38 Burst results for "Nasser"

Fresh "Nasser" from AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:44 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh "Nasser" from AP 24 Hour News

"This can be a very fickle year in terms of politics And the New Jersey election is overwhelmingly either a referendum on or a reaction to the presidential that just came before A loss for Murphy would be shocking in a state that Biden won over Donald Trump by nearly 16 points Meanwhile chiro has to please moderate and traditional Republicans he supports abortion rights while backing fewer COVID restrictions I'm Julie Walker Saudi Aramco president NCO Amin Nasser has announced the state owned oil company aims to reach net zero greenhouse gas emissions for 2050 And it zero from our operation by 2000 and 50 Speaking from south Arabia's green initiative forum narciss says the company understands that the road will be complex It's challenges but we are confident that we can meet them and accelerate our efforts to allow emission future.

Julie Walker Saudi Aramco Pres Chiro Donald Trump Biden New Jersey Murphy South Arabia
Fresh update on "nasser" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

01:37 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasser" discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"News Taliban and a health officials say a roadside bombing targeting a Taliban vehicle in the eastern Afghanistan has killed at least two civilians including a child according to police chief two bombs detonated as a Taliban vehicle was passing by killing one child no Taliban fighters were harmed A local hospital official said two bodies and four wounded civilians were transferred to the hospital after the attack No one immediately claimed responsibility for the bombing in eastern Nangarhar province However the Islamic State group has launched frequent attacks there targeting the Taliban New Jersey's decidedly liberal shift under its first term democratic governor Phil Murphy faces a political test as he squares off against Republican challenger Jack chitrali Under Murphy there's now paid sick leave taxpayer funded community college and legalized recreational marijuana his agenda will be on the ballot November 2nd and history isn't necessarily on his side The state hasn't reelected a democratic governor for decades We're taking nothing for granted I mean the history has proven that this can be a very fickle year in terms of politics So and the New Jersey election is is overwhelmingly either a referendum on or a reaction to the presidential that just came before A loss for Murphy would be shocking in a state that Biden won over Donald Trump by nearly 16 points Meanwhile citarella has to please moderate and traditional Republicans he supports abortion rights while backing fewer COVID restrictions I'm Julie Walker Saudi Aramco president and CEO Amin Nasser has announced the state owned oil company aims to reach net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 And.

Taliban Nangarhar Islamic State Group Phil Murphy Jack Chitrali Afghanistan New Jersey Murphy Meanwhile Citarella Donald Trump Biden Julie Walker Saudi Aramco Ceo Amin Nasser
Fresh "Nasser" from AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh "Nasser" from AP 24 Hour News

"CEO Nasser has announced the state owned oil company aims to reach net zero greenhouse gas emissions for 2050 And it is zero from our operation by 2000 and 15 Speaking from Saudi Arabia's green initiative forum NASA says the company understands that the road will be complex You will have its challenges but we are confident that we can meet them and accelerate our efforts to allow emission future And this is coming from also the biggest producer of hydrocarbons in the world Saudi Arabia had earlier announced its intention to reach the net zero mark as a country by 2060 ram kunal ranks third behind Microsoft and Apple as the world's most valuable company far exceeding the combined value of some of the world's biggest oil companies It produces a kingdom's vast oil and gas products and receives directives on supply production each month from the energy ministry of Saudi Arabia To show you how easy it is to file a claim with Geico we hired a scary movie victim And there's only one thing to do Trip over my own feed and pull myself across the lawn while yelling help at a barely audible volume Sorry to interrupt But you file the claim with Geico So you've got a.

Ceo Nasser Saudi Arabia Nasa Microsoft Apple Geico
U.S. Gymnasts Say FBI Failed to Protect Them From Sexual Abuse

Mojo In The Morning

01:56 min | Last month

U.S. Gymnasts Say FBI Failed to Protect Them From Sexual Abuse

"Four american gymnast. Simone biles michaela maroney aly rice. Men and maggie nichols sat in front of the senate yesterday. Engaged emotional testimony about the abuse. They suffered at the hands of former usa gymnastics doctor. Larry nassar and their feelings of betrayal by investigators particularly the fbi the fbi. Let them down big time. This is simone biles. I don't want another young gymnast. Olympic athlete or any individual to experience the horror that i and hundreds of others have endured before during and continuing to this day in the week of the larry nassar abuse. She said the scars of this horrific abuse continue and the impact will never be over michaela. Maroni told a story about sitting on her bedroom floor back in twenty fifteen and talking to the fbi over the phone and telling them all of the details of everything that had happened to her and then told the f. b. i. About tokyo the day he gave me a sleeping pill for the plane. Ride to then work on me. Later that night that evening i was naked completely alone with him on top of me molesting me for hours. I began crying at the memory over the phone. And there was just dead silence. I was so shocked at the agents silence and disregard for my trauma. After that minute of silence he asked is that all advocates for the young women. Say as many as one hundred twenty athletes may have been abused by nasser. they says l. erased men nassir found more than one hundred new victims to molest serving innocent children up to a pedophile on a silver platter. All we needed was one adult to do the right thing. I don't know if you guys saw this part of her testimony but she told a story about sitting with an fbi agent and him trying to convince her that everything that had happened. Wasn't that bad.

Simone Biles Michaela Maroney Aly Rice Maggie Nichols FBI Larry Nassar Maroni Gymnastics Michaela Senate Olympic USA Nassir Tokyo Nasser
"nasser" Discussed on AfterHour

AfterHour

04:04 min | Last month

"nasser" Discussed on AfterHour

"Retains a lawyer to solve societal problems because sometimes knowing why isn't good enough we need to know what we can do. Sometimes we need more than truth. We need hope. I'm jane steal your host and investigative journalists here with joseph the managing partner of saying an associates justice hygiene. Thanks so much for being willing to talk with me. Again is a pleasure to be here. So our case today revolves around child labor. Which is essentially child slavery. And it's interesting because it actually takes place not far from from where we're doing this right now. It took place in irvine so a few minutes down the road for those who don't know it's in southern california very close to where i actually grew up essentially a twelve year. Old girl who was from egypt's was hidden in this family home and kept us their domestic servants. The cases the united states versus abdel. Nasser yusef ibrahim. This was an irvine couple. Who did plead guilty to enslaving this twelve year old girl. Her name is shema hall and they kept her in their garage for two years forcing her to work as domestic servants for a family of seven so themselves and their five children. The couple's names are adele nasser. Yusef abraham he was forty four at the time and his wife. Amal ahmed odds model abe. Who is forty one. So these were the two that ended up being charged. Basically the backstory to this is that two of the girls older sisters had worked in this family's home back in egypt's before they moved to irvine in two thousand. The husband caught one of the sisters stealing and so he threatened to have her charged with theft. Unless the girl's parents agreed to send their youngest daughter who is ten years old at the time to work for his family as a maid when they moved to the us. The girl's parents actually agreed to this and they signed a document offering her for what was basically a ten year sponsorship with the family in exchange for about thirty dollars a month so essentially nothing but then they also arranged for a third party to obtain a visa for her so she could travel to the us. The family kept her basically in squalid conditions. She lived in their garage. They hit her from immigration. She didn't go to school. They obviously kept her away from police officials or anyone. Who would maybe question why she was there and her whole role of being in the united states was to serve this family as their domestic servants. She would help. The youngest kids get ready for school. You.

irvine Nasser yusef ibrahim shema hall adele nasser Yusef abraham Amal ahmed egypt abdel jane joseph southern california us
Saudi Oil Giant Aramco Sees Half-Year Earnings Climb to $47B

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Saudi Oil Giant Aramco Sees Half-Year Earnings Climb to $47B

"Saudi Arabia's oil producing company Aramco has announced an income of forty seven billion dollars for the first half of the year the ending is double what the company took over the same period last year when the coronavirus ground to travel and pummeled global demand for oil Aramco's CEO Amin Nasser said the company's second quarter results reflects a strong rebound in worldwide energy demands around his financial health is crucial to Saudi Arabia stability despite massive efforts by Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman to divest by the economy the kingdom still depends heavily on oil exports to fuel government spending I'm Karen Thomas

Aramco Saudi Arabia Amin Nasser Prince Mohammed Bin Salman Karen Thomas
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:38 min | 3 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"That due process applies at guantanamo. So i think it's really hard to handicap beyond bunk dc circuit because. It's really hard to know where the judges who will end up in the middle. We'll come down. I mean the last time the dc circuit her guantanamo on bonk was the second time they went on bonk and the military commission case. And you know what folks remember if they remember anything about that. Was that the sort of the two wings of the dc circuit were very strongly in opposition to each other while judges. Maleta and wilkins both wanted to rest on narrow case specific grounds that deprived either of majority. It's possible that that's where we're headed here where you know. There's one camp. That firmly wants to say due process applies. There's one camp that firmly wants to dozens and there's a camp in the middle. That's going to embrace the biden administration's position and you know that i think is going to accomplish. Absolutely nothing in settling the law if instead we somehow got to a majority for due process applying. You know assuming that they say. Do you process applies. But it satisfied. Ben that puts the by the administration in a very interesting position from the perspective of do they have been asked the supreme court for at that point right if this is hold as opposed to assumes that. The due process clause applies to the guantanamo detainees. But that it doesn't require more than what the jurisprudence has already articulated. whether or not it cert worthy. I'm not sure it's actually surf provoking. We will have to see on that point latiff. I want to close with you. The guy who bears your name has gone home. What happens to him now and and let's use it. as a reflection. On sort of seven hundred people have been removed from guantanamo and sent elsewhere. What happens to them. Yeah the sort of tip to talk about his case. I zoom out a little bit for him. He is very lucky that he has a family to go to a home to go to job to go to. There is a rehab center for torture victims. Basically in his home city of casa blanca. It looks like he. Yeah he sort of has a has a path back to a a stable life. One of the things i. I remember vividly. When i started reporting this with you know this is not sort of my my zone. I got pulled into it because his name coincidence but but my my kind of an assumption i had at the beginning was after being held for so long This man if you didn't have you know anti-american sentiment and urges and and motivations before all of this he certainly would have them after that he would come out. And i kind of i was imagining it. Probably the same way as a lot of these other seven hundred guys that they would come out really pissed and what i found at least in abilities. Case and in several of the other from guantanamo detainees that. I talked to him getting out. He he wasn't or he's not angry so much as from what i can gather from his lawyer and his family. He's tired and he's sad. He wants to have a family. He wants to kind of do the things he hasn't been able to do for the last nineteen years. He has a name picked out for his first born child. And that's kind of a. I don't know it's like a just the fact that this man for whom we had very flimsy evidence. We held him for this long. And kinda now. That's that's the only thing he wants to do. I don't know to me that kind of puts a lot of this. Yes this sort of fighting over over who these guys are like. He has a lot of health. Complications has permanent hearing damage from sensory overload From guantanamo according to his lawyer like he has held his issues he just wants to get back to his family. He wants to be left alone. that's kind of the picture that i'm getting and in this guy's case and you know it's clear there thirty nine other cases where maybe that's not the case but in this case he might be able to just do that so i wanna ask you this precisely because you're not a lawyer you've some. You're just somebody who's engaged the case of this individual with a lot of complexity in a lot of sympathy as i. It's been a while. Since i've listened to your series about him but as i recall you concluded that he was almost certainly more tied to bin laden then his lawyer is allow that the evidence of his engagement in any particular violent activity was not all that strong but he was certainly associated in some sense with enemy forces. Is that a fair summary. Yeah and also i think kind of pivotal pivotally like from what we found that there was no evidence that he had ever tried to harm civilians that he had ever sort of targeted or kahn. After american citizens like those two things to me were like spoke. Pretty what do you think you know should have happened to abdelatif nassir. He was captured by either pakistani or or northern alliance forces and turned over to us forces with a kind of tag on his toe that said al qaeda we're allowed to detain the enemy in wartime nineteen years of detention on. That record seems pretty hard to understand. Like what to you. Would've been justice or a appropriate handling of lot of nassir. I think the situation. He's in right. Now is pretty reasonable. I mean sending him to the fact that he's from a country that is an ally that has you know security apparatus that is able to keep tabs on this guy and you know yeah. Pay attention to him to make sure that in the off chance that he does re engage which the numbers from the obama administration and forward have been very low You in in the case that he does re engage like that he can be stopped. But i think that that situation that he's in right now where it's like sent him home to his family and monitor him. That seems like a pretty reasonable. Uh solution keeping him for nineteen years before. That seems very extreme. it's it's obviously. It's easy for me to say this now Whether if i was the person in charge Right after nine eleven might have been a harder call but right now i think that scenario that seems like a very reasonable scenario. That could have been true. You know even fifteen years ago we're gonna leave it there. Lot of nassir steve vladeck. Thank you both so much for joining us. Thank you and ben. If i can just say one thing which is i just wanted to say. Thank you in series. That i reported you us out so much me and my colleagues and your we're just really grateful for your help supply-sider the.

