35 Burst results for "Nasser"

Iranian Soccer Player Sentenced to Death After Protesting

Mark Levin

01:35 min | Last month

Iranian Soccer Player Sentenced to Death After Protesting

"Armini is the young woman She was murdered while in custody after being arrested for improperly wearing her hijab We've talked about this And the international soccer federation professional footballers say they're shock and sickened by this And they stand in solidarity with a mere is the soccer player Nasser Azure will be the 28th person sentenced to death amid the protests Iran conducted its first execution in relation to the protests last Thursday Three of those 28 individuals who they executed were children Children A friend zaid has a Tala a member of Iran's World Cup team was shot and killed earlier this month While celebrating Iran's loss to the U.S. in the group stage of the tournament what do you think of that But there's a lot going on over there People disappearing Hundreds and hundreds if not thousands are being murdered and missing In these torture chambers young women who they are grabbing off the streets are being raped and then brutally killed and of course this is supposed to be a religious government

Armini International Soccer Federatio Nasser Azure Iran Zaid Soccer World Cup U.S.
"nasser" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

05:15 min | 2 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Whatever Elon Musk did at Twitter. I mean, that's some crazy stuff, Stephanie. I often say that a lot of people could run their companies better if they just read a pamphlet on management, like not even really a book or a course. I don't know what he's been reading, but it's the opposite, right? It's like, what can I do today to annoy my workforce? Particularly when your workforce is engineers and you're short of them and unemployment is under 4% in America and you're all trying to be, you know, like when I go to work, we have these framed things that say, we're number 16 on the top hundred best companies to work for or whatever the case is. Like companies brag about that stuff about the nice things they try and do for their employees to recruit them. Twitter's not doing that right now. Elon Musk is trying a different experiment. Maybe this is not a work will be on Mars. What would a hardcore vision of the Stephanie Miller show be? I don't know. Don't really know. Yeah, you know, Ali, I don't know what you're thinking, but we were saying, I'm going to stay, I don't know, I'll be there till the end. I'm not sure. I think last night people were thinking it might actually physically shut down if all the employees were locked out. I mean, they were they locked a whole bunch of people out. It's not even the way you make policy changes, right? Usually the CEO makes a nice letter or the HR person about, hey, we need to change these things and we're going to be a transitionary period for three weeks or whatever. This is the craziest stuff I've seen in a very long time. But it's not, Stephanie, it's not, actually, when you follow Elon Musk's history and how he runs things, it's often that kind of people, these visionaries, these, you know, people who think outside the box. Well, that's fantastic, except when you have to deal with people. Yeah. Sometimes. Sometimes you have to come back in the box a little bit. As a business reporter, have you ever seen someone appear to run their business into the ground and what is this three weeks? You see it, I've seen it with CEOs who are generally short lived, right? They bring in somebody because there's a great example at Ford, right? Things were not working at Ford for a long time. And then they brought in Jack Nasser. And Nasser was this guy who breaks the China and does all sorts of things. And he was really going to change at all so much so that executives started not driving forwards, but they started driving land rovers and Jaguars because they had acquired those companies. And it became less and less about Ford, the big oval came off the building. And it was just going to be this new global country company, didn't last. Didn't last because he broke so much China that Ford workers didn't know what Ford was. So what happens is you see these kinds of disruptive figures come in sometimes and leave. Or you see Steve Jobs kind of figures who are disruptive and stay, but they're so disruptive that the world accepts that, oh, you've created remarkable things. It sounds like you're a bit of a distasteful human. But you know, you're making life easier for the rest of us. Twitter's not making life better or easier for the rest of us. It's not helping democracy and apparently Elon Musk is a really bad boss. What? Well, yeah, but so obviously I'm reading your tweets in front of me. So your honor. As a journalist. As a journalist, I'm trying to improve the quality of Twitter one tweet at a time. Right. No, I'm staying. Are you staying? I mean, what's your take on that? Yeah, I mean, I get the problems which were, and I've known those problems for years. I do believe like roger mcnamee often says that social media is starting to become incompatibility incompatible with democracy, but for the moment it is a method for me to communicate with people and I'm using it. Yeah, yeah, no me too. I'll be there playing in the band with you when the Titanic goes down. Right. Okay. So like what it feels like, yeah. But you covered a bunch of bub, you know, stories obviously as a relates to the election, but you said election deniers overwhelmingly lost in battleground states. That may be the most important story practically of the election cycle. Don't you going forward for 2024? Yeah, there's so it's one of those statements that is, you know, can be put out by a PR department because it hides a lot of flaws. A lot of election deniers did actually win. And a lot of election deniers did win as governors attorney generals or secretaries of state, but they're not in battlegrounds. This is where the races would be tight. There's one exception and I'm not really sure I'd call Indiana a battleground state, but a Secretary of State prevailed there. Who is an election denier? But generally speaking, yeah, in the, in the places where democracy was going to die, Michigan, Arizona, Pennsylvania, and places like that wiped out across the board. Yeah. Wisconsin has a senator reelected. Ron Johnson, who is an election denier, but generally speaking, senators don't have impact. Right. Oh, Ali froze. Uh oh. Is it our Internet or is it Ali? I don't know. He's beautiful in that position, though. Yeah. Okay. Ally? Nope, still frozen. Oh, dear. Oh, really? Okay. I was going. I was going to ask, do we know actually maybe you guys know? And then I'll ask the news guy. What the actual margin is right now for the house? I don't know where we're at. I know it's not done yet. But I would look it up, but we don't have the Internet. Oh, is that yeah, that's problematic. Oh, Ellie went away. Yeah, okay. Why don't we tell you what? Why don't we break, see if we can get him back, okay? And here we go. Okay, 13 minutes after the hour. This portion of the Stephanie Miller show brought you by Adam and Eve. Oh, the girlfriend was very excited. I told her to go shop around on Adam and Eve

Elon Musk Ford Twitter Stephanie Jack Nasser Stephanie Miller Ali roger mcnamee China Nasser Jaguars PR department America Steve Jobs Ali froze Ron Johnson Indiana Pennsylvania Arizona
"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:15 min | 4 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"To take the wise assessment to get clarity over where you are today. Your current position. How do you score and how is your current position versus where you ideally would like to be?

"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:46 min | 4 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Way of looking at what our future can hold. Now I want to talk a little bit about the wise framework WISE fire nation knows I love acronyms, focus is actually my favorite acronym follow one course until success focus. What is the wise framework? I love that. The wise framework. So why stands for the wealth integration system for entrepreneurs? And essentially, wealth is everything that you have, not just not just money, but your values, your assets, your businesses, your all the things you hold dear. And how do you integrate all those pieces together as an entrepreneur? Essentially, that's what Y is addresses. So one of the challenges is, as entrepreneurs, we don't have a framework to see our position more clearly, in many cases, we are building building building and its functional chaos in some ways. And having a lens or a framework that we can see all of our position is very helpful, both for us to be more intentional with planning our goals, as well as having the integration that it is that we desire from the people that support us. Our family, our teams, our professional advisers. So there's 6 components within the wealth integration system for entrepreneurs. And similar, I know many entrepreneurs use a system called EOS. And actually, Gino wickman, who the creator of EOS was one of the early collaborators on my book and what he referred to wise as is it's like EOS, but for a business owner's personal wealth. And the 6 components essentially uncover the first is a balance sheet strategy, which is how are all the different assets that you have working together to build the ideal outcome that you want from a wealth standpoint. Next is liquidity and cash flow, all the capital that's coming in going out, how it's positioned. Third component is a lifestyle and legacy. What's for you and what's for others that might be part of your legacy children charity, et cetera.

Gino wickman
"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:28 min | 4 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"We're going to talk about the wise framework and also the return on life experience. When we get back from taking our sponsors. 2002 1008, 2022. When it comes to the economy, those are some scary years. Dot com crash, housing crash, and the roller coaster we're going through right now. One thing is certain. It's a dangerous time to not know your numbers, but over 31,000 businesses have the confidence and clarity they need because they rely on NetSuite by Oracle.

"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:10 min | 4 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"I thought I was done after one when I was building it, but it ended up being the worst day of my life. And it was so hard for me to understand back early in my journey. I couldn't get it. But hearing it now, thousands of times, 3700 plus interviews I've done, so many of those people have face scenarios like this. And I was like, man, they're just has to be a better plan in place. It has to be talked about more often. So people are prepared and ready for this, because that was the thing. They just weren't prepared for it. They weren't ready for it. Just like somebody that works for their 65 years old, thinking they're going to retire, get a gold watch and have the best 30 years of their life or 20 years of their life and to retirement ends up within a year or two, some people like to say the biggest cause of death for a retiree is retirement because they lost that focus. They lost that relevancy. They lost that meaning to be alive. There are three dilemmas that every business owner will face Ali. What are they? Successful owners are going to face the first dilemma they face is called the reinvestment dilemma. And this is I've been successful in my main company and making great profits. What do I do with the capital? Do I reinvest it back in my company? Do I invest it in another company and private equity and real estate and the stock market and cash and crypto? What's my best reinvestment strategy for my balance sheet? So that's kind of the first critical dilemma successful owner will face. The second dilemma is the legacy dilemma, which is, what is it all for? All the wealth that I've built all the wealth on accumulating, perhaps more wealth than I'll ever need. Is it for fun? Is it for my children? Is it for charity? Is it for ego? Well, my wealth be a source of empowerment for my children or a source of entitlement for my children. What's kind of the purpose behind everything that I'm building. That's the second dilemma. I refer to as the legacy dilemma. And then the third dilemma is the exit dilemma. I've built a successful company, I could scale this business or I could sell this business. Does it make sense to sell it to my executive management team to private equity or should I leave it to my son or daughter? If I did sell my company, would I now have the freedom to pursue my life's purpose?

