19 Burst results for "Nataly"

"nataly" Discussed on Learn Astrology with Mary English

Learn Astrology with Mary English

04:17 min | 6 months ago

"nataly" Discussed on Learn Astrology with Mary English

"Mars is going to have to be involved in some way and in else he got. Oh yes the moon is opposition to his son. Side just said the muniz being opposite his son sign for a number of days so in the planning capacity of doing this. The moon has been opposite. I mean if your sunshine yourself ruled by yoenis were not be saturn and one of the things. I did point out to him at one point because because as bit bastard particularly interesting stories i said we haven't son return And it was only off twits mentor. Went back and analyze everything that the when his brother died on the house burn down some was transiting. His son sign so he was born. Pinto was twenty seven when the been down by the died. Settlements was transiting past his sentence. He didn't have a particularly good relationship with saturn. Anyway so saturn return as well Astrologically wasn't helpful. So the ema they sends the that ruling plummets is venus vinci's in the fifth so it's Creativity romance et cetera. And i think venus is conjunto neptune so we have to be aware here that that neptune has an impact on this particular exchange between me and him. Now remember the costa. I'm a pisces. He is and bihi himself. Nataly has mercury imposes. His is six degrees minus column. But i think some Is my son. Sen's fifteen is is about eighteen degrees or something much much later into policy. Bend over these type of emails. I'm all skin and stuff. And he's replying wherever and we get to the point where he eventually We get what. I would classify as the breakthrough he. He finally tells me his story..

six degrees Nataly Mars fifth Pinto twenty seven one fifteen one point eighteen degrees venus vinci Sen saturn venus days bihi twits
Should I Use My Employer's Car Lease Benefit?

Ramsey Call of the Day

06:12 min | 1 year ago

Should I Use My Employer's Car Lease Benefit?

"Ethan is in Detroit High Ethan. Welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Doing great man how can we help? I word for an automotive maker manufacturer and engineer there. Can One of the company perks or benefits I guess. That they offer is a employee leaf option, right? So I I can get a vehicle. It's a one year lease. Yep a London Mile with insurance included YEP and repairs. Repairs Maintenance wrinkly Irish included everything's included. Yep and prior to. Working there I was paying around two hundred insurance. Idea of And I'm debating. So my current payment is around five fifty and actually brought my wife's and on the program recently. I'm debating even worth it to carry that. The Fowler. The lease on your employment on your employees deal. Yeah Okay. You're on and you're driving a nice car. Yeah it is. It's a truck. You you didn't take. You didn't take the cheaper chicken you got the big dog. Well Who is Ford. Our Jeanne outs. I. Chrysler Oh. Okay. All right. Well, I've looked at several of these Nissan is here in our neighborhood I've looked at the Ford one. I've looked at the GM. Went off the top of my head but most of these have nothing to do with a traditional card lease. It's an employee benefit program. You're basically got a car completely furnished miles everything insurance everything's built in at five fifty. You can't touch that truck for that. Truck goes down five, hundred, fifty dollars a month in value if you own it. And you got insurance and maintenance and gas and everything they include gas don't they some of them Goodson doesn't okay but it's got everything is maintenance included. All maintenance. So car breaks, you just take it in. Yeah. So this is not a this is an employee benefit. This not lie to Lee. Not, Your Evil Carly's program right that the other side of your company sales. But this is a great deal for you Ethan driving around. Yeah. It's a round. where? I, thought you were thought. Dadgum usually, it's not five fifty. It's usually like three hundred when I'm running into these things but you got your driving seventy thousand dollars truck. That's the thing. So good for you. You cannot touch that truck for that kind of money it's six grand a year and everything's G. if I worked there I would do that deal. This is not a finance plan. This is not a lease. This is a simple employee benefit and it is a killer employee benefit do it I guess we're kind of debating knows. So my wife is on it too. She has a wrangler. Yeah, and I'm wondering if it's worth to have two vehicles on that, we're trying to get something cheaper off. Let me try this again, you cannot operate a vehicle for three times what you're paying. Car Think. About. It add insurance. Maintenance depreciation. In value right now, put those three numbers in the calculator. Do the truck you're driving it takes fifteen, hundred, fourteen, hundred dollars a month to replace it. Okay because a stupid things going down in value more than you're paying a month, not counting the maintenance in the insurance. And the same for her now. The question is. Can you afford? Are you? Are you biting off too big a bite of the apple here is your household income, support these payments but the bottom line is if you if they support these payments and you were to buy this vehicle, you're going to have three ex in the vehicle what you're paying. Okay so it's a great deal. Do as many as you need to do as long as you can handle the cash flow out of their income, which is unbelievable. So would a situation like this? Dave, if you were to leave the company, you're just turning in the vehicle. Yeah you lost it. You lost your employee benefits. You lost it. Okay. And you and you do need to flip it every year because they're they're flipping these things out that you know it's a small percentage of their total production under the employees right but the Nissan plan is very similar. Right down here, the road from us the the Ford is very similar. I've seen those and BMW's and other one's got. They've got one that's pretty similar to the guys over in south, Carolina that listen to us over there at the beamer plant It's got the same option and driving a stink in beamer for a third a fourth of what it would cost you. Anyone else. To buy it outside of that employees listen everybody out there that's listening real quick. We're talking about an employee benefit program not nataly idolise yeah, I. Don't don't don't blow up men box with this It's an employee benefit plan, which is why people were able to do that. So it's part of their recruiting. It's part of the benefits that they're given to their team members. So just wanted to clarify that. Yeah. In his case on that layer worth hit the employee benefit. The value to him is around a thousand dollars a month because it'd be fifteen hundred to replace what he's doing for five hundred. Oh. Yeah. His truck payment. Yeah Without A. That's another twelve thousand dollars a year in income are effectively his benny package is adding. Another two thousand dollars a year to his value again, assuming you can support that level of truck with your income. We not ask Denka I got sidetracked on that. But as Chris said, it's very, very, very smart to say. out loud. We are not saying it's okay at least a car this is not leasing a carton. This renting from your employee employer has a benefit that's all as they call it a one year lease, but you can turn it anytime. You want I don't even hold you to that on this. Very, very good.

Truck Ford Ethan Dave Ramsey Nissan Engineer London Detroit Fowler Goodson Carolina GM Denka BMW Benny LEE Chris Apple
"nataly" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"It, I don't think another team. If given one hundred chances could pull off the turnaround that Miami did considering the contracts had guys like dion waiters and James Johnson up their lack of upcoming draft picks. Their lack of cap space the way they turned it around I I. Don't know if it's feasible for another team to do what they did. Yeah it really is kind of like. When you think about it sort of a laundry list of things. It wasn't just one move. I mean it was a series of really well calculated moves that worked out. And it's very rare that type of return not only from your draft picks I mean obviously getting Bam. And TALIAFERRO. Late in the lottery, you know bus picks have worked out. But I think. And I've had I can't even remember you probably remember. I feel like there are so many years and you're the one Miami Pick for next for twenty twenty one right next year the kept getting passed around like going to be a high lottery pick because everyone figured you know with all the money that they took on and that one summer I think. That's right. It was summer right when everyone took on the band money will they? Actually, did a year later, which is the crazy. Okay, right. Right. Right. I can remember the timing, but either way the conversation was just you know, well, how are they going to get out of? This predicament. and. Look like they weren't getting any younger but obviously Jimmy Butler. Big Sort of a godsend you'll be able to get him. and. All kind of. A big thing I heard two. Team sort of echoed this about the bubbles just like a big part of winning in this environment is being team that really wants to be there. Just because you know you, all you have is basketball. You don't really have anything to go do. Your there for better or worse, and it sounds simple but. Factor comes down to it even more and there's no fans you're planning for yourselves I think Miami to me is the team right now that's like the most comfortable in its own skin kind of just like knows what they want to be a you don't see any guys fighting over shots late in the game like you Kinda just know they seem to have a good understanding of who supposed to have the ball when. And even heroes getting big buckets, slam games and they have confidence in him to do that. And I think that's one thing if we're looking at Boston talking about this series that. Layton game sometimes, they broke down a little bit because I think they're still not sure. You guys sort of our Nataly seek shots whether it's tatum around in about those guys have always been guys who want to get their shot. You know they've adjusted a little bit and then you can walker obviously his I don't think he ever gotten a great rhythm because he's not he's used to having them all the time and now he's playing off these two guys so. That dynamic is going to be interesting moving forward. We don't have to get into the Boston teacher think because that's going to get picked apart but. I think Miami. Does have a real chance to win the series. Lakers. Obviously the favorites at this point but. They match up pretty.