guantanamo bonk Maleta biden administration latiff military commission wilkins casa blanca supreme court Ben abdelatif nassir bin laden obama administration kahn al qaeda steve vladeck ben
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:47 min | 3 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Transfer of you know muhammad al qahtani so i i think either. You're missing my point. I wasn't clear and my money is on the line. Maybe both so my point is not that they ought to do this at the expense of every other item on their domestic agenda. Because it's not hard to imagine. How every single republican will react. My point is that it is not. We're not gonna get anywhere unless they do. And so. yeah. I mean ben. Do i understand why. Closing guantanamo is administration's expanding any capital. Of course i do. If i were in the administration would feel the same way quite. Possibly that doesn't change the fact that they're the only ones in a position to do anything about it. And that's that's why were stuck now as opposed to why we've been stuck previously. I do think there are things they can do. Short of you know using their razor thin democratic majorities on guantanamo. I don't think for example the video plea deal proposal requires any legislation at all and so in so far. That was something they were willing to. Do you know as long as there were defendants who are willing to acquiesce. Identify could be pursued. I didn't they could really ramp up the efforts to not just get all ten of the pr. Be clear detainees out of guantanamo. But to actually see if any of the seventeen not. Pr be clear detainees might now actually get through the process because that has happened before so i won't be as clear as possible. It is not that. I blame the biden administration for where we are today. I do not. It's that so much of the sort of reasons why we're going to continue to be stock are because of the political factors that will lead the administration to expand capital on the things. It would need to do to actually make meaningful dent in that number okay and this brings us very neatly to al hilla the dc circuit case a to which you referred earlier which involves has actually potentially substantial implications for a lot of people but i think particularly for the remaining detainees who were in abdelatif nassar's position that is people who were pr be cleared for transfer got kind of stuck so Walk us through where where we are with that okay. So is one of a couple of the seventeen detainees who have not been cleared by pr. Bees whose habeas petitions took a really really really long time. These are not like second successive. These are first petitions and al hilo along with stifle a piracha. And there's i think one other. Ms i fully to purchase i. It's it's even hard for me to keep track of all these things. Anyway so al heels case finally got to the dc circuit last year and it produced this remarkably two thousand and nine like opinion because it produces remarkably two thousand nine like panel where you had a three judge panel of judges naomi. Row a raymond randolph. And former judge riffs and for folks who don't have the dc circuits guantanamo jurisprudence committed to memory. Judge ran off is the one who wrote the opinion that was reversed by the supreme court in brazil. He's the one who wrote dependent was your first by the supreme court in hamdan. He's the one who wrote the opinion that was reversed by the supreme court in boumediene and he was the one who worked the opinion that was vacated by the supreme court in piazza has some views on guantanamo. So the three judge panel held a couple of pretty important things but most importantly it held at guantanamo detainees categorically. Do not have due process rights. Judge griffiths separate concurring. Opinions suggest that it was unnecessary to reach that conclusion because as various other panels had done at various other points. One could assume that you process clause applied if one believe that whatever process that detainees had received met due process standards. And then the the detainee. Mr al hilla sought rehearing on bonk from dc circuit given. How sort of one sided a panel. He had received. The disease agreed to rehear the case on bonk. But and here's what technical especially important only the due process issue. There were actually some other important questions that the panel decided about. Whether the scope of the government's detention authority includes the power to detain someone who is not a member of al qaeda or any of its affiliated groups but who provided substantial support to al qaeda affiliates through non-belligerent activity. That's a big deal to that is not what's going before the on the unbound is just as i am the due process question so of course this led to the question of well. What's the biden administration gonna say about the due process clause and again we're back to carol and charlie's report in an according to caroline charlie. There was a huge interagency. Kerfuffle about what the by initiations position ought to be where all three positions were represented. Basically the notion that the due process clause should apply to the detainees and yet was satisfied. Here the notion that the court should not reach whether it applies because even if it does it was satisfied and the notion that the it was not applicable. All three positions were aired. Apparently the middle one one and so the brief that we have not seen as we've been told by caroline. Charlie takes no position on the due process question. It merely takes the position that to whatever extent to process applies the procedures at guantanamo comport with due process. Exactly so and that's an elegant compromise. If you don't think about it that much the reason why. I'm i'm sort of wary of that compromise and the reason why i've been wary of opinions making that point. Go all the way back to. I think it was then circuit. Judge brett cavanaugh. Who was the first. Big argument is because various judges on the dc circuit have suggested that some of the critical procedural rulings that the court of appeals reached in the first round of post boumediene cases ben back nine ten and eleven were informed by the assumption that the due process clause did not apply so for example the notion that the correct standard of of the burden of proof is a preponderance of the evidence not clear and convincing evidence. Well judge silverman has all but said the reason why you know. They're not troubled by hamdi is because that case of course was about due process so color me skeptical that the dc circuit jurisprudence over the last eleven twelve years would look the same if the due process clause clearly applied to the detainees. But the larger point. And i'm just gonna say working now i'll shut up. Is you know whatever this means. For the habeas cases it has enormous implications for the military commissions because to whatever extent in the government can get away with the argument that the procedures. These defendants are the detainees are receiving satisfied. You processing the habeas context. You know ben courts have a much better idea of what due process requires the criminal context especially in the capital context. And that's where i think. Al hilla could have enormous practical ramifications on the military commissions side answering that question one way or other. And do you have an instinct about how to handicap the bank dc circuit on this point. And let me just make the question a little harder and do you have an instinct about if the on bank dc circuit agrees with you. What the chances are the. Supreme court would regard the matter cert worthy where i have to say. There certainly is not a majority in my view for the idea..

guantanamo biden administration muhammad al qahtani supreme court al hilla abdelatif nassar al hilo raymond randolph Judge griffiths Mr al hilla ben al qaeda caroline charlie hamdan naomi piazza Judge brett cavanaugh brazil dc carol
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

08:15 min | 3 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Martin stepping down but the government filed something asking for an extension and then the government has since filed a very careful a tight rope walking brief where they are declining to defend. Judge a costa's decision but they're not agree on that it's wrong. Basically where they want sort of live to fight this the the the administration's not asking this emc are to affirm. But they're also not willing to concede that a cost to was incorrect so that they can have this issue for a future case if they want it. That seems to be ben. What forced or pushed martin's out whether it was his own or whether it was he was asked to step down by the very few people above him in the chain of command. I only a handful of people know but it seems to be that. The by the ministration insisted on martin's not defending that ruling on appeal. And that was the last straw. So your your inference. Here is that martin's wanted to defend this decision and the biden administration Did not although having gotten rid of him. They didn't acknowledge error. In the case either right did not have knowledge error. What they're basically saying is that they are not that they're not defending basically that they're going to sort of you know stipulate. I think what they've done. They're going to stipulate to sort of a withdrawal of that opinion without considering that it was error that basically there are no longer going to seek to introduce that evidence against al nashiri and therefore the legal issue is moot. moot not necessarily settled. And so you know. I think the the reason why ben i feel somewhat comfortable in the inference. Although it's right to say that there's an inference is because we only got to this point because the prosecutors under the direction of general martin's had pushed for this ruling in the first place and so i find hard to believe it was the other way round right. I find it hard to believe that. A legal argument advanced by general martin's and his prosecutors that pushed gentle martin's out because he was standing by the same argument. If you follow me. Because he wasn't ended by this. I it's usually the most logical inference here is that he wanted the government to defend that decision. The people above him didn't and they just reached some kind of intractable in impasse. So this brings us to the more general point about the proceedings. Continuing in the military commissions are not as the case may be albeit without the chief prosecutor. Unlike latiff if nasser there are these detainees who have pending charges against them including mr al-nashiri and the five nine eleven accused conspirators. Where are we at this point. I mean for those. I would say overwhelming majority of listeners and l'affaire readers who have frankly lost track of the saga of the military commissions. What does it mean that proceedings resumed and is the resumption of proceedings really mean the resumption of a stalling at a different rate. I would say stalling for different reasons right. That as opposed to be installed by cova did. Now we're back to where we were before. Which is with different cases stalling because of various procedural impasses. So you know the reality is. I mean there are ten defendants spread across four trials or at least four cases there. Is you mentioned the five nine eleven defendants alan the sheree hotmail rocky also known as national to mir and then there are the three sort of the so-called indonesia defendants whose cases the least far along who were just only a couple months ago arraigned and there are also to be clear a couple who have clad right so i'll alu. Oslo was convicted and majd conp- lead so there are two. There are two still guantanamo. Who are on the far side of the military commissions system introduced in in sort of post conviction imprisonment. If you will better we could do like an hour on each of the cases and why they're stuck in the mud make a long story short yes. The resumption of prasino's guantanamo means that we will go from zero movement toward trial in. This case is toward the very slow paced movement toward trial that we had seen before last march. You know i still think a twenty twenty four trial date in the nine eleven cases still to me wildly optimistic probably the same violence show because the the wildcard here and the mark martin store is a good example of this. The wildcard here is interlocutory. Appeals and the specter that if the trial courts hand down you know rulings that really tilt very heavily one way or the other. There's going to be time. Spent taking that issue to the cr. And then if necessary the dc circuit perhaps without the trial being able to continue perhaps without further progress in the proceedings. And in the nashiri case when that happened indeed they went backwards three and a half years so there are so many things still to be worked out. There are so many questions still to be answered. And frankly i mentioned ben. The ongoing fight in the al hilla case about whether the due process clause applies at all to the detainees. That's on the habeas salad. Wait man we're getting to that but don't jump the gun. I'm not jumping the gun. I'm just tying threads together which is to say that like what the dc circuit does in that case could yet further either slowdown or throw a wrench into the you know the the incredibly slow march of pretrial proceedings and each of these four cases. I have a quick question. Actually if i could. But in steve this is like i feel like i'm one of those people that ben was saying before is like sort sort of lost a threat to actually hearing you lay it all out like this is very very helpful but the fact that this is like this has been dragging on for so long my my my question is like he's there anybody anybody on any side of this. Who is happy with the way things are going right now not publicly so you know i had thought this is why i took it back to the mark martin story for a second. I mean you know say what you will about general martin's and he and i have certainly had our differences over the years but man if you needed someone to stand up and say you know this is going okay. We'll just have to keep the only way out is through like yes you know. Kip common carry on like that was his stick. Was you know. We're reinventing the wheel. This is gonna take awhile. They're going to be some bumps and bruises but we're marching in the right direction. And so you know to me. At least right. General martin's sort of stepping off stage is just yet another nail in this coffin of like. What are we still doing here. I mean you know ben no i wrote a piece for for l'affaire i just went back and looked at when i wrote. It was april of twenty nineteen titled. It's time to admit that the military commissions have failed. You know here. We are two years and three months later and they haven't gotten any better. And if you wanna symbol general martin's leaving is quite simple and it's not a good one so there may be people out there who still think. Everything's going great with the military commissions. I'm hard pressed to think of anyone who says that publicly. I don't think there's anybody. I mean as somebody who defended the military commissions for quite a while. I haven't done so publicly in years. It seems to me they. They have a demonstrated record of failure across all of the axes that justify their existence in the first place. And i don't know anybody who argues to the contrary.

martin nashiri biden administration ben al nashiri general martin latiff mr al majd conp prasino emc mark martin store costa nasser cova Martin al hilla guantanamo government Oslo
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