Ali
"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

04:22 min | 4 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"Ali say what's up the fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming a successful that most people disagree with. What's that fire nation, JL D, great to be with you. That's a great question. And I think that the biggest thing that comes to mind is people assume entrepreneurs or business owners, they have confidence confidence confidence. And that there's always a sense of confidence in what they do. When in reality, I think it's a function of courage. It's not that entrepreneurs are always confident. I think we make a lot of mistakes and we fail often. But we have the courage to take risk. We have the courage to get back on our feet. And I think that oftentimes people think it's confidence when in reality, courage is the underlying trait that I think makes us do what we do. Oh man, doubts, fear, stress, anxiety, we force sat down for breakfast every single day fire nation because that's part of being an entrepreneur. Because what we swallow it, just like you have to take your medicine as a child, that castor oil, we swallow it down, and we have the courage to do that every day. So I do love that phrasing. That was cool, Ali. And as we're talking about the business owners dilemma, I want to start by talking about your why, Ollie. Your purpose in mission for writing the business owners dilemma. Thanks, John. I've spent almost 20 years guiding helping entrepreneurs. While also being an entrepreneur myself. And about ten, 7 to ten years ago, I had a few experiences that completely changed the trajectory of my life. And I had some business owners I was working with that had all sold their companies. Exit really substantial exits, 20 million, a 100 million, the largest was 500 million. Just sums of money that were just enormous. And while they had complete financial freedom and complete financial independence, the majority of them were struggling. They were struggling with the life after, they were struggling with big dilemmas they were facing. There was struggling with their identity. And watching them go through such a challenging period when you assume you just made it, you just hit the jackpot. You reach the summit. And watching them struggle, it crushed me. And it made me hyper aware that wealth is a means and not an end. And that if you're not really clear about what your end goal is, you can have all the wealth in the world. You can have all the financial freedom in the world, but you're not mentally free. And when I saw this happen, it made me lean in. It made me take greater care and greater attention to what they were going through, what was going on. And what I learned in those few years working with those business owners, what the approach the system, the paradigm shifts the psychology, the planning, all the work that I was doing with these owners.

Ali Ollie John
"nasser" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:13 min | 4 months ago

"nasser" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We had the best two day performance since April 2020 on the S&P 500. Let's get all the latest on what we can expect for the Asian trading session with Bloomberg's Brian Curtis in Hong Kong Brian. Julia, thanks very much, and when you see games like that over two days, usually means something. It's not likely to turn around on a dime. That's what we can see from history. Asian equities are higher, a following on from the strong rally both in Europe and the United States. 3% plus was basically what we saw from just about every major benchmark in those areas I mentioned, the Dax was up 3.8%. The S&P 500 was up 3.1% and the NASDAQ tracking up about three and a third percent. Energy, though, was the best performer. It wasn't like all the money was flowing into a handful of sectors, was pretty much right across the board financials was the second best performing sector on Wall Street. Now, looking at the open in Tokyo, the nikkei has moved up about 8 tenths of 1%, 207 points. The ASX 200 is up 1.7% and getting the opening numbers in Seoul as well. The cost be rallying 1.7%. So it carries through. The big debate is how sustainable is this. And we're looking at a number of developments here, weaker economic data in the United States. We had Australia's Central Bank moving 25 instead of 50. The Bank of England is buying bonds. All of that kind of plays into the what our headline said was a moderation in Central Bank activity. Doesn't mean a pivot doesn't mean they're cutting interest rates anytime soon, but just slowing down the rapid pace of increases might be enough to bring out some bullish behavior. That's what we've seen. On oil, Aramco CEO, Amin Nasser said that spare capacity is low, there won't be any left after China ends COVID zero, and the energy tracker vortexia says that China already shipped in a record volume of fuel oil from Russia last month as importers snapped up discounted supply. At the moment, WTI crude is trading essentially flat at 86 57, yields down the yield on the ten year treasury, now trading with a yield of 3.62% Julia. Well, Elon Musk is confirmed he has revived his bid for Twitter at the original offer price of $54 20 a share. Musk made the proposal in a letter to Twitter. This according to an SEC filing and Twitter said it received the letter and intends to close the deal at the original price without commenting specifically on how it will respond to mask. Musk's proposal likely eliminates the need for a court trial this month. Bloomberg's Jeff feely tells us a trial may not have worked in Musk's favor. The reality is that it would have been a very tough case to make. You would have had to show that there was a material adverse effect. And they tried everything they could to find one with the whistleblower and the other stuff. But it's very difficult to prove that in these cases, we've only had one real MAE case down here in Delaware in the 50 years that this has been going on. So they just probably came to the conclusion that couldn't get up, get up the mountain on it. And Musk's attorneys wrote that he intends to proceed to closing of the Twitter transaction penning receipt of the proceeds of the debt financing. Well, fed officials are reinforcing the message that the U.S. Central Bank will continue to hike rates to cool inflation. Here San Francisco fed president Mary Daly during a discussion at the council on foreign relations in New York. Right now the pain that I hear every day the suffering that people tell me they're going through is on the inflation side. If we let it go, it's a corrosive disease. It's a toxin that erodes the real purchasing power of people. Daily also told CNN that ensuring high inflation doesn't become entrenched requires further rate hikes. She said those restrictive policies will need to be held in place until the fed reaches its inflation target. Daily added that officials could achieve this without crushing the U.S. economy into a severe recession. Meantime, the fed governor Philip Jefferson said the fit has acted boldly and is committed to taking the further steps in S three, although he said that that will take time and likely until a period of below trend growth. Coming up, we are going to join divya devis, Asia FX strategist at standard chartered, but now it is 5 minutes past the hour and time for global news

Brian Curtis Central Bank Amin Nasser Bloomberg Julia Twitter U.S. Musk Jeff feely Hong Kong Aramco
FBI open to settling claims by gymnasts abused by Nassar

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

FBI open to settling claims by gymnasts abused by Nassar

"I Mike Gracia reporting the FBI is open to settling claims by gymnasts who were abused by doctor Larry Nassar The FBI's general counsel has reached out to attorneys representing Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles Ali raisman of Michaela maroney and dozens of other women who were sexually assaulted by Larry Nassar to begin settlement talks in the $1 billion claim they brought against the federal government Three people familiar with the matter say the FBI reached out on Wednesday The settlement talks were first reported by The Wall Street Journal The victims brought claims against the FBI for failing to stop nassar when the agency first received allegations against the sports doctor in 2015 Nasser continued his assaults for more than a year and pleaded guilty in 2017 Mike Gracia Washington

Larry Nassar FBI Mike Gracia Simone Biles Ali Raisman Michaela Maroney Olympic Gold Nassar Federal Government The Wall Street Journal Nasser Mike Gracia Washington
Joe Biden States Support for Two-State Solution

Mark Levin

01:00 min | 7 months ago

Joe Biden States Support for Two-State Solution

"So here he is Cut 5 go Now as president of the United States my commitment to that goal of a two state solution has not changed And all these years two states along the 1967 lines were mutually agreed to swaps And again in 1967 lines Israel can not survive with the 1967 lines They can't survive The 1967 lines Obama pushed the same thing There was a war in 1967 Because the Arab states led by Egypt Nasser In Syria and others we're building up their military to cut off Israel economically from the sea from the land from the air To surround it attack it and destroy it

Egypt Nasser United States Israel Barack Obama Syria
 Larry Nassar loses last appeal in sexual assault scandal

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 8 months ago

Larry Nassar loses last appeal in sexual assault scandal

"The former sports doctor convicted in 2018 of sexually abusing gymnasts has lost his last legal appeal The Michigan Supreme Court rejected a final appeal by Larry Nassar he went to prison after pleading guilty during an extraordinary 7 day hearing in which over 150 dancers Olympic gymnasts and other athletes detailed how he sexually assaulted them over many years under the guise of medical treatments Nasser said he deserved a new hearing and was treated unfairly by ingham county judge Rosemarie aquilina who said she signed his death warrant with his 40 year sentence that he would wither in prison like the wicked witch in a two page letter the court said it had concerns over the judge's conduct but declined to take the case noting that the judge stuck to the sentencing agreement and that they had no wish to subject the victims to additional trauma NASA received another 40 year sentence in a separate case in a neighboring county and

Larry Nassar Michigan Supreme Court Judge Rosemarie Aquilina Ingham County Nasser Olympic Nasa
Simone Biles, others seek $1B-plus from FBI over Nassar

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

Simone Biles, others seek $1B-plus from FBI over Nassar

"Former Olympic gymnast including gold medalist Simone Biles are among dozens of assault victims seeking more than a $1 billion from the FBI for failing to stop sports doctor Larry Nassar There's no dispute FBI agents in 2015 knew that Nasser was accused of molesting gymnasts but the agents failed to act leaving Nasser free to continue to target young women and girls for more than a year The approximately 90 claimants include Olympic gold medalist biles aly raisman and mckayla maroney the FBI declined to comment in April when a smaller batch of claims was filed referring instead to director Christopher wray's remarks to Congress last year where he apologized and called the failure inexcusable I'm Julie Walker

Simone Biles FBI Larry Nassar Nasser Olympic Biles Aly Raisman Mckayla Maroney Olympic Gold Christopher Wray Congress Julie Walker
Mark Levin: Israel Needs to Attack First When It Comes to Iran

Mark Levin

01:24 min | 1 year ago

Mark Levin: Israel Needs to Attack First When It Comes to Iran

"One of the reasons the Israelis won one of many The 1967 war because they went on attack Nasser was working with the other countries To economically choke off Israel they were preparing a military attack and Israel attacked first An Israel needs to attack first when it comes to Iran They can't wait for them to have a nuclear weapon So this administration is forcing Israel to decide between its own survival and the survival of its relationship with the current U.S. government Because that's the choice the Israelis have to make now Are they going to defend themselves against what is I don't like this word existential because 98% of Democrats don't know what it means Survival Whether it's going to survive because Iran has said it wants to destroy Israel And with nuclear weapons it can do that Or or well its relationships with the United States government survive And it's going to have to choose the former but that is the position that the Biden administration the Biden Secretary of State the Biden national security adviser have placed the State of

Israel Nasser Iran United States Government Biden Administration Biden
Interpol elects United Arab Emirates official as president - Associated Press

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Interpol elects United Arab Emirates official as president - Associated Press

"Law enforcement body into pole has elected a contentious official from the United Arab Emirates as its new president Major General Ahmed Nasser al Raisi who's the inspector general of the U. A. E.'s Interior Ministry has been elected by interval full one four year term he's been accused by human rights groups of torture and this criminal complaints against him in five countries including in France what interval has it's H. Q. and then took it with the election has been held the elections drawn angry responses from two Britons who filed the complaints Matthew hedges who'd been imprisoned in the UAE for nearly seven months in twenty eighteen on spying charges says this is a sad day for international justice on global policing I'm

Major General Ahmed Nasser Al U. A. E.'S Interior Ministry UAE Matthew Hedges France
"nasser" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"How people work the supports that they need It's not just about building bridges though that's very important because those are very important construction jobs In New York we had a lot of bridges get rebuilt in the last 18 years So that's important but also focusing on things like child care focusing on those small businesses That's how people are working today Broadband for school kids because there are a lot of kids that we realize didn't have access to that during the pandemic So all of these things I think unfortunately have been discussed at the same time need to be negotiated at the same time But I do think the different fear and we can sort of put the baby a little bit here is that we do not have the stomach and never had the stomach for large sweeping programs It's rare that we have in our country's history We tend to favor incrementalism So having said that what are the small pieces that we can get now made of markets for the next four months Prioritization Thank you so much It's a terrific panel we've had here at Jeffrey Nasser and basilica Stay tuned now for a Bloomberg special report on the fed decision you out at the top of the hour to be followed by chair Jay Powell's news conference And this is balance of power on Bloomberg radio This is a what's the difference between you and your competition What's your vision in this relationship We're guessing one thing is that you are better informed European Central Bank president Christine Lagarde had this to say Actually we're not guessing The realism of this is tangible Up to the moment news Some of the.