Miami Boston Lakers tatum dion waiters Jimmy Butler basketball James Johnson Nataly Layton twenty twenty walker
"nataly" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

08:24 min | 1 year ago

"nataly" Discussed on Marketing Today with Alan Hart

"Are really stress and I think that shows how good a company's relationships at leadership really is and and I'm pretty proud of how we we've come out of it so far that's great that's great? We'll what were you brought in to do at agent are black. It's been a couple years right when you came in. Yeah yeah so as the big mandates that I've been focused on the first one is fairly straightforward for a marketer. Which is how do you advance the performance marketing capability off the organization? We've been heavily dependent on television. How do we create supplement that with while class digital marketing and social media marketing and paid search? Seo and all the other elements off a crm. And ALL MR. Bring it together so that was one material that we had. The second is client experience so I managed the end to end. I met the client experience organism. Which has all the designers and the end to client experience structure and what we really started to recognizes that we needed to really elevate the way the client experiences our products and services as well as our our site and just the way that they could do less even before they buy the product in a way that reflects modern transformational company that we are also takes advantage of digitization so. I talked a little bit of what tax will go. It's a product that we launched a couple of years ago and then essentially we launched last year in a bigger way with the material changes to the experience and what that product really does is it to using your S. Stop or your phone. Selecting the product you want which is would be extra go and then you get assigned a tax pro to the system and in the tax pro starts communicating with you through the digital form. You can upload your docs and in the tax pro takes it from there and then sends you back. The form completed tax form for you to sign up for you to review. And then we'll sign a door as well and submit the form for you so that that structure and that product is new for us and it's and part of our set sets of plant expense transformations and then the third area is of course financial products. And how do we create more out of the relationships? We have and create value for clients in ways that we haven't done it before so are the areas that that I came in for Katcha. Gotcha in two of those. I would say one is bolstering capabilities. Obviously around the performance marketing but then his client experience. Seems like much more of a transformative effort and not to belittle any of the other things that you're doing at all. Those are very important as well but it just seems like it's much more comprehensive potentially cutting across many layers of the organization and curious. What's it been like in the last couple of years driving that transformation? It's been hard for sure. I think the things that strikes me about any kind of transformation certainly ours is The Way to get there is not through at least for us has not been through the big wins but rather through a slow shifting of the way that the organization is pointing and then things start to work and operated that function. And then over time you find your way in the destination you want it to be and so for US. What that means is we are phenomenal at the human relationship phenomenal. You know you talk to our tax law tax pro not only cares deeply for client but you know as very very skilled we have very skilled rose who had years of experience doing what they do and then you combine that with our ability to stand up digital experiences we had the basis of our we have the basis of phenomenal while world-class Transformational Klina gauge. Part of what we needed to do to make that real was structurally create something that allowed the products which have historically been managed in different groups to find continuity togetherness across the board. So the first thing we did was we created this organization. It didn't exist before the client experience organization and we brought all design teams from the various product. Groups have brought them together to one. Now we all designers together. We also have the end to end client experience strategy team as part of this organization and so we've combined the two areas that can really create the experience. What is that into inexperienced? And then what are the design elements that allow us to create continuity across those experiences? We also have DOT COM in here which I moved into the because again dot com becomes the filled the top of the funnel for everything and so we can imagine this end to end experience with dot com playing a material part of the top of that funnel. Then you start to you start to see and reflect on what how you want to serve the customer in ways that are very different and so are bringing these together and then started starting to do work in that fashion. We started to see progress and change. I mean if you look at the site today you look at it two three years ago. It's it's very different here. We used to be a site that sold widgets our site that sells experience. There's obviously ways to go and everything but just I think it's about making the subtle changes in how work gets done and how thinking is developed so that you start going particular direction and then allowing the allowing that journey to happen. I think is the way that I've approached it and I think that has been beneficial for the way that we would you highlighted a number of things there in terms of like aligning the right resources together with a common mission focused point and picking the right functions right the designers and the strategists to lead the charge or coordinate and lead the overarching effort. Is there as you think about advice you might give to other? Cmo's is there anything else? There's a lot packing and what you said. Is there anything else you would highlight? The you feel was his lead to success or helped you down this path. I think the couple of things I might add is number one. This is very dependent on really really understanding the customer and being the voice of the customer and so having very clear metrics on what the voice of the customer is and having consistency those metrics across the products helped us sort of find the right way of of having the conversations that take you on the path that you want to go and so I think that is an important piece and the other is very much a a sort of an organizational relationship piece. Because it's nothing comes from pulling a group together and putting them in one structure I. That's a tactic where the value comes from is if the organization starts to see that integration as something useful their individual functions to that requires a level of partnership and communication. That I think is ongoing. Asked you know a daily affair and If I were to look back at my myself two years ago or one and a half years ago. I'd say the way I thought about this was I need to come in and transform this company and the way I think about it now is I need to find a way. Connect people to an idea that is long term that connects the company towards transformation. And if I do that that's where we'll end up. That's really insightful. Thanks for sharing that. That's a more artful way of saying that it's people stupid. Yeah Yeah to change hearts and minds not just process. Yeah Yeah exactly. That's great. That's great I don't WanNa cut. The ancient are blocked conversation short. But I would love to get to know you too. Is there anything else you WANNA share in terms of advice appears doesn't need to be but just curious for we switch gears entirely? Let's switch gears. I will go over the conversation. We talked at the top of the interview about this formative experience of schooling which may not have thought was that unique until we had our prior conversation but along those lines. I'm curious if there's if there's ever you experience of your pass that defines or makes up you are today as an individual. Wow that's A. that's a deep question. I would say I hope so. I think we all do yeah. There's there's a couple of things that I'd say define me and I don't know why I don't know if it's my schooling or or just by habits or something in me Nataly. I don't know but when I look at the way I lead as an example it it's super trite but I'm the Super Believe Word Servant leadership and I I call it service leadership but the exactly the same. My belief is that the more that marketing function marketing but anything has gotten more and more complex the people that know the subject better than anyone else is the person doing.

DOT COM US Katcha Nataly
"nataly" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"nataly" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Good afternoon my name is Nataly Vasquez Roland and I am the president and co founder of a safe haven foundation since nineteen ninety four AC Kayvan it's been on the front lines of homelessness we provide when the most complete and comprehensive solutions to addressing the underlying issues related to poverty and homelessness as well as advocating for relevant policy issues and the topics of criminal justice reform mental parity the opiate epidemic and now culvert nineteen pandemic we also provide faced housing approach with the multi disciplinary team of professionals that include individualized assessment physical education workforce housing needs for our residents these wraparound services are designed to meet the underlying issues of individuals needs and provide them with the coordinated care services they need to foster good health social economic and housing stability for themselves and for their families thankfully the vast majority of the people that we serve as a safe haven had succeeded succeeded in recovery family reunification employment permanent and stable housing every year we serve over five thousand people a year our network of transitional supportive affordable senior and veteran housing provides people to live with the level of housing in the level of care that they need based on where they are in life he and our I. color work at a safe even truly an elegant solution to a very complex issue we are proud to be among a network of top notch leaders in the field who are doing good work on behalf of our most vulnerable populations many of whom are in this room I want to thank me for life and for your leadership your steadfast leadership during this unprecedented time in the pandemic crisis we've never seen anything like this in our history for the first time our city in our city we're seeing the issue of homelessness being dealt with on the level of urgency that recognize it recognizes it not as just a moral or financial imperative but truly as a public health imperative for the first time we are acknowledging how as a nation health and wellness of this public of this form of population is truly interlocked with our own today what is happening on the front lines is truly transformative and is uniting the expertise of all the community subject matter experts working on this issue together in this one in response.

"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

The Lavendaire Lifestyle

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

"To make it your own like just create your own life. Get painting about that all right Natalie. Where can we find you online? So you can find me as Natalie's alley on YouTube instagram twitter. Pretty much everything awesome. Thank you so much. It was so fun to talk to you and I appreciate you for your time. Oh my gosh no thank you and I hope everybody listening was able to take something away from this conversation. I'm sure there were so many good golden nuggets of wisdom. So thank you thank you island. I really appreciate it all right. I hope you enjoy that episode with Natalie Asante going ahead and follow her on all her social platforms at Natalie's outlets she is just such a cool girl and she is so kind and down to Earth for the size of channel that she is. She's just grown so much in the past few years so to wrap up with some key tips. I took away from our interview. The first tip that I got from Natalie is that she does her homework. She studied other channels that were growing in other Nisha. She didn't just focus on like beauty or fashion. She really studied any channel that was growing and she really went down and dirty into like the analytics and the data. Not only. Did she do that. But she also worked on the manifesting part of it she visualized what she wanted. She had a vision board. She was really really clear about all the aspects of her life and what she wanted in those areas you know. She wanted to be married. She wanted to have a house. You want all these things and she had the plan. She believed she could do it and then she went ahead and did it. You know she did bats and the next thing that really stuck out to me about. Natalie's journey is how she's becoming more and more intentional and authentic and that in turn leads to living a more fulfilling life because she previously ran her channel just based on trying to grow as fast as possible and so she just did whatever worked and now she seems like. She's being a lot more intentional about what she wants to put out into the world how she wants to share herself and she's becoming more and more open vulnerable and authentic with her content especially more recently and so. I'm really proud of her growth. And one thing she said that is really important for anyone out there who wants to be a contact creator. How important it is to have a niche to niche down because she grew her channel really fast and although that is really great and she is successful now. She's starting to niche down a little bit because when you have a niche people tend to trust you more because you become like an expert in that niche if you are making content. That's all over the place you have beauty fashion travel. This and that people don't know what you're an expert for and it's harder to sell yourself. It's harder to brand yourself that way and the last thing that really stuck out to me about Natalie is. She is a proactive girl. Not only as she's smart. She does her homework. She does her visualization. She goes out there. She reaches out to people. She pitches her ideas and that is something that is more rare than you think. A lot of people they work and they create and they do their own thing but they don't really reach out because so many people are afraid of being rejected but in Natalie's words or maybe she said Chris Jenner's words if you get a No. You're asking the wrong person so it's okay to reach out and it's okay to get a no like just ask someone ask just keep asking and you will yeses along. Your journey is just a matter of putting yourself out there so that's your reminder for the day to go ahead and ask for what you want be proactive reach out do that thing so. I wrap it up here today sending you all so much love and I will talk to you next time. All right. That's it for today's episode. Thank you so much for listening to the lavender lifestyle. If you like this podcast please show your support by leaving a review on itunes. Lastly you can catch me on Youtube and Instagram at lavender where I have even more contemporary artist of life sending you so much love bye..

