever never huge it's like a huge paradigm shift and you get the experience with the patients is you and He's always so supportive of that. which is the Great God? Bless them. Because I don't know I think if somebody hit coming into my office like arithmetic. I probably would leave but he he's you know he's always reading books on how to better himself and how to better our practice so Yeah I I think it's probably the most important thing to to elevate your the practice and to also help your practice member. You cannot serve others if you have not served yourself just can't just wanted to go back to that. A little of that point about chiropractic. Ah Your story under Chiropractic care. Tell me a little bit about that experience. Like I know you said you kind of a little bit shut off. And now you're kind helped turn you onto Kinda Anna listening to your inner nor tell me a little bit. What your experience that way going through as a as a fax number and I feel like I was dead before Chiropractic I mean I would not i? I don't think I would sooner myself. A Happy Person I wasn't then at least I always kind of hid myself through humor and I still do that to some. He said I'm not who I was supposed to be. I was Just I would not well I had. I still have thyroid issues. But I'm getting off off medication. Because the Chiropractic it is. It's just been a game changer. When I first got adjusted I actually felt horrible afterwards? I had Had A lot of concussions prior to me working here just through backer and all sorts of different head injuries by dom on which is ridiculous. I remember when I first got adjusted. I actually felt all those can causes. Symptoms coming back. I felt I couldn't stop sleeping But but it was like I had eggs hailed for the first time in like twenty years and I just knew I was going to be okay with. It was like an epiphany I'm doctor. Heidi havoc have the book that she wrote Thank you rally like. She has sent him one point at at this someone starts to look through a different set of is when they start getting dusted and I thought that's exactly what happened to me. As soon as I started getting adjusted I was a different person and every belief that I had had with turned upside down every belief. I mean just about who I could be what I say about myself would i. You know the power or a my immune system and the power my body and that everything is everything's always ready at. There's ever a symptom in your body. It's supposed to listen to it. That's it doesn't mean. Ronaldo you're you're supposed to listen to it because like all these ideas that were floating all the time and that's why partly I would run into the clinic breath for the other production Hanson. Because I was some waited about these things that I have never known to be true. Pirates you getting adopted. Did it feel Kinda like before you like as far as health was. You're kind of more powerless before. And then once you learn these things you're like whoa. I have way more impact or way more influence over my potential than I thought in the past. You better believe it. I mean I was Natasha With that like I was my diagnosis. That's who I was and everything that I did. I can't do that. Plan Blah Blah garbage and I know now is complete crap. Sorry are you. I don't know how to talk without cussing cussing I. I totally believe that and now it's a completely different. Thank story I mean I just know that there's nothing I can do. I mean I'll give you an example so I've been on thyroid medication. I've been hypothyroid for thirty five years. I'm significantly so oh and I am now have it has the dosage which is a huge thing. And it's you know it's GonNa take a while to get off of it because I've always been used to for so long but I have people telling me that I were crazy that I was going to hurt myself. Even loved ones that I thought would be very supportive. Were telling me to expect at least feel bad You you and I were really hurtful thinking this is ridiculous like I know if I give my body appropriate tools I can and you anything I mean. It sounds ridiculous. I know what to be true. In every ounce of my soul and I it's it's a complete game changer for me now I feel totally Liam powered where it becomes challenging though at the CIA. If you're a Gung Ho as I am Jeff it's harder to connect than you have to really work hard to connect the dots the the the practice number. That is at point a when you're like point Z.. Generally you know it's hard to relate and to marry those. Make It approachable able and edible edible rather for someone. That's just kind of take a little bite. Yeah 'cause it's kind of like we want. Have that bridge where we want to come across the bridge you you WanNa meet them where they're at but then but then not say there are some people just stand there but but helped to lead them back but if you're just shouting from the other side of the bridge you look like you look like a looney and people are like what's wrong right totally. And that's that's that's unfortunately my go-to because I get really excited I so for me. One of my Areas for development element is always just making sure that it's given in mall proportionate bits of information that will be applicable to that person that used to be me cool all right now I get I get the fun part of the podcast when I get to ask the terminator questions. So this'll be interesting because because the the alive Natasha and the Dead Natasha. But if you could travel through time back to maybe you're in your twenties or or in your later teens or something and you could give yourself some other lead by what. What kind of things do you think would be would be your younger self could have benefited from from advice from you now? Okay so my my my first response to this is I wouldn't say anything on that just because I wouldn't be who I am now and I love that. I'm a huge believer that so you can only evolve through struggle. Just struggle.