Jeffrey Nasser Jay Powell New York Bloomberg radio Bloomberg fed European Central Bank Christine Lagarde
"nasser" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Messer and Bloomberg quick takes Tim Sten on Bloomberg radio I am Carl Nasser And I'm Tim stenbeck Plenty ahead in our second hour of the weekend edition of Bloomberg businessweek As we bring back some of our favorite conversations from the milk and institute global conference back in full force this year after the 2020 event was completely remote due to the COVID pandemic In just a bit in fact we'll hear from Barbara humpton president and CEO of Siemens USA who says The White House has a good plan to help relieve certain supply chain bottlenecks she should know being involved in a meeting at The White House Plus we'll talk with bright machine CEO amar Hans Paul on what the next wave of automation and AI technology means for the modern worker Maybe it's not all bad Also Scott minore of Guggenheim investments on modern monetary theory MMT becoming a reality Hashtag MMT it's happening First up the Sarah let's focus on impact investing earlier this year a company called engine number one you know who we're talking about Well they skipped up three seats on Exxon's board of directors It was a big big win for investors who are demanding that their profits come with a greater purpose The small activist fund now is the world's attention as it pushes for more emphasis on sustainability at the oil giant And it's telling what it calls a total value framework It ties progress on ESG initiatives directly to financial value creation The company's CEO Jennifer grant seo explains When we set out with engine number one to do things in a different way And so instead of what we all think of as slightly older school ES and G people aren't sure if it works People aren't sure I think it returns We built engine number one to take the data the environmental and the climate or the government's data and use it to drive returns And so as I've watched and talked with lots of people over the last couple of days large bowls of assets as well as younger people people are ready But they're ready because the performances there are just ready because it's the right thing to do What is it They're ready They're ready to have impact in their investments but they're not willing to do it with giving up returns So the way they think about it is we care we care about people and wages and workers we care about climate but we need investors to do it for us in a way where we don't give up return So Jennifer is it harder though for a company that is delivering the returns to kind of get them to make the changes and investors or maybe not going to be so supported because they're like listen I like these returns So give me an idea Yeah we think it's all we think it's all about using the data on climate or environment people using it to drive returns over time So to take an example let's take General Motors So Mary Barr has got her great business She's a great CEO She's got a strong board But they can actually make more money.

Tim Sten Bloomberg radio Carl Nasser Tim stenbeck milk and institute Barbara humpton Siemens USA amar Hans Paul Scott minore Guggenheim investments Sarah let White House Bloomberg businessweek Messer Jennifer grant seo Bloomberg Exxon Jennifer Mary Barr General Motors
U.S. Gymnasts Say FBI Failed to Protect Them From Sexual Abuse

Mojo In The Morning

01:56 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Gymnasts Say FBI Failed to Protect Them From Sexual Abuse

"Four american gymnast. Simone biles michaela maroney aly rice. Men and maggie nichols sat in front of the senate yesterday. Engaged emotional testimony about the abuse. They suffered at the hands of former usa gymnastics doctor. Larry nassar and their feelings of betrayal by investigators particularly the fbi the fbi. Let them down big time. This is simone biles. I don't want another young gymnast. Olympic athlete or any individual to experience the horror that i and hundreds of others have endured before during and continuing to this day in the week of the larry nassar abuse. She said the scars of this horrific abuse continue and the impact will never be over michaela. Maroni told a story about sitting on her bedroom floor back in twenty fifteen and talking to the fbi over the phone and telling them all of the details of everything that had happened to her and then told the f. b. i. About tokyo the day he gave me a sleeping pill for the plane. Ride to then work on me. Later that night that evening i was naked completely alone with him on top of me molesting me for hours. I began crying at the memory over the phone. And there was just dead silence. I was so shocked at the agents silence and disregard for my trauma. After that minute of silence he asked is that all advocates for the young women. Say as many as one hundred twenty athletes may have been abused by nasser. they says l. erased men nassir found more than one hundred new victims to molest serving innocent children up to a pedophile on a silver platter. All we needed was one adult to do the right thing. I don't know if you guys saw this part of her testimony but she told a story about sitting with an fbi agent and him trying to convince her that everything that had happened. Wasn't that bad.

Simone Biles Michaela Maroney Aly Rice Maggie Nichols FBI Larry Nassar Maroni Gymnastics Michaela Senate Olympic USA Nassir Tokyo Nasser
"nasser" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"You're there once you join. It's here you will be able to open all the old shows and bonus material and everything from that year since the beginning. If i understand it correctly so now it'd be the time. Hopefully i'll get a couple of patients today. I always go to bed at night. I wake up in the morning checking patrons. I feel like it's a vote of confidence when they see my little got a new patron. So hopefully you will be. I patron thank you so much and now on to the last story of the free thirty which is a couple things heo see. I like to call her sandy. Okay so since. That was her name before she made her name. A political statement. Sandyhook aco which is exactly what it would be because you drop out last name anyway. Like barry obama. It was barry so tarot indonesian. Yeah barry sotero. He was adopted by indonesian. Father the guy who was the liaison between union oil and the us government after the us to the coup in indonesia. And that's i think around the time. His mom worked for tim geithner's father at the ford foundation. I have right here behind me. Webster tarpley book the unauthorized biography of barack obama before they got support poor webster and wow notch socks off and i think there was another big expose wayne famous guy. No alternate in that conspiracy research department. I forget wayne madsen. Maybe i can't remember anyway. There's a big really really fascinating. Cia back story of the whole obama history. But we digress. A oc shows up at. I guess it was a met gala wearing an expensive dress that said it was white with blood. Red letters on it straight out of the life of brian who says tax the rich now. This is an event that cost thirty five thousand dollars to attend..

barry sotero tim geithner barry obama Webster tarpley ford foundation us government barry indonesia wayne madsen webster wayne us Cia brian
"nasser" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"And justice. This is monica peres with three today. Is cam still filling it before brat we hope to see again very soon and in the meanwhile though we want to tell you about a couple of things that are coming up. I've been terribly remiss in not telling people about the patron saint zoom party this weekend saturday. Eleven o'clock pacific time. Two o'clock eastern cam. Hopefully you will join us of league basically will be there and we are gonna talk about anything anything you wanna talk about. We've got some folks coming. Wanna talk about living entirely off the grid. I'm hoping someone will show up. Who knows a little bit about de documenting yourself. I don't know if part of that movements but if you are a patron saint. I on our patriot. Patriotic dot com slash propaganda report. You will be able to open the post that has zoom link in it so you can join any time until then otherwise. Maybe we'll put it sometimes do. Sometimes we don't a little excerpt of it if everybody agrees that it's okay and so even if you're not a patron saint you may still be able to hear a bit of it. Got a little taste and then tonight of course we have a i would say it is the most fun i ever have and as i guess on a podcast i am going to be your guest tonight on. We are v- matlins the mad ones tonight. Ten pm eastern youtube dot com slash. The matt ones yes so if people haven't been to a dp resume party with me. This is your chance to have a live experience..

patron saint zoom party monica youtube
Saudi Oil Giant Aramco Sees Half-Year Earnings Climb to $47B

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Saudi Oil Giant Aramco Sees Half-Year Earnings Climb to $47B

"Saudi Arabia's oil producing company Aramco has announced an income of forty seven billion dollars for the first half of the year the ending is double what the company took over the same period last year when the coronavirus ground to travel and pummeled global demand for oil Aramco's CEO Amin Nasser said the company's second quarter results reflects a strong rebound in worldwide energy demands around his financial health is crucial to Saudi Arabia stability despite massive efforts by Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman to divest by the economy the kingdom still depends heavily on oil exports to fuel government spending I'm Karen Thomas

Aramco Saudi Arabia Amin Nasser Prince Mohammed Bin Salman Karen Thomas
"nasser" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