09:11 min | 3 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Kind of if you were looking. I say i think from a political strategy perspective. We're coming up on the twentieth anniversary of nine eleven Guantanamo still being there is kind of a reminder of what went wrong. I think to a lot of people and in a way to get people out of there would look like a mic. One time a smaller or to get rid of it Or close it down would be a win for this administration that said they. You know it's it's really hard getting guys out of there abdelatif first of all as you said. He had that sort of transfer package. It was completely done. It was just kind of paperwork that got snarled at the end. Like you know the secretary of defense his signature on a piece of paper essentially and so. That's what was holding him up. But like if you look at sort of his case like he's going back to morocco a country that is a stable country ally the united states. He has family there waiting for a job there waiting for him a house there waiting for him like he he was i think on paper he was the easiest case to transfer one of the folks i talked to who is involved in putting transfer together said that his case was not a low hanging fruit his case was annot hanging fruit it was like it was just right there it was It was the layup that the biden administration could just kind of put in the bucket. So steve how should we understand this transfer. There are fortyish people remaining at guantanamo. How many of them are plausible. Transfers at this point and how many of them fall into this category of really really difficult to imagine what a disposition that doesn't involve continued detention. Looks like there are Often like to think that there are four. categories ben of guantanamo detainees. And you know for folks who haven't seen it. The new york times has a fantastic thing called the guantanamo docket which really is a super helpful breakdown of of all of this including the four categories so with the transfer of missile latif. There are ten detainees who are of the remaining thirty nine who have already been cleared by the periodic review boards. Who you know. Meet the other sort of internal criteria for transfer and so the question is just if the biden administration is going to be able to find somewhere to send them of those tennis. Worth stress in a bunch of them are yemeni and that has continued to pose difficulties on the resettlement question. And just to be clear that because you can't easily repatriate somebody to yemen because of the state of that country so you have to find some third-country country attributing to take the person. At least one of the ten is stateless which raises complications of its own. So those ten. I think it's right to sort of about this the way. Let's put it as no hanging fruit. Said the low hanging fruit are the ten you know who have been cleared in are still there. There are another seventeen who are in detention not in the military commissions who have not been cleared by. Prp's and you know. I think those are the most complicated cases for the administration politically that will be the last nut to crack in the universe at guantanamo. There are two of the remaining thirty nine who are serving sentences pursuant to military commission convictions. And then there are ten who are in various stages of pretrial proceedings in the military commissions. And that's it and so you know twenty seven of the thirty nine on the tension side twelve of the thirty nine and the military commission side and the twelve on the military commission side that have their own problems. But i think from the from the perspective of an administration that has not repudiated commissions. You know. I think it's safe to assume those are going to soldier ahead at whatever terrifyingly slow paced. They're soldier in the the. You know the real political challenge the by administration the the diplomatic challenges. The ted who have already been cleared the political challenges the other seventeen all right before we turn to the other major issues that arose which coincidentally involve those other groups of people. Let's finish up with with the transfer Situation latif have you been in touch with Lot of nassar's family owned with him. I you were sort of famously. Not able to have direct contact with him while you were reporting your story about actually surprised. You're not in morocco hanging out with him now. It's yeah it was. I was very tempted. Let me tell you But i basically in reporting i did. A number of interviews with former guantanamo detainees. And those were the hardest interviews. I've ever done in my entire career impart because these men have been through a lot and they are very i mean they have all kinds of sort of ptsd and they have all kinds of Hesitations and unwillingness which you can sort of imagine to sit and subject themselves to more questions and so to me. I like that was actually very much. My first impulse like here. He's got gets transferred. Just jump on a plane. But then i realized that actually probably more productive. What would lead to a better interview and a more kinda humane way to approach. It is to sort of give them a little time. Let them settle with his family. modal space. I didn't want to be you know the pozo going in through brittany spears bathroom window or whatever and just give them a little space and then and then kinda pursue it. After that. And i think that Yeah i i have been sort of in touch with him through his lawyer and and as well with the family Again through the lawyer and yet they are. They are ecstatic. They're so excited They are and especially because it. Sort of coincidentally thank happened to be. He'd when when he sort of the day before he lands there so he celebrating his first. You know holiday with his family in nineteen years so they are. They are Very excited they are very. They're also a little bit. I mean kind of tender transitional time for them. Yeah so i. I think it's kinda we'll see how it shakes out and hopefully i'll be able to To get that you know interview that i've been waiting for for like five years now. So steve let's talk about general mark martin's who was the chief prosecutor of the military commissions. And as you described contended for a number of years that he would be there through the nine eleven trial mark. Martin's has now announced his retirement. The nine eleven trials still hasn't happened. What happened well you know. We only know been publicly. Reported ben and and so. I think it's an important caveat upfront but there are coincidences. That seemed to give a lot of credence to the public reporting. So carol rosenberg and at least on one of the stories i think. Charlie savage reported that martin's stepped away as the result of fight with others in the biden administration albeit unnamed. Others about the position the government was going to take on an interlocutory appeal in the al-nashiri case al-nashiri folks may remember is the alleged accused mastermind of the october. Two thousand bombing of the us has coal. It's al-nashiri case where the dc circuit in twenty nineteen wiped away three and a half years of pretrial proceedings because of a conflict that the trial judge hadn't disclosed here. Now ben what. We're what everyone's fighting about is an effort by the government led at the time general martin's to introduce statements al-nashiri made while he was in cia custody and by every account accept the government's being tortured not at his trial but at least in support of certain pretrial proceedings and the military commission and that fight produced a ruling by the trial. Judge judge a cost a gosh. I think it was late last year early this year. Adopting what to my mind was a rather implausible. Reading of the military commissions act under which those statements could be admitted for pretrial proceedings because pretrial proceedings were not quote proceedings in a military commission on that the that was just a reference to the trial. Whoever has the better argument al-nashiri has appealed that to the court of military commission review and general martin. Sears for court my favorite court the court that has has done the most the most article one courts bad name of any court. I can think of so. The that appeals. Pending and the time in of martin's departure was the day. The government's response was due and on that date. Not only did you know the times..

biden administration guantanamo abdelatif military commission nashiri morocco Situation latif nassar Guantanamo latif ben steve The new york times tennis brittany spears united states carol rosenberg ted Charlie savage mark martin
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

06:43 min | 3 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Stagnated. We talked about the resignation of general martin's. And we talked about the dc circuits. Latest forays into guantanamo bay. It's though l'affaire podcast. July twenty third a guantanamo update with latiff. Nassar and steve vladeck. So steve get us started. It's been a a big few weeks for guantanamo news which usually doesn't take place in big clusters give us an overview of how the the world the small world of guantanamo bay is different this week than it was safe three weeks ago. Well i mean. I think the first thing is that there are things happening in the military commissions. I mean we've were on the far side of what was a sixteen seventeen month pause in every single pretrial proceeding in all four of the pen. No military commission cases and you know we had the first proceedings in at least two of those cases in the last couple of days in the last week or so. So that's i think a big shift. There's one fewer detainees guantanamo then. There was a couple of weeks ago. So we've had the first you know. Transfer of a detainee out of the administration at least a transfer that wasn't pursuant to a plea agreement since president obama's last folded office in two thousand seventeen and we no longer have general mark martin's as the chief prosecutor of the military commissions even though at various points general martin's had told various folks that he was gonna see the nine eleven trial all the way to its conclusion that ended up not happening Apparently it didn't happen because of a disagreement over some litigation strategy. So you know. These are at least in guantanamo land. Pretty big deals and then the fourth piece of news is sort of less of a pretty big deal because it was sort of a punt but the the biden administration filed its brief under seal in probably the most important guantanamo case. The dc circuit has heard in a while about whether the due process clause applies to the guantanamo detainees and apparently according to report him from carol. From charlie savage the administration took no position on that question. So you know. I would say ben four to five pretty big news items that i didn't matter a lot on their own but together also i think are a pretty interesting inflection point all right so we're going to go through each of those in turn but i wanna start with the transfer. The trump administration had not transferred people at least not pursuant to plea agreement and the the gentlemen transferred was named lot if nassir and we happen to have lots of nassir. Al beit a different one right here. Lot f- tell us about the gentleman who was transferred from guantanamo. This week and how you came to be interested in him. Yeah well. I guess. Maybe i'll answer the second question. I and in a way in your introduction you already answered it. Which that i found too much to my sort of befuddle moment a few years back when i was just sort of procrastinating on twitter that there was this guy at guantanamo who had my same name. Yeah i just like. I didn't realize that such a person exists. As soon as i did. I immediately wanted to know everything i could about him. So kind to your to the first part of your question. Basically what i could find out. Then there was pre little about him out there. The first kind of place where i found anything was on the guantanamo docket on the new york times website. And basically what. I found about him there through those Like leaked dod dossiers. It sounded very nefarious. I mean he basically the the charges. They were actually formal charges. But basically what they said were. He was a top explicit expert of al qaeda. He was top advisor to osama bin laden. He helped blow up the bamiyan buddha statues which were a unesco world heritage site he fought. Us and coalition forces at the battle of tora bora and then wound up at guantanamo where he had all kinds of disciplinary infractions. And everything like that. That's sort of what it said. I had this very stark picture of the sky. And then when i talked to his attorney a woman. By the name of shelby sullivan bennett. Who was then at the law firm reprieve. She basically said the exact opposite she said. No no no. This guy was an aid worker at the wrong place the wrong time. Yeah he never. Al qaeda didn't have any kind of relationship with osama bin laden and so on and so on and basically this guy the us paid a ransom for this guy and they got a guy who you know Who's just mixed up in something. Nothing do with and never had charges and never had a trial and then to kind of to make matters more intense. What at the time. When i discovered around Twenty two ebb and of two thousand sixteen early twenty seventeen. He had gone before this. Pr be hearing this parole like process Board made up of people from the heads of six top agencies of the us government and they unanimously declared that he was that they didn't need to be holding him any longer he was not a continuing threat so he was this guy that was sort of like cleared on paper but remained at guantanamo. Not sort of when. I found him when i started doing research into his story. And as you reported in your excellent radio lab series about him he kind of got hung up in this end of the obama administration period where he was Notionally under under certain circumstances cleared to be transferred to and yet it kinda didn't just didn't happen before trump took office. What do we know a lot about the circumstances of his actual transfer was it just that the biden administration picked up where the obama administration left off when it left office and now that they had the chance they affected the transfer order or is there more to the story than that. That's basically the story. There's maybe a little more to the story like it does feel like in general. The story is the his transfer was kind of this une. Cash check from the obama administration of the biden administration. Just finally you know endorsed or whatever but basically there were other things..

guantanamo guantanamo bay latiff Nassar steve vladeck biden administration charlie savage martin Al beit mark martin osama bin laden shelby sullivan bennett al qaeda steve carol obama dc tora bora ben obama administration
Iran Candidate Says He’s Willing to Potentially Meet Biden

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Iran Candidate Says He’s Willing to Potentially Meet Biden

"An Iranian presidential candidate says he'd be willing to meet with president Joe Biden if he wins his country's election next week so Americans to send a better and stronger signals to the stomach for public speaking to the Associated Press former Iranian central bank chief Abdel Nasser how much he stressed that an American return to rise talk to the nuclear deal is key to any possible relationship amid the wider tensions in the Middle East how much is one of the seven candidates approved by Iranian authorities to run for the presidency in this Lamical public's June eighteen election outgoing president Hassan Rouhani a relatively moderate cleric with Iran's theocracy helped his nation reach its landmark two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with world powers I'm in Syria Shockley

President Joe Biden Iranian Central Bank Abdel Nasser The Associated Press Hassan Rouhani Middle East Iran Syria
Former U.S. Gymnastics Coach Is Dead After Human Trafficking Charges

The Takeaway

01:00 min | 8 months ago

Former U.S. Gymnastics Coach Is Dead After Human Trafficking Charges

"Being leveled at an associate of Larry Ness are the former U. S gymnastics team doctor now behind bars accused of sexually molesting hundreds of young female gymnasts, most of them minors. Ah, former head coach of the U. S team, John get hurt is now under arrest in charge with 24 felony counts. Including human trafficking and sexual assault. In announcing the arrest, state Attorney General Dana Nessel also implicated Michigan State University in the crimes for failing to turn over internal documents believed to be connected to ness are There are no legal avenues remaining that would allow us to secure these documents absent MSU's decision to voluntarily produce them. I find it unconscionable. At the university would stonewall the very investigation that it requested some gym. This alleged together. It was physically and emotionally abusive and force them to be treated by NASA are Get her, maintains he had zero knowledge of Nasser's crimes. The

Larry Ness Attorney General Dana Nessel Gymnastics Michigan State University John MSU Nasa Nasser
Ex-US Olympics gymnastics coach with ties to Nassar charged

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 8 months ago

Ex-US Olympics gymnastics coach with ties to Nassar charged

"U. S. Olympics gymnastics coach with ties to Disgrace, Sports Doctor Larry Nassar is now facing criminal charges in Michigan. John get erred, was head coach of the 2012 Women's Olympic gymnastics team, which won the gold medal. Details about the charges were not immediately known. NASA is a position that or was a position at Michigan State University and was also the team's doctor Get hurt, has insisted. He had zero knowledge of NASA's crimes. Although some of the gym this claim he forced them to see Dr Nasser and was physically abusive to them. Nasser has been sentenced to decades in prison for sexually assaulting gymnasts and possessing child pornography. New

