35 Burst results for "Nastase"

Chris Knowles,  Lucifers Technologies And The Mk Ultra-terrestrials

The Higherside Chats

04:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Chris Knowles, Lucifers Technologies And The Mk Ultra-terrestrials

"This is the way our side shatters from sunny san diego. I'm greg carl would. And when we think about technological progress on human time line and all the nineteen fifties versions of what our world would bring. It seems that we're quite a bit off script. Not only are we lacking the personalized silver saucers and cheery meal making robot maids but instead the false promises of tomorrowland have been replaced with dystopia digital surveillance intense fields. vmf radiation and rarely a useful tool. That isn't paid for with data collection and market research to further. Commit you to a bland existence of screen addiction and a never ending struggle to keep it all charged sure. The screen is smaller. The internet is here in the vacuum can fumble around on its own but how advanced if things gotten really nastase extraordinary budget in decades of focus of yielded almost no major changes to rocketry no exciting daily moon shuttles or space elevators just rc. Cars of tinfoil taking selfies nevada desert and calling it mars the advancements in food science and industrialized diets have left many of us. We can obese with gmo. Crops compromising the global food supply with all the altruism of an invading army and with malpractice medical airs death by medicine being the third leading cause of death even by the most conservative statistics. I'm not sure they've got it all worked out there either so it seems the biggest achievement of modern is the cult like following. It's a amassed despite its shortcomings and when you consider where they might have been getting their ideas. Maybe that's to be expected. Well when it comes to the work in today's returning guests. Chris knowles has pulled on so many fascinating threads throughout the years on the secret son blog from the strange songs of the siren. Elizabeth frazier to the potent symbolism of award shows in pop culture rituals material nested beneath the umbrella term lucifer's technologies. It is fascinated your humble host. The most and with chris having added a few logs to that fire. Recently it gives us plenty to talk about society crumbles down around us her says no shortage of. Thc appearances at this point. And i'm psyched to do it again. Hot on the heels of his new book entitled the endless american midnight a massive collection of the best of the best from the secret son blog as well as the launching of the secret son institute of advanced synchro mysticism on the patriot platform. And let's not forget to mention his recent novel. He will live up in the sky. A wild ride if there ever was one and his classics our gods wear spandex. The secret history of rock and roll as busy as ever. The chronicler of humanity's decline apocalypse watchdog extraordinary and straight shooting synchro mystic sage of the secret son blog christmas man. Welcome back to the higher side. Oh what an introduction. I try to frank. You thank you very much. I'm going to blurb that on my next book. Yes i'm hard and this is real exciting man. Lucky number nine. It seems and You know i checked in with you just at the right time. As one of my favorite topic seems to have resurfaced to the forefront of your mind as well which revolves around what you call loose verse technologies and the roswell working you say on the blog. This is one of the most requested topics for you to revisit as well and for good reason to get us started here. What would you say. Is the overall thesis of this thread or the hypothesis. You're working from man. It's so complex because the series was written in one of my ocd. you know. or i'm just sort of manic mode for like a week and a half just stayed up all night reading everything and writing and all that kind of thing so you know in my most. When i started the series again. I talked about how like it wasn't the most workers have ever done. It was just very haphazard. But you know just like that thriller discovery finding things but basically is i was looking at the explosion of technology particularly electronics after world war. Two and how that coincided with the don of the ufo age with roswell and so on

Greg Carl Nevada Desert Chris Knowles Elizabeth Frazier Institute Of Advanced Synchro San Diego Chris Frank Roswell
Astronauts plan Saturday spacewalk at space station

NASACast Audio

00:21 sec | Last month

Astronauts plan Saturday spacewalk at space station

"International space station's fifth spacewalk of the year. Risk slated for march. Thirteen during the audi nastase michael hopkins and victor glover are scheduled to service and relocate some jumper cables of the station's thermal control system. Continue some work from january twenty seventh spacewalk and work on some other tasks. The outing is the fourth spacewalk. Glover and the fifth for

Michael Hopkins Victor Glover International Space Station Audi Glover
NASA Honors Mary Jackson's Legacy

Innovation Now

01:21 min | Last month

NASA Honors Mary Jackson's Legacy

"She was the agency's first. African american female engineer and now nasr's headquarters building in washington. Dc has been named in her honor. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped our future. Mary w jackson earned her degree in mathematics and physical science from hampton institute now known as hampton university. She began working at the national advisory committee. For aeronautics in a ca in nineteen fifty one after two years in the computing pool. At langley jackson. Supervisor in the supersonic pressure tunnel suggested she enter a training program that would allow her to be promoted from mathematician to junior the classes for the program however were held at then. Segregated hampton high school jackson would need special permission to join white peers in the classroom. Never one to flinch from a challenge. Mary not only obtained that permission but earned the promotion becoming nastase first. Black female engineer starting her career during an era when female engineers from background were a rarity with the naming of the headquarters building nasa honors. Mary jackson's legacy and affirms commitment to diversity and inclusion as core values for the agency for innovation. Now i'm jennifer. Public

Hampton Institute Mary W Jackson Langley Jackson National Advisory Committee Hampton High School Washington Jackson Mary Mary Jackson Nasa Jennifer
Mars Cam Views from NASA Rover during Red Planet Exploration

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 5 months ago

Mars Cam Views from NASA Rover during Red Planet Exploration

"Now you can travel to the planets their moons asteroids comets and see the nasa spacecraft. That explore them. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. The last time we saw nastase mars twenty twenty perseverance. Rover mission was on july thirtieth as it disappeared into the black of deep space on its trajectory from mars. But you can follow. Humanity's most sophisticated rover in real time as it treks millions of miles over the next six months before landing at jarrow. Crater nasr's is on the solar system a fully interactive web application visualizes the same trajectory data the navigation team at j. p. l. uses to plot. Perseverance is course to mars dozens of pop up menus. Allow you to customize what you see and how you see it with a pair of red blue stereoscopic glasses you can switch to three d mode for more experience and other applications is on earth and is on exo planets give viewers an opportunity to experience earth or catch a glimpse of other solar systems each interactive is populated with real time data. Letting you see the universe through nassar's is

Crater Nasr Nasa Jarrow Nassar
NASA’s ‘Worm’ Logo Will Return to Space

Innovation Now

01:04 min | 5 months ago

NASA’s ‘Worm’ Logo Will Return to Space

"After almost three decades nastase historic worm logo is being used for the artemis program. The sleek logo was officially introduced in nineteen seventy five and was incorporated into many of the agencies next generation programs. It was retired in nineteen ninety two but made a comeback in twenty twenty. Has nasa up in a new modern era of human spaceflight. The worm made its first reappearance on the space launch system. Twin solid rocket boosters. The team used new laser technology to mask out the logo and correctly shape the letters especially the curve of the s. The red logo will be visible as the boosters are stacked on top of the mobile launcher while the rocket is on the launch pad and as it soars through earth's atmosphere during launch the worm has also been applied to the underside of the orion spacecraft. So the cameras at the end of a orion's solar arrays will dramatic images as the spacecraft travels toward the moon and back for innovation now. I'm jennifer

Nasa Jennifer
NASA spacecraft sent asteroid rubble flying in sample grab

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:50 min | 6 months ago

NASA spacecraft sent asteroid rubble flying in sample grab

"A certain. About Nasr's latest mission. Remember the old barnstorming air shows you might see someone hanging on a rope ladder dangling from a biplane. Then he swoops down past the audience and grabs a handkerchief. On Tuesday night NASA essentially performed the Hanky grab on the far side of our solar system two hundred million miles away. For the first time, NASA sent a spacecraft to snatch soil samples from an asteroid moving at sixty three thousand miles per hour. Asteroids are geological time capsules floating in space. Or as Nastase tone acerbic can put it. The rebel scoop from Benue could be a kind of cosmic Rosetta stone. The tells the history of our earth and solar system during the last billions of years. At the very least this mission is a triumph of imagination and technological prowess and Patients. The Oh Cyrus. REX, spacecraft left Earth four years ago in orbit, the asteroid Ben who for two years collecting photos and data yesterday the craft touchdown for a few seconds and snatched up as much as four point, four pounds, primordial rocks, and dust in about a week. NASA should know the spacecraft collected enough rubble or if it needs to make another attempt, then the spacecraft will back to Earth with its Rosetta rocks. That journey will take about two more years. But. Some things like a deeper understanding of the origins. Our solar system. Are Worth waiting for.