15:07 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Release. By the U.S. Military since 2016. 39 prisoners remain at Guantanamo. This comes as activists gathered last week in front of the cultural attache office for the united. The Arab Emirates in Washington D.C. to protest the planned rendition of former Guantanamo prisoner revealing back to Russia. He's currently being held in a UAE prison after being released from Guantanamo in 2017 where he too was held without charge for 15 years. Advocates say 17 other former Guantanamo prisoners are now locked up in the UAE under inhumane conditions. This is Helen sheeting of witness against torture. They've been tortured. This man will live with that for the rest of their lives. We are the reparations we need to make sure that they are in good situations and continue to follow them and support them in attempting to make the rest of their lives. Fulfilled. For more we're joined by two lawyers representing these men. Gary Thompson's an attorney and private practice who's worked on pro Bono for Guantanamo prisoners. He's the lead attorney for former Guantanamo prisoner revealing Gaza. Also with us Mark mayor staff attorney for reprieve U.S. who's represented 6 men in prison at Guantanamo including Abdullah teeth Nasser who is just released to Morocco. Mark let's begin with you. Can you tell us the circumstances under which. He was just released and what's happening to Abdullah thief Nasser now? Absolutely. Thank you for having me on so the circumstances under which she was released actually begin back in 2016. As you said if not sir was held for close to two decades 19 years without charge or trial he was actually cleared for release by the periodic review board which is a pearl like institution that was set up under the Barack Obama's presidency and his staff by 6 members of federal agencies from the United States including the departments of defense Homeland Security and the joint chiefs of staff. They determined unanimously that optimal Nasser posed no threat to the United States or anybody and determined that he should be released from Guantanamo. Unfortunately this determination came quite late in Barack Obama's presidency and the State Department at that time deferred to the administration as we all know was the Trump administration. President Trump had campaigned on the idea of not closing Guantanamo and in fact not transferring anyone out of Guantanamo and largely kept to that promise. So even though opted Nasser was cleared by senior civil servants from the U.S. government he had to sit and wait until the political will within the United States changed. And as thrilled as we are that optimal chief master is now out that he is back in Morocco and is with his family and is trying to start a new life and is focused on the future. The fact remains that he lost close to two decades of his life and that a number of 27 men are still there without charge or trial waiting for the political will of this administration to change as well. And Mark Mayer could you talk a little bit about how he came to end up in Guantanamo? How was he originally. Captured and transferred and detained there? And why did he never receive a trial? Well I can say that the reason why he never received a trial is the same reason why 27 of those men haven't received a trial either and that's because they have never faced any kind of charges at all. They're being held essentially as prisoners of war. Optimal teeth now ended up in Guantanamo the way a lot of people ended up in Guantanamo. There was a bounty program essentially that was being run in Afghanistan. And in Pakistan I believe. The number I might be getting wrong but I believe what the bounties were being offered for turning over people to Afghan or American or Pakistani authorities was close to $5000 at the time which was a huge life-changing amount of money. And. We happen to know in a lot of cases of people who ended up in Guantanamo that they were the result of people lying about the people who ended up there or simply mistaken identity. That's the case of another one of our clients who was still detained at Guantanamo Bay. Ahmed Rabbani. The story is actually detailed in the Senate torture report that he was detained mistakenly because the United States believed he was another man named Hassan Ghul. He was severely tortured including techniques that haven't been used since the Spanish inquisition. The United States eventually actually detained mister Hassan Gul at the same prison Bagram that mister Rabbani was being held at. Mister Hassan gu was eventually released from there. But now 20 years on much like the situation that optimal teeth nos are found him in just a month ago Ahmed Rabbani remains there. So sadly this is a situation that we've seen repeated for a number of the men who are still detained. And the calls have been growing for the Biden administration to close Guantanamo. How could that be done and do you think it's likely? Well one of the easiest ways is to begin with releasing the ten men who have been cleared for transfer and working to release all 27 of the men who have never been again charged with any crime or have faced a trial. It's unlikely that any of those men will ever face any trial. This is especially true in light of the fact that as I think as your viewers and listeners will know the Biden administration has announced that the war in Afghanistan is supposed to completely end by I think mid August was the last estimate that they had and I believe earlier in the show we heard President Biden saying that combat troops will be exiting Iraq by the end of the year. That says to me and I think to a lot of observers that the wars that led to these people being wrongly imprisoned in Guantanamo are ending. If there was ever a right and just time to be releasing these men this is the time to do it. The only thing that might be lacking from moving these out there is political will. If they haven't been charged with anything if they haven't faced trial for anything if the wars are over then the question isn't. What can the Biden administration do to solve this problem? The question should be what justification does the Biden administration still have to be taken to be detaining these people? I want to bring Gary Thompson into the conversation the attorney who worked pro Bono for Guantanamo prisoners and is the lead attorney for revealing who is a former Guantanamo prisoner. Can you tell us his full story? And then where he's ended up today. How he started at Guantanamo. Yeah thank you very much. Revealing God's office from an area in Russia called tartar Stan and he began to practice his chosen religion freely in the late 1990s he was a professional ballet dancer. Then drafted into the Russian army and came to a point in his life where he decided he wanted to leave Russia and flee religious persecution simply to live a life of religious freedom with his wife and then young baby. They attempted to travel south only ravelle made it across the border. Into Tajikistan Afghanistan and then Pakistan. Where he was arrested in March 2002 by Pakistani police and his mayor mentioned also sold for bounty. To the United States authorities who took him to Bagram took him to Kandahar and tortured him. He suffered extreme interrogation. And supposedly confessed under duress. He was then taken to Guantanamo in October of 2002. Where he suffered greatly for many years under harsh conditions and sometimes solitary confinement. Eventually he was permitted to have counsel which is where we came in and we filed a petition for habeas corpus and in 2010 here in D.C. where I live judge Henry Kennedy issued the writ of habeas corpus in order the United States government to release revealing Gaza from Guantanamo. Believe it or not it then went through the case then went through a 6 year Kafka esque appellate cycle. Where he was not released. And then in 2010 reveal also went through a periodic review board hearing like mister Nasser that Mark mentioned. And that same panel cleared reveal for release. And then took the State Department about 6 months to locate a country for reveal to go to. He can not go back to Russia because Russia has a record of killing or torturing ex Guantanamo detainees return to them. So we thought it was our lucky day when it was confirmed that reveal could go to the United Arab Emirates where several other or dozen other detainees also went. It was always revealed his dream to be in an Arab country. He learned Arabic in Guantanamo. He understood Arabic culture. He wanted to be there. And we really celebrated that day. Ravel was on the last plane out of Guantanamo the day before Donald Trump was inaugurated. So it really felt like we had dodged something terrible. We were promised by our State Department. That the UAE had promised them that revealed would be released in 6 months that he would be treated humanely. That he would be given a job in a place to live in about 6 months time which is similar to the Saudi program for exploit time of detainees. It didn't come to pass. It turned out that the UAE lied to the United States government. These so called diplomatic assurances were simply all lies and revel along with about two dozen other men have suffered even more in UAE prisons most notoriously the Al regime prison. These now four and a half years and they're not permitted review by the international Red Cross or Red Crescent. They've been able to get out sporadic calls to their families with the help of reprieve where mister mayor works. The dots have been connected. We know there's torture there. We know there's mistreatment and the man stuck in the UAE like ravel have all said it's worse than Guantanamo. Worse than Guantanamo. So that's why with. 18 men still there we call the UAE gitmo east. As opposed to gitmo west and with the numbers that gitmo dwindling now to 39 and 8 with 18 in the UAE they're really a pair and if Biden is serious about closing Guantanamo. He needs to in his State Department needs to look into the concept of re resettlement look at people like revel mango off some of the tiny. Garrett if I can. I just wanted to ask you about this particular issue of the UAE as gitmo of the east. To your knowledge what has been the U.S. government's reaction to basically offloading its gitmo prisoners to another gulag. Totally complicit. The UAE passed all these men off to the UAE and as far as we know did absolutely nothing to follow up on those diplomatic assurances. Apparently our State Department at least under Donald Trump just didn't care didn't care that they were lied to. And we've seen no evidence that our State Department even now under the Biden administration is really doing anything. To remedy the situation in the UAE some people in the State Department have told us they're working on it or they're in touch with people in the UAE. But we're seeing nothing and in the meantime we're getting very very scared that reveal might be rendered to Russia or in the case of the Yemenis who are in the UAE that their fate might take them back to Yemen where they could suffer from. I just wanted to remind people what Joe Biden said and the last democratic presidential debate when he was asked by PBS moderator Michel sundor about closing Guantanamo. Vice President Biden why couldn't you close Guantanamo Bay? Why couldn't the Obama administration closed? Closed Guantanamo Bay but you have to have congressional authority to do it. They've kept it open. And the fact is that we in fact think it's the greatest it is an advertisement for creating tear. It is an advertisement for creating terror. The image of Guantanamo around the world the fact of it. Mark mayor your final words. The only thing that the only two things that I would add were to kind of hone in on something that Gary was saying there he mentioned having petitioned for rid of habeas corpus back in 2010 that would have been during Barack Obama's presidency. And that means his Justice Department was opposing that petition for a writ of habeas corpus. We found ourselves in a similar situation with our client asado harun Gul. His Justice Department mister Biden's President Biden's Justice Department took the same position that president Bush's president Obama's president Trump did. We have ten seconds. What should Biden do? He should stop opposing these petitions for writ of habeas corpus and begin releasing all.

Guantanamo UAE Biden administration United States Ahmed Rabbani Gary Thompson Washington D.C. Mark mayor Russia State Department Abdullah teeth Nasser Mark let Abdullah thief Nasser Nasser departments of defense Homelan Trump administration President Trump Mark Mayer U.S. government Morocco
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"That due process applies at guantanamo. So i think it's really hard to handicap beyond bunk dc circuit because. It's really hard to know where the judges who will end up in the middle. We'll come down. I mean the last time the dc circuit her guantanamo on bonk was the second time they went on bonk and the military commission case. And you know what folks remember if they remember anything about that. Was that the sort of the two wings of the dc circuit were very strongly in opposition to each other while judges. Maleta and wilkins both wanted to rest on narrow case specific grounds that deprived either of majority. It's possible that that's where we're headed here where you know. There's one camp. That firmly wants to say due process applies. There's one camp that firmly wants to dozens and there's a camp in the middle. That's going to embrace the biden administration's position and you know that i think is going to accomplish. Absolutely nothing in settling the law if instead we somehow got to a majority for due process applying. You know assuming that they say. Do you process applies. But it satisfied. Ben that puts the by the administration in a very interesting position from the perspective of do they have been asked the supreme court for at that point right if this is hold as opposed to assumes that. The due process clause applies to the guantanamo detainees. But that it doesn't require more than what the jurisprudence has already articulated. whether or not it cert worthy. I'm not sure it's actually surf provoking. We will have to see on that point latiff. I want to close with you. The guy who bears your name has gone home. What happens to him now and and let's use it. as a reflection. On sort of seven hundred people have been removed from guantanamo and sent elsewhere. What happens to them. Yeah the sort of tip to talk about his case. I zoom out a little bit for him. He is very lucky that he has a family to go to a home to go to job to go to. There is a rehab center for torture victims. Basically in his home city of casa blanca. It looks like he. Yeah he sort of has a has a path back to a a stable life. One of the things i. I remember vividly. When i started reporting this with you know this is not sort of my my zone. I got pulled into it because his name coincidence but but my my kind of an assumption i had at the beginning was after being held for so long This man if you didn't have you know anti-american sentiment and urges and and motivations before all of this he certainly would have them after that he would come out. And i kind of i was imagining it. Probably the same way as a lot of these other seven hundred guys that they would come out really pissed and what i found at least in abilities. Case and in several of the other from guantanamo detainees that. I talked to him getting out. He he wasn't or he's not angry so much as from what i can gather from his lawyer and his family. He's tired and he's sad. He wants to have a family. He wants to kind of do the things he hasn't been able to do for the last nineteen years. He has a name picked out for his first born child. And that's kind of a. I don't know it's like a just the fact that this man for whom we had very flimsy evidence. We held him for this long. And kinda now. That's that's the only thing he wants to do. I don't know to me that kind of puts a lot of this. Yes this sort of fighting over over who these guys are like. He has a lot of health. Complications has permanent hearing damage from sensory overload From guantanamo according to his lawyer like he has held his issues he just wants to get back to his family. He wants to be left alone. that's kind of the picture that i'm getting and in this guy's case and you know it's clear there thirty nine other cases where maybe that's not the case but in this case he might be able to just do that so i wanna ask you this precisely because you're not a lawyer you've some. You're just somebody who's engaged the case of this individual with a lot of complexity in a lot of sympathy as i. It's been a while. Since i've listened to your series about him but as i recall you concluded that he was almost certainly more tied to bin laden then his lawyer is allow that the evidence of his engagement in any particular violent activity was not all that strong but he was certainly associated in some sense with enemy forces. Is that a fair summary. Yeah and also i think kind of pivotal pivotally like from what we found that there was no evidence that he had ever tried to harm civilians that he had ever sort of targeted or kahn. After american citizens like those two things to me were like spoke. Pretty what do you think you know should have happened to abdelatif nassir. He was captured by either pakistani or or northern alliance forces and turned over to us forces with a kind of tag on his toe that said al qaeda we're allowed to detain the enemy in wartime nineteen years of detention on. That record seems pretty hard to understand. Like what to you. Would've been justice or a appropriate handling of lot of nassir. I think the situation. He's in right. Now is pretty reasonable. I mean sending him to the fact that he's from a country that is an ally that has you know security apparatus that is able to keep tabs on this guy and you know yeah. Pay attention to him to make sure that in the off chance that he does re engage which the numbers from the obama administration and forward have been very low You in in the case that he does re engage like that he can be stopped. But i think that that situation that he's in right now where it's like sent him home to his family and monitor him. That seems like a pretty reasonable. Uh solution keeping him for nineteen years before. That seems very extreme. it's it's obviously. It's easy for me to say this now Whether if i was the person in charge Right after nine eleven might have been a harder call but right now i think that scenario that seems like a very reasonable scenario. That could have been true. You know even fifteen years ago we're gonna leave it there. Lot of nassir steve vladeck. Thank you both so much for joining us. Thank you and ben. If i can just say one thing which is i just wanted to say. Thank you in series. That i reported you us out so much me and my colleagues and your we're just really grateful for your help supply-sider the.