Larry Nassar Gymnastics Olympics Nasa Michigan Michigan State University Dr Nasser John Nasser
"nasser" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With the wounded Isis fighter at the center of the Gallagher trial. He's lying on the ground, and his head is thrown back, he says. He's 17 years old. He's wearing a black tank top and he's so thin. His arms were like sticks. There's a bloody bandage around his leg. He's sedated but lucid. He says he joined Isis because they praised him, and he says his father beat him to try to prevent him from joining Iraqi forces handed him over to Navy seal medics to treat him shortly after he was dead CNN breaking NEWS There's a verdict now in the trial of a Navy seal accused of murder. The stabbing of an ISIS detainee I want. Eddie Gallagher was acquitted in the military trial after one of his men confessed to killing the prisoner himself. Then President Trump Pardon Gallagher of his soul conviction of posing with a dead body. A Navy seal, who said he killed him was under immunity and walked free. Amid months and months of coverage of the trial. The Iraqi teenager at the center of it was almost never talked to vote. His name never released. The military has kept court records sealed. There was no autopsy done because his body was left there and then dumped in a mass grave with other Isis dead. After searching for him in Mosul, We finally tracked his name down through Iraqi security sources. It's Halid, Jamal Abdullah and in a small town about 30 miles south of Mosul. We found his family Dulles father, Jamal Abdullah Nasser was an Iraqi intelligence officer and Saddam Hussein's time. A career that included a posting at the Iraqi Embassy in Malaysia. Now he works in a small grocery shot. Nasser had been told by a friend of his son that the teenager was killed in an airstrike. He's never seen the video of the wounded Isis fighter. Never heard of the trial. US. Investigators spent weeks in Iraq gathering evidence for the investigation. But he says no one ever contacted the family of the victim. That the center of it the military hasn't responded to an NPR query about why not? What do we do now, Sir, is a big friendly guy with a stubble of a grain beard. Governor standing behind the counter next two bags of potato chips near coolers full of milk and yogurt. He watches the video for the first time he barely changes expression. And as he listens to the wounded teenager say his father beat him to stop him from joining Isis. A tear rolls down his cheek at the time, he says he isn't 100% sure the team and the video is a son. He asked us to come back and show it to his wife at his home as we sit on the floor in the living room, his father tells us salad was a normal young guy. He didn't even pray sometimes. He would be playing with his friends and I would tell him you should go and pray. Nasser says His son was a good student who loved soccer and video combat games in 2016. He was in the ninth grade. Isis had controlled Mosul for two years. And the U. S and Iraqi military. We're mobilizing for an attack on the city ballot came and said he was joining Isis. He paid him $50 a month by he joined at the end of the Islamic state in the last days. I told him Why are you joining? Look, Isis is running away from the troops. You were a child. What are you going to do against the planes in US technology in all those countries? You will destroy all of us. His father promised to buy him a motorbike. Whatever he wanted If he didn't leave when holiday insisted Master took away his I d thinking If he didn't have it, he couldn't join. He even hit him after he joined. They took him for a month to train him. When he came back, he said, Dad and started crying. He was a child, he said. I can't quit. If I quit. They will punish me. I said you have destroyed us, He says Callate came home twice to recover from bullet wounds in the roughly 10 months he was with Isis official Donna's mother, Fauzia. Amina. Mohamed says she wants to know what happened to her son. Pampered first boy born after spree daughters she watches the video with her nine year old daughter on one side, her young grandson on the other. It's him, she says. Now, sir, tears up again. His wife is almost expressionless song that left this nation. We've had our fill of pain over the past three years, she tells us. Whoever takes this road and joins Isis doesn't come back when we tell them about the trial in the US that a Navy seal confessed to killing salad there shocked America how America has civilization on development and humanity. It's true college was a criminal. If he was a prisoner. You should have been taken to court. He was 17. It's a murder now, sir says we consider that they murdered him. At the shore of police Station Colonel Adult The AB Aziz Leafs through the evidence of Isis is reach. It's a yellow folder with columns of names, each one, a resident who joined Isis more than 2500 of them from the small town. One quarter of the entire population. Some are dead. Some are alive. Others are hiding in the desert, some others Aaron Jail, Colonel Aziz says poverty and the lack of jobs in the Sunni area neglected by the central government, where the main reasons that young people joined Isis Colonel goes down the list of names until he comes to college, Jamal Abdullah. Killing us. Teenage fighter at the heart of one of the most high profile U. S. War crimes trials. Now named and known Jane Arraf. NPR News in Shura, Iraq. This is NPR news. And you're listening to morning edition here on W. N. Y C coming up. We speak with the chief medical officer of a medical center in El Paso, Texas, about controlling the surgeon covert 19 cases there. That story still.

Isis Jamal Abdullah Nasser US President Trump Pardon Gallagh Jamal Abdullah Mosul Iraq murder Iraqi Embassy Navy NPR CNN Jane Arraf Saddam Hussein soccer AB Aziz Leafs Texas
"nasser" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A lot of Nasser. When we left the story, Sylvester Reyes had put into place Operation Blockade, which was then renamed Operation Hold the line and everyone in El Paso. Seemed happy, very happy. Yeah, but people in Washington D. C were not because the Clinton administration they're about to have this vote on NAFTA. They're talking about free trade. And then this guy, this little guy an apostle. He's created a blockade and looking like it's going to be closer than I thought. And the last thing the Clinton administration needs is any controversy over this until right in the middle of Operation Blockade, Reyes gets a phone call from his bosses. Boss's boss. You're magenta arena. No, Janet Reno was the attorney general was a big lady proposal. I like her. I mean, even back then, when she was Hammering away at me. I liked her and she wanted to talk to me, and she started using talking points. Why? It was the wrong thing. Political consequences. International ramifications. He has this sense. Okay? I'm I'm I'm about to be fired, but he says to her, I said Madam attorney general, With all due respect to me one favor, I said, come and visit l pasa. Just come and visit a pestle because you are making these statements with all due respect without knowing The difference that it's made the police come to our castle. She silence and crap. She says. I will be there Tuesday. So Janet Reno flies to all Posso raise sets up a bunch of meetings for her and I told her I said, Look, I'm not gonna be there because I want you to hear it unfiltered and without me being there, as he tells it, Mannarino sat down for all these meetings with all these local business people, and she was so blown away by what she heard how happy everyone was with the situation that she put aside the fact that Mexico was pissed. Put aside NAFTA and she came back and she she shook my hand. Very impressive. What.

Janet Reno Sylvester Reyes NAFTA Clinton administration El Paso Mannarino attorney Nasser magenta arena Washington Mexico
Meet Jerri Evans, The Turning Natural Juice Bar Founder Transforming Lives in the Black Community

Side Hustle Pro

06:51 min | 1 year ago

Meet Jerri Evans, The Turning Natural Juice Bar Founder Transforming Lives in the Black Community

"So welcome to the guest chair Jerry. Thank you for having me I'm so happy to have you here as I mentioned I was in the juice bar on h street the other day, and I was like this is so yummy. This is amazing I'd love to know more about your story. So first and foremost what was your career path before becoming the owner of turning natural juice bars. So prior to juicing, I was an air nautical engineer I worked for a major company which is probably the main companies in the Department of Defence Specialty was F twenty, two fighter jets. So Bess, literally my background I didn't WanNA been engineer at first I wanted to go to fashion but we had a career fair in highschool they separated all the boys of jobs that they believe men become in they separated the girls with like nursing and teaching and I didn't know you know to be feminist then I just wanted to go with the boys and so went with boys and this guy from NASA's Guy Actually said women do not become engineered. Yet I was so offended I went home and that's home. My Mama say what I only WanNa do fashion anymore I wanNA become an engineer and she's like. Bass drastic. So I just kind of looked into what types of engineering I would potentially enjoy in to be truthfully honest none of them were remotely interesting. I just knew that airplanes was probably the most interesting to me and I ended up majoring in Tennessee State University. So you were on that path and what did you envision your life looking like before this whole entrepreneurship thing happened. My first internship with with Nasser in our member calling my mom during that year that summer I was like. Do this every single day for like sixty five years. There's no way. This could be life, and so I knew that I was going to work for a while I. Just knew that couldn't be that person that worked until retirement indigenous. No hope to petty pitch whatever they decided I I earn so. Actually, GonNa. Probably be engineer for a while. Then I had no idea. So, walk us through what was the motivation behind starting turning natural. While two thousand, one by MOM was diagnosed with Stage two breast cancer and even though Stage two is roads of we early at that time cancelled as like a death sentence, everyone was so afraid of being diagnosed in, you know all the people that we had known to be diagnosed like my aunt who was diagnosed with stage four she passed away shortly after being diagnosed in. So our live drastically changed a mom went from a meat eater to vegetarian to Vegan and. Nine and a half years she was cancer free. Very healthy life in we found out in two thousand ten that cancer I came back. When it came back, it was much more aggressive. It's spread to her bones and then it went to her liver was in like two weeks of out that it came back my mom transition and so you'll never really hear me say my mom died I think super aggressive word. In it helps me cope to say she transition because I believe is energy. Redo that guy we just exist in another space and so shortly after my mom passed a believe that very next summer I quit my job and has started going to grief counseling When my mom transition, they give you this pamphlet that tells you what morning is GonNa look like in one minute you're GONNA be happy. One Minute you're going to be said and you're going to be depressed. That you're going to be angry. and. I was just angry I was angry for a very, very hard time. A MOM's a super spiritual woman. I was very angry with guy. Stop believing in any and everything in ages I'm already an introvert. So I literally practice. introverts space like no one could get in my space in. A really good friend of my recommended grief counseling which even made me angrier. Like I don't want to go to counselling I don't want another person to tell me to be absent from the bodies to be present with guy like that didn't make sense to me and I didn't want someone else to say I'm sorry for your loss because I really don't know how to respond to that. I don't WanNa say thank you that you're sorry for my law. So I was just in a very angry space in a started going to counseling. It was difficult because everyone that I had talked to a new mom. So I never had to explain my mother in the way that I had to explain to this counselor. and. She told me that morning isn't linear. You're not going to feel one way today, and then the next day is the next phase in pampering. You're gonNA fill multiple things on multiple days. And that was probably the single best advice that I could have gotten after my mom transition. So I'm sitting at my desk at my job at the time when I'm still in engineer and I hear my mother's voice and she said, why are you still here now in my mind I'm like I read about this this is the point where my mind I'm going crazy because if I turn around my mom is standing here I am not Right anymore. and. So I stopped what I was doing and I turned around I. Heard it again of course, she was there but I knew that Mitt like you don't WanNa do this anymore you not fulfil. You're just doing it because you're good at it. and. So I went to my boss's office and. told him as saying, Hey, you know I can't do this anymore. And you know at the time I was doing about equipment. The workload that I had was equivalent to two or three people job title. And so he said, don't worry. We're interviewing people were going to get you some help You don't understand I don't want to do this job at all anymore So I quit.

Engineer Jerry Nasa Bess Department Of Defence Specialt Tennessee State University Nasser Mitt
"nasser" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

08:50 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"I finished graduate school, and then I basically became a science journalist which is sort of again like something I didn't really know any listing I knew was my sister who like by that point was Yes. She was a news reporter. Like neither of US really knew anybody in the field like we sort of I think kind of made it up as we're going along and we're lucky enough to have like a few mentors here and there to kind of help us piece it together. But Yeah. But it's so science journalism I was like, okay. I'll just gonNA take what I know from play writing and I'm GonNa take what I know from the history of science and I'm just GonNa and what I know from like you know talking to people at at at. A dinner party or whatever, and just like tell people telling people stories, I'm going to try to. Put that in a blender and and see if I could make a career out of that, which is what whatever doing. My son and I have also been listening to your. PODCAST I think it was earlier this year really to write the other. Let's move. Yeah this. This. Year. Yes. Looking you you go new podcast new, you Netflix show The question I. I think the next episode, I'M GONNA listen to its Afghanistan. The question I have is. At times in the podcast feel like. The story is about you. In your relationship with your face young. I'm curious because you sort of. Relate yourself to the other Latif and. The choices he made and the environment that he was in that sort of directive to where it is that he added up versus you and the choices you made and sort of the environment that you grew up that is taking you to where you are today I'm curious about that. You know I don't know whether it's did you learn anything about you? Did you learn anything about your faith in your relationship to it? I think I think it. was quite a shock. It was quite a shock i. think there were a few things that happened sort of around the same time when I started working when I found the existence of this guy the other if this guy with my name who was a detainee at Guantanamo Bay who had not had a trial or even charges pressed against him for almost twenty years when I learned about that Guy It was also around the time that I had my first. Kid. And it was also around the time when president trump was elected and the Muslim ban and there were a bunch of other things that happened and I think before then. Like I I wouldn't necessarily self identify as a Muslim I feel like I'm very proud of my like the culture that I was raised and I like I'm I'm not I'm not a practicing Muslim but I felt like it was like a part of my cultural identity, but it wasn't one that I would sort of proudly. Like where in a way like I was like I'm a science reporter I don't really care about any of the rest of the stuff like this is just what I do and and that was how it was raised but it doesn't matter and and and I, think now I feel much more like. Oh, this is a part of me like this is a part of me and who I am and it's I influence my kind of Spirituality in different. Ways but but but even more importantly like my my day to day reality, the values that I have the the the way that I see the world and. And my politics too I mean. So so for me, I was like it was a it was those three things like the trump administration this story that I was working on about this particular guy, and the fact that I had a kid all of a sudden I had this kind of moment where I was like Oh. Wow. I really need to do some I feel like I have a sort of undigested. On on chewed. Part of myself that I need to like really kind of look at scrutinized and. And address because it's like this thing that I just sort of put on pause like that I I grew up with and then I was like I'll figure that out later and it was like, oh no, now's the time. Now's the time because in a way it feels like the the. I don't know t to do this man's story justice in a way kind of the only justice ever he ever has gotten. I. Like I felt like it was necessary for me to. Kinda Kinda be a be a guide for the listener to like help help them imagine this guy you know. For, sure, let's get to some. Questions. Cure that people have free. So the first one. Is from. Hasina. Great. So she's in a bunch of questions. To, ask him 'cause they're all related. So number one is, what is the most beautiful thing of discovered about connections? With. The scariest thing. You've discovered. and. How did you know the directions of the connective threads in your stories with the right directions? To. Explore. Yeah Okay I'll take the last question I because it's the easiest on for me like I really imagined all of these I tried to scope them from the beginning. So I I would often start with A. Sometimes I would start with an end actually. So shape that I really fell in love with like in the cloud episode, not to spoil it for you with clouds episode. It starts with the cloud and ends with a cloud, a real cloud, and really to be even more technical starts with a storm and ends with a storm. So it starts storm clouds the ends of the storm cloud in a way. And I had that idea that it's like Oh that's beautiful. Let's do that and then go all over the world and then we'll go to another class. There's a kind of a pretty shape there. For. Digits it's like let's start with a kind of mundane thing which is your you know this this library book and then your taxes. And then let's go bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger and bigger. You know since it until it's like the biggest possible thing. So. Each of them has kind of shape like that like a like a and and whether it's something that you pick on a pick up on is if you are not I I don't know but but I sort of I built it with a shape that way. So so the connections they are like. Their structural it's like it's like we talked about it like like each absence kind of a roller coaster. Building a roller coaster each part you need each part to get you to the next part to get you enough momentum to through that loop or to to to get you around that curve you know so. We built them very carefully actually and hopefully it feels like on a roller coaster it's just like you're zipping along, but actually like it was. Really. Careful. Yeah like like. Dynamics going into each one. Really Cool. Yes. I feel like you've pulled up other mushrooms I try to answer those other two if you want. But yeah. Yeah. So beautiful as she is asking about the most beautiful thing and sort of the scariest thing about connections yeah I think this. I mean to be honest with you. I don't think there was anything in the show. There were scary things I found in the show about. Your apps spying on you about. There's a bunch of things. I don't think I could have even thought while I was making this. That something like corona virus could have happened like A. Sense of it like I. I'm a historian of I studied the history medicine I wrote my my dissertation on an epidemic you know I I. B- While I was in Grad school I learned about nineteen eighteen. Still I, don't think I could have anticipated or seen the level of like global disruption and scariness that this pandemic kind of showed us all and this isn't even the worst could get it could it could have been worse than it could still be worse. Yes. Let me see this Based on what you've studied. Are we what similarities are you seeing?.