Natalie Asante Natalie Youtube Instagram Chris Jenner
"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

The Lavendaire Lifestyle

13:26 min | 1 year ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

"That's shop dot lavender dot com so like any other creator. I'm sure that you also get unmotivated and uninspired so how do you stay inspired or what do you do? When you're in those slums because I feel like we all go through it okay. So I really went through it like last last year. I burnt out like literally. I had my podcast. I had my merchandise. I was running three different channels. I had like side businesses. I was investing. I was doing it all it was much. It was too much. I was one person and that was like a like I hit a wall pretty much where I was in motivated and I was like Jesus Christ would what am I supposed to do and what I did was I did nothing like I literally just did nothing. I saw everything. Yeah I stopped like I. I mean certain things I was in contract for so I couldn't necessarily stop but right to my best ability like I give myself a break which I think is so important especially entrepreneurs. We don't realize you know we're not machine we're human beings and we need to breathe and we need to just like pause and I like re watched a few movies. I loved eat. Pray love for instance being one of them and there's something that movie that really stuck to me it was called Dole shed Anita believe. What does that use my pronunciation pretty much? It means the sweetness of doing nothing and I think like in this time and age. A lot of us don't understand that concept like literally doing nothing like just sitting with yourself right and like just hearing your breath. I mean a Lotta. This can go into like meditation and you know things of that nature but I had been on such a like a roller coaster. I would say that that whole year doing so many different projects that if someone were to ask me. Oh is your yesterday. I was like it was good. Oh would you do? I can't remember like I was on autopilot exactly so I literally. I took a break and I tried to be as present with myself as possible. I tried to figure out. Okay you know. This is a new. It feels like a new era for me. Like what are the things that I love now? Not The things that people on my channel want to see for me like who am I now because the thing is you know as a creator. Obviously you filter yourself in many ways right like you edited video. You cut out the things that you don't want people to see likewise on social media it makes your audience kind of question like okay. So who is this person but also your questioning all the time. I don't know I deal with all the time but I pretty much a step back for my work and take time off. I think born yeah and you talked about in the beginning of the podcast that you're trying to show more of your actual self on your youtube channel is yeah yeah like what. Where do you plan on taking this well? To be honest I actually sat with myself yesterday to create a vision more because I had no idea like. I genuinely yeah. I don't know I just feel like I've been doing it for five years. Which doesn't seem like a long time but I feel like on Internet years. It's like it's quite some time you know and I just started to really look at my work and I asked myself like. Does this make me proud war? Do I wanna see myself doing in the next five years so for me it just came down to like simplifying and it was all about intention so kind of like what. I mentioned so not doing things anymore just because of the money. You're not doing things anymore because of You know what people want to see from you because you know on the back end of things you know for for bay. I had like people like. Let's say managers telling me what I should be doing. I had people telling me how I should be dressing how I should be doing things like. And that's why I said in the beginning of this I felt like a character and it was off one. I didn't even know who I was and yeah I'm just like I'm letting go of that. I guess of all those strings and all those people that were telling me what to do and learning about myself. Yeah I love it. It's like your journey to being more authentic. That's exactly yeah and it's cool because it's like you're doing it in public in the public and everyone can see your transformation. Do you ever feel that way as well like you. These layers but you don't see that online and then you're kind of you know having to explain in a way like Hey. I'm now yeah I feel like especially the past year. I've been changing a lot. And it's always it's not always easy to portray the change on your channel but I guess naturally like overtime like they can tell. Yeah I don't know which is Great. Then that means you're living your most authentic life. Yeah and I also think it's like a fun idea to think when you're old if you were to like age like you look back at your first videos and I think that's actually. Why like youtube videos kind of remind me of journaling but digitally yeah? It's like a live in Iraq. And you just go back and you're like this is where I was while these were. My problems wasn't even a problem. You know yeah so. It's really great. Yeah totally so something I do want to talk about and I don't know if you're not comfortable it's okay but let your breast implants. Illness talk about because I think I didn't know about that until I saw on your instagram stories. And I think you shed so much light on that which is really important. Yeah so pretty much. I got a breast augmentation. Sorry I haven't talked about this in a while is like what am I saying? I got breath contagion at the age of nineteen due to a deformity that I had. I grew up feeling really insecure with my with my chest area on just like with my body. I didn't understand why I was different. And so I started pursuing what I would do to change that and so I got implants at the age of nineteen and slowly but surely like five years down the line I it affected everything. It affected my auto. Immune sorry my immune system so I had an autoimmune disease. I had hypothyroidism something. That didn't really run in my family by here when you didn't realize it was coming from the breast implants on originally. I didn't until you know kind of connecting the dots and really being real with myself. Because you know when you go in and you change yourself you don't want to relate what's going on with your body to what you did you feel guilty right. Yeah I was. Yeah I had a really check my ego and be like Natalie like maybe this is it so I pretty much had all these symptoms which you can just look up online breast implant illness. Everybody feels things differently. Every single body is different and I decided I was like. Hey you know I'm twenty five. I'm in a different stage in my life. I'm married I feel different about myself and so I'm just going to remove my implants and I'm GonNa do it because I feel like this is the issue. This is what's been really affecting my health but also just going to do it. You know if that's not the case it's okay regardless I don't WanNa be changing my implants. Every ten years like my priorities in life had changed. You know I went in. I removed my breast implants. Obviously it's very serious procedure. It's not just like taking them out only microsurgery and can do it. So they removed the the capsule. Which is what your body forms to protect itself from a foreign object and I could not I left and that surgery feeling better literally out of surgery that I had for the past five years like my brain fog was on five years eight and then a few months after you know from the detox of having the foreign object to my body I went back in to check on my thyroid was and I was completely clear. Yeah I mean to me that that was like okay. Hey great you know I this. I felt huge obligation. Obviously to share this with my audience. I don't ever touch on these topics but I was like you know if I could help one person if I could just share my story like you just never know and thankfully because the other women that had shared their stories I was like hey that tons a lot like me. This sounds a lot like what I'm going through and it's not self diagnosing or anything like that because a lot of people will say. Oh well you know what a breast implant illness is like trying now or whatever like you would never wanna go and put yourself under surgery just because of a trend very serious to me like my biggest testimony is just how I feel after and how my body is doing so that was. That was the best thing that I condone myself. Washer definitely. Yeah. I'm so happy for you that you did it. You know 'cause yeah it's such a big risk because you don't even know if that's the issue that will kill you so yeah that's a risk to take but yeah it seems like you are now like Natalie two point like living new right because if you feel a little bit maybe you're like eight point. Oh but I'm always trying to evolve myself to change to you know I think just like with maturity also. I just realized I have nothing against like plastic surgery like I can totally inside who you know. Maybe have had breast cancer at times feel like. That'S THEIR MESS OPTION. Because of the way they look or whatnot I totally can sympathize with women like that for Muse just all about really educating the people at watched my videos that trust me to just talk about my story. It was never to tell people. Don't go get implants or don't do this. Survey everybody has to really be smart with their decisions and make it upon whatever their circumstances are so right but it's just so important because you have the platform to be able to share your story and changed so many lives and like that video that you posted about your breast implant illness like the comment section is like you know. It's like a heartfelt deep. Yeah it is really also interesting. Is You know you don't have to have breast implants or a deformity to relate to like what I went through. I think a lot of those comments were like. Oh my gosh like you know. I've never liked my nose or I never liked this about me but it made me realize maybe it's not worth the risk you know being. Maybe I should just leave myself as I am right. And it all goes back to self love. Yes which practicing only inside of this year. Yeah super important. I right Natalie so I'm gonNA move onto the rapid fire questions that I ask all America's so what does your Dream Life..

Natalie youtube hypothyroidism Illness Iraq instagram autoimmune disease Dole America Anita
"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