guantanamo bonk Maleta biden administration latiff military commission wilkins casa blanca supreme court Ben abdelatif nassir bin laden obama administration kahn al qaeda steve vladeck ben
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Transfer of you know muhammad al qahtani so i i think either. You're missing my point. I wasn't clear and my money is on the line. Maybe both so my point is not that they ought to do this at the expense of every other item on their domestic agenda. Because it's not hard to imagine. How every single republican will react. My point is that it is not. We're not gonna get anywhere unless they do. And so. yeah. I mean ben. Do i understand why. Closing guantanamo is administration's expanding any capital. Of course i do. If i were in the administration would feel the same way quite. Possibly that doesn't change the fact that they're the only ones in a position to do anything about it. And that's that's why were stuck now as opposed to why we've been stuck previously. I do think there are things they can do. Short of you know using their razor thin democratic majorities on guantanamo. I don't think for example the video plea deal proposal requires any legislation at all and so in so far. That was something they were willing to. Do you know as long as there were defendants who are willing to acquiesce. Identify could be pursued. I didn't they could really ramp up the efforts to not just get all ten of the pr. Be clear detainees out of guantanamo. But to actually see if any of the seventeen not. Pr be clear detainees might now actually get through the process because that has happened before so i won't be as clear as possible. It is not that. I blame the biden administration for where we are today. I do not. It's that so much of the sort of reasons why we're going to continue to be stock are because of the political factors that will lead the administration to expand capital on the things. It would need to do to actually make meaningful dent in that number okay and this brings us very neatly to al hilla the dc circuit case a to which you referred earlier which involves has actually potentially substantial implications for a lot of people but i think particularly for the remaining detainees who were in abdelatif nassar's position that is people who were pr be cleared for transfer got kind of stuck so Walk us through where where we are with that okay. So is one of a couple of the seventeen detainees who have not been cleared by pr. Bees whose habeas petitions took a really really really long time. These are not like second successive. These are first petitions and al hilo along with stifle a piracha. And there's i think one other. Ms i fully to purchase i. It's it's even hard for me to keep track of all these things. Anyway so al heels case finally got to the dc circuit last year and it produced this remarkably two thousand and nine like opinion because it produces remarkably two thousand nine like panel where you had a three judge panel of judges naomi. Row a raymond randolph. And former judge riffs and for folks who don't have the dc circuits guantanamo jurisprudence committed to memory. Judge ran off is the one who wrote the opinion that was reversed by the supreme court in brazil. He's the one who wrote dependent was your first by the supreme court in hamdan. He's the one who wrote the opinion that was reversed by the supreme court in boumediene and he was the one who worked the opinion that was vacated by the supreme court in piazza has some views on guantanamo. So the three judge panel held a couple of pretty important things but most importantly it held at guantanamo detainees categorically. Do not have due process rights. Judge griffiths separate concurring. Opinions suggest that it was unnecessary to reach that conclusion because as various other panels had done at various other points. One could assume that you process clause applied if one believe that whatever process that detainees had received met due process standards. And then the the detainee. Mr al hilla sought rehearing on bonk from dc circuit given. How sort of one sided a panel. He had received. The disease agreed to rehear the case on bonk. But and here's what technical especially important only the due process issue. There were actually some other important questions that the panel decided about. Whether the scope of the government's detention authority includes the power to detain someone who is not a member of al qaeda or any of its affiliated groups but who provided substantial support to al qaeda affiliates through non-belligerent activity. That's a big deal to that is not what's going before the on the unbound is just as i am the due process question so of course this led to the question of well. What's the biden administration gonna say about the due process clause and again we're back to carol and charlie's report in an according to caroline charlie. There was a huge interagency. Kerfuffle about what the by initiations position ought to be where all three positions were represented. Basically the notion that the due process clause should apply to the detainees and yet was satisfied. Here the notion that the court should not reach whether it applies because even if it does it was satisfied and the notion that the it was not applicable. All three positions were aired. Apparently the middle one one and so the brief that we have not seen as we've been told by caroline. Charlie takes no position on the due process question. It merely takes the position that to whatever extent to process applies the procedures at guantanamo comport with due process. Exactly so and that's an elegant compromise. If you don't think about it that much the reason why. I'm i'm sort of wary of that compromise and the reason why i've been wary of opinions making that point. Go all the way back to. I think it was then circuit. Judge brett cavanaugh. Who was the first. Big argument is because various judges on the dc circuit have suggested that some of the critical procedural rulings that the court of appeals reached in the first round of post boumediene cases ben back nine ten and eleven were informed by the assumption that the due process clause did not apply so for example the notion that the correct standard of of the burden of proof is a preponderance of the evidence not clear and convincing evidence. Well judge silverman has all but said the reason why you know. They're not troubled by hamdi is because that case of course was about due process so color me skeptical that the dc circuit jurisprudence over the last eleven twelve years would look the same if the due process clause clearly applied to the detainees. But the larger point. And i'm just gonna say working now i'll shut up. Is you know whatever this means. For the habeas cases it has enormous implications for the military commissions because to whatever extent in the government can get away with the argument that the procedures. These defendants are the detainees are receiving satisfied. You processing the habeas context. You know ben courts have a much better idea of what due process requires the criminal context especially in the capital context. And that's where i think. Al hilla could have enormous practical ramifications on the military commissions side answering that question one way or other. And do you have an instinct about how to handicap the bank dc circuit on this point. And let me just make the question a little harder and do you have an instinct about if the on bank dc circuit agrees with you. What the chances are the. Supreme court would regard the matter cert worthy where i have to say. There certainly is not a majority in my view for the idea..