Nasa Nasr Benue Nastase
Astronomy from Mars: NASA's Curiosity Rover Snaps Images

Innovation Now

01:20 min | 7 months ago

Astronomy from Mars: NASA's Curiosity Rover Snaps Images

"Occasionally. Even Nastase Curiosity rover stops to gaze at the stars. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future it was the two, thousand, seven, hundred, eighty, four, th day, or soul on Mars. NASA's curiosity rover aimed its mast cameras skyward about seventy five minutes. After sunset the purpose of the brief I session was to gauge the twilight brightness during this time of the year on Mars, there's more dust in the air to reflect sunlight making it particularly bright similar to bright twilights on earth after large volcanic eruptions on this particular evening the dust in the Martian. Atmosphere was thick enough that not even moderately bright stars were visible, but a to image twilight. Panorama reveals earth in one frame and Venus in the other both planets appear as mere pinpoints of light in the distance since landing in two thousand twelve, the rover has captured Blue Martian sunsets, passing asteroids and images of Mars two moons, Phobos, and Dimas as they transited across the sun and the images captured by curiosity make astronomers here on earth long for a chance at stargazing for months

Dimas Nasa
Eyes on the Solar System

Innovation Now

01:28 min | 7 months ago

Eyes on the Solar System

"Now. You can travel to the planets, their moons, asteroids, comets, and see the NASA spacecraft that explore them. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. The last time we saw Nastase Mars Twenty Twenty Perseverance Rover mission was on July thirtieth as it disappeared into the black of deep space on its trajectory for Mars. But you can follow humanity's most sophisticated rover in real time as it treks. Millions of miles over the next six months before landing at Jarrow Crater Nasr's is on the solar system. A fully interactive web application visualizes the same trajectory data. The navigation team at J. P. L. uses to plot perseverance is course to Mars dozens of pop up menus, allow you to customize what you see and how you see it with a pair of red blue stereoscopic glasses. You can switch to three D mode for more. Experience and other applications is on earth and is on exo planets give viewers an opportunity to experience earth or catch a glimpse of other solar systems. Each interactive is populated with real time data letting you see the universe through Nassar's is

Nastase Mars Twenty Twenty Per Jarrow Crater Nasr Nasa Nassar J. P. L.
Comet C2020 Remains Visible Until Late July

Innovation Now

00:59 min | 9 months ago

Comet C2020 Remains Visible Until Late July

"See twenty twenty was discovered in March by Nastase Neil wise mission now the comet is getting the attention of sky watchers. Hemisphere neo. Wise the infrared wavelength space telescope, for which the comet has been named, was re purposed specifically to identify and characterize near Earth objects as the telescope I caught sight of the comet. It was a fuzzy dot moving across the sky when astronomers realized how close the comet would come to the Sun. They hoped it would put on a good show, and no one has been disappointed. The comet has been relatively easy to observe with binoculars or a small telescope and a clear view, but comets are notoriously unpredictable, so it's impossible to know if this one will remain easy to see. Observers looking to the north western horizon just after sunset are hoping for a glimpse of the glowing ball and streaky tale before the comet speeds away in late. July

Nastase Neil Twenty Twenty
NASA's Juno Spacecraft At Jupiter Reveals New Info, Rocket Lab declares Electron launch failure

NPR News Now

01:13 min | 10 months ago

NASA's Juno Spacecraft At Jupiter Reveals New Info, Rocket Lab declares Electron launch failure

"Nastase Juno spacecraft is heading for its twenty eighth close encounter with the planet Jupiter later this month. As NPR's Joe PALCA reports, the probe continues to explore new feature is on the giant Gas Planet Juno arrived at Jupiter four years ago, it went into an elongated orbit, plunging fairly close to the planet's cloud tops for a few hours before swinging far out into space for weeks. Keeping the close encounters short is essential because of the harsh radiation environment close to the planet. Recently has been exploring an enormous storm that just appeared on Jupiter. An amateur astronomer here on earth was the first to spot the storm. The probe has also been making in-depth studies of the famous red spot, and even bigger storm Juneau's main mission is to map Jupiter's gravity field something that will take another year to complete Joe Palca and news. The private satellite launch firm rocket lab is trying to figure out what went wrong with the mission. Yesterday it's rocket successfully lifted off from New Zealand but was unable to reach orbit and lost its payload of seven small satellites rocket had planned to make monthly launches for the rest of the year, and into two thousand, twenty one

Joe Palca Rocket Lab Juno NPR New Zealand
Crew Dragon astronaut reveals what he loves most about spacewalks

CNN 10 (video)

03:20 min | 10 months ago

Crew Dragon astronaut reveals what he loves most about spacewalks

"It's been a couple of weeks now since the amazing historic launch. What surprised you the most about the journey I think just in general the. The the biggest surprise, probably for both of us was just how different the rocket felt than what we experienced with shuttle I mean we expected some of that to be different. Just because it was a liquid fueled rocket, and the shuttle had solid boosters, so that was going to be different, but it certainly was a great ride. It was just different very exciting all in all I would say that was the first big highlight, and then the second one was was getting space station and. Three Smiley faces when we came through the hatch. It was just great to see those guys and I I think they were happy to see us. Get you know. Get a little change of scenery, onboard station and a little bit more help now. Bob We know you've been busy training for an update spacewalk. Can you tell us a little bit about what you'll be doing during that? Walk in at this point, you know you're a veteran spacewalker, so what is? Is your favorite part about spacewalk we'll be changing out all of the batteries on one of the channels on the space station from my perspective, adding done a few spacewalks and being a veteran, I really look forward to the views of the earth. When we get a free moment, and and this time they'll be dragon vehicle pointed on the forward into the space station, instead of the space shuttle, and so I'm looking forward to that something new new view. View that I can capture and share with the world. Some might say that the most dangerous part of the mission still lies ahead the journey home and this time you guys won't be landing on a runway when you land back on Earth, you'll be splashing down in the ocean. What are you anticipating? The ride back home to be like an? Are you guys at all nervous? No I don't think were nervous. We watch the Demo one flight. The test flight the. The crew test flight in the vehicle performed very well. We've seen the flight aboard tests and the vehicle perform well again. We have full confidence that the vehicle will perform just like it's supposed to. That being said it's a it's a completely different entry profile than what we are used to or had been used to in the space. Shuttle will land in the water. As you said, we'll land under parachutes much more dynamic entry. They'll be much higher, Jeez and That's just part of the unknown as to. We have prepared port, but we can only prepare so much, and we'll see how the vehicle does, and we'll see how we do when we get back now says I s program manager. Kirk Sherman is down, and this comes after Nastase head of human spaceflight resigned in May. How do all of these changes in leadership affect you guys and the other astronauts that are currently living on the International Space Station or I think if you look at who is. Replaced some of those positions you'll you'll, you'll see. People from within moving up and stepping into those roles, and just doing an excellent job and so That's one of the strengths of an organization like NASA is that? We don't rely on a single individual to drive the entire assessment and evaluation and management effort. We use a team of individuals to do that. And and the team is strong enough to be able to recognize their role in assisting that new leader, and and coming into their own as they take over the organization.

International Space Station Nasa BOB Smiley Kirk Sherman Program Manager Nastase
Surveyor 1 landed on moon - June 2, 1966

This Day in History Class

03:18 min | 11 months ago

Surveyor 1 landed on moon - June 2, 1966

"The Day was June second nineteen, sixty six. Nastase Lunar Lander Surveyor wine landed on the moon. The event marks the first time an American. Space probe made a successful soft landing on the moon. On February third nineteen, sixty six, the Soviet Union's Luna Nine, became the first spacecraft to make a soft landing on the moon. By this time, the Soviets and the Americans successfully crash-landed probes on the surface of the moon, but landing required something to cushion the landing like rockets as well as a way to send the information back to Earth. For Luna Nine, the entire spacecraft descended to the surface, but a landing capsule was ejected just before impact. NASA launched the Surveyor Program to demonstrate the feasibility of lunar surface landings. The program was also designed to get data and preparation for Nastase Apollo space, missions. Surveyor one was the first of the series of seven robotic spacecraft sent to the moon. As part of the program, it was designed as an engineering test flight for demonstration of its launch vehicle the Atlas-centaur, it also served to demonstrate the spacecraft's mid course and terminal maneuvers as well as radar in rocket controlled soft landing. Another one of the mission's objectives was to demonstrate the ability of the survey or communication system and deep space network to maintain communications with the spacecraft during its flight after a soft landing. The planning site for Surveyor. One was the southwest part of. The Laura Avast, dark plain on the western edge of the near side of the moon. surveyor-1 lifted off from Cape Kennedy on May Thirtieth Nineteen Sixty six. On June, second

Surveyor Program Lunar Lander Surveyor Luna Nine Soviet Union Nastase Apollo Cape Kennedy Nasa
Interview With Jenny Ma About The  Center for Reproductive Rights

Worst Year Ever

12:49 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Jenny Ma About The Center for Reproductive Rights