reporter US Guantanamo Bay Netflix Grad school Latif trump Cure Hasina president Afghanistan
A Song For Peace

The Promised Podcast

05:17 min | 1 year ago

A Song For Peace

"This is the story of a song that is in a way the story of this country in the spring of Nineteen, sixty-nine at a sidewalk cafe on Richmond Street tucked in from the corner of Dizengoff. Street in Tel Aviv a twenty four year old poet named Yakov or Janka wrote Blit met a twenty five year old musician and arranger named yet year Rosenbloom and the two men became friends the cafe was called California and the. Place, itself said something about the people who made a habit of spending their days especially, their long nights there. The first thing to know about Cafe California is what it wasn't just one hundred and twenty five meters up Dizengoff was a legendary Bohemian cafe called carseat. It had been in operation since nineteen, thirty five, and since then it was the place where you can find some of Jewish palestines and then Israel's greatest poets and writers. On Alterman and Lebron's Sean Ski. Lay. Goldberg. Alexander Penn great writers who had been young and who grew old drinking coffee in the afternoon and vodka in Iraq at night at the simple spare tables of cassette alongside these luminaries in the nineteen sixties. New Generation staked claims at the table, the actor or. The singer Oregon Stein the architect Yaakov wreck there and many others cafe California was not seat from its vantage half of long block away even the young people at seat where old carseat was yesterday's Bohemia California was today's Cafe California was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine by a man named Ab Netanyahu who was only thirty two. Then that had lived a good deal of life. Netanyahu was born in nineteen twenty seven in the southwest corner of what is now Iran in a place called Abedin on the Persian Gulf just. Across the border from Bosra not far from Kuwait at six he was sent to board at Saint. Mary's a Jesuit School in Mumbai where you had an aunt, his parents abandoned. Persia. For India when he was twelve at sixteen and Nineteen, forty three, he lied about his age and joined the Royal Indo British Air Force in time after he trained to watch the Second World War wind down at twenty one he came to fight in Israel's war of independence and never left taking a job as an El Al pilot when he was decommissioned. It was with a few restless L. Buddies that Netanyahu opened cafe. California soon, it was filled with the city's young wannabe writers, directors and poets the people most eager to knock from their sinecures the city's old writers, directors, and poets who argued and held forth at carseat. Ab Thanh was a magnet for Bohemians and he came alive when he was with Bohemians, their company produced in him at once a sense of satisfaction. He had found his people but also a sense of restlessness eighty, nine ton was in constant search of his next Gig in nineteen sixty five he ran for Knesset advice of a friend who worked in PR he pledged that if he was elected, he would fly to Egypt to meet with General Nasser to seek peace after he failed to win a seat in parliament, he anyway bought a nineteen twenty seven steer. Men by playing that, he named piece one on February twenty, eighth nineteen, sixty six, he took off and flying low to avoid Israeli radars he landed in Port Saieed the Egyptians sent him back the next day Nassar had refused to see him back home a retired David Ben Gurion told reporters that not tons trip was an event of moral and political importance and quote pope. Pious gave him a medal of peace and Robert Kennedy and Bertrand Russell sought out his company not much later the notion took hold of Natanz, that music held the key to altering. Israeli. In the summer of Nineteen Sixty Nine AB NATANZ bought a Dutch cargo ship named MVP SEATO MVP stands for motor vessel and he rechristened it the MVP piece from Holland he sailed to New York to raise money and set up a shipboard radio station. His plan was to anchor in the Mediterranean outside territorial waters of Egypt and Israel and broadcast songs of peace that might open the minds of Israelis any. Alike his sojourn to New York stretched biblically three years would pass before he returned with ship in good repair with mixers, turntables, ABC cartridge machines, reel to reel tape machines, and fifty kilowatt transmitter to help not on- by what he needed John. Lennon. And Yoko Ono signed hundreds of posters of the two of them in bed in Amsterdam their famous bet in which not on sold to raise money for audio equipment. John Lennon also offered not time yet. Rolls. Royce grads to sell at auction, but the practical impediments of shipping the grand car stymied the business, the carpenters, Johnny Mathis and other musicians recorded for non promotional clips in praise of peace. Not an idea was that new music might open minds in Israel Egypt. The station eventually began to broadcast in nineteen seventy-three as the voice of peace

Ab Netanyahu Cafe California California Egypt Israel Dizengoff John Lennon Persia Bertrand Russell Tel Aviv MVP Johnny Mathis Alexander Penn Rosenbloom Bosra Iraq Yoko Ono Nassar New York Persian Gulf
Students may not get "the true college experience" this year

Nightside with Dan Rea

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Students may not get "the true college experience" this year

"International students in Massachusetts and across the country may be forced to leave if they're university goes virtual. More from w TVs. Louisa Moeller full classrooms in person debate that used to be Valeria Mendy old is experience at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. I was in shock. I was like, I can't the can's right like he has now the grad student from Mexico says Uncertainty from the pandemic has turned into hyper uncertainty with a new directive from Immigration and Customs enforcement that international students in the U. S will have to leave the country or risk deportation. If their school switched online on Ly Learning. Harvard, for example, had just announced it would hold on ly virtual classes in the fall. What am I gonna do with my with my lease on my apartment when I'm going to go with my furniture? Go back to Mexico. Where am I going to say international students are basically confronted between two choices between risking my own health and, you know, attending in person classes or be deported from the US. Maya Nasser, a PhD student at MIT worries that if she leaves, she won't be allowed back on top of the challenges she could face trying to learn from her home country of Lebanon. Right now open on its passing through an extreme economic crisis. The country is on a brink of Herman. We do not have access to power electricity, InterNAP. Ice is expected to release more guidance later this week. But Sarah Sprites her with the American Council on Education, which represents over 700 colleges and university, says the impact could be huge. So we have over one million students in the U. S that come from other countries on they actually have $41 billion impact on the U. S economy. That was the estimation from

Mexico Valeria Mendy Harvard Kennedy School Of Gove Ly Learning Sarah Sprites Lebanon Louisa Moeller Harvard Massachusetts Immigration And Customs Internap Maya Nasser American Council On Education United States MIT
"nasser" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"Don't know the reason behind that, but I'm glad it did. Though it's interesting. I mean I. Don't know how many more videos we have to see for people to to open their eyes, you know. Maybe, you're not allowed to answer this question and I and I would totally appreciate it okay. But when you were just after, you said that I thought of a wondering what conversations? And maybe I only see this on television, so maybe this doesn't happen. In the newsroom before you go on air, maybe you're sitting down with all the producers and everyone's saying the writers. Hear the stories. We're going to cover here. And I remember your Ted Talk. That you gave it up. Maybe you've given many of them, but I saw the dawn mills one right? About having these conversations and there was always that. That rolled his eyes. Has, that started to happen within what I'm getting at is. Are People covering the news. Bring the news to us. Are they getting tired of okay? Can we stop believing with race? Can we do something else? I think see I started doing this work I a couple years ago at global right, and maybe more anyway, and I think when I was pushing for it all the time there were certainly I rolling like I'll be honest with you. I be sitting those meetings and I I. Know I don't know I don't have to. I didn't read it. I just knew like they were just like. Oh, God here she is with another one of these stories, and again to me it leads into so many different things since Donald Trump's election. All the stuff has really bubbled to the. The surface, and it's the reality that so many people are living, and so I would bring it up again and again and again and I'd say we have to cover this kind of thing. And I think there was also that fear that it's Oh. If we talk about this, you know, deface thing, or whatever are we GONNA? Are we going to incite people who are copycats because we're giving them? We're giving them legitimacy by putting it on the news and to me. That's a real cop out because it's like no, you show what's happening society right now in any? I think right now. It's totally changed I. think that rolling is had happened for years, but I think now I think everybody is behind it and understand how noises says. Yeah, yeah, in newsrooms. I have noticed a shift. Where did you? Maybe you don't see this? We've A. Where did you get your would you get that thing inside of you? You're listen. You're female. You're Brown. You're Muslim Faces. There's more that I'm seeing now right but. was there ever fear that? Maybe I should just keep quiet and do my job down best not to shake things up like. Where did you get that sink inside of you? That says no I'M GONNA I'M GONNA push for this I I I. I discovered you. The Aleppo! Right and I was. So happy I was like. Wow, this is. I get that that that far as Muslim Bush this this is going out to all of Canada. This is amazing. Where.