The Lavendaire Lifestyle

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

"I would literally go online. It'd be like was it social blade which I don't check anymore because I don't think it's very healthy. I would go on social late. I would see who were like the top one hundred channels that were growing. I would go in. I would learn about different niches. I wouldn't just stick to like my own makeup because truly when you do that it's amazing you. You encounter like a very close knit community but also you just stay within that community and everybody's business is different. But that wasn't really my my goal and so I would just observe what these people are doing. Right Howard their thumbnails you know. What are they saying within the first few minutes and then I would go on the back end of things analytics and I would see. Oh Gosh when did people drop off a which thumbnails the most Russians and really doing a lot of the the work that like math wise I guess on other people's channels too but also allies in that? Okay yes you can observe these people. But you can't you can try to emulate but you can't copy because what ends up happening is like for me. Bethany Mota was like popping right at that time and so I was like. Oh my God let me be just like Bethany Mota so I started my videos just like her and I realized that that content wasn't sticking and the reality is you know no one could be like a Bethany. Mota only Bethany. Mortar could be that if that makes sense so nobody wants to see the same version and I find that even the top creators right now on the platform each of them have their own little unique quirk or their own little unique story or something that sets them apart so really figuring out what that is for you another advice I'd say. Is You know when you get a no for an answer. Like you're asking the wrong person so like for me. I was constantly emailing different businesses. And things like Promo and it's Kinda weird even looking at it now because I don't do that anymore. But for instance I have a series called beauty busters and so I was pitching it out to a network and beauty. Busters is all about a series where I test our Internet beauty to see if there are poop or maybe baby and it kind of became this thing on my channel but I was pitching it to to someone who was not interested and so I had already gone in. I've done animations for this. I was so excited about the project and I remember leaving that meeting like feeling so bombed and I was like. Wow this actually sucks. Like why did I think this was going to be so great? You know they said no to me and I was like what the Hell you just use it for myself and so I ended up doing on my channel and it did incredible like millions of human really big series for me a big serious for me to also pitch two different brands. And so can I ask. Why do you doubt it yourself like why did you not that on your channel in the first place? Well because I thought at that point in time I was a smaller channel so I thought that giving this to someone else a network right kind of have more reach would have more but it would have been dumb of me because the reality is they would have taken ownership over that content. I have even been able to use it. Which is what we see with a lot of people that work off like buzzfeed in and things of that nature. Gaffe so just depends. I mean there's different routes for different people. If that's the route that you WANNA take throw. I thought I wanted and I'm so happy that they said no one that I just decided to invest that within myself on my own Like it all happened for a reason. Yeah exactly so aside from that I mean how much research do you put into each of your videos so like what's the process. Yes so the process for me right now is actually so different. I don't know right now. I. I'm seeing my channel more of like intentional. I'm seeing it more as I want to build a community whereas before like I was mentioning to you it was all about reaching the masses which I think is power but I also think it's more important now that I look at it. Would I wish I would have done is just kind of it in because especially when it comes to selling product right? It's a lot easier that way people trust you a little bit. More for instance like for you. You know you talk a lot about self help and so you have that Awesome Journal book which I absolutely love. Yeah and so I I will trust you because that that's your content. You know what I'm saying whereas if someone all of a sudden wants to sell makeup but they don't do makeup it doesn't Really Make Samurai. Oh that yeah that's true. 'cause they're too like white Exactly Yeah So. That's something that I found out through all this also in terms of like brands brands. WanNa Work More. Now with niche creators. Just because they see that the return on investments a lot higher so I see yeah so then. Are you saying that now? Most of your content is like what you WanNa create versus what you think other people want. Exactly yes I always just huge shifts that I think when you're trying to grow a small channel you kind of have to focus on what other people wanNA see right. Like there's like I think for youtubers. It's always like a weird balance to sustained. Can you talk about what that is for you? Hopefully I mean I think it is a balanced just because at the end of the day like for instance my prank videos were popping off in other words like doing so good like I have. Some that are like over ninety million. You know I was really proud of that content back then now. Is it content that I want to be related to right now like I'm you know I'm older? I'm a little bit more mature. It doesn't quite fit a lot with a lot of different brands. Like I would actually have my managers. Tommy Natalie really have to stray away from this stuff because it just doesn't look good to brands. Yes so I liked it at that time and finding new as fun but what I'm trying to say is to each their own for me. I also would have gotten bored. Doing the same thing over and over so for me there's always uncensored like evolution's like twenty two thousand New Year to me and my word of the years intention and everything that I post this year. I wanted to be intentional. I want it to mean something to me Yeah I don't want to do it for the masses if that makes sense because that's kind of as creator right and it's more fulfilling to be intentional into what you want. Imporant yes yeah. Let's take a break and talk about how to make twenty twenty your best year as an artist of life..

Bethany Mota Bethany buzzfeed Mortar Tommy Natalie Howard Awesome Journal
"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

The Lavendaire Lifestyle

12:10 min | 1 year ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

"I am thrilled. Thank you so much I love. How just casually pretending like we didn't just talk twenty minutes we go. I know but I have to start with excited because I really am end right and I. I love your podcast. I know you have it. You stop doing it. It was like a temporary thing but like I love listening to it and I think you're just so much smarter than you. Actually give yourself credit for on Youtube saying no I agree. I feel like you know it's interesting that you say that because I do feel like I kind of put up youtube for me. I kind of became character. Spoke about this in my last video. It's not something I want to do. I really do reflect more myself but I feel like as I've ball as a creator as a person I get more comfortable in my own skin and Kinda like showcasing. What I'm good at but it's interesting because I go into business meetings right to like with channel. It's very bubbly. It's very like a kind of like a very youthful vibe. Yeah people will be really surprised me. Wow I didn't know you were so like business savvy. Yeah expect this from you and I'm like yeah well I mean. I'm twenty five years old. I went to school for marketing and business. But it's just things that obviously you know I don't show case it's different SII different dimension than on channel. So yeah I mean. It's okay that you don't showcase it because there's a place for everything but I'm just like it's something that's so cool I would want to. I think it's on. It's different brings about the different dynamic to the scene which. I think is always nice. Yeah so let's first talk about your story. What led you to start creating on Youtube in the first place. Oh my goodness okay. So this goes back. Five years ago I pretty much was in school for marketing and business. I was it was all kind of monotonous for me. I was in my economics class. Doing you know supply and demand and I would just be watching videos like hiding my phone from my professors and I was so inspired by like all of these incredible entrepreneurs like Michelle Fon deal. Candy a Candy Johnson and I really like it was something I truly wanted to pursue. I felt like almost like a relationship with all these people that I didn't even know I propose myself to do it and I told myself you know why not why not start posting once a week and seeing how this thing goes. I was so scared. I don't know if you felt the same way when you post your first video and you're like gosh everyone's going to see it but the reality is it's a lot harder to market yourself and. I think I had like ten views or something like that. It was a slow start for me on my channel. Didn't really kick off until maybe two years into it. Yeah I was just like in school for business and really uninspired. Didn't really have a drive or a passion but on the side I was doing youtube and I was becoming obsessed with analytics and with you know marketing myself. What what colors on thumbnail? Where psychologically do people want to click like all of these marketing things? I'm sure you're aware of and I became obsessed and yeah I think my heart's in this and so I was in my third year of college and I went to my parents room very nervously and I was like hey is do you think it's okay if I pursue this and my family of course being you know first generation immigrants and all that they were like absolutely not like You know school. Is that what you have to do? This is what we came here for. I'm like this is the route you should take and it was kind of like a blow to me because I was like. This is what I really WanNa do this. I'm passionate not too passionate and business school. Listen I'm already applying all these things that I'm learning. I'm already negotiating with France. I'm already up connecting with people from all around the world doing what I'm learning but I'm actually applying it and so I pretty much just to deal with them and I said all right. Let me take the semester off of school and at the time I had seven thousand subscribers I was literally not even monetize and I told him I said you know. Allow me to get to one million subscribers and if I do that by the end of the semester let's call it quits or school. That's a huge goal. Yeah we're like no kidding. I had one opportunity knish to show them and to prove to myself that hate. Yeah if you really WANNA make this word. You better be every single night. You know figuring out what's that next video you WANNA do. It was me like behind it all. I'm sure with yourself as well people. Yeah they see this whole thing like a huge video but in the beginning it was just me myself right now. We're a team of five and so for me to be writing the videos editing. The videos producing the videos being a part of the videos then trying to market the video yet but thankfully I was able to. Kinda like what we were discussing with the whole vision board thing. I have always been like a very big believer in mindset and visualizing and like manifesting great things in your life and so I would cut out like a piece of my youtube channel and I at the time had seven thousand subscribers. So you know my goal was a million so I changed it for a million and I would look at that every single day and I would go to school and my business uniform taking my supply and demand economics class that I hated hated and I'd go to all these mathematical classes and I would speak out and manifest. I would say hi. My name is Natalie from Natalie's outlived. I am a top fastest growing youtube channel. I am a top creator. I have a house by the age of twenty three. I was very specific with what I wanted. Dennis Garcia which at the time we urges danger I would be very specific with the amount I wanted to earn. And you know eventually it all came true which is just kind of crazy and It feels like such a blessing. So yeah well I think it came true because you did both sides you did the manifesting and the research looking into the data like you. I don't want people out there listening to think it's all just like you manifested everything because my girl alley would say to. That is just that you know. You can't really for me personally. I have never accomplished something without believing in it. I yeah so of course so much dirty work that you have to do In terms of just you know late nights and connecting with people and people saying no and emails that that no one reads feeling kind of down on yourself but that's where your mindset comes in and it's like you really have to be your biggest advocate for everything in your life. You really have to believe in your dreams and what you're saying you're preaching so yeah like you you believed in yourself. Plus you kind of put a timeline on yourself to like I have to my family. I do this new troy's and actually was a huge for me as well to me. You know what guys like. I understand where you're coming from. I understand you guys immigrated here to give you my sister a better life but listen. I have a vision and I see this becoming. I want you to trust that and even today. My parents don't quite understand what I do. It's interesting and it's opened up. There is as far as I think you might relate that growing up what people use to really glorify was everyone. That would say oh. I WANNA be a doctor or hey I wanna do this. Those are very incredible careers right fabulous but not for everyone so for me. I always grew up with that pressure having to be like. Oh God if I say I want to be an animator on Pixar which is kind of like what I wanted to do or if I say. How do graphic design all of a sudden? The conversation and the vibe in the room is like very good holidays route so I do like that. Nowadays a lot of artists proving that wrong like a lot of people are self-employed. Are Entrepreneurs are doing a lot of incredible businesses like unite? So yeah totally. And how did you find your niche? Did you really did? You have an idea of like the type of video you wanted to make. Because I feel like you're KONTA has evolved over time we girl. Yeah it's been all over the personally. Yeah I started with an outfit of the day. Which is you know very difficult video of showing your outfit and like I hate passion like truly like quite honestly. I cannot really. I don't really. I take like the Steve. Jobs approach which is like just make one less decision and just wear the same thing over and over again. My husband's the one that is like onto fashion and he dresses me for events and stuff like that. So it's interesting that that was my first video right. I kind of just did what I watched at the time. Which was outfitted of the days? And then I went into makeup and then slowly but surely the makeup stuff wasn't really sticking now's like why is this happening honestly like for me. I wasn't creatively like I couldn't see myself doing so. Many different. Makeup looks with like one pallet. For instance right. I just didn't have the heart for it so then I started to really you know. Read books and understand that you know people need to see value and so you need to give them that and so I started kind of implementing. Let's say make up with value. And so what does that make like? Let's say make packs. And so yeah hacks. Were kind of the niche. That really room I channel. Lot and the time there wasn't so many people doing it and it was kind of like a find new term kind of like diy. Yeah Yeah and then. At what point did you start your Spanish channel? Okay so my Spanish channel I would say I was three years into might channel so that channel has been out now hair two years. I believe I believe and maybe a little bit more with that channel. You know I didn't want to like I quite frankly I was like this is so much work but it was my family all in Columbia. They're like Natalie we support you love you. We understand what you're saying like. Can you give us a little bit of something I was like? Oh my God if guys knew like now you want me to replicate this content but My approach was just repurposing content. So what I would do is I would take a video that patently well on my English Channel and I would just sit down. Do An intro in an altro in Spanish or Masan Yarmuth Blah Blah Blah. And then I would put it together or I would have an editor kind of translate certain words and then that's it and what I found it to be was just like really shocking like my channel. I think within the first year it grew to almost a million subscribers almost a million because there and I was like wow this is so interesting like hitting a new demographic a new crowd of people and I believe it was in two thousand eighteen on this was one of the stats that I talked about in my podcast Hashtag viral. The top ten fastest growing channels were hit Latin American yeah so whether it was from Brazil or whether it was from Mexico and it was because the content in the states for instance was much more saturated whereas These people are just getting the resources to do a lot of these videos than it was blowing up so I guess. Good timing as well right. I just think it's so cool that you use your ability to speak Spanish and you like you know what I mean like. You did that and that not everyone can do that. Thank you. Yeah it's been really fun so you are probably the most successful youtuber on my podcast. So I would love for you to share. I would love to share for our listeners. Your best tips on growing a channel. what were those secret? Nitty-gritty things that you did that. Oh my gosh. There's so many I would say like first and foremost really studying your peers. But when you study other people so like..