"All right well. Today we are joined by Jenny. Ma who was a senior staff attorney with the Center for Reproductive Rights? Hi Jenny how are you doing okay? Are you for hanging in there? Thanks so much? We're really grateful to you for taking the time to speak with us. We know you're very very busy but we're very excited to hear what you are working on over there. I'm sure most of our listeners are familiar with your organization. But can you start by telling us a little bit about the center and what it does sure The Center for Reproductive Rights is a global organization so we work on domestic as well as global matters and we use the power of the law to advance reproductive rights as fundamental human rights around the world and my role as litigator is to lift in state and federal courts to ensure that unconstitutional laws. Do not go into back across the United States. That's really concise answer. It seems like you've done that before. A mission with everything going on right now. We're seeing that. It's really easy to lose track of all the different ways that you know. Governments are using corona virus as a cover to chip away at rights for example. We've seen a lot of states trying to shut down or shutting down abortion clinics saying that it's an interest of public safety. Bite that being very counterintuitive and. I know that that is something that you're currently really meshed in and we would love to. Have you walk us through? What's happening you know from before the virus have until now and all the stuff that we should be aware of. Yeah absolutely Hopefully some of your listeners have heard what's been going around Across the United States with regards to abortion. And what's been going on with? Nineteen but If I can backtrack just a little bit. The center did have this Case argued before the Supreme Court. It was called. You'd Medical Services Verses Reso- way back when which seems like a lifetime ago back in March for five years ago in March one hundred years ago a century ago. And you know coming off of that. It's really really thought that we were going to enter. In to a time where we would just watch the state legislatures in see if they would pass bans or other restrictions. That's what we do in a normal year every year state legislatures need. Sometimes they'll be proactive bills to protect reproductive rights but oftentimes as you guys have homeless in the media. There's bands being on promulgated twenty week bands sixty bands fifty week bands like the and most recently last year you saw Alabama which I like basically a total ban on. Yes so that's what we track normally and it gets to a point where those Bills Become Law. We go ahead and bring our lawsuits in court so our state team very much tracks. Those laws are litigation team goes to court and try walk those laws and that's kind of the the bread and butter of what I do. Now when Corona virus and cove in nineteen crisis began As many of your listeners are out there We began to work from home and we started to see basically that first week Several states pass Either through their governor's executive orders or through the Health Department. These notices and basically there were very differently worded. You know across the different states. But it said something like no. You're non-essential your elective or minor. Procedures would have to be postponed now. I want to emphasize that makes total sense right. Like if you have your nose job scheduled you should probably hold off right. Nope oh talks right now. Plays right exactly the hold off on that. But then we saw You know none of these orders had the word abortion in it you know. We saw some. That had actually proactive measures. that resulted from. Illinois. New Jersey Massachusetts. California Michigan The stage for a lawn saying but definitely not for pregnancy related care definitely not Okay including abortion so we saw stomach ulcers now of course you know your Spidey Sense. Kinda tingles when words like this right and And this is not us being paranoid Clearly time has shown. That's exactly what certain states did. But we started tracking Kind of the actions of different governmental actors in certain states. That are the what? I'd like to call market leaders in Abortion Resign Cambridge. So it's the typical group of folks in these states and we saw the first one out we were tracking star roles states in the south and the Midwest and we saw Ohio's governor on at Saturday after their executive order issued publicly. Go out there and say well. Of course. Abortion is nonessential or non time-sensitive. Nastase stop. Because you know you can stop a pregnancy. Yeah that's not time sensitive. We only have Bans for time sensitive bands. But it's not time sensitive isn't time sensitive F. Yeah exactly it's like you can put pregnancy on a shelf right so no that's not without delay due date just hit the bus so obviously alarmed a lot of lawyers so we got together with a lot of our litigating friends out. There are so we work a lot with planned parenthood. Aclu and the learning projects along with my organization the Center for Reproductive Rights. We decided okay. We're going to start tracking what's going on here since. Ohio clearly put us on high alert. There were certain states that we were pretty sure Would Act similarly all suits so he can imagine Texas was high up there and guess what went on there but So that's kind of what we started to see 'em then we started seeing more and more public displays by Attorney General's by governors by different health department officials saying. Yeah you know what abortion is going to be banned for this time period and we're going to say that it's nonessential we're GONNA say it's not time sensitive and you're GonNa have to halt During this time now I want to just say that you know. There's some intuitive appeal to this. I want to make it clear to you all on your listeners right yeah. Pregnancy is not static. I think that's basic principle and these states. You can save all sorts of the equipment that you need during this pandemic you know and you should just put it on hold because it's not essential and I wanted to make clear two things one. The states that are saying this are the same vendors have tried right. I wanted to be clear that it's it's not like Mary. Transparent right it's it's what's been clear and they are putting press releases out there saying they're gonNA shut down clinics and they're making their role as explicit as possible like the purpose is so clear when they're out they're just putting it out there in the public. It's it's pretty wild and then I just want to also emphasize the science right. Forget the lawyers like my job is to make arguments for our clients but science has weighed in here and immediately and I wonder what I rightly know. The American Medical Association truthfully had not weighed in on abortion for the longest time out there that this is not a time for politicians to be deciding what is time essential on what is not like those are for the doctors and provide professionals to decide rain events basic concept and the American college obstetricians gynecologists which is the leading medical group for Obgyn's explicitly said and then they came out almost immediately when they started seeing this initial trend in Ohio and Texas. And they said Look. This is not abortionist. Absolutely time-sensitive care. It is necessary if you are pregnant. Go either get. Ob Care if it's a wanted pregnancy and absolutely get your abortion if it's an unwanted pregnancy abortion is do you remember the date that that happened. When when people I started to notice this was happening it was a little bit over a month ago and I think if you kind of Google are friendly there we could not but it's around. I would say we started March march sixteenth. That gap of sixteen than really kind of picking up That week and so it's been a little bit over a month and of course I've mentioned two states Texas and Ohio but Not just them right now. We have eight states that have been explicit. And I just want to emphasize here before we if you WANNA go into detail about those states like those are the ones that are lawsuits on alright. I Call Leagues and the Litigating Groups. I mentioned were also monitor training and preparing legal. I in several states that have had these stop goes like there. Were these public. Statements knows a withdrawal and and so they're way more than eight states kind of odd about using this opportunity and down to ban abortion care. These eighths eighths Like I said are the worst offenders before we move forward. I just wanted to clarify when we talk about these states Announcing these these bands you know stops are. They're saying that it's temporary. Are they putting out? Are they saying that? I'm assuming they are for now but as the same are stay at home orders. Just keep getting extended. I'm wondering if they're saying it's just for a few weeks. Or what have you and you can wait a few weeks. Is that kind of what we're seeing so in some states. Yes right. So they're not cut copy and paste stage so in certain states. There are okay. It's going to last till the end of the month in certain states. They'll be like oh if but it'll get extended if necessary some states actually. Don't have anything. Some states actually stay until further notice which is actually even more offensive because it's so early and right But I just WanNa be clear that Abortion terrorists incredibly safe but it is more safe if you get it all right. There's no reason to delay healthcare in any capacity and for a state legislator and state officials to be saying you know what even though this is considered essential health care by the AMA and all believing health and public health officials. That are out there. Yeah you still want you to stop. We still want to wait a month or wait even longer than that because no one knows how long this is going to go right and so on the surface. This is infuriating. But it's even more so when you start to think about who specifically this is affecting The majority of people that require abortions. I don't have the statistics but I know I know that they're you know. Maybe the people that are single mothers or you already have children and they are low income and now they are without work or their now in charge of the daycare for their existing children or God. Even there's people that are sheltering in place in environments with. They aren't safe to communicate with their partner. Maybe they're sheltering with their abuser and they don't have anybody that can reach out and talk to about this stuff and and this guy's of saying that this is for public health and public. Safety is so backwards because the opposite happens yes. People might take matters into their own hands or they're going to try to go out of state to find treatment and a lot of these people are in states in states that are surrounded by other states that also have abortion bans. Or what have you? Yes so this is absolutely true. You've hit upon so many burdens that we see from our clients patients all the time in normal

United States Reproductive Rights Center For Reproductive Rights Texas Ohio Jenny Executive Attorney Cambridge Alabama MA Midwest Massachusetts Illinois Supreme Court Aclu
NASA science and technology continues from home offices, aiding in coronavirus response

Innovation Now

01:05 min | 1 year ago

NASA science and technology continues from home offices, aiding in coronavirus response

"Many organizations NASA has reduced the number of on site staff going into work each day but thanks to remote technologies NASA is moving ahead with everything from space exploration to Earth Science Research and some of that Nasa know-how is being used to help policymakers and medical professionals address pressing science questions. Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory is using artificial intelligence to extract current medical data from huge numbers of publications Nastase. Ames Research Center will use its supercomputer to crunch high. Volumes of complex data in shorter amounts of time NASA employees can submit ideas for solutions relevant to the pandemic via an internal crowd sourcing website and biology research data continues to roll in from the International Space Station from managing missions to conducting research. The NASA workforce will keep working for the nation leveraging technical expertise and technology from wherever they happen to sit for

Nasa Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Earth Science Research Ames Research Center International Space Station
Why Has NASA Set Their Sights on a Human Mission to Mars?

Innovation Now

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Why Has NASA Set Their Sights on a Human Mission to Mars?

"After returning home from the Moon Astronaut Buzz Aldrin said. Is there waiting to be explored? But what's the point of sending humans to another world? This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future exploration is in our blood. But why has NASA set their sights on a human mission to Mars? The payoff for human exploration is the science. Here's Molly Anderson. Principal technologist for Nastase Space Technology Mission Directorate. To explain the reason we do. Human exploration is to enable the science getting in the field and having the human there is an important part of the science really gives you context really speeds up the rate at which they are able to acquire data and make conclusions and so when we do these missions to the Mars surface and things like that. We really have to protect and focus on the science value that we're going to achieve while you were there. Developing the technology that will take humans to Mars to do that science and designing the robots. That will help. Humans PROTECT THE PLANET. While they're there will lead to advances in capabilities here on earth while inspiring our young people to reach for the stars for Innovation. Now I'm Jennifer

Nastase Space Technology Missi Buzz Aldrin Molly Anderson Nasa Principal Jennifer
Leveraging Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology with David Chung, Head of Carewell Health

Outcomes Rocket

10:20 min | 1 year ago

Leveraging Artificial Intelligence in Cardiology with David Chung, Head of Carewell Health