Donald Trump Aleppo Canada
"nasser" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

05:55 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"Because to me, that's not a two sided story I think that's backed based, and I think that race is the biggest story of our time, and I think that there are systemic issues that take place in our city and our country. And I will not like to me. There's no two sides. It's actually what exists so when I hear premier like France while ago or what I hear Doug Ford, who? Ford actually walked this back, but he's still set it. It's the stomach. Racism doesn't exist like a dozen. The United States I. Will Be Quick to point out that that is false. When caller go says that we didn't have slavery like we did it. In the states, I will be two point out that that's not. That's not true to me. That's not two sides. That's that's the reality and bake cannot speak to that reality as I can. Do you know what I mean? they? They don't have that experience, so some people will say well. That's your opinion will. Yeah? It is maybe my maybe I don't have data points to show you though there is so much data based on this, but it is, it is the reality for people who are racialist where they have equipped to save. It doesn't exist especially. I point to Quebec's premier because I mean in that province we have. You know bill that that is you know. Prevents Religious Religious Garb right, so e it's. It's very much it's very much a struggle. It's I think it's a blurred line right now. I think there is a lot of activism going on alongside journalism which I don't know how all the bosses feel about, but. There's certain. Attorney pointed history and I think we have to tell the truth and to me impartiality and telling the truth are both key principles journalism. Yeah, so in terms of impartiality to me as a viewer. Or is it consumer? It would be like okay if you're going to. Cover this many minutes. This many stories for example on people involved in. Let's say the black lives movement. Matter Movement. I need to give as as as much time or as many stories that say against those who might. Disagree is would that be correct in terms of someone would perceive impartiality. I'm sure those people who perceive it that way that you're a I'm sure there's there's definitely a segment. The audience sees that way, but I think the majority of the audience, and certainly our editorial judgment is. That's not the case in a in a in a story like that. There's like I said. There's one clear. there's one clear. I guess I wouldn't say side. I would say more. There's this there's some movement. There's some movement that's happening right now that you can't ignore. That's what you're covering so. Like that's that's exact, trump example to right like you. You cannot just give someone like that pulpit. Right like just to speak lies. You can't do that. You have to call out and then people will say you're calling that an. You're being fake news. You're calling that out in your editorial. But again I mean it's such a weird world. We live in things. Things have definitely changed. Would you like to one day just to aditorial stuff? That's a good question. Yeah, I think. I'll probably end up there to the. I think I will eventually I don't think I'm ready to do that yet. I still think I wanNA grow before I do that but I. Think I, think later in my career. That's something I would certainly consider. When George when George Floyd was killed. In the states. unleashed a a movement. That has been there, but it's like nothing we've we've seen before. In terms of. Just, the amount of people, the the passion, the anger the frustration. You've you've spoken with many people over the past few weeks, Wondering if you have a sense or if other people have told you why they think. It's exploded up now. I asked that to at an older man and older black man. He was I think it has seventies. and ski I said. What do you think it's taken like? Why is it now? and He seems to think it's because if the young people because of millennials who are not taking no for an answer, and that you know, maybe the older generation was used to being like we're GONNA we're GonNa do this, but you know. We're GONNA. Do everything we can to get this message out, and then it kind of it's. It's kind of fizzles because people get exhausted and. They they try to try to move the needle, but then there's this new generation this really hopefully young generation. That's like no, we are. This is how it is, this is. We will not be treated like that. When you see a reporter is like you know what I was. Yeah, I would never be able to say anything against the company I worked for because you have to protect the brand, you have got to protect the company. Company and now these are like no. I, this is no right. I'M GONNA. Call this out and I really see a shift with with younger journalists at least and I think that's a microcosm of people out there like there's really they really have the courage. They have the guts and bear light, and and there there's so many of them that are mobilized and I also feel, and this is my personal opinion. He didn't say this. This that I think that there's a real involvement for people who were not realized as well. who were part of this movement like I've really noticed that in the protest that I've attended that. It's I mean it's. It's not like it's maybe majority, but but even some of them are half half like they're people who are racial is to our allies were like no, this is BS. My eyes have been closed for so long. Long this is happening and I want to be part of the change. I want to be on the right side of history about this I think those two factors, but I have to say I. Just Find It really strange that we've had so many videos from the time of Rodney King. Yes, and they don't move the needle like this George Floyd video dead and I..

George Floyd Doug Ford Matter Movement United States France Rodney King Quebec Attorney reporter
"nasser" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"Because to me, that's not a two sided story I think that's backed based, and I think that race is the biggest story of our time, and I think that there are systemic issues that take place in our city and our country. And I will not like to me. There's no two sides. It's actually what exists so when I hear premier like France while ago or what I hear Doug Ford, who? Ford actually walked this back, but he's still set it. It's the stomach. Racism doesn't exist like a dozen. The United States I. Will Be Quick to point out that that is false. When caller go says that we didn't have slavery like we did it. In the states, I will be two point out that that's not. That's not true to me. That's not two sides. That's that's the reality and bake cannot speak to that reality as I can. Do you know what I mean? they? They don't have that experience, so some people will say well. That's your opinion will. Yeah? It is maybe my maybe I don't have data points to show you though there is so much data based on this, but it is, it is the reality for people who are racialist where they have equipped to save. It doesn't exist especially. I point to Quebec's premier because I mean in that province we have. You know bill that that is you know. Prevents Religious Religious Garb right, so e it's. It's very much it's very much a struggle. It's I think it's a blurred line right now. I think there is a lot of activism going on alongside journalism which I don't know how all the bosses feel about, but. There's certain. Attorney pointed history and I think we have to tell the truth and to me impartiality and telling the truth are both key principles journalism. Yeah, so in terms of impartiality to me as a viewer. Or is it consumer? It would be like okay if you're going to. Cover this many minutes. This many stories for example on people involved in. Let's say the black lives movement. Matter Movement. I need to give as as as much time or as many stories that say against those who might. Disagree is would that be correct in terms of someone would perceive impartiality. I'm sure those people who perceive it that way that you're a I'm sure there's there's definitely a segment. The audience sees that way, but I think the majority of the audience, and certainly our editorial judgment is. That's not the case in a in a in a story like that. There's like I said. There's one clear. there's one clear. I guess I wouldn't say side. I would say more. There's this there's some movement. There's some movement that's happening right now that you can't ignore. That's what you're covering so. Like that's that's exact, trump example to right like you. You cannot just give someone like that pulpit. Right like just to speak lies. You can't do that. You have to call out and then people will say you're calling that an. You're being fake news. You're calling that out in your editorial. But again I mean it's such a weird world. We live in things. Things have definitely changed. Would you like to one day just to aditorial stuff? That's a good question. Yeah, I think. I'll probably end up there to the. I think I will eventually I don't think I'm ready to do that yet. I still think I wanNA grow before I do that but I. Think I, think later in my career. That's something I would certainly consider. When George when George Floyd was killed. In the states. unleashed a a movement. That has been there, but it's like nothing we've we've seen before. In terms of. Just, the amount of people, the the passion, the anger the frustration. You've you've spoken with many people over the past few weeks, Wondering if you have a sense or if other people have told you why they think. It's exploded up now. I asked that to at an older man and older black man. He was I think it has seventies. and ski I said. What do you think it's taken like? Why is it now? and He seems to think it's because if the young people because of millennials who are not taking no for an answer, and that you know, maybe the older generation was used to being like we're GONNA we're GonNa do this, but you know. We're GONNA. Do everything we can to get this message out, and then it kind of it's. It's kind of fizzles because people get exhausted and. They they try to try to move the needle, but then there's this new generation this really hopefully young generation. That's like no, we are. This is how it is, this is. We will not be treated like that. When you see a reporter is like you know what I was. Yeah, I would never be able to say anything against the company I worked for because you have to protect the brand, you have got to protect the company. Company and now these are like no. I, this is no right. I'M GONNA. Call this out and I really see a shift with with younger journalists at least and I think that's a microcosm of people out there like there's really they really have the courage. They have the guts and bear light, and and there there's so many of them that are mobilized and I also feel, and this is my personal opinion. He didn't say this. This that I think that there's a real involvement for people who were not realized as well. who were part of this movement like I've really noticed that in the protest that I've attended that. It's I mean it's. It's not like it's maybe majority, but but even some of them are half half like they're people who are racial is to our allies were like no, this is BS. My eyes have been closed for so long. Long this is happening and I want to be part of the change..

Doug Ford Matter Movement George Floyd United States France Quebec Attorney reporter
"nasser" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is really a lab we're back with a lot of Nasser reporting on horseshoe crabs in the scientists who love them or at least love they're a very valuable blood maybe them too but mostly the plot and therein lies the rub so they're basically like I think four or five companies that go out find horseshoe crabs and then extracted their blood and I wanted to see like what does it look like so I sent a few emails and then I was emailing these companies for like three years and nobody ever return my emails I don't know why maybe they didn't want bad press or I don't know maybe the one bleeding that year or whatever and so I'd basically given up on the story but then this year these folks at one of the company's called Charles river laboratories they were like Hey why don't you just come down to Charleston South Carolina and watch what we do here so I went I'm Rowland you're rolling me double check and along with me hi Brian this does include a they go and Lulu Miller you guys shine the horseshoe crabs signal on the moon as I come a Runnin Taylor is a former Radiolab staffer actually she is the first radio lab staff member besides myself Robert and Ellen and she is a co creator of NPR's Invisibilia how did you get in on this I weirdly have had affection for these creatures my whole life I like grew up with them they're some of my first memories what do you remember seeing I I remember seeing what I thought was a crab I was like probably three or four I'm on the beach with my parents in Cape Cod where we've gone my whole life and and I just remember walking on the beach and seeing this like massive crab in whole or third of the size of my body basically and I remember kind of jumping back and my dad saying take it up poke at it you know interacted so I kind of turned it over and I saw this clause and I got scared and then he you know he showed me it wasn't alive is a multi channel and he explained what it meant was that there had been a crab in there and it's laid out and now was this perfectly intact skin of what used to be and you wonder like where is it now and what's it doing now and do I ever leave the self behind I don't know just little and I thought it was cool and we we brought it back to our porch I remember that sat on her porch for years unlike the dog would say if I don't where we going ever since then it's just been a like mild poetic fascinations visitors report to build building fee I think that's a little did you have a feeling about this business of any sort before you and visited yeah there's a part of me though that wondered like I totally love these creatures this big Bad Company just exploiting it for their blood and you know I I went with a little skepticism great thanks don't you know an eyebrow down and scrunch to the bleeding until he was just in this kinda under stated nondescript office park land there's like people in Capri pants and sandals basically from the outside it looks like every other one story brick building but then when you go on the inside of me you're hit with this like I can smell it wash of a smell of crab Hey.

Nasser
Israeli Settlers And Palestinians In Occupied West Bank Grapple With U.S. Peace Plan

All Things Considered

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Israeli Settlers And Palestinians In Occupied West Bank Grapple With U.S. Peace Plan

"Under president trump's peace plan for the Middle East all Israeli settlements in the occupied west bank would remain in place that's the land that Palestinians seek for their own independent state reporter Naomi's level off as Palestinians and Israelis now living in the west bank what this plan would mean for them a tire is a Palestinian village perched on a rocky west bank him mayor Nasser el Atari takes me on a tour of the area in the municipalities white mini van we passed stone buildings some of them hundreds of years old but it never would have been number Atari tells me the village is famous for its herbs but he says over the years the village has lost a lot of farm lands to the Israeli settlement next door it has a similar name a tear at the Israeli anti settlement group peace now says Israel sees some land owned privately by people in a Tara for security perimeter around the settlement the group also says the settlements housing was built on land that had been used by other Palestinian villages of Iron Man at that at the time he takes me to a lookout point where you can see the settlement a bunch of red roofed houses after Israelis began to move there in the nineteen eighties Atari says no one here believe the settlement would stay for ever warning to trump's new peace plan it's not going anywhere man lam local health let him look he says of trump the person who doesn't own something has no right to give it away as a gift and he's not impressed by what the Palestinians would get the White House calls it a state but it would be in pieces surrounded by Israel went back often often when a donut on the he asks where is this state he's offering Atari like most Palestinians once the settlements out of the way there on occupied territory the UN security council has said they're illegal but across the hill in a terrified settlers feel a historic Jewish tied to the west bank I go to Sam's question markers house to ask him about terms plan he's a member of the town council and he and rolls a large map on his living room table for actually in the center of Israel it includes Israel and the west bank but he calls all of it is round you take map of Israel were like almost in the middle he says a tear it was built at a strategic place between two Palestinian cities to prevent them from growing together which he sees as a threat to Israel he's happy the trump plan would let them stay but one thing makes him nervous under the plan they would be an Israeli enclave surrounded by parts of the Palestinian state I think it's a shocking because you know you see where you live and they say that no that you know the Arabs will be all around you after the plan was released his counsel issued a message to a terror it residents over what sap Schumacher reads it to me I think this would describe as a lifestyle which you will note that god been no meat so in one area we're getting seventeen and it that's amazing on the other hand it continues a terror it will be an enclave in the so called Palestinian state his wife ideology marker says she's even concerned that people in a terror it might choose to go somewhere else I'm guessing families who would move many even

Donald Trump Middle East President Trump
Former Michigan State gymnastics coach convicted of lying to police in case linked to Nassar

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Former Michigan State gymnastics coach convicted of lying to police in case linked to Nassar

"And a former college gymnastics coach has been found guilty in a case tied to sexual abuse by sports doctor Larry Nasser a jury of twelve in Lansing Michigan deliberated for about three hours before returning with guilty verdicts Friday against former Michigan State University gymnastics coach Cappy click as the case tied to the Larry Nasser sexual abuse scandal the jury found clay just lied to police when she denied being told by two teen athletes of abuse by Nasser in nineteen ninety seven it would be nearly twenty years before Nasser

Larry Nasser Lansing Michigan Michigan State University Cappy Clay
Ex-Michigan State coach convicted in case tied to Nassar

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Ex-Michigan State coach convicted in case tied to Nassar

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting an ex Michigan state gymnastics coach is convicted in the case tied to Larry Nasser former Michigan State University gymnastics coach Kathy click as was convicted by a jury Friday of lying to police when she denied to teens told her of sexual abuse by sports doctor Larry Nasser in nineteen ninety seven the sixty five year old Cletus was found guilty of a felony and misdemeanor she faces up to four years in prison after April fifteen sentencing Nasser who worked at Michigan state and USA gymnastics which trains Olympians serving what are effectively life sentences for child porn possession and sexually assaulting young women and girls