Dr Hanson CIA Jeff it Natasha Ronaldo Dr Pepper Pather terminator Anna Liam Gung Ho
"natasha" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

The Culture Soup Podcast

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"natasha" Discussed on The Culture Soup Podcast

"Natasha. <Speech_Music_Female> Where can you find online? <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Yes Oh <Speech_Music_Female> definitely <Advertisement> come <Speech_Music_Female> see me <Advertisement> on late. <Speech_Music_Female> In <Speech_Music_Female> posting content <Speech_Music_Female> the most interactive <Speech_Music_Female> you can just type <Speech_Music_Female> in my name <Advertisement> and following <Speech_Music_Female> Natasha Golden <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> Dave E._S._p._N.. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> H._R. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Visit My <Speech_Music_Female> website performance <Speech_Music_Female> status removed <Speech_Music_Female> dot Com. <Speech_Music_Female> I want instagram <Speech_Music_Female> and twitter <Speech_Music_Female> at <Advertisement> the workplace <Speech_Music_Female> doctor adopter <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> then I do <Speech_Music_Female> love all of you to <Speech_Music_Female> head on over to Youtube <Speech_Music_Female> and watch <Advertisement> my ted <Speech_Music_Female> talk <Advertisement> so you can <Speech_Music_Female> hear more about <Speech_Music_Female> my journey and how <Speech_Music_Female> much or any shape <Speech_Music_Female> what what I'm doing <Speech_Music_Female> now so you can just <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> to the power <Advertisement> of London <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> excellent <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> Tasha. I am <Speech_Music_Female> proud to call <Speech_Music_Female> friend <Speech_Music_Female> fellow <Speech_Music_Female> faculty in <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> an even <Speech_Music_Female> more. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you so <Speech_Music_Female> much likewise <Speech_Music_Female> like <Speech_Music_Female> I said it was so <Speech_Music_Female> exciting into <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> thin <Speech_Music_Female> and now <Speech_Music_Female> they're <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> I <Advertisement> really <Speech_Music_Female> appreciate <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> that. <Advertisement> Thanks for coming <Speech_Music_Female> on the culture <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> <Music> <Music> a wonderful conversation <Speech_Music_Female> she with <Speech_Music_Female> Natasha <Speech_Music_Female> Bowman <Speech_Music_Female> the workplace. <Speech_Music_Female> <Music> Thank you so much. <Speech_Music_Female> Hey <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> listen <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> that <Advertisement> Webinar <Music> <Advertisement> that I <Speech_Music_Female> did third-minute <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> Mentor <Advertisement> masterclass <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> get <Advertisement> walked clients. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Fast <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> was one <Advertisement> of my most <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> I the way <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> you you <Advertisement> can still wants <Speech_Music_Male> to <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> go <Advertisement> to <Speech_Music_Male> mentor <Advertisement> DOT <Speech_Music_Male> COM <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> and Click there <Speech_Music_Female> to register to watch <Speech_Music_Female> for free <Speech_Music_Male> and by the <Speech_Music_Female> way I had the sly <Speech_Music_Female> <music> available <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for you as <Speech_Music_Female> well <Advertisement> at Thirty <Speech_Music_Female> Minute Mentor <Advertisement> DOT <Speech_Music_Male> COM <Advertisement> look <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we're <Speech_Music_Male> coming up on <Advertisement> a coaching <Speech_Music_Female> corner <Advertisement> episode <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> first <Advertisement> Tuesday of <Speech_Music_Female> the month <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> of August. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Guess <Speech_Music_Female> what I'm going <Advertisement> to do <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Music_Male> Webinar <Speech_Music_Female> so you get to hear <Speech_Music_Female> the audio <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> and what <Advertisement> everybody's <Speech_Music_Female> talking <Advertisement> about <Speech_Music_Female> it. It's <Advertisement> based on <Speech_Music_Female> Dan <Advertisement> Black <Speech_Music_Female> Enterprise <Advertisement> article <Speech_Music_Female> that <Advertisement> I wrote <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dear sis <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Female> of course <Advertisement> this was <Speech_Music_Female> all about <Advertisement> what <Speech_Music_Female> to do do <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> when you're <Advertisement> trying to <Speech_Music_Female> get more <Advertisement> clients <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> you WanNa <Advertisement> hear this y'all <Music> <Advertisement> if you <Speech_Music_Female> are <Speech_Music_Female> a small <Advertisement> business <Music> owner <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> and <Advertisement> entrepreneur <Speech_Music_Female> even even <Advertisement> if you <Speech_Music_Female> are in a nonprofit <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> because <Advertisement> at the <Speech_Music_Female> end of the day <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> your <Advertisement> clients <Speech_Music_Male> drive <Speech_Music_Male> the business <Speech_Music_Male> you're donors <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> drive <Advertisement> the business <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and what <Speech_Music_Male> better way way <Advertisement> to raise <Speech_Music_Male> capital <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> have more <Speech_Music_Male> clients <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> this <Advertisement> all we have <Speech_Music_Female> for you today. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Find <Speech_Music_Female> US online <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> at the <Advertisement> culture