"It's a true privilege to have you here on the podcast. David thanks for joining. You're welcome so what else would you like to highlight to the listeners. And in particular sure I'd like to know more about why you get into the medical sector I really I really gunned medical sector with more like faith or I'm actually patient myself. You've got into it because I know in the world business you can create efficiency drive everything better and faster but one thing that hurts the most my mom always say health is wealth when you Harvard Heaven Heart attack. You have a need a disease. You don't have any choices at you or healthy. You cannot work unit a healthy Network you can approve table as more of everyone in have health and I wanted to bring health to everyone and as important as it pointed to me as if everyone because this family history not really would house genetically. While I think that's a great great call out David and health is wealth and I I would say even more right and and so when we discuss this topic when I had the chance to connect beforehand the difference between merely innovating versus marketing ad love to dive into that idea with the listeners. Here what are your thoughts on that. Why is it important? Boyce important because health off is actually look at us as Is everyone everyone should I could literally innovate anything or anybody could innovate in even a lot. The things is actually very successful patient population but how is it being disseminated to be able to deplore to everyone. That's the key ticket. For example you know. I could develop a very popular wherever devices to measure a lot of is the ultimate data. What happened this devices actually auto reached because it's too excessive or is the incorrectly market specifically concentration of chronic disease patients? Where while it could actually push every single patient to be used to predict AH prevent improve preventive healthcare? So that's important is try not to focus Problem with just for the chronic disease population focus focus in overall health population even outside at hostile and try market at a very affordable way is a challenge. Not only for me for every every other big giant companies industry too. I think it's a really great call out. You know inside if you innovate. That's not necessarily enough. You gotta be able to market canalization and make it available and so tell us a little bit of bounce The work that you do at CARE well and Intel L. Life-science the division there. What are you guys doing to market is better? We're doing artificial intelligence business so we all know. Aw patient data to create an artificial intelligence engine that can protect heart disease. Our example will be a typical patient will call nine one one when they have heart attack. What I have is I've artificial intelligence that can predict it your impending beating a diseases patients before he coronado want desperate? But how do we even market that right now. We have to be simple. Look at today's physicians. Right you have your servers yet this machine. Yeah that machine you have this platform that there's no enough for the lock and everything in the world. It got five six seven opening. The last I want to do is is to be another provider Provider to add another platform for you to look at but it might strategy of Marketing Shoe Polish. It connects with the most well-known system other and create platform is open ended. Were any solution can plug it in and just going to one place and and seamlessly get all the data where you want Monto of patient if you want a strategy has been doing this for treating well so make it simple. Simple is really elitist. Keep the time should be spent on patients. Not Looking data lock in a couple of websites forgot the password funds love. It adds a great call out and sounds like you guys have a quick way into the market. Give us an example. So have you guys. Launched or you still in development we are in what we develop. This technology was span around hundred. Fifty million dollars has a database about one hundred times more than the recent study study for Mayo Clinic and is highly accurate. Cmr's of the approve currently there. Are Anybody be able to compete with this. This but my challenge is dead active legion. How they launch to let the PUCK? Nobody's advanced technology. We are launching this. The first face aid North America United States and through telehealth platform. You're out that form. Why don't you just click the button here? Go a power you can have all your decisions positions within five seconds Patient's heart disease attack before it happens. So that's one way to do it. October second will be launching California so waiver very excited about that. Hopefully hopefully I could give a good speech WHOA about Well listen it's around the corner and you're saying one of the ways people will be able to get access if they're currently using your telehealth platform. What telehealth platform is that? I can say okay. Gotcha but it's a very popular. Well known to have platform at the partnership as a partnership. Got It Ganic. I think it's very well know is even Nastase using the same platform that stay NASA so's secure will say very cool while a great opportunity around the corner to access a and clinical decision support predictive analytics. It's is all very exciting. And and so these types of advances don't happen easily and so I love to hear from you David what you believe. Steve is maybe a setback. That you guys had in the development of this technology that that led to a big Aha and the reason why the platforms a strong as it is today time I would say time and resources is also very shortly. The the need for this is important that makes us to say a how we did a southwest problem so look a statistically America has about twenty million adult population should diagnose a heart diseases for me as a matter for me to spend a hundred million dollars for this. Doesn't Miss Three dollars. Persian it that if I could predict heart disease for three dollars now you could reduce our yard business reduce I could predict heart attack so you have planned surges Ah-ha aw for patients actually were diagnosed incorrectly. And then now they just misdiagnosis the reimbursement. Denial so the wrong is a drugs lawsuits. All those will be gone off so I think it makes sense so that was a moment that we had. Why don't we do this? Challenge this artificial intelligence artificial intelligences It is as simple as training childhood how to read a book you could feed thousand before the trial and to peace city Components one does look as clean and actor is medical data Structural Vice and second of all you also have to have Train to chop off a redesign. It's just gonNA feed this data. Will they call machine learning that. Resell you happen when I tell them Santarpio's bunch of books they not gonna a lot. The Sun rip in launching public in do positions Galore. Exactly so kind to write. You know you gotta continue doing this again a and again again every time you make an error my certified urologist Learning Brain Multiple iterations to have you as later under fifty million dollars and got it work for the cost of a microcosm healthcare is we. We need to fall from patients. aspirated arrayed that knows the heart diseases. Often patients No they had it Heart disease patients publishes. Yeah yeah no that's Fascinating work and so the data I. I'm sure a lot of people are wondering like where did you guys get all this data and Intel is a self self insured employer is that were a lot of it is coming from Lo- low. Data's actually coming from outside the front country so I do have wait. We're into a partnership with Intel. Actually Building Custom Air Could actually process artificial intelligence Without the Internet. So that's a strong arm about Intel. The latest Acknowledging Open Dino over platform showed if endurance is actually sixteen times faster. What that means is that you know? I'm thinking about your laptop. That has a gate Ram. I am sixty times that I don't even as similar so I can I can. It's been okay. I at the speed that allows us to make decision making a great lot faster more accurate and so so intel has a chip that will be able to be empathy. I guess used in a lot of these devices has correct. Yes and we are a very large manufacturer so example would be Active put a chip in Device with an ambulatory instantly is going to be diagnostics. NFC APPRO- and you do not eat is complete disconnect connected. You don't need to connect to anything. No Internet no network. You don't need. Aws You didn't even zero That can also be applied into Help us now. You can diagnose patients remote even in Africa is we do have project with a gauge invasion to fascinating fascinating work and the promises is pretty

Intel Heart Disease David United States NFC Mayo Clinic California Africa Boyce Nasa Provider Provider Drugs Monto CMR Medical Data Structural Vice AWS Steve America Santarpio
Why Mars is a lovely dream that will also probably kill anyone who goes

The Big Story

08:50 min | 1 year ago

Why Mars is a lovely dream that will also probably kill anyone who goes

"I have been known on occasion to talk about my desire to leave this doomed planet behind by known to I mostly mean I've been told shop. You have a family. You're not going to colonize Mars. And that's true. I because no self respecting colonization mission. Asian wants a podcast or closing on forty but mostly it's true because for every Rosie promise of an eventual human colony on Mars reality sets up. That's too bad because those promises get more rosy by the year it sounds like something sci fi but Nastase Mars orbiter orbiter has seen something only imagined. Liquid water has been found on Mars. This is the first time in four and a half billion year history of it's been possible to extend life beyond earth. Thousands of people are going to colonize Mars. And I am telling you that they're going to do this soon. Strap yourselves in. We're going to Mars. It will not shock you to learn that there are some problems these rosy announcements. Don't address and that the likelihood hood of an early death a failed mission cancer from extreme radiation or even in the very best case scenario a life lived in tunnels meters under the surface are among those problems. Why do we still dream of Mars? Why do we want a backup plan? What's going on there? That keeps US hoping beyond hope even though it would be easier to live on earth after total nuclear winter and to exist on Mars right now that will one day making their we natural dreamers or is it more than that Jordan Heath Rawlings this is the big story Dr Katie Mac is a theoretical cosmologists. She is an assistant professor of Physics at NC State University and she's currently on a visiting fellowship at perimeter theoretical physics in Waterloo eye. Doctor can we start by. Just telling me that as a scientist when you hear an announcement like The latest one in a string from Elon. Musk what is the first thing that goes through your head. Well I you know. I wonder what the technical plans are. Because Sir Lotta Times these announcements are things like. Oh we're going to do this. We're going to do that. And I'm always curious to know what what the real sort sort of thinking is behind it in terms of. What are the resources that are going to be used? How's the technology going to be used end? You know is this a plan ignores this a hope or is this a sort of you know. Maybe we could do this if we are a certain amount of funding if we had a certain you know situation in terms of the technology development. It's you know so I'm always kind of wondering exactly exactly what people mean when they. When they make big pronouncements about big plans? How often do you find that it comes with the technical stuff that you just mentioned? And how often is it More of a hope. Well it's it depends on who's talking about it and it depends on how developed the plans are if there's so for example if Nasr's developing a plan to send a probe to a comment or something like that. There will often be a website with a lot of technical details about the mission. It's something that's been in development for thirty years And you can download fact sheets and all of that with private companies. It's a lot a lot of times a lot less Open and that's for various reasons around the privacy seve of the technology or just the different standards by which Different organizations were operating. Well I just wanted to because in preparing for this interview because we decided we wanted to talk to somebody about The specifics of this after the latest announcement but I I in preparation. I wanted to figure out how long this idea's kicking around particularly from Elon. Musk so this is just about five or six headlines going back to September Twenty Seventh Twenty Sixteen Elon. Musk has a lot to prove. Today's Mars. Ars Colonization announcement a year later alone must projects mar spaceship will be ready for short trips by the first half of two thousand nineteen next later that year Elon. Musk defense plans hands to build a community on Mars after a downbeat NASA report. September Twenty Nine Twenty Nineteen Elon Musk unveils spacex new starship plans for private trips to Mars. And Beyond and and of course last week Yulon Mosk is still thinking big with spacex his starship Mars colonizing Brockett envisioning fleets of one thousand star ships CBS departing for Mars. Every twenty six months because you think when you heard that one it sounds very ambitious This is a this is is a ship that's still in development. We've seen a prototype. There was a big press conference when You know the initial kind of prototype was unveiled but It's never flown. And there's there's still a lot of technological development that's going to happen before this spacecraft is is available and how's for getting a lot of people out into orbit up in an out tomorrow It's not clear exactly how this is GonNa work You know there are. There are a few details online Illinois Musk has been tweeting about it. A bit but whether or not there's going to be the infrastructure available there her You know what the time line is exactly. That's also a little vague and presumably purchase purposely vague. Because it's still kind of in the future And a lot of this is going to depend on how the development of the rocket goes whatever kind of living situation they set up. There is going to be so you know it sounds it. Sounds like a lot to promise but We don't we don't know yet how it's going to turn out. And I think as with a lot of space missions there will probably be delays. There will probably be changes to what exactly is being done. And that's something that anybody who pays attention to spatial space missions is very used to so. I don't think that it's beyond You know the Pale for there to be a promise of a really cool thing that gets pushed back a bit or the scope changes So I think in general when I hear an announcement of any kind of space mission I take the details with a grain of salt and I should add that I wasn't even though it might have sounded like it reading those condescending tone I am an optimist towards going to Mars. I would love you and then every time I talked to somebody who actually knows about it. they pour a lot of cold water over my. I mean I would love to go to you. Know I I have applied to the NASA astronaut. Twice I I made the first cut one of the Times. You know. I've I've this is something that I would love to do. I would love to go into space. I would love to go wander around on Mars. I think this would be An amazing dream but there are also some realistic limitations that we have to consider and there are things that we have to prepare for and the there have to be really good plans in place I would. I think personally much rather go to Mars with NASA than with SPACEX. Just because I know that NASA is definitely going to put you know to be very conservative about everything and I am as somebody who would be on the rocket. I appreciate that well. Let's leave Colonizing Mars for just a moment. When is it inevitable that we're inching closer to eventually sending you know a NASA astronaut to Mars? I think that's the definitely in the plans. You know that's part of what the those sort of long term goals of of human spaceflight for NASA are so there there is a hope to to get people out there. There's a plan to send people back to the moon and eventually on to Mars. That's that's part of the stated plan of of NASA at the moment. Why why do you think that astronaut on Mars aside people are so much more captivated by the idea of thousands of people and thousands of rockets going to live there? I think there are a few things I think one thing is that it's the idea of being on. Mars is something that has captured the imagination. For a long time. You know it looks like like a place you could go wander around you know. It looks like a desert With you know hills and rocks and and dunes and it just looks familiar in a way that a lot of the other planetary bodies out there and moons. Don't you know the the Moon looks very very alien. Mars looks Kinda like a desert desert. You know it looks like something we could imagine wandering around on and so I think part of that is what's really fascinating to to as as people we we like the idea of just going and seeing the place