guantanamo biden administration muhammad al qahtani supreme court al hilla abdelatif nassar al hilo raymond randolph Judge griffiths Mr al hilla ben al qaeda caroline charlie hamdan naomi piazza Judge brett cavanaugh brazil dc carol
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Martin stepping down but the government filed something asking for an extension and then the government has since filed a very careful a tight rope walking brief where they are declining to defend. Judge a costa's decision but they're not agree on that it's wrong. Basically where they want sort of live to fight this the the the administration's not asking this emc are to affirm. But they're also not willing to concede that a cost to was incorrect so that they can have this issue for a future case if they want it. That seems to be ben. What forced or pushed martin's out whether it was his own or whether it was he was asked to step down by the very few people above him in the chain of command. I only a handful of people know but it seems to be that. The by the ministration insisted on martin's not defending that ruling on appeal. And that was the last straw. So your your inference. Here is that martin's wanted to defend this decision and the biden administration Did not although having gotten rid of him. They didn't acknowledge error. In the case either right did not have knowledge error. What they're basically saying is that they are not that they're not defending basically that they're going to sort of you know stipulate. I think what they've done. They're going to stipulate to sort of a withdrawal of that opinion without considering that it was error that basically there are no longer going to seek to introduce that evidence against al nashiri and therefore the legal issue is moot. moot not necessarily settled. And so you know. I think the the reason why ben i feel somewhat comfortable in the inference. Although it's right to say that there's an inference is because we only got to this point because the prosecutors under the direction of general martin's had pushed for this ruling in the first place and so i find hard to believe it was the other way round right. I find it hard to believe that. A legal argument advanced by general martin's and his prosecutors that pushed gentle martin's out because he was standing by the same argument. If you follow me. Because he wasn't ended by this. I it's usually the most logical inference here is that he wanted the government to defend that decision. The people above him didn't and they just reached some kind of intractable in impasse. So this brings us to the more general point about the proceedings. Continuing in the military commissions are not as the case may be albeit without the chief prosecutor. Unlike latiff if nasser there are these detainees who have pending charges against them including mr al-nashiri and the five nine eleven accused conspirators. Where are we at this point. I mean for those. I would say overwhelming majority of listeners and l'affaire readers who have frankly lost track of the saga of the military commissions. What does it mean that proceedings resumed and is the resumption of proceedings really mean the resumption of a stalling at a different rate. I would say stalling for different reasons right. That as opposed to be installed by cova did. Now we're back to where we were before. Which is with different cases stalling because of various procedural impasses. So you know the reality is. I mean there are ten defendants spread across four trials or at least four cases there. Is you mentioned the five nine eleven defendants alan the sheree hotmail rocky also known as national to mir and then there are the three sort of the so-called indonesia defendants whose cases the least far along who were just only a couple months ago arraigned and there are also to be clear a couple who have clad right so i'll alu. Oslo was convicted and majd conp- lead so there are two. There are two still guantanamo. Who are on the far side of the military commissions system introduced in in sort of post conviction imprisonment. If you will better we could do like an hour on each of the cases and why they're stuck in the mud make a long story short yes. The resumption of prasino's guantanamo means that we will go from zero movement toward trial in. This case is toward the very slow paced movement toward trial that we had seen before last march. You know i still think a twenty twenty four trial date in the nine eleven cases still to me wildly optimistic probably the same violence show because the the wildcard here and the mark martin store is a good example of this. The wildcard here is interlocutory. Appeals and the specter that if the trial courts hand down you know rulings that really tilt very heavily one way or the other. There's going to be time. Spent taking that issue to the cr. And then if necessary the dc circuit perhaps without the trial being able to continue perhaps without further progress in the proceedings. And in the nashiri case when that happened indeed they went backwards three and a half years so there are so many things still to be worked out. There are so many questions still to be answered. And frankly i mentioned ben. The ongoing fight in the al hilla case about whether the due process clause applies at all to the detainees. That's on the habeas salad. Wait man we're getting to that but don't jump the gun. I'm not jumping the gun. I'm just tying threads together which is to say that like what the dc circuit does in that case could yet further either slowdown or throw a wrench into the you know the the incredibly slow march of pretrial proceedings and each of these four cases. I have a quick question. Actually if i could. But in steve this is like i feel like i'm one of those people that ben was saying before is like sort sort of lost a threat to actually hearing you lay it all out like this is very very helpful but the fact that this is like this has been dragging on for so long my my my question is like he's there anybody anybody on any side of this. Who is happy with the way things are going right now not publicly so you know i had thought this is why i took it back to the mark martin story for a second. I mean you know say what you will about general martin's and he and i have certainly had our differences over the years but man if you needed someone to stand up and say you know this is going okay. We'll just have to keep the only way out is through like yes you know. Kip common carry on like that was his stick. Was you know. We're reinventing the wheel. This is gonna take awhile. They're going to be some bumps and bruises but we're marching in the right direction. And so you know to me. At least right. General martin's sort of stepping off stage is just yet another nail in this coffin of like. What are we still doing here. I mean you know ben no i wrote a piece for for l'affaire i just went back and looked at when i wrote. It was april of twenty nineteen titled. It's time to admit that the military commissions have failed. You know here. We are two years and three months later and they haven't gotten any better. And if you wanna symbol general martin's leaving is quite simple and it's not a good one so there may be people out there who still think. Everything's going great with the military commissions. I'm hard pressed to think of anyone who says that publicly. I don't think there's anybody. I mean as somebody who defended the military commissions for quite a while. I haven't done so publicly in years. It seems to me they. They have a demonstrated record of failure across all of the axes that justify their existence in the first place. And i don't know anybody who argues to the contrary.

martin nashiri biden administration ben al nashiri general martin latiff mr al majd conp prasino emc mark martin store costa nasser cova Martin al hilla guantanamo government Oslo
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Kind of if you were looking. I say i think from a political strategy perspective. We're coming up on the twentieth anniversary of nine eleven Guantanamo still being there is kind of a reminder of what went wrong. I think to a lot of people and in a way to get people out of there would look like a mic. One time a smaller or to get rid of it Or close it down would be a win for this administration that said they. You know it's it's really hard getting guys out of there abdelatif first of all as you said. He had that sort of transfer package. It was completely done. It was just kind of paperwork that got snarled at the end. Like you know the secretary of defense his signature on a piece of paper essentially and so. That's what was holding him up. But like if you look at sort of his case like he's going back to morocco a country that is a stable country ally the united states. He has family there waiting for a job there waiting for him a house there waiting for him like he he was i think on paper he was the easiest case to transfer one of the folks i talked to who is involved in putting transfer together said that his case was not a low hanging fruit his case was annot hanging fruit it was like it was just right there it was It was the layup that the biden administration could just kind of put in the bucket. So steve how should we understand this transfer. There are fortyish people remaining at guantanamo. How many of them are plausible. Transfers at this point and how many of them fall into this category of really really difficult to imagine what a disposition that doesn't involve continued detention. Looks like there are Often like to think that there are four. categories ben of guantanamo detainees. And you know for folks who haven't seen it. The new york times has a fantastic thing called the guantanamo docket which really is a super helpful breakdown of of all of this including the four categories so with the transfer of missile latif. There are ten detainees who are of the remaining thirty nine who have already been cleared by the periodic review boards. Who you know. Meet the other sort of internal criteria for transfer and so the question is just if the biden administration is going to be able to find somewhere to send them of those tennis. Worth stress in a bunch of them are yemeni and that has continued to pose difficulties on the resettlement question. And just to be clear that because you can't easily repatriate somebody to yemen because of the state of that country so you have to find some third-country country attributing to take the person. At least one of the ten is stateless which raises complications of its own. So those ten. I think it's right to sort of about this the way. Let's put it as no hanging fruit. Said the low hanging fruit are the ten you know who have been cleared in are still there. There are another seventeen who are in detention not in the military commissions who have not been cleared by. Prp's and you know. I think those are the most complicated cases for the administration politically that will be the last nut to crack in the universe at guantanamo. There are two of the remaining thirty nine who are serving sentences pursuant to military commission convictions. And then there are ten who are in various stages of pretrial proceedings in the military commissions. And that's it and so you know twenty seven of the thirty nine on the tension side twelve of the thirty nine and the military commission side and the twelve on the military commission side that have their own problems. But i think from the from the perspective of an administration that has not repudiated commissions. You know. I think it's safe to assume those are going to soldier ahead at whatever terrifyingly slow paced. They're soldier in the the. You know the real political challenge the by administration the the diplomatic challenges. The ted who have already been cleared the political challenges the other seventeen all right before we turn to the other major issues that arose which coincidentally involve those other groups of people. Let's finish up with with the transfer Situation latif have you been in touch with Lot of nassar's family owned with him. I you were sort of famously. Not able to have direct contact with him while you were reporting your story about actually surprised. You're not in morocco hanging out with him now. It's yeah it was. I was very tempted. Let me tell you But i basically in reporting i did. A number of interviews with former guantanamo detainees. And those were the hardest interviews. I've ever done in my entire career impart because these men have been through a lot and they are very i mean they have all kinds of sort of ptsd and they have all kinds of Hesitations and unwillingness which you can sort of imagine to sit and subject themselves to more questions and so to me. I like that was actually very much. My first impulse like here. He's got gets transferred. Just jump on a plane. But then i realized that actually probably more productive. What would lead to a better interview and a more kinda humane way to approach. It is to sort of give them a little time. Let them settle with his family. modal space. I didn't want to be you know the pozo going in through brittany spears bathroom window or whatever and just give them a little space and then and then kinda pursue it. After that. And i think that Yeah i i have been sort of in touch with him through his lawyer and and as well with the family Again through the lawyer and yet they are. They are ecstatic. They're so excited They are and especially because it. Sort of coincidentally thank happened to be. He'd when when he sort of the day before he lands there so he celebrating his first. You know holiday with his family in nineteen years so they are. They are Very excited they are very. They're also a little bit. I mean kind of tender transitional time for them. Yeah so i. I think it's kinda we'll see how it shakes out and hopefully i'll be able to To get that you know interview that i've been waiting for for like five years now. So steve let's talk about general mark martin's who was the chief prosecutor of the military commissions. And as you described contended for a number of years that he would be there through the nine eleven trial mark. Martin's has now announced his retirement. The nine eleven trials still hasn't happened. What happened well you know. We only know been publicly. Reported ben and and so. I think it's an important caveat upfront but there are coincidences. That seemed to give a lot of credence to the public reporting. So carol rosenberg and at least on one of the stories i think. Charlie savage reported that martin's stepped away as the result of fight with others in the biden administration albeit unnamed. Others about the position the government was going to take on an interlocutory appeal in the al-nashiri case al-nashiri folks may remember is the alleged accused mastermind of the october. Two thousand bombing of the us has coal. It's al-nashiri case where the dc circuit in twenty nineteen wiped away three and a half years of pretrial proceedings because of a conflict that the trial judge hadn't disclosed here. Now ben what. We're what everyone's fighting about is an effort by the government led at the time general martin's to introduce statements al-nashiri made while he was in cia custody and by every account accept the government's being tortured not at his trial but at least in support of certain pretrial proceedings and the military commission and that fight produced a ruling by the trial. Judge judge a cost a gosh. I think it was late last year early this year. Adopting what to my mind was a rather implausible. Reading of the military commissions act under which those statements could be admitted for pretrial proceedings because pretrial proceedings were not quote proceedings in a military commission on that the that was just a reference to the trial. Whoever has the better argument al-nashiri has appealed that to the court of military commission review and general martin. Sears for court my favorite court the court that has has done the most the most article one courts bad name of any court. I can think of so. The that appeals. Pending and the time in of martin's departure was the day. The government's response was due and on that date. Not only did you know the times..