Mike Crossey Larry Nasser Cletus Michigan USA Michigan State University Kathy
"nasser" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Well Nasser it assimilation in twenty sixteen about five hundred well actually that was three hundred and thirty foot asteroid that impacted Los Angeles and the it impacted cities wiped out cities you know where to basins pretty flat you know for thirty miles five point three hundred the five hundred foot asteroid thirty four after reading their simulation and it wiped out everything for about thirty miles buildings everything just demolish everything all right I went to as you know getting prepared for this I went to impact earth website from produce at the university and I input a five hundred foot asteroid iron so what a good blast in coming in at fifteen thousand miles per hour and it created a crater two point three miles in diameter fourteen hundred feet deep she and if you were six miles away from it you'd feel it earthquake about six point three earthquake Chile's my fault things but it's not finished with you yet because twenty nine seconds after the impact one airburst going one thousand miles an hour will come through and destroy every building at multi story building in its direction or doesn't go out all over the place in every direction gosh if you for how many miles out that was six miles out if you happen to be miles Exeter you'd be buried under twenty three so you'd be gone instantly yeah yeah yeah you know after that burst you don't want to you know come outside is radiation you know what just too much dust four seconds after impact the subject to the map well you couldn't breathe what comes out of the out of the crater it starts falling and you would have about three feet or so of of a check to but some trunks would be thirty five P. big and it would be steamy hot to would not crushing buildings cars and people Omar gosh or below and if we ever tried to rebuild let's say that area that got hit by a three hundred foot asteroid how long would it take to fill in a two mile by fifteen hundred foot deep crater well in Los Angeles with my sister due to a football stadium for a lake or something yeah I do read the work it would take awhile to fill in the you know that big hole she now what about odds what are the what are their odds computer odds say about the probability of getting hit ten percent a two person but it's it's very low I mean if you ask NASA was you know it's very low and they see something like that they're asked rated Russia might be once every you know a hundred years and maybe once every five hundred years we might have something that's you know the five hundred foot sites Astrid so they say it's you know very low risk but it but in fact it could happen at any time well the Tridentine in Saint Louis in nineteen ninety three we had what they call the five hundred year flood which means you get a flood that size once every five hundred years but what they don't say and what is entirely possible is let's say you get that five hundred year flood the next year you could get another one for the next five hundred years but it could come that soon that's right it's raining so tell us a little bit more about the book well the book you know it it in the book the government doesn't tell people the storms coming they hide do you have any cited Missouri celebrity star within the book no so every star in the book well we have we do have our hero Rick Monday who is an astrophysicist from cal tech used to be a baseball player was ending okay was a brick Monday I think think used to play for the San Francisco Giants along tower.

Nasser
"nasser" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Minutes stations too many customer Nasser fox news thirty there only have one space telescope that is looking for asteroids and and unfortunately it's going out of service may twenty twenty and if it was during this this work it was it was designed to do this work it's a re purposed space telescope we're gonna come back in a moment and talk with Mike McCoy about the threat of asteroid to the planet and also a planetary defense system what can we do have one is heading this way his workers called asteroids bridge to nowhere is website linked up with coast to coast AM dot com never miss a detail on a show or a guest sign up for the coastal zone email newsletters available for free it coast to coast AM dot com thirty W. CBM Baltimore by the rains blasting in here for the overnight and forty degrees for the low initial the response Thursday morning mainly by a fifty nine degrees in much colder tone of the forecast Thursday night even freeze clear things out for valentines and the temperatures really strong thirty five for the high Friday Friday night on the twenty the weekend going to be a cold start.

Mike McCoy Nasser fox Baltimore
Ex-Michigan State coach set for trial in Nassar scandal

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Ex-Michigan State coach set for trial in Nassar scandal

"One a trial expected to get underway today for a former Michigan state gymnastics coach charged with lying to investigators in connection with sexual assault complaints against former sports doctor Larry Nasser prosecutors say Kathy clay guest denied she had been told of Nasser's misconduct before twenty sixteen she resigned the following year after being suspended answer serving decades in prison for sexual assault and child porn

Assault Michigan Larry Nasser Kathy Clay
Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

Between The Lines

13:38 min | 1 year ago

Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

"For a generation Iran's May General Sulejmani he was a consequential Fica League in the Persian Gulf for the Americans in the region Sunnis? He was a terrorist mastermind for the Iranians the Assad regime in Syria Hezbollah in Lebanon. Sulejmani was a hero who protected the Shia cresent in the region. So it's no wonder the Iranian generals death via a drone attack attack in Baghdad. That was a huge news story. Earlier this month cast into the money rainy and military commander assassinated in the US drone strike on mm struggling marks a huge escalation coming just days at was revered by Iran supporters in proxies being blamed for the deaths of hundreds of Americans in the Middle East over the we took took action last night to stop a war. What comes next? What's the broader strategy? Here we did not take action to start a war. Your since the American killing of Sulejmani Tehran launched a missile strike on your spices in Iraq and in the process mistakenly shot down a Ukrainian Ilana carrying one hundred seventy six passengers something. The Mullah's had initially denied responsibility but crucially the Iranians signings avoided killing Americans. which was the red line? The president trump has drawn. US military response. So we'll this episode. Leave Iran Ryan stronger or is tyron now more isolated than ever and what is the showdown between Tehran and Washington Maine for Iraq the US military Tori prisons there and Iran's nuclear ambitions. Danny Applica- is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington and Co host of the AAAGH. Ah podcast what the Hell is going on. Making sense of the world get identity. Hey Tom and I'm in. Sokoll is author of Iran Rausing the survival and and future of the Islamic Republic and CO author of Islam beyond borders the Oma in world politics. Welcome back to Iran. How good morning now? Also Amani abetted genocide in Syria to keep the Assad regime in power. He's responsible for the deaths of many American troops. He armed Hezbollah in. Lebanon with rockets is to attack. Innocent Israelis killed many innocent Sunnis in Iraq. So I mean isn't the world better off without Sulejmani. Were president trump. I think so. And also quite a number of American allies in the region Probably I think the same way but at the same time demand was a national hero and in fact that he was the one of the top strategic brains behind Iran's overseas operations and expansion of eight onion influence in the region. I will just support related to the fair that it only leadership has about the possibility of an American attack or an Israeli attack on a combined and attack. But let me see this Tom that nobody is commendable. dimitris full of commanders. Top commanders into the Nobel Prize winners and so on General money is being replaced And I think e to the debt is a widespread view in the West. That if you bump one or two individuals isn't the situation is going to get better We duty cold in history that take for example a Prime Minister Anthony Eden go around the nineteen fifties and calling for the elimination of Jamaa Nasser as the national president of Egypt and has was that this man is removed from a then. Everything will be fine. Nothing died in nine hundred. Seventy and a situation has not improved a cold and and at the same thing was said to be so I mean the point though. Is that knocking off Salomon. He's not going to make a great deal of difference. But also can I just add to this Dani salamone and these Iranian backed Shia proxies. They did help inadvertently into why help. America Islamic state. So does it worry you that people cheering the loudest about this. Guy's death other suny jihadists in there are slighted areas in the desert and the mountains of Iraq and Syria. I don't think they're the ones who are cheering the loudest I. I think you heard pretty loud cheering from here. I think you heard some plenty of loud cheering in In Iraq and Lebanon and and elsewhere throughout throughout the region. Look you know. I think it's important to acknowledge that. That as the head of the cuts force Qassem Soleimani was a very powerful folks very influential very strategic and very effective leader and he brought that effectiveness to things. That would terrible And the arming of Hezbollah. The murderer of half million Syrians. The arming of mass. The arming of in Yemen. We could go on for a while here but but But he did all of those things but when when the challenge was from Sundays you had is. He helped set up and guide ride. The hoste. Shabby the popular mobilization units in Iraq that That that ended up being part of the battle to to defeat Isis. The problem here is that every situation in the region is is more complicated than the enemy of my enemy is my friend. Just because Stalin Fort with us to defeat Nazi Germany did not make stolen a good guy. And if you look at these anti-regime protests some and. I've been breaking out in Iran since Tehran admitted that its military military shot down. A Ukrainian passenger Ilana have the Iranians overreached because despite the Iranian successes in Iraq Syria and Lebanon on on their rule out officials sites there on stable they print across he so have the Iranians overreached. There's no doubt that many Iranians feel about the Ashim and today have protested over the last few months in order to bring about A structural reforms today as a system of governance and economy which is setting enormously under represent- trump's sanctions but has the Iran overreached. What are I pointed out earlier I mean Iran does fear a a very strongly as possible American that much Israeli combined attack and therefore what update on your the humans done his belt reasonable security and press such for itself which would really want? Shepherdess Arafat at all costs but that does not necessarily Saudi mean that Iran is only Aggressive power in the region aggressive actor in the region. I mean. Let's not forget that that that the destabilization Iraq really started the two thousand three. US invasion of that country. Okay so the. The American invasion of Iraq helped Iran on because it overturned the suny state and it created a Shia majority Stein. I saw a natural law with the Shia brethren in Tehran following following on from that Danny shortly a problem about striking at pro Iranian sheeham paramilitary groups as trump has done is the now part of the Iraqi state. So is it any wonder. Washington's increasingly modulation is part of the world. First of all. I think it's offensive talk about Shiites. As if they're all some sort of monolith. The share of Iraq are Arabs. The Shia of Iran are Persians. These these are different people this. These two countries Shia versus Shia fought a bloody war for eight years in which there were one million casualties casualties in the nineteen eighties. The notion that somehow Iraq is a natural satellite or or or or slave to Iran is wrong Iran has chosen to try to dominate that country and demonstrations throughout the central and southern part of Iraq. Over the last month have been against Iranian domination the Iranian consulate in Jeff was burned to the ground at the end of last year not by Sonny's he's not by Sunni jihadis not by Isis not by Kurds but by Shiites carrying placards yelling out to out for Iran. Get Out of our country and I think that that is absolutely right to suggest that Iran has gained more influence in Iraq since the demise of Saddam Hussein. I I guess I I'm just not that big a fan of Saddam Hussein and the and the stability that he brought to Iraq. I wish that the United States had done more in the aftermath of the wall. I think thinks that we I think that we failed miserably. In many instances I think it was absolutely fatal in two thousand eleven when at a time of genuine stability in Iraq Iraq. President Obama withdrew troops and really provided the opportunity for Isis. To rise up again. My guest Daniel Placate from the American Enterprise Institute. And I'm in Sokoll. He's the author of Iran rausing and Islam beyond borders. I mean how would you respond to all of this. Because we've got these tensions here between Tehran Iran and Washington and the Iranian backed Shia politicians released most of them in Baghdad. I support if not closer ties with Tehran. They want the the Americans out of Iraq. But don't the sooners and the Kurds fee for the Iranian intrusion in Iraqi sovereignty. I absolutely and of course sir. The APP is not only the president of the American so who'd be which are being the opposed to in Iraq but also the presence of eight onions there. No question Ah about that but at the same time if we know that the majority of the Iraqi population is made up of the Shiites and some powerful elements among the Shiites have got the value equals relationship and relationship. What they don't know in the meantime ago? The Iraqi parliament release the iranian-backed Majority Shia legislators I support the withdrawal of US troops Danny now given trump's ambivalence about the region and the fact that he was elected impact to get the US out of the so-called forever awards isn't a US military withdrawal from Iraq. Just what trump and many war-weary Americans want. Well it's kind of funny. Isn't it because we start off talking about the you know the Iranians and what they want and and of course. The number one goal is to get the Americans out of the region and that is in fact the instruction is that has gone out to all of their proxy groups. All around the region. Is You need to step up activities to get the Americans out. Then we've got the president of the United States. It's who dearest and fondest goal is to get American troops out of the region so so a couple weeks after killing Kassim Sulaimaniyah. We have this unbelievably in coherent bizarre response. Where we where we're doing exactly what the around him one let? This is what Donald Trump has to sort out. He has to sort out whether he's the president. He's the kind minded president who who leads in a forthright fashion against men like costume ceremony. Who Seek to destabilize the region and extend Iran's hegemony Germany or he is going to be the kind of president that like Bernie Sanders like Barack Obama wants to turn around and high tail fin is to the Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump's uh-huh Washington energy independent America Stein fought these endless wars danny well A? They aren't endless wars. We have lost fewer people in these. This was than than than we lost a single day in World War Two so while they are conflicts that have continued on and off to a certain extent. You know the notion Shen that we've been sold that somehow we've still got one hundred and fifty thousand troops on the ground and losing them at a rapid pace is just wrong. We lost six in Syria. I I mourn every single one of them but the Kurds lost eleven thousand in their fight against Isis. So what what. What is the reason? We'll tell you very straightforwardly woodley because every time we turn tail every time someone says let's get out of that bloody Middle East. Let's pay attention to something fun. Like Asia and you'd like that. Tom Would now but hang on your way but every time we say that we end up being dragged back because the dynamics in the region of the ones that bring us back we need. We need a long-term solution that lets us. Stay away for good rather than one where we run away. Anita did it come back every single decade I mean the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal Provided tyron with as much as apparently one hundred fifty billion dollar windfall. Aw and certainly many people who are skeptical of the deal side that the Iranian spent lavishly arming the Shia militias across the region. So what it was trump right to pull the US out of the deal and instead impose maximum Prussia built around these economic sanctions on Iran. I think he was totally wrong and and I can care. There has been a backlash president. Trump's would would you withdrawal has a basically a provoked said that on Not to really go for the for police. Speed to in order to rebuild that they have nuclear program and. I think you're going to really do that. And of course that also carries the risk of a possible confrontation from tation between the United States and Iran possibly Israeli attacks on Iran and that could easily dissolved in a regional warfare. That at the end nobody may may be able to control it Danny. Any I mean a lively debate. Thanks so much for being back on. ABC