Nasa Nastase Mars Elon Musk Spacex Rosie United States Sir Lotta Assistant Professor Of Physics Nc State University Nasr Scientist Waterloo Yulon Mosk Dr Katie Mac Jordan Heath Illinois CBS
NASA keeps a watchful eye over near-Earth objects

Innovation Now

01:05 min | 1 year ago

NASA keeps a watchful eye over near-Earth objects

"Near Earth objects are asteroids and comets that orbit the sun their orbits bring them within thirty million million miles of earth as part of a planetary defence strategy. NASA's near Earth Observation Programme tracks and monitors these space objects chicks astronomers use telescopes to make measurements of an asteroid's position as it moves across the sky. Scientists compare these measurements to the predictions. Sion's of a computer model of its orbit around the Sun. The more measurements taken the more accurate the prediction NASA is tracking more than twenty thousand near Earth Earth objects and thanks to advanced radar techniques improved optical telescopes and space-based infrared astronomy. An average of thirty new discoveries are added each week the September asteroids like many other space objects came within three point five million miles of our home planet but Breathe Easy Nastase orbit calculations ruled out any chance the asteroids would pose a threat to Earth for innovation now I'm Jennifer. pulley

Nasa Jennifer. Pulley Sion
"nastase" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"And lots of other funding sources that have bigger budgets than than we do. So that's that's I think what I guess one of my goals in my retirement now that I can speak freely and not have to worry about getting Nassar's permission is to to tell people that Nastase, you know, they're pretty smart in like Doonesbury used to say about president Nixon. Presidents a lot smarter than you think, you know, were NASA smarter than you may give them credit for and they're really thinking these things through and hits time for different ways of thinking about things not to minimize old problems. But to put them in context, and maybe I can help do that. Now from my perch on the outside give people a little bit of fodder to think about without making it Nastase NASA saying the political baggage that well. That note let me ask one of those questions artificial gravity. What's the deal? Should we be pursuing it is it, right? That we are not pursuing it. Currently. I mean, I know there's some centrifuges on the today that are there. But there's not a big investment in. Let's spin up an entire habitat and see what that mitigates whether it's the ISU's us or some different cardiovascular stuff, maybe we can exercise a little bit less than a little more science where we add on that. And what's Nasr's take from the inside from the outside. Where do you sit on them back in the sixties? I read some old memos from astronauts that were asked that opinions of slick form an astronaut office position sixties, the consensus was why were we going into space where we're weightless than bringing gravity with us. The one thing that we're trying to escape why do we bring it along with us, and that sort of the sort of the ongoing position as far as I can tell not speaking for the astronauts, but when I talked to him I sorta here that astronauts, like weightlessness number one, it's unique you don't get anywhere. Else on the earth into it really opens up the volume you can use the ceiling and the walls in the corners as workspace versus being stuck on the floor. So they they really liked to have that option now. Yes, it has some dilatory as facts, and yes at brings some overhead significant overhead to protect bones muscles. We're talking about two hours plus of exercise six days a week and a big, you know, a lot of exercise equipment of very heavy weight lifting machine zero gravity weightlifting machine..

president Nixon Nasr Nassar NASA Nastase Doonesbury ISU two hours six days
"nastase" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Don't forget about corporal. Name. Name rank and serial number soldier. I'm sorry. If I heard that it was unable to see where it was admitting from. I'd be more curious. I would actually that's how they trick. You right. It's like in like in Cloverfield with the blue light. Right. You can't not look at it. No. You have to you have to find yourself gravitating towards it. The hell is that? Meanwhile, oh, you know, what I didn't. Even think of this w space force what space for Stuart about? This is this is not their problem is wash their hands of it. Well, I mean, you can't hear in space. That's a good point. Right there. You know? She can't hear though, what's that? If you're on the actual space station, and you notice that you're having an outbreak. This is probably what it sounds like. I'm of course, talking about the new warning Nastase issued over herpes herpes. That's what I was looking for. Yes. Space herpes. No seriously. Nasa has issued a warning about space herpes. After a study found the virus was reactivating and crew aboard the space shuttle and the international space station, according to the agency, well, only a small proportion of the astronauts develop symptoms as a result of the doormat virus awakening, it could smell danger for longer spaceflight missions. So basically, the TD's act funny in space we think's the worst space version of STD's..

Nasa Stuart Nastase
"nastase" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on AP News

"It'll be tested as part of Nastase plans to eventually return to the moon. It was moved slowly and horizontally on its side out of the factory where it was constructed to a barge called the Pegasus. The version moved Friday is a test Ma. Model meaning it won't actually be launched into space at the Marshall space Flight Center in Huntsville, it'll undergo strenuous testing designed to mimic the conditions of traveling into space, the testing's intended to make sure that the tank design can withstand the worst case conditions. Nasa. Also runs computer models to simulate all the conditions the tank might encounter the company that makes candy brands like nerds in lemon heads is moving its corporate headquarters to Chicago's massive old post office building the Chicago Tribune says Ferrara candy, which has about three hundred office workers at its headquarters in suburban oak terrace will move to the new building this summer, the massive old Chicago post office buildings been vacant since nineteen ninety six and is being renovated for our follows. Walgreens, which announced earlier this year, it'll move eighteen hundred employees there in two thousand nineteen for SEO says when the company moves to the building he expects nearly four hundred employees. Will work there. Popstar secure is facing some legal trouble in Spain. Prosecutors there are charging her with tax evasion alleging she failed to pay more than sixteen point three million dollars between two thousand twelve and two thousand fourteen secure reportedly lists the Bahamas as her official residence for tax purposes during those years, but was in fact, living in Spain with her partners better soccer players are out PK. Prosecutors in Barcelona's say her travel abroad was for short periods because of professional commitments while most of the year, she stated spayed, and they want her to pay tax and Spain on her worldwide income Shakira is from Columbia and officially moved to Spain for tax purposes in two thousand fifteen now a magistrate will assess whether there's enough evidence to put her on trial. Hi. I'm Megan crane AP digital manager and host of the podcast ground game. I look at the top political issues bubbling up around the country ahead of this year's midterm elections. It's available on apple podcast and podcast one. While you're there, be sure to subscribe rate and review it that's the podcast ground game. AP radio news. I'm Tim McGuire. President Trump announces.

Spain Marshall space Flight Center Chicago Chicago Tribune Walgreens Tim McGuire Nastase Nasa AP Megan crane President Trump Huntsville Ma apple Barcelona Shakira Bahamas soccer Ferrara
"nastase" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Jordan Christmas can dog. That's everyone Santa Santa. Check it out Hymie. Voyager two now more than eleven billion miles from earth. Eleven billion miles from earth that change occurred November fifth on that day instruments aboard the spacecraft detected an increase in the strength of magnetic fields. From the interstellar region and a number of galactic cosmic rays, which originate from far beyond the solar system that had jumped the same time. The solar win petered out. See we're not seeing the solar wind anymore. John Richardson, principal investigator for the plasma science experiment. I was gonna take that job. I think figuring I was at a show already. I didn't have time to become the principal investigator for the plasma science apply. But it just seemed a little beneath my pay grade. So that means must be the interstellar medium said transition to interstate. Beneath your pay grade. Transition. Here's tower space do not exactly mirror Voyager ones. Dr stone saying the void you too was headed in a different direction and six years later. The sun is at a different point in its eleven year cycle say we're learning a lot about she says, we're willing a lot about the differences as well as the commonalities. The Voyager two's plasma science experiment provided. The first direct look at what happens to the solar wind as the spacecraft enters interstellar space Voyager one was not able to gather that data because of its plasma instrument failed in nineteen eighty. So on another related note. On December first of this year. Nasr's insight Lander, which touched down on Mars, which again, I'm so interested in this stuff. Touchdown on Mars on November twenty sixth. Couple of weeks ago, provided the first ever sounds of wins on the planet Mars. Speaking of Solar Winds. The space craft the space craft sensors captured a haunting low rumble caused by vibrations from the wind estimated to be blowing ten to fifteen miles per hour from north west south east, Mark finding would know KCRC's chief meteorologist wins were consistent with direction of dust, the dust devils and the way they were streaking in the landing area, which were observed from orbit. Bruce banner is insight. Principal investigative Nastase Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, saying capturing this audio was an unplanned treat, but one of the things our mission. He says is dedicated to his measuring motion on Mars and naturally that includes motion caused by the sound waves. So when I hear this. I don't know about you. But again, not to overuse the term at 'em fascinated by it wind on Mars hearing something on Mars. And if you're not here hurt if not if you've not heard it here it is. And this is measured by two different sensors. Here's the first wind from Mars. Now. As I mentioned there were two instruments detecting. These wins. Marshon wins Solar Winds Martian wins. Here's the other one..