Natasha Golden Youtube Natasha. US London
"natasha" Discussed on Small Doses

Small Doses

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"natasha" Discussed on Small Doses

"People i so by now you've all gotten to know natasha very well well so it's so funny also because like what i went to graduate school i literally was like i'm not here to make friends you know i thought he made my friends i'm like here to make friends i'm hearing a graduate school capacity and that has been just out the window like there's tasha there's david johns i still talk to shea who was a heart administrator it's just like the columbia iras infrastructure is it was really a blessing like to be in that and to have professor mayor bowl rest in peace and meet people like natasha was twenty five less than a classroom that's right it was mall a little bunch tongo remind me to tell you the most lear story about tom go that you maybe have ever heard your life but side note tago is martin was just nominated on the short list for the griffith poetry prize he did not win because it was he was robbed literally every told them you arrived but i'm like yeah but i feel like that sets you because now it's like everybody's like oh now we have to like really show you love but you can get those poetry book heaven is all good byes publishers city lights you can get that online and tongo is somebody who went to colombia with us and it's just like these it's like a whole squadron yet to so so tosh would just be in class and say things and i just be like who i will and i always tell this i will never forget the day that she used binary in a sentence and i had literally never use the word before never heard it before and i was like who is she thinks that's side effects of being a non black person of color i think that's where it came from that i mean that program that education and the people totally amazing do you remember the first day professor mayor but i don't know if you remember this the first class so we have first the first thing he said is he came in with his frederick douglass here and he just like walked very briskly to the end of the conference table and we all sat there wide just really like oh my god we're here we did it what's he gonna say this is the guy and he was like do you all want hip hop to die and i was like or because i had apply the temple in nyu would it was like i landed in the right lays with you all and he would always say like a hundred twentieth is the widest street in harlem because like you could see the projects across from columbia university so professor marabout also he wrote a number of great books but the latest being of course the malcolm x by biography so people were not happy with certain things that were revealed in that book but i i feel like professor memorable with somebody who have anything was about just facts as a historian right whether you and you know historians are not poets poets speak the feelings of the people historian speaks the facts of the time just right is just it has to be recorded you know it's like it's like being a meister on game of thrones you know i can see my face it you're not a game of thrones there i mean i've never seen it i shahr at the end of the friendship the segment is over the show is over i was trying to avoid the subject because i knew it was going to be the thing is going to be my stern game of thrones is somebody who's basically like the story in the grio like the knowledge based person that is within every like family and castle so like meister eamon mice sam is like the one that all of us like he's like the homey jon snow and he goes to old town to study to be a meister and like they're the ones who read you know not anybody's reading so he's like reading all the bugs and that's how he's trying.

natasha
"natasha" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"natasha" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"We'll we'll figure this out later okay so he natasha this for you he suffers from anti phobia the fear that somewhere somehow duck is watching you he's a great guy he's a great guy for a duck watching but just every once in a while there's like night terrors well we live on a pond so they'll be very difficult for again i'm not up for it it's a deal shoes she's got like a deal breaker if i got a bad cold she starts packing up the car moshe yes she has a small succulent on her bedside table instead of watering she pees on it oh is it dealbreaker that yeah i won't accept that no that's i don't care about the peeing on why she doing that first of all it's a second so it's a cactus she getting that close with her you know what i'm saying like what's going on there well no she had she was over his incredible vitamins okay the rationale is that it's like providing nutrients she's like a hippie woo person that's like oh this is actually this is better for the cactus if i piss on it yeah well she looked like oh yes she's pretty cute cute jitney but listen she's she's yeah let's say she smokin silverlake tam ten that that actually him saying that's dealbreaker oh you're out divorced that's a little crazy for me but you know what i'll accept it find if i love her i'll stick with pc pisses on all right whatever i'm in.

natasha
"natasha" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"natasha" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"Natasha zero and all the calls hey you guys can we play a game yeah okay natasha you're gonna go first we're gonna do dealbreakers natasha yes i deal breaker goes to you but you have to imagine that you're single and i know that you're both sitting on a free beam bang from lake in like with in a room that's unfurnished new mattress on the floor celeste pizza on the ground there's great isn't that appetizing wouldn't you like a paper towel and half eat one when when moshe answers okay okay first one's for you natasha he sleeps with his eyes open dealbreaker that's a psychotic person oh sorry i'm sorry dealbreaker why because it seems like it's it's a it's a symptom of a deeper problem that i don't want to deal with okay all right all right want someone healthy and fun who doesn't sleep with their eyes open i'm sorry on a camping trip i found my best friend asleep with her eyes open and it was it was terrifying but every time i didn't like sneak up on our every i mean maybe i did i mean our babies sleep with their eyes open and i it's not a deal with her eyes open and a knife in her hand a little bit weird the toss does i can't go getter a real go getter she's going to be scary movie nineteen plot of scary movie nineteen all right yes she has a tattoo of warren buffet on her left breast oh that's not a deal breaker at all i'm really i'm jewish i love a woman that cares about investments.