Iran Iraq President Trump United States Donald Trump Syria Lebanon Danny Applica Hezbollah Washington TOM Tehran Baghdad Sulejmani Tehran Shia Cresent Middle East Saddam Hussein American Enterprise Institute
"nasser" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"Difficult no. It's not I'm asking because I remember like years ago. Yeah I try try to use flash reduce on now like this. Is it like your two key. Free in pre much edited like buy just throwing. Because I'm I'm like I was saying. I was experimenting and Like last year when I was in Copernicus boom in was like the puppets site like Solo Stuff already designed already drones that you make it move yet right Like wissies one. I I want you to draw and like learn a bit more about Japanese animation. So this way I choose flash because it was really your flesh is really easy if you the duo everything I guess you have to know how to control for instagram. But like I do these daily stick fig go guys is supposed to be me but it's kind of like yeah so we've been talking about all these amazing videos where there's some places like like what's your instagram handle. My instagram used to be. I didn't post anything. Where do we we? CEO Stuff Oh I just created a website yet circle to the ANIM- dot Com. Oh Wow things will come find on this So I'm going to post figuratively about how to do any mission. Oh thank you. Yeah Yeah WanNA learn so. I'm going to do a case. Study about the music video superheroes so I say that I want to improve the music video that I remember you telling me about that. I'm I'm like what the what are you going to do. This is I don't WanNa say it's perfect. It's just great deals with the bug eye changes in this giant. It's thing like it's like huge individual and then he has like I there and then the Hero's comes entrepreneur punches look at Japanese yes I had just one months to do that. I want to experiment with Japanese animation. I'm a huge fan of house a the director and what's used to emphasize action to Empha- emphasis to fiction I really liked that. Compare a two Occidente. Animation are really good onto to direction shorts and stuff like that so I was like I should studies the frame by frame understood more got whole house. They do that but just in one month. It was not possible right so like I said I didn't sink too much. I was like I'm going to to do that. I don't really know how to do that. And now I'm like I should do like a website and like try to improve everything explained. I I my My New the new things I discovered and share it with people in like. I'm definitely going to take check that the crew because every year I tried to learn something. New in I I love film but what I want to learn. I don't WanNa let any mission. I WanNa lend stop motion. But you know this kind of animation commissioner and stop motion sickness exactly in principle exactly the principal ice ages before It's you have to use stuff to body so much work though. Yeah but you can learn. Yeah I'm super grateful yet. They are green aside. What what else are you working on? Now I have some personal projects like stories. Oh I want to tell like some stories like I'm working on since Y why now. Here's the really to talk about that. Focus we're fucking shit disclosure. I'm joking it's some ideas I have. Maybe it's not the time to know with basically what is happening is your does walking on Kapanen 'cause stuff and to the enemy dot com. Yeah Okay Okay Okay am but I want to do a project side like. I'm trying to be more entrepreneur. Some working on something aside. Yeah Oh what Like a small business to do. Okay I I try to learn more about business. Also site entrepreneurship communication deflect. That just I'm just curious about. She's also yeah. And how do you finally living in Halifax Wchs has living in how I really liked city. It's really nice not stressful adult because not really big I like to the ocean. Just decide the Mo what I liked the most people. Yeah Yeah Really Nice people agree. Yeah like I was really surprised. Roseland came here to just people seeing me. Hello Industry is really really weird for me. Buck in France doesn't work like uh-huh oh man. Yeah I also want to talk about but like I'm GonNa make sure have you come back when maybe you've finished and The thing you can weed city before now. I'm super grateful. You came. Thank you for telling me more about that video. And I'm grateful awful. Thanks Hon. Thanks to meet here as a nice. Thank you thanks.

Copernicus boom ANIM Occidente Halifax Wchs Buck CEO director commissioner Kapanen France principal
"nasser" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

Blackout Podcast

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on Blackout Podcast

"And after I got like a hint that I could come here. I began to apply those jobs placebo in Canada automation and corporations to jewelry. Blind me. So Oh wow so is. They gave me a test to. I did this for my hometown. Liquor takes off and it worked in. I came there I came to combining. How's it working working there? It's really good like I met a lot of different offense That was an amazing experience. Because I was used to work alone. Yeah I was freelancing before this and like to meet so many people from all around the world because they come from Brazil Mexico Yeah I think there is some For a British not shown hopes England. Single Yeah so it was amazing to us his experience. I you know I actually copernicus a couple the times and I think what I like about it is going to a toy store. Eighty two boys everywhere. Then I go to Ed Manda. Swimming people walking the late. This suv any like I didn't get going there. You are like the CIA man. We yeah I remember. The guy's like no no we can't see that's the disclosed. How how long did you don't ask questions always working kyun stuff? UK No talk about. No no no. We can talk about both stove after us. Come out I like I remember what I found. Run out you guys the scene teen teen. Yeah Yeah did you work on that now okay. Yeah tinted know. Now you've worked on. You can talk about yeah. I took an I worked on Give Him Oh Sukey. It's a ward. What actually does this cream Kosheh and boy man was you guys have a little fun at our please? 'cause as I remember it was that Dr Ward and your table is like all these people just laughing unhappy away and how is walking there. How is it S- pretty creative. Your were thinking like my job is to do any mission right so I recite a story. Bold ruled that I haven't done And you have to scheme of Of to any mate and after you get that You try to improve. Suppose on this terrible to exaggerate like the acting Put some gimmicks aches and stuff to make it really lively and it's the job this well in fully asked what what are some of these software that you use for your work. Tim Boom Animation. It's software fingers the best flare into rolling folks. Why it's GonNa Genu- Kanye toon? Boom blue worse things you can do on it. It's specializing animation for today. But you can integrate three the Around and yeah you can do like Animation like traditional emission from by frame you can do puppet animation go all kind of style of emission as well so frame by frame I think understand like the old Disney. The style. It's framed by frame was going. What is that stay is I can see is like you go to character already. Designed the lake with the encoded in different parts of your hand forearm head. So you can decide how it moves and based on the different parts of the popular. Yeah you can just move like one part of the puppets and twin it. We call it twin. It's like making. The computer is making drawings between all the like this had moved here. That's all you do then. The computer fills in the gap. And he's doing it really bad so our job is that's the job in fact computer the the confidence that doing everything right so like our job is to make the computer smart my to modify like curse. He's doing because he's not doing a really nice. So we re positioning everything a little work. Yeah the walk home bring walk home light like Oh you can bring go come just working studio. Oh Yeah fucking tape. It's like walking Nice. Though 'cause I wins in a meeting in an urge calm see stuff. I should've asked him to give me one of your action. Figures though body in so start walking oh despite some dispersed first and then I go to these sexual means like like a toenail of computers. No yeah well. We'll on them. We can't talk about it. Yes we know. You guys do stuff with Netflix. To against say it was a travel. Your holy smokes like arguing my poss- cool walking there and it's like rights marking listen. I've been Is Not the same building with that escape. One of these escape rooms in the never been eh night. It's just in front of this to you. Yeah I saw it. I was like Oh my India right please. Because the designs interest rate they're trapped. Yeah no meaning hanging not been to any of this escape from that. I don't get that here. Yeah Yeah don't feel although the right I saw avengers made one. There's a trump from foot avenues and eat high. Had some of the people in advance of the subject is adventure so based on the end game and then doctor. Strange strange on blockbusters houses and the blog. I that's what's in America's friend and incredible hulk and and I think it's for five of them anyway. Newsroom staff to get clues to get out of the room. They did it obviously because he wasn't. I think a pretty on twitter also once we get going back to mention just want to say. Oh Yeah I really liked into also very okay good. It was really good like to do a movie about black people in a positive way to see them. It's really amazing. Two hours I think what I would through my Marble films in one scene. I think I still rank Winter soldier really high winter. Saudi like ten America part two or in. Oh man he's really really okay. Cut Americans by heroes. I WanNa talk about the The video we use sends me superheroes okay. Daily for UH wasn't demi portion was on one side and then we'll talk about okay.

America CIA Canada Ed Manda twitter Tim Boom UK Dr Ward Netflix Kanye Disney Brazil England India
Simone Soars: Biles named 2019 AP Female Athlete of the Year

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Simone Soars: Biles named 2019 AP Female Athlete of the Year

"In the gymnastics world the four foot eight inch Biles is considered the gold the greatest of all time she owns twenty five World Championship medals the most for any gender thing what I've done it it's been an amazing experience and I don't think I could be more proud of myself after winning four gold medals at the Rio Olympics Simone Biles took some time off and returned stronger than ever she also spoke out for change in the wake of the Larry Nasser sexual abuse scandal that has shaken USA gymnastics to its core we've done everything that they asked us for even when we didn't want to and they couldn't do one day on the job you had one job you literally have one job and you couldn't protect Simone Biles is now looking ahead to Tokyo in the twenty twenty games she edged out women's soccer star Megan Rapinoe in a vote by a P. member sports editors and a P. beat writers I met Donahue

Simone Biles Tokyo Megan Rapinoe Donahue Rio Olympics Larry Nasser USA Soccer
Michigan still probing Larry Nassar, state attorney general says after 'inadvertently misleading' statements

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Michigan still probing Larry Nassar, state attorney general says after 'inadvertently misleading' statements

"Christmas this is going on today a clarification in an infamous scandal Michigan's Attorney General so to clarify a statement about the investigation into the former Michigan state doctor convicted of sexually abusing female gymnasts Michigan Attorney General Dana Nestle said a Christmas Eve statement from her office was inadvertently misleading the statement announced a suspension of the criminal investigation into how Michigan State University handled complaints against Larry Nasser who is now serving a life sentence for sexually assaulting athletes Nestle said the investigation remains ongoing but it has to be installed by the university's refusal to turn over certain documents trustees have said releasing those documents could jeopardize the school's ability to collect insurance

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nestle Michigan State University Larry Nasser Attorney
Inquiry Into Michigan State’s Handling of Larry Nassar Case Is Suspended

Lars Larson

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Inquiry Into Michigan State’s Handling of Larry Nassar Case Is Suspended

"Michigan Attorney General Dana Nestle has suspended a criminal investigation into Michigan State University over how they handled complaints against former U. S. A. gymnastics Dr and now convicted child molester Larry Nasser he also worked at the university Nestle and investigators want Michigan state to waive attorney client privilege and hand over documents to aid their case boxes going all Scott Nasser was effectively sentenced to life in prison for sexual assault

Attorney General Dana Nestle Michigan State University Larry Nasser University Nestle Scott Nasser Assault Michigan Attorney
AG suspends investigation of Michigan State over Nassar

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

AG suspends investigation of Michigan State over Nassar

"The criminal investigation into Michigan state university's handling of sexual assault complaints against doctor Larry Nasser has been suspended Michigan state Attorney General announces the suspension of the nearly two year criminal investigation of M. S. U. the investigation did lead to charges against three former school officials the school's governing board that infuriated victims of doctor Larry Nasser by dropping that promised independent review of the sexual assaults the trustees of Michigan State University are deadlocked over releasing thousands of pages of documents fearing that they could jeopardize its lawsuit to force insurers to help cover the cost of a five hundred million dollar payout to hundreds of victims I'm Jackie Quinn

Michigan State University Assault Larry Nasser M. S. U. Independent Review Jackie Quinn Michigan Attorney
China November exports fall, but import growth hints of recovering demand

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

China November exports fall, but import growth hints of recovering demand

"China's exports posted a surprise drop in November and that shows one reason why China wants to agree on a phase one trade deal U. S. terrace are hurting China's exports at a time when global demand is already weak China's customs administration reports total exports in November dropped one point one percent from a year ago and to the U. S. they were down twenty three percent Nasser saidi is founder and CEO of Nasser saidi and associates and he's just back from Hong Kong saying the Chinese hard digging in they're preparing for more stimulus packages they're preparing to support their industry and manufacturing and they're looking at all the export gold plates they will not give in when the error they are under pressure Sadie was interviewed on Bloomberg daybreak

China Founder And Ceo Nasser Saidi Hong Kong Sadie Bloomberg Twenty Three Percent One Percent