principal investigator Bruce banner Nastase Jet Propulsion Laborat Jordan Christmas John Richardson Principal Dr stone Nasr chief meteorologist KCRC Lander Pasadena Mark eleven year six years
"nastase" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Yeah. We all are who's Nastase eight successful landing at Mars since the nineteen Seventy-six Viking probes. A NASA's curiosity Rover which arrived in two thousand twelve is still on the move in Mars the significance of this mission. Though. Nasa officials said over the weekend, it will pave the way for humans to touch down on Mars. They're looking at the twenty thirties for that. Well, there aren't many women in key positions in Silicon Valley. Apples taking notice and steps to address it. It's launched a program that will see female entrepreneurs and programmers attend to week to to'real sessions at apple headquarters at the camps will be held every three months starting in January one official says it's aimed at reducing the company's dependence on men and high paying programming jobs last year, women filled less than a quarter of apples top tech jobs. Google offers a similar type of a training program for girls and women seeking freeze and tech. But it's male to female ratio for tech jobs is about the same as apple. And there are people who would go out of their way to find an ATM that doesn't charge fees, but some people near Houston made a lucrative ATM. Find the other way one that Dole's out one hundred dollar bills instead of tens it happened in Harris County, Texas, where Bank of America ATM began spitting out one hundred dollar bills. Of course, in the social media savvy days word got around quickly. It got to the point where the county sheriff's deputies had to stand guard near to keep others from taking advantage of the bounty, while others reached out to the Bank turns out, the vendor incorrectly loaded one hundreds in the slot where the tens were to go as for the windfall. Some customers that made out with Bank of America says they can keep it. It's not worried about how much was mistakenly dispensed..

apple Bank of America Nasa Nastase Silicon Valley Google Harris County Houston Dole official Texas one hundred dollar three months
"nastase" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:21 min | 2 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Zimmerman to go. Exploring we build. Rockets commercial rockets are, preferred the big space rockets still dominate when it comes to robot. Exploration Nastase robot, explorers are, magnificent and they have dawn in mission at, series the dwarf, planet and it's very low over. Series, however it's been sending back data that have been topographical looking down at the surface with very fetching and mysterious views of the white spots that we've seen for more than a. Year, now maybe two, years maybe three years and the speculation about these white spots being Brian or evaporation from an. Underground see now Bob has an image up that I recommend to everyone because it's the closest you'll ever get to exploring series until the twenty second. Century what am I looking? At Bob Well what they've done is they took a lot of the. What don't let me just backtrack dawn is now swooping in. Twenty two miles above the. Surfaces serious every twenty seven hours and it gets images, says it. Does this and so the science team there assembled a mosaic of images but they they. Maneuvered it and from a three d.. Angle oblique angle, so you're looking from, the side you're not looking straight down and then laid it on. Top of the, topographical data, that they've got some their laser altimeter so, they know exactly, how high things are and so. It's, basically the use the computer match the overhead image with the topographical images and then turn it on a computer sideways so you're looking at it from our Blake angle which means. You, really get a, sense of what should look at us like if flying over the mountains and so this is. One of the bright spots on serious I posted it on it I've even focused on one particular feature because it's really really interesting it really does. Suggest to me that this is Not the remains of what was once a Brian volcano. That rose up erupted release. The brine and then slumped down into a depression it, really does. Look like as it erupted it formed the depression You know but who, knows we don't really know the images just really spectacular and it's. And you know when these oblique images come. Out I. Try, to post them. On behind the black because they. Really give you clarity and it makes, it possible to easily understand what you're looking at. It really does look like snow on the it's nice. No but it's not it looks like I was looking I was looking for. Fayssal facial recognition Bob portrait of George Washington, or something like that That that's another broadcast now we go to Vegas Bob what are they up to well the Vega. Is one of? The rockets in. Arianespace's rockets family it's a small solid solid rocket motor of rocket they use for small. Satellites and they had a. Successful launch this week, they put up a science European science satellite called a Olis' which is designed to study the earth's wins at almost every, elevations of the? Of the atmosphere this is a big deal it'll, be really cool we'll get, a very clear measurement of wind, speed from the earth's surface to altitude of nearly Andre thousand feet what is that, that's twenty miles and so this is data that they can use. To plug into the various climate models it'll. Make them. More, accurate that's still. Very uncertain but they'll make them. More accurate if those put them into, fourth fifth place in the race this year for For the most launches in the year Arianespace. Only has five? Launches this point. Thing only would be a little more than that but nonetheless it's launched we have sex. Assigned satellite up there and. Now to the surface, of the moon a lunar cold spot this is puzzling image Bob where where's it a who took this picture Well The oblique, image you're looking at the side of a crater that will make. It I think Clara give you some. Clarity when you look at, it you'll looking, the this is literal, console but it. Is they don't have to fake. This it actually does periodically take leak images looking sideways rather than straight down and they're always. Spectacular and this is it's less spectacular only because it's so in line with the, rims you can see the near rim in the far rim almost lined up with each. Other what makes this particular crater interesting is it doesn't have a. Name it's on the fos- side of the. Moon what's interesting about this crater sits in a region surrounding it and including it that they call a cold spot because when the sun sets for the fourteen day long lunar, night this region quickly cools very quickly to a, temperature that's about ten degrees, Fahrenheit colder than the surrounding. Terrain and there's a bunch of these on the lunar. Surface they don't really know. Why They. Occur they they think they're routinely associated. With young craters craters that have the raise coming out of them. That have fresh ejecta around them but. The actual cause of the, coolness is not, clearly understood there's a, whole bunch of. Theories but none of them are. Really convincing if does appear that this cold spots could provide a so a quick way to. Maybe identify a fresh craters on the moon but maybe not since the cold areas, are usually much larger than the craziest themselves and so therefore the pinpoint the two together. Is hot but the images quite spectacular issue flying over this craze. From the side you're purchasing it from a. Low altitude zooming in on the rim as you look at it it's not an admission but it's still still pretty spectacular Bob Zimmerman he keeps the website behind the black listened, to by the second man on the moon Buzz, Aldrin who I enjoy joins, Bob in his opinion that. Floppy is not the way to the moon I'm John. Batchelor this is the John Bachelor show A free seventy seventy. Dollars away we see What would you do Curtis I think you've gotta try to fake. It cannoli and put it in one pocket take a by Ellison who. Would turn down even if you're lactose intolerant.

Bob Zimmerman Bob Rockets Arianespace Brian Brian volcano Batchelor Ellison Andre Curtis Clara Aldrin George Washington twenty seven hours thousand feet twenty second fourteen day ten degrees three years
"nastase" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:03 min | 2 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"SpaceX falcon nine rocket from Nastase Kennedy Space Center in Florida now I t's the fact we're going to. Have, an expert on coup is making the, claim that agencies no there is already identifiable life on Mars or at least that's what I'm told So I want to bring up a berry degrasse Gerry oh he is an honorary research fellow at. Buckingham center for Astro biology and berry is a doctor. Di Gregorio or are you a did you do the whole PHD thing or where are you on that. I, did not okay that's fine so I, can just call you bury or Mr. All right. But let me ask you before we go forward I understand one of your specialties as the director of over twelve years for the IC AM SR an organization dedicated to raising. Concerns about proper spacecraft sterilization and sample return missions from, Mars I'm, curious about what you think about the launches lately for example this new prototype and what kind of, things do they have to be worried about with this massive. Cylindrical habitat. When it goes up into space and comes back Well one of the things, they found out about microbes and space terrestrial microbes is that The become very very quickly and mutate, so by the time You know. You launch your habitat and you're in there, for a year, by the time you. Get to your destination Microbe can be different many different properties so You could start off with something that there's. An infectious disease causing micro by the time he Richard. Destination We, wouldn't be good for either you or the planet you're going to visit either no which would not have presumably any sort of natural way to fight off disease bearing. Micro really the The. Issue of And back contamination hasn't really been addressed very well. Throughout space, history I mean this, goes back, to you know The first rockets we, into space The stuff that touchdown on. The Millen without people, in it and then of, course we have the Apollo program which was the most The biggest example, of a failure of Planetary protection protocols that you could find because it landed on the moon and. Then, came back without planetary, protection protocol well just as an example the plan for Apollo eleven was to retrieve rock samples and soil. And bring it back to the year and the capsule was to remain sealed until helicopter picked it, up and thought it to the ship and then washed down. With a germicide and that wasn't done first thing they did was break protocol and. Open the capsule door in the ocean so You can see that there was anything alive in the. Soil of moon and he dormant spores or anything like that they would have been. Immediately Exposed. To the warm Pacific Ocean Oh Very. Serious A breach of planetary protection protocol that was in place You know aren't astronauts were just too valuable You, know in terms of the rest I guess right to save them individually? And, then break the protocol, about the samples yeah a lot of people a, lot of scientists were concerned about that. Time and that would have been Carl Sagan who would have, been one, of the most vocal opponents of Criteria protection protocol he he, was always, out there with some other, scientists associated, with and they were always warning that you know we to take this. Thing, seriously or you know you're going to possibly affect the biosphere a way, that we just wouldn't be able to understand or figure out you know it's just we have one You, know how how many times do you want to roll the, dice cafe well and how many times we've done it already which is not doesn't, make it, right but in subsequent Apollo missions was any evidence of any microbes dormant or not ever discovered in any of, the soil, samples that were brought back Well I'm, not sure if you know about the, surveyor three incidents now when Apollo twelve went to the moon I retrieved the camera housing from surveyor which had been sitting on the moon for Five Years. Okay so they brought the camera housing backing everyone surprise when they did a microbial. Analysis They found some bacteria in there and. It was able. To, be revived and you know it. Was. Controversial for the longest time there everybody said that well that's somebody sneezed you know In in the white room Before the spacecraft was sent to the moon You know that's never really been proven Still controversial as to. Whether the, microbes inside the camera unit Surveyor three was either terrestrial or extraterrestrial terrestrial or snot So thank you so tell me though that's very interesting The the possibility exists as I'm picking up on, your work because you're the author, of microbes of Mars which is a popular science magazine? Or was it. A journal article or. A trade magazine Microbes in Morris was my second Second book real good thank you so microbes of Mars, it in that thinking about that would you have wondered whether if somebody had, on, earth sneezed on a camera housing And then taking it up into space That maybe that's just the kind of thing that might have developed grown mutated so that even if it had left this, planet having been exposed to another atmosphere it. Might have turned into something completely different by the time it got back to earth you hold on that answer because we're coming up, to the bottom, of the hour break which is heartbreak and. I want to know all about that we have another half hour to go and we'll we're just getting started because we're going to talk about life on Mars that may, already exist right now which berry says we all need to know about coming up next on coast to coast AM this is he an punnet.