biden administration guantanamo abdelatif military commission nashiri morocco Situation latif nassar Guantanamo latif ben steve The new york times tennis brittany spears united states carol rosenberg ted Charlie savage mark martin
"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"nasser" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Stagnated. We talked about the resignation of general martin's. And we talked about the dc circuits. Latest forays into guantanamo bay. It's though l'affaire podcast. July twenty third a guantanamo update with latiff. Nassar and steve vladeck. So steve get us started. It's been a a big few weeks for guantanamo news which usually doesn't take place in big clusters give us an overview of how the the world the small world of guantanamo bay is different this week than it was safe three weeks ago. Well i mean. I think the first thing is that there are things happening in the military commissions. I mean we've were on the far side of what was a sixteen seventeen month pause in every single pretrial proceeding in all four of the pen. No military commission cases and you know we had the first proceedings in at least two of those cases in the last couple of days in the last week or so. So that's i think a big shift. There's one fewer detainees guantanamo then. There was a couple of weeks ago. So we've had the first you know. Transfer of a detainee out of the administration at least a transfer that wasn't pursuant to a plea agreement since president obama's last folded office in two thousand seventeen and we no longer have general mark martin's as the chief prosecutor of the military commissions even though at various points general martin's had told various folks that he was gonna see the nine eleven trial all the way to its conclusion that ended up not happening Apparently it didn't happen because of a disagreement over some litigation strategy. So you know. These are at least in guantanamo land. Pretty big deals and then the fourth piece of news is sort of less of a pretty big deal because it was sort of a punt but the the biden administration filed its brief under seal in probably the most important guantanamo case. The dc circuit has heard in a while about whether the due process clause applies to the guantanamo detainees and apparently according to report him from carol. From charlie savage the administration took no position on that question. So you know. I would say ben four to five pretty big news items that i didn't matter a lot on their own but together also i think are a pretty interesting inflection point all right so we're going to go through each of those in turn but i wanna start with the transfer. The trump administration had not transferred people at least not pursuant to plea agreement and the the gentlemen transferred was named lot if nassir and we happen to have lots of nassir. Al beit a different one right here. Lot f- tell us about the gentleman who was transferred from guantanamo. This week and how you came to be interested in him. Yeah well. I guess. Maybe i'll answer the second question. I and in a way in your introduction you already answered it. Which that i found too much to my sort of befuddle moment a few years back when i was just sort of procrastinating on twitter that there was this guy at guantanamo who had my same name. Yeah i just like. I didn't realize that such a person exists. As soon as i did. I immediately wanted to know everything i could about him. So kind to your to the first part of your question. Basically what i could find out. Then there was pre little about him out there. The first kind of place where i found anything was on the guantanamo docket on the new york times website. And basically what. I found about him there through those Like leaked dod dossiers. It sounded very nefarious. I mean he basically the the charges. They were actually formal charges. But basically what they said were. He was a top explicit expert of al qaeda. He was top advisor to osama bin laden. He helped blow up the bamiyan buddha statues which were a unesco world heritage site he fought. Us and coalition forces at the battle of tora bora and then wound up at guantanamo where he had all kinds of disciplinary infractions. And everything like that. That's sort of what it said. I had this very stark picture of the sky. And then when i talked to his attorney a woman. By the name of shelby sullivan bennett. Who was then at the law firm reprieve. She basically said the exact opposite she said. No no no. This guy was an aid worker at the wrong place the wrong time. Yeah he never. Al qaeda didn't have any kind of relationship with osama bin laden and so on and so on and basically this guy the us paid a ransom for this guy and they got a guy who you know Who's just mixed up in something. Nothing do with and never had charges and never had a trial and then to kind of to make matters more intense. What at the time. When i discovered around Twenty two ebb and of two thousand sixteen early twenty seventeen. He had gone before this. Pr be hearing this parole like process Board made up of people from the heads of six top agencies of the us government and they unanimously declared that he was that they didn't need to be holding him any longer he was not a continuing threat so he was this guy that was sort of like cleared on paper but remained at guantanamo. Not sort of when. I found him when i started doing research into his story. And as you reported in your excellent radio lab series about him he kind of got hung up in this end of the obama administration period where he was Notionally under under certain circumstances cleared to be transferred to and yet it kinda didn't just didn't happen before trump took office. What do we know a lot about the circumstances of his actual transfer was it just that the biden administration picked up where the obama administration left off when it left office and now that they had the chance they affected the transfer order or is there more to the story than that. That's basically the story. There's maybe a little more to the story like it does feel like in general. The story is the his transfer was kind of this une. Cash check from the obama administration of the biden administration. Just finally you know endorsed or whatever but basically there were other things..

guantanamo guantanamo bay latiff Nassar steve vladeck biden administration charlie savage martin Al beit mark martin osama bin laden shelby sullivan bennett al qaeda steve carol obama dc tora bora ben obama administration
Iran Candidate Says He’s Willing to Potentially Meet Biden

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Iran Candidate Says He’s Willing to Potentially Meet Biden

"An Iranian presidential candidate says he'd be willing to meet with president Joe Biden if he wins his country's election next week so Americans to send a better and stronger signals to the stomach for public speaking to the Associated Press former Iranian central bank chief Abdel Nasser how much he stressed that an American return to rise talk to the nuclear deal is key to any possible relationship amid the wider tensions in the Middle East how much is one of the seven candidates approved by Iranian authorities to run for the presidency in this Lamical public's June eighteen election outgoing president Hassan Rouhani a relatively moderate cleric with Iran's theocracy helped his nation reach its landmark two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with world powers I'm in Syria Shockley

President Joe Biden Iranian Central Bank Abdel Nasser The Associated Press Hassan Rouhani Middle East Iran Syria
Former U.S. Gymnastics Coach Is Dead After Human Trafficking Charges

The Takeaway

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Former U.S. Gymnastics Coach Is Dead After Human Trafficking Charges

"Being leveled at an associate of Larry Ness are the former U. S gymnastics team doctor now behind bars accused of sexually molesting hundreds of young female gymnasts, most of them minors. Ah, former head coach of the U. S team, John get hurt is now under arrest in charge with 24 felony counts. Including human trafficking and sexual assault. In announcing the arrest, state Attorney General Dana Nessel also implicated Michigan State University in the crimes for failing to turn over internal documents believed to be connected to ness are There are no legal avenues remaining that would allow us to secure these documents absent MSU's decision to voluntarily produce them. I find it unconscionable. At the university would stonewall the very investigation that it requested some gym. This alleged together. It was physically and emotionally abusive and force them to be treated by NASA are Get her, maintains he had zero knowledge of Nasser's crimes. The

Larry Ness Attorney General Dana Nessel Gymnastics Michigan State University John MSU Nasa Nasser
Ex-US Olympics gymnastics coach with ties to Nassar charged

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Ex-US Olympics gymnastics coach with ties to Nassar charged

"U. S. Olympics gymnastics coach with ties to Disgrace, Sports Doctor Larry Nassar is now facing criminal charges in Michigan. John get erred, was head coach of the 2012 Women's Olympic gymnastics team, which won the gold medal. Details about the charges were not immediately known. NASA is a position that or was a position at Michigan State University and was also the team's doctor Get hurt, has insisted. He had zero knowledge of NASA's crimes. Although some of the gym this claim he forced them to see Dr Nasser and was physically abusive to them. Nasser has been sentenced to decades in prison for sexually assaulting gymnasts and possessing child pornography. New

Larry Nassar Gymnastics Olympics Nasa Michigan Michigan State University Dr Nasser John Nasser
Meet Jerri Evans, The Turning Natural Juice Bar Founder Transforming Lives in the Black Community

Side Hustle Pro

06:51 min | 2 years ago

Meet Jerri Evans, The Turning Natural Juice Bar Founder Transforming Lives in the Black Community

"So welcome to the guest chair Jerry. Thank you for having me I'm so happy to have you here as I mentioned I was in the juice bar on h street the other day, and I was like this is so yummy. This is amazing I'd love to know more about your story. So first and foremost what was your career path before becoming the owner of turning natural juice bars. So prior to juicing, I was an air nautical engineer I worked for a major company which is probably the main companies in the Department of Defence Specialty was F twenty, two fighter jets. So Bess, literally my background I didn't WanNA been engineer at first I wanted to go to fashion but we had a career fair in highschool they separated all the boys of jobs that they believe men become in they separated the girls with like nursing and teaching and I didn't know you know to be feminist then I just wanted to go with the boys and so went with boys and this guy from NASA's Guy Actually said women do not become engineered. Yet I was so offended I went home and that's home. My Mama say what I only WanNa do fashion anymore I wanNA become an engineer and she's like. Bass drastic. So I just kind of looked into what types of engineering I would potentially enjoy in to be truthfully honest none of them were remotely interesting. I just knew that airplanes was probably the most interesting to me and I ended up majoring in Tennessee State University. So you were on that path and what did you envision your life looking like before this whole entrepreneurship thing happened. My first internship with with Nasser in our member calling my mom during that year that summer I was like. Do this every single day for like sixty five years. There's no way. This could be life, and so I knew that I was going to work for a while I. Just knew that couldn't be that person that worked until retirement indigenous. No hope to petty pitch whatever they decided I I earn so. Actually, GonNa. Probably be engineer for a while. Then I had no idea. So, walk us through what was the motivation behind starting turning natural. While two thousand, one by MOM was diagnosed with Stage two breast cancer and even though Stage two is roads of we early at that time cancelled as like a death sentence, everyone was so afraid of being diagnosed in, you know all the people that we had known to be diagnosed like my aunt who was diagnosed with stage four she passed away shortly after being diagnosed in. So our live drastically changed a mom went from a meat eater to vegetarian to Vegan and. Nine and a half years she was cancer free. Very healthy life in we found out in two thousand ten that cancer I came back. When it came back, it was much more aggressive. It's spread to her bones and then it went to her liver was in like two weeks of out that it came back my mom transition and so you'll never really hear me say my mom died I think super aggressive word. In it helps me cope to say she transition because I believe is energy. Redo that guy we just exist in another space and so shortly after my mom passed a believe that very next summer I quit my job and has started going to grief counseling When my mom transition, they give you this pamphlet that tells you what morning is GonNa look like in one minute you're GONNA be happy. One Minute you're going to be said and you're going to be depressed. That you're going to be angry. and. I was just angry I was angry for a very, very hard time. A MOM's a super spiritual woman. I was very angry with guy. Stop believing in any and everything in ages I'm already an introvert. So I literally practice. introverts space like no one could get in my space in. A really good friend of my recommended grief counseling which even made me angrier. Like I don't want to go to counselling I don't want another person to tell me to be absent from the bodies to be present with guy like that didn't make sense to me and I didn't want someone else to say I'm sorry for your loss because I really don't know how to respond to that. I don't WanNa say thank you that you're sorry for my law. So I was just in a very angry space in a started going to counseling. It was difficult because everyone that I had talked to a new mom. So I never had to explain my mother in the way that I had to explain to this counselor. and. She told me that morning isn't linear. You're not going to feel one way today, and then the next day is the next phase in pampering. You're gonNA fill multiple things on multiple days. And that was probably the single best advice that I could have gotten after my mom transition. So I'm sitting at my desk at my job at the time when I'm still in engineer and I hear my mother's voice and she said, why are you still here now in my mind I'm like I read about this this is the point where my mind I'm going crazy because if I turn around my mom is standing here I am not Right anymore. and. So I stopped what I was doing and I turned around I. Heard it again of course, she was there but I knew that Mitt like you don't WanNa do this anymore you not fulfil. You're just doing it because you're good at it. and. So I went to my boss's office and. told him as saying, Hey, you know I can't do this anymore. And you know at the time I was doing about equipment. The workload that I had was equivalent to two or three people job title. And so he said, don't worry. We're interviewing people were going to get you some help You don't understand I don't want to do this job at all anymore So I quit.