Youtube Natalie Candy Johnson Michelle Fon Pixar Masan Yarmuth editor France Dennis Garcia Mexico troy Columbia Brazil
"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

The Lavendaire Lifestyle

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Lavendaire Lifestyle

"Allow me to get to one million subscribers and if I do that by the end of the semester let's call it quits or score..

"nataly" Discussed on The Here for Her Podcast

The Here for Her Podcast

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Here for Her Podcast

"nataly" Discussed on The Here for Her Podcast

The Here for Her Podcast

14:09 min | 2 years ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Here for Her Podcast

"Her light. Here's Sandra thanks to see your face. Oh good to see you to look a few. Your Your House is Europol thank you thank you. Thank you thinking the stuff off the counter which I think is a clean also cleaner to one frame up against. Where are you located? I'M IN DENVER. Oh you're in ten ninety okay. You were just outside of Toronto. So we're at actually nuts. work office. So we're on her lunch break we're in Waterloo Waterloo. Okay perfect yes. It's why went to Western so. Oh that's so cool. What did you take? What did you take Western a psychology? Hugh Laurie no in Waterloo Aweso. I know it's like I feel like everyone take psychology when they don't really know what to do with their lives. Exactly you could always apply to psychology to whatever you're doing. Yeah true very true. Okay well Sandra we are so excited tab. You only here for her podcast. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks so much for having me. I'm excited awesome. Okay so for those. That don't know you. Can you tell everyone a little bit about yourself. Yes so only gonNA SORTA So my I guess. My story really got started Twelve years ago living in Vancouver over and a bunch of girlfriends and myself got together just because we were looking at investing starting to one investment property and Just make smarter choices with our money and so we ended up forming. This grew. We called ourselves. The Smart Cookie is in. We started essentially a money club so instead of have you know getting together and talking about books over wine we talked about money over wine and so we were able over the course of that year to sort of develop delta system and a way of educating ourselves and then educating each other as girlfriends do right because we're so good at sharing resources and Really talking openly with one another and supporting one another and over the course of that year we were able to pay off collectively over fifty thousand dollars worth of debt and increase our salaries salaries We also started side hustles on the side before. Like side of those even a thing we did. We did everything like Robin rented out her. A parking spot in her garage and walked dogs when she had a minutes and ended up getting a job at the future. Strap Pottery Barn because she wanted to buy new desks. Capriccio literally got the night. That's amazing anything. And we're are low butts off in. We ended up on Oprah a year later to share our story about how we did it. which was how that okay? So how did you stop there from it. How did Oprah find you like how? How did that happen? Yes so we worked three of us at the time worked for a company in Vancouver called one eight hundred got junk which was an amazing company to work for end so Katie and I worked in the PR department. So we were always hustling for stories and for media exposure so Katie happened to be on Oprah's website one day and she was Jewish. She was doing a call out or what she called her debt at Diet Success Stories and we had actually it was Andrea. Who's part of the money club? Who had seen that episode of Oprah where she was starting this thing about the debt diet? So that's what spurred the whole conversation in so Katie shoddy note through the website of like. Hey we're five girls and we have. Here's what we did. And she voted out what we did. And just you know said the Milwaukee thinking anything of it and she sat in a cubicle across from me and I remember her standing up and she had the phone and she was like they'll uh-huh precious obviously wasn't breakfast and yeah. Yeah that's what it was so funny and I got his for work like. I thought it was for Brian the time for sure it was him. She's like no they're interested in our story. So anyways long story short we ended up going back and forth and Started talking with our producer. You Sir and they were very careful to manage expectations and then About a weekend in the process she called and said Yeah you guys are on the show and so she flew out to Vancouver very we shot a bunch of stuff and then flew to Chicago and how crazy that is so crazy so my mind is just circulating through this whole process and drinking it at the core of the program that you guys worked through and came up with respect cookies. Like what is that one impeach That helped you along through saving money. Yeah it actually is funny because it had nothing to do with money the the piece that helped us with the money and what I mean by that is we really got clear on. We sort of created this version of you've heard of like an exercise was called the perfect perfect day at the time. So you really visualize what your ideal life scenario is and so we did that. We evolved over the years because the idea of perfection. I think is something that's impossible so Call it now but day while live but it was really getting clear on not the stuff that you want in your life and that certainly part of it like I like having nice things and that's great but more the relationships you WanNa have and how you want to feel in your career and your job and how you WanNa feel with the wealth and abundance in your life and so we created that exercise we shared it out loud with one another and think. What's cool about that when you're surrounded by new girls notice when you're surrounded by true friends who really like see the best in you and see your best south and once you articulate to them like this is my dream this is where I wanna go and you can see that for them and support them and you know because we all veer off track right but when you can have the support of people to bring you back to you like like hey? Is it really in line with what you shared you really want. Is that really getting closer to that life that you have described. I think that was the that was sort of the the key the secret sauce of of why we were able to do what we did like. Yes we got really strategic with like paying down our debt like crazy people But it didn't feel like the cooling was. It didn't feel like sacrifice. I think we were all super excited about the end goal about this life. We're rebuilding that all of a sudden. We didn't care about missing happy hour because we bought wine into at our house instead like those things that may have felt like sacrifices. Like we're missing out. We didn't like we were really feeling excited and motivated and inspired about what we were doing. I think that was what allowed us to due to do what we're able to do in that circle that's amazing. It's so inspiring. Many lingering so many people can relate to that story of like struggling and being so in debt it end it gives people hope going back to so so with Oprah. How did this idea so you got with your girlfriends? You created the smart cookies as you went on Oprah. How did that lead you to the crear that you're in now? Yeah Oh my gosh. It's been such a crazy journey. So when we got back from Oprah I mean we didn't. We weren't business. We were literally girlfriends with fulltime jobs. Who had this club? So I remember being in the limo going back to the going back to the airport and calling my brother who's super smart and intact and being like we need a website like as Sath And so we very quickly when we got back to Vancouver I started reaching out and getting help so that we can start to build the structure for incorporating anyway so the business of smart cookies happened from that. What also happened during that? TV show the taping. We were on with Gene Shatskikh whose The financial editors. Today's show is very big in the personal finance world. She was on that episode with us and she had a show on Oprah's radio shows. We went to her show after she said on air. You guys need to meet my literary agent. You have to write a book own my car. Oh it's okay now. Whatever whatever you tell me to do a thing why when we got back to Vancouver than it was amazing and it's interesting because looking back on business backwards like me had a lot of money falling bring in a lot of opportunities coming in and it was? It was awesome into be able to do that as girlfriends. And we're very transparent about you know we had our rocky times to like you can imagine with five of us Doing that but we really surrounded ourselves. We created a little board of advisors of people to help us manage the money in the business us manage all sorts of things that we just had. No no clue what we were doing and so from from there the mission became okay. Let's inspire inspire other women who Start the conversation about money and reach their financial goals and so over the course of five years and you really did the business together together and wrote two books and had a TV show and Traveled all over North America together. We joke because we got when we did partnerships or whatever we were doing travelling and there would always be like a hotel room for each of US books. And we're like well we're all GONNA share a room so like one. Oh my gosh unhealthy amount of time together but it really was a sisterhood. That's a special special people to do that with people that you love so much like. That's a rare totally any. We definitely had it out and would like family right like totally at each other and the next morning get up for breakfast and hi so we asked the business Evolved from there because I mean that was like twelve years ago so Win and then we started you know getting married and having families and it got to the point where the direction of the business it you know. It really needed to either kind of fold as a chapter or one of us take it on and keep the legacy and keeps building on it and so I had the opportunity with the other girls blessing and support you. Take over the business right after I had my first baby which is crazy. Goodness Yeah Yeah I mean I had no idea I was like cool. I have no idea what I'm doing actually brought so. The business was incorporated in Canada. And so I had to take everything in Puerto Ric- here which is a whole report. A whole podcast on that in any way so that businesses where it is today and the girls are still involved as they want to be But it's been an amazing thing for me to be able to grow it and really really a lot of it's online so all of its online so I'm able to work with women who I now do An online money club in idea one. That's that's business focused as well and the women. I have a woman from Haiti. Who has her own business in two girls from Australia and Canada the US and so this community that started in like Katie's apartment in Vancouver has grown into this global community which is so crazy and so awesome super lucky to be able to do that? So is this. Is this source studio that you're referring to. Yes so the source studio is the program that I launched this year so taking what I learned about being an entrepreneur the end taking the money piece but also working backwards and figuring out. Okay what is the life that you wanna live and let's talk about creating a business that matches action that life and so you know. Do you want the freedom to be able to work from home. Awesome but like get clear on that from the GECKOS. The design your work schedule and design your pricing structure around what you really need to get paid to to live the life that you want so yeah so that is the source studio that I watched this year which has been so so awesome. Awesome to have that community of women and talk openly about money in business. We still don't do that in us. Getting really real about that and how to you and how to make smart decisions so that you can create that vision for Your Business and your life to well let's talk a bit about that whole business mindset because we have a lot out of listeners. Who may be our MOMS or who are women that are just kind of thinking about maybe starting their own business You know they're just kind of in the in the beginning thanks stages of that yet and they really want to create that dream job for themselves. What would you suggest their first steps? Be For women that are going through this. Yeah for sure so honestly right out first of all understand. It sounds obvious to say about a lot of I don't do it. I didn't do it for a long time before being in the money club to and being conscious of all this but really understanding what it costs to live your life like really like with and not just the bare bones. Because you're still gonNA WANNA you know go out to dinner with your girlfriends and Travel and certainly when you're starting a business you know you've got to be real about what you're willing to sacrifice in that's totally okay But just understanding what that dollar figure. So what is the base amount that you need to be making to live your life and then what is the ideal amount to like if you if you're looking at two years in and and you WanNa be making you know twenty grand month that's awesome but like get get really clear on that so that you can build a business strategy. That's working backwards to that in a lot of times as we get into whether you're looking at being photographer starting online at whatever the businesses. Yes you need to look at the market price but also you need need to make sure that you're pricing yourself at a level that is going to allow you to succeed and to do that right from right from the.