Nastase Kennedy Space Center camera unit Surveyor SpaceX Di Gregorio Buckingham center Pacific Ocean Gerry berry Carl Sagan research fellow Florida Millen Mr. All Apollo director Richard twelve years
"nastase" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

08:07 min | 2 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on KTOK

"September seventh two thousand seventeen with a launch atop the. SpaceX falcon nine rocket from Nastase Kennedy Space Center in Florida now I t's the fact we're going to. Have, an expert on coup is making the, claim that agencies no there is already identifiable life on Mars or at least that's what I'm told So I want, to bring up a berry d gregarious He is an honorary. Research fellow at Buckingham center for Astro biology and berry? Is a doctor Di Gregorio or are? You a d did you do? The whole PHD. Thing. Or where. Are you on that I did not okay that's. Fine so I can just call you bury or, Mr. All right But let me ask you before we. Go forward I understand one of your specialties as the director of over twelve years for the IC a. m. s. are an organization dedicated to raising concerns about? Proper spacecraft sterilization and sample return missions for Mars I'm, curious about, what you think about the launches lately for example this new prototype and what kind of things do, they have to be worried about with this massive cylindrical habitat, when it goes up into space and comes back Well one of the things they found, out about microbes in space you know terrestrial microbes is that The become very very quickly, and mutate, so by the time You know. You launch your habitat and you're in, there for a, year by the time. You get your destination The microbe. Can be different many different properties so You could start off with something that isn't infectious and and a. Disease causing micro by the time he Richard. Destination Wouldn't be good for either you or the planet you're going to visit either no which would not have presumably any sort of natural way to fight off disease bearing. Micro really the The. Issue of Forward and back contamination hasn't really been addressed very well. Throughout space, history I mean this, goes back, to you know The first rockets we, science space The stuff that touchdown on. The moon without people, in it and then of, course we have the Apollo program which, was the most The biggest example, of a failure of Planetary protection protocols that you could find because it landed on the moon and. Then, came back without planetary, protection protocol well just as an example the plan for Apollo eleven was to retrieve rock samples and soil, and bring it back to the era and the capsule was to remain sealed until the helicopter picked it, up and brought it to the ship and then washed down. With a germicide and that wasn't done first thing they did was break protocol and. Open the capsule door in the ocean so You can see that there was anything alive. In the soil of the moon and he dormant spores or they would have been. Immediately Post to the warm Pacific Ocean Oh Very. Serious A breach of planetary protection protocol that was in place You know our astronauts were just too valuable You know, in terms, of the rest of the world I guess right to save them individually? And, then break the protocol about the samples yeah a lot of people a, lot of scientists were concerned about that time and that would have been Carl Sagan who would have, been one, of the most vocal opponents of Predatory protection protocol, he he, was always out there with some other scientists, city associated, with and they were always warning that you know we got to take. This, thing seriously are you know you're gonna possibly affect the biosphere and away, we just wouldn't be able to understand or figure out you know it's just we have one earth How how many times. Do you want to roll the dice cafe well and, how many, times have we done it already Which is? Not, doesn't make it right but in subsequent Apollo missions Was any evidence of any microbes dormant or not? Ever, discovered in any of the soil samples that were brought back well I'm not sure if you know, about the surveyor three incident When Apollo twelve wants to the moon retrieved the camera? Housing, from the surveyor which had been sitting on the moon for Five years okay so they brought the camera house back and to everyone's surprise when they did it microbial analysis say They found some. Bacteria in, there, and it was able to, be revived and you know, it was. Controversial. For the longest time there everybody said well that's somebody sneezed you know in in the white room Before the spacecraft, was sent to the moon You know that's never really been proven And the still controversial as to whether the microbes inside the camera unit from survey three was, either terrestrial, or extraterrestrial terrestrial or snot So thank you so tell me though that's very interesting The the possibility exists as I'm picking up on, your work because you're the author. Of microbes of. Mars which is a. Popular science magazine Or was it a journal article or a trade magazine piece, micro was Morris was my second Second book okay good thank you so microbes of Mars it in that thinking, about that would you have wondered whether if somebody had? On earth sneezed on a camera housing And then taking it up into space That may be that's just the kind of thing that might have developed grown mutated so that even if it had left this, planet having been exposed to another atmosphere it. Might have turned into something completely different by the time it got back to earth you hold on that answer because we're coming up, to the bottom, of the hour break which is heartbreak and. I want to know all about that we have another half hour to go and we'll we're just getting started because we're going to talk about life on Mars that may already exist right now Which berry says we all need to know about coming up next on coast to coast AM this is the on it.

Nastase Kennedy Space Center SpaceX Pacific Ocean Carl Sagan berry Research fellow Buckingham center Florida Disease Mr. All director Morris Richard twelve years Five years
"nastase" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Says sixty two. Year old Joseph pompous died from a self inflicted gunshot wound to the head during a confrontation with police Nastase chosen the astronauts that will ride the first Commercial spacecraft, into orbit next year nine NASA astronauts many of them veterans space flyers will get to ride privately operated spacecraft. To and from the international space station Nicole man. Is a rookie astronaut who will fly on, Boeing star liner it's going to be a proud moment for the, team it's going to, be a proud moment for America so, I'm just, grateful to be able to help usher in this new era of American spaceflight Boeing and Elon Musk's SpaceX will be providing transportation services for NASA on contract these will use American. Rockets launching from American soil for the first time since the final. Shuttle, mission, in twenty eleven in Miami Eban Brown Fox News two sets of. Twenty four year old identical twins are getting married. This, weekend and grass Lake Michigan than twin. Thing we'll continue after the wedding the couple say they plan to move in together into a two bedroom apartments I'm rich Denison FOX News Radio From the Florida. Central credit union home loans traffic center we've got a. Bad one eastbound I four right around the thirty eight mile marker that puts a near state road thirty three in Polk County about a five mile, backup now on eastbound I four if. You're heading over to Auburndale Orlando again eastbound I four at mile marker thirty. Eight that would be state. Road thirty three very serious accident that's going to be a long term investigation. Ron Stevens NewsRadio, nine seventy, WFL Partly cloudy skies. Seventy seven degrees to, start the, day temps quickly warmed ninety four for a high..

Rockets NASA Boeing Miami Eban Brown Elon Musk Ron Stevens Nicole man Joseph grass Lake Michigan Polk County Orlando America Florida Seventy seven degrees Twenty four year
"nastase" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on AP News

"Facts life and technology anyone can submit their names which will be sent on the probe headed to the sun once it's launched this summer it'll eventually come within four million miles of the sun closer than any other spacecraft temperatures will reach twenty five hundred degrees as it zips in and out of the atmospheric hot zone nastase accepting name submissions until april twentyseventh at nasa dot gov thank you for listening to the ap radio network hey did you know that the associated press produces news related books the latest installment is i cut i fat brings key moments in presidential pep district to life through the vast eighteenth auto collection highlights include checkers the dog that was a focal point of nixon's nineteen fifty two checkers speech and the clintons beloved cat socks i had is perfect for animal lovers and history buffs of all ages ipad is available on kindle nook an i books ap radio news i'm ben thomas stakes are responding to president trump's call for troops along the mexico border if he correspondent mike rossier texas and amazon have begun activating national guard troops for deployment on the us mexico border brigadier general tracy moore's is commander of the texas army national guard within seventy two hours the texas military department will have two hundred and fifty personnel along with ground surveillance vehicles as well as light and medium aviation platforms meantime president trump has signed a memo directing his administration to take steps to end the policy of catch and release of unauthorized immigrants while they await immigration hearings and attorney general jeff sessions has instructed federal prosecutors to have zero tolerance with the detention of even first time illegal border crossers mike cross washington rain is falling across northern california tonight and the national weather service predicts four to six inches through sunday yosemite national park is shutdown with flooding expected and mudslides are a worrying parts of wine country burned in october wildfire years health officials in gaza say seven palestinians were killed during another border protests today and nearly three hundred wounded demonstrators burned tyres to try to block the view of israeli snipers you lieutenant colonel jonathan con rica's is with the israeli defence force not seeing demonstrators meaning about we're seeing an actively organized riot spearheaded.

gaza colonel jonathan con rica washington attorney texas army amazon mike rossier mexico president kindle ap nixon yosemite national park california jeff sessions texas military department commander
"nastase" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on AP News