Engineer Jerry Nasa Bess Department Of Defence Specialt Tennessee State University Nasser Mitt
A Song For Peace

The Promised Podcast

05:17 min | 2 years ago

A Song For Peace

"This is the story of a song that is in a way the story of this country in the spring of Nineteen, sixty-nine at a sidewalk cafe on Richmond Street tucked in from the corner of Dizengoff. Street in Tel Aviv a twenty four year old poet named Yakov or Janka wrote Blit met a twenty five year old musician and arranger named yet year Rosenbloom and the two men became friends the cafe was called California and the. Place, itself said something about the people who made a habit of spending their days especially, their long nights there. The first thing to know about Cafe California is what it wasn't just one hundred and twenty five meters up Dizengoff was a legendary Bohemian cafe called carseat. It had been in operation since nineteen, thirty five, and since then it was the place where you can find some of Jewish palestines and then Israel's greatest poets and writers. On Alterman and Lebron's Sean Ski. Lay. Goldberg. Alexander Penn great writers who had been young and who grew old drinking coffee in the afternoon and vodka in Iraq at night at the simple spare tables of cassette alongside these luminaries in the nineteen sixties. New Generation staked claims at the table, the actor or. The singer Oregon Stein the architect Yaakov wreck there and many others cafe California was not seat from its vantage half of long block away even the young people at seat where old carseat was yesterday's Bohemia California was today's Cafe California was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine by a man named Ab Netanyahu who was only thirty two. Then that had lived a good deal of life. Netanyahu was born in nineteen twenty seven in the southwest corner of what is now Iran in a place called Abedin on the Persian Gulf just. Across the border from Bosra not far from Kuwait at six he was sent to board at Saint. Mary's a Jesuit School in Mumbai where you had an aunt, his parents abandoned. Persia. For India when he was twelve at sixteen and Nineteen, forty three, he lied about his age and joined the Royal Indo British Air Force in time after he trained to watch the Second World War wind down at twenty one he came to fight in Israel's war of independence and never left taking a job as an El Al pilot when he was decommissioned. It was with a few restless L. Buddies that Netanyahu opened cafe. California soon, it was filled with the city's young wannabe writers, directors and poets the people most eager to knock from their sinecures the city's old writers, directors, and poets who argued and held forth at carseat. Ab Thanh was a magnet for Bohemians and he came alive when he was with Bohemians, their company produced in him at once a sense of satisfaction. He had found his people but also a sense of restlessness eighty, nine ton was in constant search of his next Gig in nineteen sixty five he ran for Knesset advice of a friend who worked in PR he pledged that if he was elected, he would fly to Egypt to meet with General Nasser to seek peace after he failed to win a seat in parliament, he anyway bought a nineteen twenty seven steer. Men by playing that, he named piece one on February twenty, eighth nineteen, sixty six, he took off and flying low to avoid Israeli radars he landed in Port Saieed the Egyptians sent him back the next day Nassar had refused to see him back home a retired David Ben Gurion told reporters that not tons trip was an event of moral and political importance and quote pope. Pious gave him a medal of peace and Robert Kennedy and Bertrand Russell sought out his company not much later the notion took hold of Natanz, that music held the key to altering. Israeli. In the summer of Nineteen Sixty Nine AB NATANZ bought a Dutch cargo ship named MVP SEATO MVP stands for motor vessel and he rechristened it the MVP piece from Holland he sailed to New York to raise money and set up a shipboard radio station. His plan was to anchor in the Mediterranean outside territorial waters of Egypt and Israel and broadcast songs of peace that might open the minds of Israelis any. Alike his sojourn to New York stretched biblically three years would pass before he returned with ship in good repair with mixers, turntables, ABC cartridge machines, reel to reel tape machines, and fifty kilowatt transmitter to help not on- by what he needed John. Lennon. And Yoko Ono signed hundreds of posters of the two of them in bed in Amsterdam their famous bet in which not on sold to raise money for audio equipment. John Lennon also offered not time yet. Rolls. Royce grads to sell at auction, but the practical impediments of shipping the grand car stymied the business, the carpenters, Johnny Mathis and other musicians recorded for non promotional clips in praise of peace. Not an idea was that new music might open minds in Israel Egypt. The station eventually began to broadcast in nineteen seventy-three as the voice of peace

Ab Netanyahu Cafe California California Egypt Israel Dizengoff John Lennon Persia Bertrand Russell Tel Aviv MVP Johnny Mathis Alexander Penn Rosenbloom Bosra Iraq Yoko Ono Nassar New York Persian Gulf
Students may not get "the true college experience" this year

Nightside with Dan Rea

01:48 min | 2 years ago

Students may not get "the true college experience" this year

"International students in Massachusetts and across the country may be forced to leave if they're university goes virtual. More from w TVs. Louisa Moeller full classrooms in person debate that used to be Valeria Mendy old is experience at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. I was in shock. I was like, I can't the can's right like he has now the grad student from Mexico says Uncertainty from the pandemic has turned into hyper uncertainty with a new directive from Immigration and Customs enforcement that international students in the U. S will have to leave the country or risk deportation. If their school switched online on Ly Learning. Harvard, for example, had just announced it would hold on ly virtual classes in the fall. What am I gonna do with my with my lease on my apartment when I'm going to go with my furniture? Go back to Mexico. Where am I going to say international students are basically confronted between two choices between risking my own health and, you know, attending in person classes or be deported from the US. Maya Nasser, a PhD student at MIT worries that if she leaves, she won't be allowed back on top of the challenges she could face trying to learn from her home country of Lebanon. Right now open on its passing through an extreme economic crisis. The country is on a brink of Herman. We do not have access to power electricity, InterNAP. Ice is expected to release more guidance later this week. But Sarah Sprites her with the American Council on Education, which represents over 700 colleges and university, says the impact could be huge. So we have over one million students in the U. S that come from other countries on they actually have $41 billion impact on the U. S economy. That was the estimation from

Mexico Valeria Mendy Harvard Kennedy School Of Gove Ly Learning Sarah Sprites Lebanon Louisa Moeller Harvard Massachusetts Immigration And Customs Internap Maya Nasser American Council On Education United States MIT
Israeli Settlers And Palestinians In Occupied West Bank Grapple With U.S. Peace Plan

All Things Considered

03:23 min | 3 years ago

Israeli Settlers And Palestinians In Occupied West Bank Grapple With U.S. Peace Plan

"Under president trump's peace plan for the Middle East all Israeli settlements in the occupied west bank would remain in place that's the land that Palestinians seek for their own independent state reporter Naomi's level off as Palestinians and Israelis now living in the west bank what this plan would mean for them a tire is a Palestinian village perched on a rocky west bank him mayor Nasser el Atari takes me on a tour of the area in the municipalities white mini van we passed stone buildings some of them hundreds of years old but it never would have been number Atari tells me the village is famous for its herbs but he says over the years the village has lost a lot of farm lands to the Israeli settlement next door it has a similar name a tear at the Israeli anti settlement group peace now says Israel sees some land owned privately by people in a Tara for security perimeter around the settlement the group also says the settlements housing was built on land that had been used by other Palestinian villages of Iron Man at that at the time he takes me to a lookout point where you can see the settlement a bunch of red roofed houses after Israelis began to move there in the nineteen eighties Atari says no one here believe the settlement would stay for ever warning to trump's new peace plan it's not going anywhere man lam local health let him look he says of trump the person who doesn't own something has no right to give it away as a gift and he's not impressed by what the Palestinians would get the White House calls it a state but it would be in pieces surrounded by Israel went back often often when a donut on the he asks where is this state he's offering Atari like most Palestinians once the settlements out of the way there on occupied territory the UN security council has said they're illegal but across the hill in a terrified settlers feel a historic Jewish tied to the west bank I go to Sam's question markers house to ask him about terms plan he's a member of the town council and he and rolls a large map on his living room table for actually in the center of Israel it includes Israel and the west bank but he calls all of it is round you take map of Israel were like almost in the middle he says a tear it was built at a strategic place between two Palestinian cities to prevent them from growing together which he sees as a threat to Israel he's happy the trump plan would let them stay but one thing makes him nervous under the plan they would be an Israeli enclave surrounded by parts of the Palestinian state I think it's a shocking because you know you see where you live and they say that no that you know the Arabs will be all around you after the plan was released his counsel issued a message to a terror it residents over what sap Schumacher reads it to me I think this would describe as a lifestyle which you will note that god been no meat so in one area we're getting seventeen and it that's amazing on the other hand it continues a terror it will be an enclave in the so called Palestinian state his wife ideology marker says she's even concerned that people in a terror it might choose to go somewhere else I'm guessing families who would move many even

Donald Trump Middle East President Trump
Former Michigan State gymnastics coach convicted of lying to police in case linked to Nassar

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

Former Michigan State gymnastics coach convicted of lying to police in case linked to Nassar

"And a former college gymnastics coach has been found guilty in a case tied to sexual abuse by sports doctor Larry Nasser a jury of twelve in Lansing Michigan deliberated for about three hours before returning with guilty verdicts Friday against former Michigan State University gymnastics coach Cappy click as the case tied to the Larry Nasser sexual abuse scandal the jury found clay just lied to police when she denied being told by two teen athletes of abuse by Nasser in nineteen ninety seven it would be nearly twenty years before Nasser

Larry Nasser Lansing Michigan Michigan State University Cappy Clay
Ex-Michigan State coach convicted in case tied to Nassar

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 3 years ago

Ex-Michigan State coach convicted in case tied to Nassar

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting an ex Michigan state gymnastics coach is convicted in the case tied to Larry Nasser former Michigan State University gymnastics coach Kathy click as was convicted by a jury Friday of lying to police when she denied to teens told her of sexual abuse by sports doctor Larry Nasser in nineteen ninety seven the sixty five year old Cletus was found guilty of a felony and misdemeanor she faces up to four years in prison after April fifteen sentencing Nasser who worked at Michigan state and USA gymnastics which trains Olympians serving what are effectively life sentences for child porn possession and sexually assaulting young women and girls

Mike Crossey Larry Nasser Cletus Michigan USA Michigan State University Kathy