Natasha zero moshe
"natasha" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"natasha" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"I'm selena i'm crystal and feeling for graham it's natasha nice work we're gonna make this entire break about our very own lovely crystal oh god it's okay talking to be good i'm looking out for you about something i feel like i am anyway but we're going to start with natasha second natasha every time she comes in she fills my mouth with all his chocolate mouth my favorite you guys know she does that to you too brings us chocolate all right so we were just talking about we threw out hey any interesting story is about your mom and krystal goes me like no i think it's a thing i think it's a store your thing that i heard the same thing about going out the window landing you just said it there's something irresponsible parenting to make up for that because you were loved so much mexican families all right so here's what by the way if you are mexican and you've heard this before it can you hit me on twitter and i'm kind of curious otherwise natasha's a big fat liar before jp.

graham twitter natasha krystal
"natasha" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"natasha" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"Yeah from that special was over i just felt like such a relief because there were so it was more intense than any any other stand up related thing i've ever done i don't know if it's true you just because the pregnancy was so interlaced with it the next day we spent an extra day in austin at the hotel sainte cecile which is like natasha's favorite hotel and then we went and we ate sundays and we heard that there was a screening of titanic at the am see on the big screen and we went to see titanic and it was like it was just the night i don't know it was just the nicest decompression mandic thing i've ever heard you say much that i like titanic i didn't know you you loved that day so much and you ever have a day where you don't do anything no yes yeah no no no no lydia's always like stopped doing when we go on vacation it takes me seventy two hours to unplug and it takes me seventy two hours to reply in when we start back up from the momentum you probably have an itinerary for vacation maybe i do maybe i planned out you don't you should go where we went on our on david o two to bora there's nothing to do good for you just stare at the glass floor it'd be funny if they started a service for people like you where it's like you know the when the kids are on drugs they like a duck them and send them to rehab in utah right but it's like you and they come in the night that grab you they throw you on a private plane and they take you to bora bora and they're like relax mohawk.

austin hotel sainte cecile natasha lydia utah bora bora seventy two hours
"natasha" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

ID10T with Chris Hardwick

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"natasha" Discussed on ID10T with Chris Hardwick

"What is the game here right these dudes are just like oh those feet though your feet your feet or the feet i want the feet all honey i'll get dough to force let me smell your farts it's just like let's working out of this thing like she dmz 'em like my farts i'm just ate a burrito come on by but so that was my and then below it was interesting as we had to wrestle over who where it worked better it's not a callback per se but it's it's a kind of theme matic callback for which would work better for her to do her but styler she did it wasn't even competition too much where would it fit mathematically right felt more like a callback and in the end it was like yeah she sets it up and then it becomes almost a callback which i think is one of the unique thing the subtleties of our specialists at there's almost callback but it's a different comedian was kind of need also that we did in the third act of this the third part of the special we tell a story together and we were trading punch lines like i would tell it one night and it wouldn't work and so natasha would try to say it's done same joke and it would work for my okay you do that or vice versa that's so interesting and also just the idea that you know doing comedy together is such a that's a pretty magical thing to be able to do in a relationship touring together not ainhoa being with each other both in your leisure time and at work essentially where your stage show really does depend on you both being present and therefore each other that's a fucking amazing almost couples therapy kind of an exercise i feel incredibly lucky.

natasha
"natasha" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"natasha" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

"You're listening to you rica on monocle 24 brought to you by the team behind the entrepreneurs natasha ozlan is the founder and chief executive of all cart an online auction house that office contemporary art straight from the studios of early career artists the platform which launched earlier this month allows art lovers and collectors like natasha herself to buy works directly from artists in their final year of school for three years post graduation unlike the traditional 5050 split most galleries offer she gives artists seventy percent of the final price natasha joined us for this week's episode of eureka to tell us how she came up with the idea and launched or carter i wish share aging street hans marching with graduate pre emerging artists i was who say whacking where the commercial aww gallery in tel aviv for a few years i saw semi mouses in two thousand fifteen in ought management and about three months said we were talking in a lecture about other ways in which we could support emerging artists without government grants and with all of the experience for the will of my issues with the all wild and then with this big question i was kind of boiling on the subjects have mccabe but how come we do that and it was an issue that cold baker and baker in my mind i became obsessed i look back and it was this big problem analysts site it came together piece by piece i can't say that it just happens overnight but it was like putting pieces of a puzzle together and i guess once you start running with.

natasha ozlan founder carter baker chief executive seventy percent three months three years