"And would welcome more nastase offering to fly people to the sun well their names anyway and for a pitch man none other than william shatner captain james t kirk from star trek parker's silver pro is going to help us learn about half the sun words and how defects life and technology gear owner anyone can submit their names which will be sent on the probe headed to the sun once its launched this summer it will eventually come within four million miles of the sun closer than any other spacecraft temperatures will reach 2500 degrees as it zips in and out of the atmosphere hot zone nastase accepting name submissions until april 27th at nasa dot gov he made his mark in movies amongst the stars now way ps met small reports mark hamill has been honoured with a star on the hollywood walk of fame when the original star wars movie premiered in theatre back in nineteen seventy seven it made more kamel of boxoffice store on taiwan heavier rucki now more than forty years later he's received this store of his own yesterday on the hollywood walk of fame as fans from across the galaxy cheered him on it's been a fantastic ride as daylight lange presents an aggressive what a great let's dim the light for this next one too much veritas gotta get things just right like progressives name your price to tell us what you want to pay and we help you find coverage options literature budgen and now them israeli wait the lights are back on again to kenya and now it's completely dark progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates pricing coverage match linde by.

parker mark hamill kenya william shatner 2500 degrees forty years
"nastase" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on AP News

"It's completely dark green casualty insurance company injuries pricing coverage match limited by state law watchdog group wants the justice department to look into the president and his connection to a porn star ap's wore levinson reports a secret payment to xrated actress stormy daniels before the 2016 election may have violated federal law the group citizens for responsibility and ethics in washington wants to know whether money paid to a porn star violates federal election law because donald trump did not listed on his financial disclosure forms stephanie clifford who performs under the name stormy daniels says she got the money just before the 2016 election to keep quiet about her affair with trump trump attorney michael cohen says he made the one hundred thirty thousand dollar payment out of his own pocket and was not reimbursed so the money did not come from trump or the trump campaign i'm warren levinson nastase offering to fly people to the sun well their names anyway and for a pitch man none other than william shatner captain james t kirk from star trek parker's silver pro is going to help us learn about how the sun words and how defects lyft an technology gear owner anyone can submit their names which will be spent on the probe headed to the sun once its launch this summer will eventually come within four million miles of the sun closer than any other spacecraft temperatures will reach 2500 degrees as a zips in and out of the atmosphere hot zone nastase accepting name submissions until april 27th at nasa dot gov the national hockey league's making its first foray into the world of ease sports the league's launching the 2018 nhl gaming world championship at tournament that old and champion in june in las vegas league officials and ease sports experts say it's a way to attract millennials to hakim and to.

hakim las vegas nhl hockey william shatner warren levinson attorney stephanie clifford xrated parker michael cohen donald trump washington stormy daniels president one hundred thirty thousand do
"nastase" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on WCHS

"Federal budget but let any listeners worry about how much that might cost them i might point out that at the height of the net feddie project it was costing each american taxpayer on average three cents a year so it's not very expensive okay well given the fact that we now have this avalanche this incredible avalanche of data from three thousand sick hundred planets orbiting other stars systems right business me that you're like a kid in a toy store i mean given the fact you have all these potential targets to to listen far for intelligent life in outer space i mean it's a game changer right well if years in detention when i was a kid glitch was quite a while ago now but when i was a kid you know i would go to new york to visit relatives and i would go to the hayden planetarium on the west side of central park there and they would tell you frequently that won't planets might be very rare or hank that because they were furious of how you make planets that involved very improbable event and it could be that our solar system could a be the only follow sniff them in the whole galaxy immediate with that was a possibility when i was a kid well it's not a possibility anymore as you point out the kepler space telescope nastase kepler space telescope has found no thousands and thousands of planet but that's actually not the most interesting thing the most interesting thing the fact that they now have established that essentially seventy eighty ninety percent of all stars have planet and it could be a higher percentage than that even so that that for an astronomer saying seventy or eighty percent at the same thing all right so it isn't you you look up in the sky infidelity stars now most of the sergey to you're not a read interesting bunch but others stars up there most of them have plan that's something we didn't know even ten years ago we didn't know that so that can hope to those of us who are looking for signals okay now let's be very specific the closest star to our son is proximus and tari eight triple star system and it was just an hamas last year that there is an earth like planet revolving around the closest star to the planet earth is that isn't that remarkable and then.

new york hayden planetarium solar system kepler space telescope nastase hamas hank seventy eighty ninety percent eighty percent ten years
"nastase" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Kfi am 640 stop where show and i the today was the day where his seaney blew walk and it was nastase ventured to to saturn the look at the rings in the moon's thirteen year deal hill and a blew it up today and with us is a fellow goofball like myself who probably a telescope when he was a kid khorasan carl isis cmn that is conferred to tell us go i did i govan an entire selling gary and shannon earlier today that my room when i was growing up in elementary school was decked out in space pay for so look like i was on the moon motivator array of awesome oh that's where did a lotta chicks not at all boy by crozier you had a telescope to right i did my dad living in dc which in carl and it was oh yeah took me at a school to air and space museum to watch all the old when i am xi came out with all the shuttle launches all yeah big it is awesome so why did they throw this into saturn it just didn't have enough fuel no they they had enough fuel bots there is an international trees several international treaties that actually govern outer space wrong and one of the things that they have to do is to responsibly dispose of any space vehicles within the solar system so so women were worried about the the environment a yes because of blitz here's why billion miles away so one of the great things that cassini was able to do was to spot the presence of salt water of liquid saltwater are on the moon called in several lease screwed up but he was one of the moves to saturn and when that happened the proposition the idea that life could exist somewhere else on the solar system suddenly burst forth because they also found these hydrogen plumes coming up from from the moon which i want to contaminate that so the that theory is this if a spaceship of any form has just even a micro from planet earth in a crash lands in a place that could even theoretically be suitable for life friday you have essentially planted live on another planet which can create some ethical issues ride i think there are a bigger issues though a heal the planet or that we have destroyed that plenty i we're on our.

gary shannon crozier carl solar system Kfi thirteen year
"nastase" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

The Personal Computer Radio Show

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on The Personal Computer Radio Show

"Nastase chasing the solar eclipse well coming up his obviously 21st that's when the solar eclipse will occur which lasts happened ninety nine years ago this is an eclipse coming and even with the best possible planning you won't be able to see it for longer than two minutes and 40 seconds that's the maximum amount of time the moon's shadow will be visible overlapping the sun from directly in the eclipse path which stretches all the way across the continental united states scientists from southwest research institute working in cooperation with nasa well they plan to monitor the eclipse continuously for much longer than that how well they rigged appeal jets with telescopes to chase the clips to make the planes into mobile observatories the researchers will be able to track the eclipse as a moves across the earth national already had the perfect aircraft to make it happen to the high altitude w b fifty seven f is used for the agency to capture images of cloud formations and study climate but now two of them have been repurpose for airborne astronomy amir casts be a sola astrophysicist with southwest research institute is leading the project for the rich eclipse the jets will fly seventy miles apart placing them at each edge of the total eclipse that runs from oregon to south carolina the jets however a launching from nastase johnson space center in houston don't meet up with the eclipse fifty thousand feet above missouri and we'll keep with it as a pass over illinois and tennessee the telescopes observing the eclipse are mounted on the nose of each aircraft one telescope is tuned to capture visible light and the other will see infrared and eclipses an unprecedented opportunity to gather data on the sun's corona and to better understand how the loop supplies more on its surface remains so smooth that something all current models of the sun dozen predict.

Nastase southwest research institute nasa oregon south carolina jets nastase johnson space center missouri illinois houston tennessee fifty thousand feet ninety nine years two minutes 40 seconds
"nastase" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Researchers at the university of texas san antonio using observations from nastase stratospheric observatory for infrared astronomy or sofia found that dust surrounding active ravenous black holes are much more compact than previously thought most if not all large galaxies contain a supermassive black hole at their center's many of these black holes are relatively quiet and inactive like the wind at the center of our milky way galaxy however some supermassive black holes are currently consuming significant amounts of material that are being drawn into them resulting in the emission of huge amounts of energy these active black holes or called active galactic nuclear previous studies have suggested that all active glock tikk nuclei have essentially the same structure models indicate that active lactic nuclei have a doughnutshaped dust structure known as a taurus surrounding the supermassive black hole using the instrument called the faint object infrared camera for the sofia telescope or forecast the team observed the infrared emissions around eleven supermassive black holes with active lactic nuclei located at distances of one hundred million lightyears and more and determine the size of passivity and distribution of dust in each taurus in a paper published in the monthly notices of the royal astronomical society the team reports that the toray or thirty percent smaller than previously predicted and that the peak infrared emission is that even longer wavelength than previously estimated the implication is that the dust obscuring the central black hole is more compact than previously thought.

nastase stratospheric observat black holes milky way sofia telescope the royal astronomical society black hole university of texas san antonio thirty percent
"nastase" Discussed on The Pod Delusion

The Pod Delusion

01:35 min | 7 years ago

"nastase" Discussed on The Pod Delusion

"A cape great end so while briefly touched on the eib can you give an overview of keppler solve what it is what's he subject his where and how long it's been running things that up absolutely so kepler's nastase first mission capable of finding earth science planets orbiting it's other stars like the sun and it was launched in march of two thousand nine to search for transiting planets planets across the face of their star as i viewed by the spacecraft in so were interested in observing these transits and because we're interested in planets like earth i'm that means that we need to observe for for several years of we see several instances when the planet crosses in front of the face of its star now the probability that a planet will cross the face but start from our point of view is very small at the orbit of the planet has to be edge on from our point of view otherwise the planet never crosses the face of its star nats one reason why keppler observes over one hundred fifty thousand stars because this probability of the geometrical amnesic small we need to look at large numbers of stars norder too on be certain that if planets like earth our common that will see a sufficient number them over the course of the mission okay and damn the the take note the technology so finding choon that you can detect just the slight dip in the light yes it is and it it's a very small signature up from the ground people have been able to detect planets as similar in size to jupiter and jupiter is about ten times the diameter of the earth and so it's it's a little over a hundred times.

kepler keppler