"nataly" Discussed on The Here for Her Podcast

The Here for Her Podcast

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Here for Her Podcast

"My IPAD. Could you imagine could you imagine. Oh Oh too funny to. I had to play that I just I feel like it would really tell the story. Oh God I I can't really play more than that because I feel like we're GONNA get sued by Nelly really but Bursley so anyways We fertilized sixteen of those twenty three retrieved eggs which was stellar numbers. We we were so pleased with that so they grow them in a dish and they check the Monday five and they usually flash freeze them on day. Five and I wasn't able to do a fresh transfer. So what that means is that they transferred them literally five days after they retrieve them but because I was so over stimulated. It's very dangerous to do that. So we had to wait until my body calmed down and then I obviated again and I could go back and transfer the egg. So after five we had eleven really great quality eggs eggs and And we went back and we transferred one The monthly or that one. Unfortunately we miscarried The eight and a half weeks due to a sub Oriana camera inch which then left us with ten frozen embryos which Again we were so happy with those numbers burs because We're very fortunate to have that. A lot of people. Don't even get one or two out of a cycle so we're okay with you know everything that has happened and we went back and we transferred little embryo number ten and that was Emmett and he is absolutely perfect. The pregnancy was perfect The birth was perfect and That really in a nutshell is my entire Infertility and I the F. story so we have nine embryos frozen right now in Toronto at a clinic and I get asked all the time. What are we going to do with the little embryos? I honestly don't have an answer right now. We we pay a monthly storage fee and monthly. We play an annual storage fee to keep them there and we just. I'm not ready to make a decision yet. I don't think we're going to have any more kids but you never know what happens I just you know I'm not in a position to just throw those all away or donate them to research. I mean this is a very controversial topic I understand and but like we just literally don't know what we're going to do right now. We may consider donating them to couples. We don't know That's it I hope it wasn't not too long. I hope to go back. And Edit it to see where we're at But I figured it was the perfect time to tell that story because It's you know it's a perfect time of year when we're recognizing and were talking about you know infant in in in fertility and pregnancy loss and all those things and it's such a sad thing to be dealing with if you're going through it I mean there's really nothing that someone can say and do to make the situation situation better. I think for me my biggest advice is if you know someone that might be going through that just the worst thing then you can do is saying nothing just all you have to say. Is You know I'm here. If you WanNa talk and just do little gestures like send them a five dollar gift card through through starbucks APP and just say you know this is me. I'm thinking of you. I'm here if you need me kind of thing. You know most chances most times you know People don't really WanNa talk about it. It's a tough thing to talk about. And that's totally fine but there are a lot of resources. There's a lot of people connected on the community on instagram. That you can reach out to and talk to. I'm always here if you need anything or anyone to talk with You know I always make myself available for that and I'm so happy happy that I was able to sit down and tell this story because it's something that I still really am extremely passionate about like I said it's kind of how I started out on Instagram and I do want to continue. Continue talking about it and bringing awareness to it and helping other people the best way that Kim show tell some wells we haven't done. I feel like we've missed our wills. The last few weeks leaks so maybe I will. Maybe I'll tell you guys feuilles. I was going to save these for next week but And I feel like these probably aren't going to be a big surprise to you because if you follow me on instagram you know everything that I share in love by. I'm GonNa tell you again So the GIF refinery sent me one of their subscription boxes and guys. This box is like a subscription box on steroids. It's got every you know how sometimes you get subscription boxes and you're like Like I'M NOT GONNA use product is just going to sit in my closet for a year and then I'm GONNA end up throwing out this one. Everything in it was so beautiful. And I like it because it's SORT use listeners. But it's all Canadian All Canadian brands. Everything was meaning crafted in Canada There was some awesome soap in there. There was a scarf a necklace necklace. Some lip balm really cute headband. some treats just a balance of everything like snacks. girly beauty You know even the scarf was so cute and I've gotten so many comments on the scarves. I really really love that. But they did. Give me a code love Natalie. Fifteen and it saves fifteen eighteen dollars off your first box which is amazing. Because I think it's one hundred bucks You can get them monthly or you can get them you know quarterly. You can send them as a box Fox once a year you can do it however you want And I love it like all straight up the ordering the next one And then my other will for the week is Oh my God. It's totally it's totally another podcast Again you'll probably know if you follow my an scrammed by it's called crime junkies and and another fellow instagram. Mom told me about this podcast because she knew that I love true. Crime podcast and Holy Shit. It is amazing every every episode is a new story or a new. You know murderer missing persons and I know like call me a creep. Whatever but I there's something about your crime I swear I was like an an investigator in a past life Fun fact actually wrote the outside. I was going to be a lawyer. Also but It's it's so good and there's over two hundred episodes so if you're looking for a new true crime podcast then you should definitely check it out. I've been loving it. I've been listening to it every single day. You know what I'm going to call Alex Right now. See if she's got two wills washing. Hey how's it going good gun. Disregarding opinions to your phone saw an a really quiet room so I think they'll be able to hear you on the recording. If you WANNA share to will for the week Shohei Hey can't hang on okay so actually I do have one well. I been getting a lot of questions lately on one particular color that I been a lot of people. When I shared my stories they wanted me to let power so it's a really nice full color I would so it's like Okay how do I describe this color. It's it's a pink an it's more a played.

"nataly" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"nataly" Discussed on KCRW

"The poor people's Pam paying. I even put my kids by their ears, you're voting, and they tell me my, my vote, don't count. That's a lie. And for her personal right now, her kids have their own places to live this way in my might have to come back home, because the rent is so high, which is what Democrats are. Counting on that. This is an issue. Most Americans can relate to Pam fester. NPR news. Washington are at you know that mushy feeling you get when a dog looks at you with a sad or confused face. Why does that happen? Why do they do that NPR's Vanessa Romo reports? A group of scientists say they have figured it out. We all know the look, and it turns out there, actually is something to what we call puppy is the big round is the eyebrows raised up in what looks like a why is everybody always picking on me kind of stare and inside we get that feeling and become total pushovers. Well, according to Ambrose the lead anatomist on a study about the phenomenon that was just published in the journal proceedings of the national academies of sciences. The sad expression on our canine, besties is the result of tens of thousands of years of evolution and something called a leader muscle. It seems like the an. Ancestors of domestic dogs were quickly domesticated by humans. And as part of that process, human, or selecting for this, I'm movement, which is produced by this leader, muscle, essentially, those tender looks are mirrors of our own facial expressions, specifically to help dogs better communicate with humans and get what they want. Things like food and a warm place to live. It's also almost entirely absent from wolves the ancestors of dogs burrow, says she and her colleagues don't have concrete proof just yet. But earlier studies they've done suggests that this relatively small inner eyebrow movement in pooches, that makes their is look larger and more baby, like if oaks, a protective instinct, and people just anecdotally when my dog does that I think, oh, my gosh. She's worried. She sat she needs me for something. And so. We, we pay attention to them. So I it seems to trigger some kind of caregiving response in most human, and that desire to peer into one another's eyes is apparently mutually beneficial. Researchers found that dogs like humans experience a surge in oxytocin levels what's called the love hormone as for. What's next Burroughs says? Well, future studies may seem like their dog focused, they're really about understanding ourselves because we're this weird BC's that decided to bring other species to live with our in our house. So there's something to be learned in all of these factors of dogs faces to inform us about why we evolved like this. Maybe they'll finally figure out who's a good boy, Vanessa Romo, NPR news. This is morning edition on KCRW ahead on morning edition, whale watching is generally regarded as innocent fun. But how harmless is it? When the watched whales or endangered the story of a bit of controversy that is flaring and the Pacific northwest. That's coming up on morning edition. You're listening to KCRW Leary parole. Next time on all things considered schools are supposed to file a report, every time, a student is restrained or secluded now the federal government is looking at the quality of that data. Also, what experts who studied terrorism are struggling to categorize all the different groups, currently threatening public safety, and a look at the immigrants from Africa who've made their way to Portland vein. Plus local news, weather, and traffic to it's all things considered from NPR and KCRW a Tuesday edition starts at three. Now this from KCRW news. Have you ever gone to Hearst castle, on the central coast and wish you could take a dip in one of the historic mansions or Nataly tiled, swimming pools, well now you can, but his case it'll be us. Eric, Roy explains it won't be cheap. The California state parks.

Pam KCRW NPR Vanessa Romo Hearst castle national academies of sciences Pacific northwest Portland California oxytocin federal government Ambrose Washington Africa Nataly Burroughs Eric Roy
"nataly" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

09:50 min | 2 years ago

"nataly" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"I am ready to be a parent. And I am ready to raise a child. I was telling you when I had my kids when I was pregnant with him. I was able to turn to different people and say how do I do blank, you know, all this little things that kind of worry you because you're not you don't know how to do it. But so many people move in the area who just don't have that kind of connection network is that a piece of what you deal with it is and from action such as speaking with you today and communicating with our local OBGYN's are berthing facilities and moving forward with our mission through partnerships were able to better identify, these families and mothers and even mothers. Thank you said that are transient are visiting the area, which have a great impact on our rates. It's here in Orange County where able to with our resources and partnerships connect them with the resources that are available to them at that moment in their lives. I feel as if we really just would have a better perspective of how to best serve our mothers. If we'd like you took it in our own consciousness and said what if I was a mother, and what assistance would I have available if any to move forward and having a healthy, baby. And that's what we wanna do. We want to let everyone know that we are resource for them to move forward in a positive birth outcome. Now, this is important to the whole community. This isn't just important to the pregnant mom, and why don't you explain why that is the case? And and and really the reality is we we haven't even said that word we're talking about infant mortality, indeed, a baby surviving or not is is really the issue here. Indeed and infant mortality play such a pivotal role of not only. And how your community is perceived. But and the manor which you can move forward and living exiting in that area. Because it takes a lot to say, okay. What are we going to do to move forward to prevent infant mortality are we going to educate? Are we going to go into communities and tell them that these are the ways in which we need to ensure a healthy mother before we have a healthy child? Do we need to educate about them of a father in the home as we know? Statistically, when a father is in the home, we have better birth outcomes with that child. So like, you mentioned it's a matter of ensuring that the main focus is always at hand is that we are preventing infant deaths and just last year we had over one hundred infant deaths in Orange County more than half of those infidels were black babies and the number one cause of those infantries was prematurely. And low birth weight. So again is that education than we are here to assist is getting them access to services because again, they're screening were able to move forward and access to care. And so it's just a a paradigm shift for some. But regardless I feel as if when we get to the point where we recognize them portent of that infant that child and that child's life within our community in the future. We will have a better perspective of how to address this concern, what are some of the factors that you're able to help with? I'm thinking pre prenatal care would be a main win. Guess prenatal care is definitely we always encouraged our mothers to make sure that they are prepared for a berth innocence before moving forward and conception are you at an ideal weight are you at a place in which you can move forward in a healthy pregnancy. And of course, we know statistically half of births are unplanned, however. Even if you did not plan that pregnancy are you entered into prenatal care her first trimester. And if cell that's amazing. That's what we would love. But a lot of women either due to access or cause or whatever the factors are don't have that resource or capabilities. So we're able through our screening process and through our partnerships able to connect with these mothers throughout prenatally pair, Nataly and postnatally throughout all of the factors of their birth and their pregnancy, and and hopes to like, I said educate and make them aware. So that they have a positive outcome. So that they have a healthy baby. Now since you are here, and you are you talk to me from the male perspective. And this, of course, of course. And as a man I feel as if a lot of times with them maternal child health, of course, due to the title the male role or the fatherhood role is not looked at as import. Wouldn't out and get pickles or something writer? Ice cream. Go, you know, massage swollen feet do things such as that. But it's more than that. And essence is instilling pride about the family. An essence I feel as if when fathers are in the row in the picture, the the child takes it into consideration. They they thrive more and fathers. I feel as if don't have as much support and preparing for new other. And that's why we have fatherhood initiatives that we partner with which her in a sense are all star dad's boot camp for new dads programs that we have and also we have other initiatives throughout the year. The where we don't just bring him mothers. We bring mothers and fathers to see the progress and the evolution of their children or to educate and determine more about how do I prepare for postpartum depression in the mother how do? Prepare for the feeding and things of that nature that they didn't even think that they had a role in. And so I feel the fatherhood role is neglected. But luckily, we here in healthy start coalition of Orange County have taken that into consideration and continue to instill programs in the community that allow us to trust farther ahead as well. What's an example, as you mentioned the bootcamp? What's an example of something that happens at the bootcamp perfect one of our boot camp programs VO first of all we're able to have four dad by dad experiences. And when I say that I mean that our instructors are fathers themselves, and that they are instructing fathers to be to move forward and being a father and being an act of father. That knows what to expect that knows how to best assist that mother during the pregnancy and thereafter, a lot of questions. That you would think fathers would be like, duh. Dave there may be ashamed to ask in a mother and father setting when we have it forefathers by fathers, it tends to drive the conversation to a more transparent discussion, and we're able to talk a lot about our expectations as a father and the things in which we saw as men in our own lives that we didn't have addressed. And so I love the setting and to answer your question, again, one of the main things that we're able to do is just have a father's only space, and that is our primary focus because we feel that that's conducive to the discussions that need to happen to get the answers, we need you don't let me ask you because I asked you about the men versus the women. Let me ask about the age too. Because I know you have some older mothers, you have some younger mothers, you have some younger fathers, you have some older fathers. How does that? Fit into the mix in terms of the support you can offer or even when those men are together. Does that make a difference? It does actually because one of the items that I I like to see is when we see grandfather's in the mix, as you know, in our age and society were starting to see a lot of older parents or grandparents taking the role of parenthood, and one of the factors that we like to address the safe sleep safe sleep at a time was always put the baby on the stomach. You know, that's they sleep better that way. But that statistically and scientifically is not the case we move forward and educating these fathers on the ABC principle alone on their back in a crib now. Taking that from a perspective generational e- say, for instance, a grandfather came in owes like I'll this ABC principle. I am not familiar with it. But then this young father. Here's from us. And. Sees the data about how we're moving forward an infant mortality due to unsafe sleep that paradigm shift that that change in the perspective of the generations. It really really is a sight to see because now we've not only educated this new father. But we've educated and retort this grandfather how to move forward and caring for their grandchild. And so I I want to say that we don't really we don't really focus on the age gap. We focus on the educational attainment of those in the room because we know that our education will stretch through the generation. Well, I mean that makes sense not only because at the age, but simply because of some of us grew up around a lot of siblings, for example, in some of us were only children. So he didn't even have that kind of connection. Maybe indeed I want you to go ahead and throw out your contact information right now..

Orange County ABC swollen feet Nataly writer partner Dave
"nataly" Discussed on BiggerPockets

BiggerPockets

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"nataly" Discussed on BiggerPockets

"Extra light, you'll see all the little things that marijuana grow houses needs that happen. They all happened in the garage. So like, that's something you definitely don't want to skip over as I'm sure. Graham is now looking at like Jassam of the some of the warning signs were there. But he was twenty one years old. He didn't know and even making all these mistakes, you still want to be a really really successful Rosset investor in Asian. So what excuse we all have? Right. Exactly. That was on. I think the best learning experience. I ended up taking the tenant. He got very violent basically trash the house. I lost a years worth of income on that house between the addiction fixing it up insurance wanna cover that. I didn't wanna fight insurance on that. But it was the best lesson looking back. I mean like this. I think I lost twelve grand or something thirteen thousand dollars. But looking back. I'm so happy. I pay twelve fifty thousand dollars to throw in that lesson because that could be a drop in the bucket now for the wrong tenor zone. Like, I'm glad and got that out of the way. That's the best college education. I ever got. Yeah. This is also just good like, you know, a good lesson that landlord in is a skill like, I said that allowing landlord he does not something that any of us are just bored and Nataly knowing how to do. And as a hundred tips and tricks that will help you improve your landlord. And so you'll take it seriously. If you're going to manage yourself taken seriously, I made the exact same mistakes. You did. I mean, every one of those things you said on like smiling and nodding every one of them I made right? And a lot of us do and still if you wanna avoid that just like read some books on being a landlord octa other local lords or if you're not willing to invest the work needed to become a good landlord. Hire that out and spend spend your time finding the best property manager. I agree with. Yeah. There's just to marry wise Brandon. That's why they call me. The wise old owl. I listened to a lot of rap songs to see if you're in or your property shows up in the video max good way to that's a good should be a part of Tennessee resell. It was so funny to see my house in the background of all of his pictures. Like, he would take pictures of him holding a gun to the camera and like on it's my living room in the back on. That's that's the that's the stove. I bought that was used to save a little bit of money on it. At least don't get shape. All right. He broke that now. So. Yeah. He smashed he's smashed that thing G for last one of our ten actually moved out of our property this. She's been there for a couple years now her dog chewed through adore big would solid door dog shoot through it. Like, I've never seen that happen. I'm I'm always shocked, and I shouldn't be shocked. But I'm always shocked at the level of destruction a person can have in a house, especially with dogs, but just don't get it. Yeah. It's it's absurd. But anyway, anything else did you learn on the lesson in the you wanna kind of summarize that deal up an oral will move on. I think we can move on. I think is really just the tenant selection on that deal. That was really made one for me. Yeah. Local. Well, hey, if I was interested in learning how I manage my properties, my wife, and I wrote a book on that while ago called the book on managing rental properties. It's yellow by Barnes and noble, or Amazon or whatever. But you know, I think it's kind of cool with that. Let's move over to the world famous fire round around. It's time for the fire round. Today's show is brought to you by specify this is an essential and really really cool tool every real estate investor needs. We've all been there overwhelmed with a shoebox of receipts to record juggling multiple Bank accounts, and unsure how much money were actually making..

Brandon Graham marijuana Rosset Jassam property manager Nataly Amazon Tennessee Barnes twelve fifty thousand dollars thirteen thousand dollars twenty one years
"nataly" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"nataly" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"We need to bring them together. We were talking before that after many, rain, consensual Europe. Especially in the south is they seem so much better public spaces than we are much more traditional deal related to climate. Or is that is there the stuff going on? I think he is related to climate. It's related to cultural tradition. The passage Atta Nataly in Greece families at six in the evening will just walk around the school. Square. You know, there's a real public culture of just sitting outside and talking. But again, I don't want to overdo it with the privatization of public space. But in Greece, you know, the idea of having the streets of Athens, privately owned would just be complete anathema, you know, it just wouldn't be culturally acceptable, and the vibrancy of those public spaces. You know is just the sort of organic. I mean, it just sort of is it's much more spontaneous. So how was that crept up on his over here, then, but I think it's been quite insidious because I think people haven't really noticed it's been very very gradual. And actually now they've begun to notice and we've started to have the debate, but really before Canary Wharf and broad gate. We didn't really have any of these spaces. And it's only really been in the last ten to fifteen years that they've started to really become the template for all new development. Like in towns and cities across the u k is part of that. Because of what it does is it takes away from local authority budgets and private complete six pick. I think that's very big factor. Clearly, local authorities are under more pressure than they have ever been before. And the private sector is happy to say, you know, we can take care of this. We can maintain the space too far higher standard with providing additionality. You know, we're making it better. But actually, what you're losing in the process is the democratic right to the city because in these places, you can't have a protest. You can't hand up political leaflets. You can't get up, you know, safe things you can't have gatherings. You know? You can't be a group of young people enjoying yourself. And you know, they're all sorts of activities like skateboarding and rollerblading even eating drinking in some places which on allowed. So it's a very different understanding of the city, and it creates quite monocultural spaces. So when we're looking at social cohesion and trust in the city monocultural spaces. I think actually very positive in that direction to think is entirely a bad thing. Would you think there's potential model were private companies still own space light Vesper, the more? Regulated in the firm rules on what's allowed to happen in them. I've actually started to become interested in. Recently is this idea of an urban right to roam which would build on the labour party's legacy of introducing the right to roam in. I think it was not. And I mean, I think it is. Now, a reality that so much of the city is in fact in a has already been rolled out in this way. And you know, it's going to be very difficult to introduce some sort of retrospective legislation. But since there is already this template, mainly of and run through essentially in privately owned spaces public rights of way, don't exist. And if they did exist before they were stopped up to use the terminology, and this would put public rights of women driving, and it would allow people to walk through. And it would allow anyone really to come into these spaces are completely agree. I mean, I think that I I would like that you can never put a gate to to create a gated community or too close it at night. And and the beauty of a city is it's Peraza is being able to take a shortcut through a lane. It's really upsetting. When you have to do a great detour to go somewhere in privates faces when it happens even like in my street. I had to fight for having a pedestrian passage to the people in social housing next door could get to the chew station without having to do a huge detour. And it makes a city more interesting because then you have secret Londono, you say have secret Birmingham of little places that only the people who live there, really, no the the the area, and it makes them feel like they they know then the manner, and it's good feeling. I mean, you're completely right? And the Thames path is supposed to be a walk that you can do along the time..

Greece Atta Nataly Canary Wharf Europe skateboarding Athens labour party Birmingham fifteen years
"nataly" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"nataly" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"So it was clear that whatever happened in the future. It was not going to be like that. And and I spent a lot of time designing that that tour. With all our great, creative people and trying to make sure that it told that story in reverse, and and it was great fun to do. And I think my sadness was just the fact that I was so happy we pulled it off with the whole reverse chronological thing that I would like to have had the rest of the world that couldn't come to those cities experienced that. And that's really the only regret I have is that we couldn't do more shows. But in hindsight now and with the benefit of time, I'm very happy with the way it went down. And and it just didn't sit right for me to do a farewell tour and try to capitalize on that word. Just just didn't just didn't work for me. And you I remember talking to you about this after the show that I was at we were in in the dressing room. We haven't some food, and you were saying to me as mentioning to you. I thought your voice on that tour was better than it had been like your voice was spot on. And you had said that you had made some adjustments to your diet or something. To help your voice. No dairy. I remember you telling me the story. But I mean really ban went out so strong. And then, of course, the document the documentary time stand still such a great sort of button as well on the whole thing. So I know that I speak for all the rush fans in that. It's it it hurts when you see a ban you love so much kind of end. But man, I'd rat. I mean to me you guys created the blueprint for how to do it the right way at the right time. That's that's really kind. And I really appreciate you saying that, you know, it wasn't the easiest thing to pull off. But I feel good about our body of work. You know, and I feel good about the way it ended, and you know, onward and upward in last thing before I let you go. Speaking of collecting, we talked about if the base is in the book, and all that sort of stuff seems like I always get to talk to you. You just around when we're starting to talk about baseball heating up and all that I think all the time about when you're. Solo record came out in two thousand you'd call into my radio show. And one of my best friends might pizza was sitting with me. And at the time he was playing for the Mets, and I'll never forget this because you had said to him like, hey, Mike came down to spring training. And Mike said why don't you come over and say alot, and you said, I can't your Mike Piazza. And then Mike said, hey Getty. But I saw you in the stands to and and you said, well, why don't you come over and say, I can't get he Li you know, guy said had this sort of standoff, but you had reached out to me not too long ago. Because at that point you were talking about doing documentary on a talion baseball. You want to connect you with Mike at that time. Right. You did anything ever come of their. Well, you know, it's it's kind of a bittersweet story, but I've been still working on this film project. It's not a documentary, but it's based on some real events. But it's and it is set in Italy about baseball Nataly, but we had an actor lined up. Up to play the lead. And then there was this terrible accident involved in and he lost his life. And it's really tragic Celo project sort of went to bed and understandably. An and now we're starting to Rev it up again, I really hope to make the film. It's an independent film low budget film, but it's a really sweet story. And so Mike, I might be calling you. Well, he lives in Italy. Now, a great a move there. So there's another you can drink some wine in Italy. If you're gonna if you're gonna stroll you to talk about days Lee, I'm sure you'll go to Italy to talk baseball with Mike. Absolutely. And I imagined the last thing I mean, it seems like the the upside of this..

Mike Piazza Italy baseball Mets Li Lee Nataly
Asia, Singapore and Europe discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

02:11 min | 3 years ago

Asia, Singapore and Europe discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

"Asia pacific index retreated at the start of the session g to trade concerns about it's called back some of those previous losses to still try though in negative territory but only marginally so at this stage japanese shares just shutting up shop the nikkei two to five index has dropped into negative territory off by zero point one four percent the hang seng index also off bomas two tenths of one percent investors caused digesting the inclusion of two hundred and thirty four chinese ashares to mci's emerging markets indices over in asia treasuries have been slipping overnight the ten year treasury yields they're trading at two point eight six five percent role so looking of course at the opening of european cash trading when it comes to bonds will bring you any opening price as and when we get it just looking at the dollar this morning building on gains from yesterday the bloomberg dollar spot index higher by more than a tenth of one percent the euro on the back foot trading after one spot sixteen seventy four francine america's some of our top stories and let's start in italy populist parties will sweep to power nataly later today with a spending program that is a direct challenge to european union rules bloomberg's kevin costello has this report from rome career as a professor economics in rome and he has called for a debate on the euro common currency both in italy and in the rest of europe giuseppe kante a law professor will be the prime minister in the new populist government content and his cabinet ministers will be sworn in later today they are expected to challenge some of the key rules of the european union with higher spending and tax cuts in rome kevin castillo bloomberg daybreak europe upheaval to in spain where mariana roy heading for defeat in a vote of no confidence the parliament will vote later friday and opposition parties all joining forces against him the socialists have the backing of two antiestablishment groups and one catalan party another catiline group on the basque nash nationalists are also expected to vote against roy the prime minister says he won't resign now let's cross over to singapore where finnerty from.

Asia Singapore Europe Kevin Castillo Cabinet Rome Nataly Italy Bloomberg Nikkei MCI Finnerty Mariana Roy Spain European Union Prime Minister Professor Giuseppe Kante Kevin Costello