39 Burst results for "Nasa"

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on GSMC Weird News Podcast

GSMC Weird News Podcast

01:15 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on GSMC Weird News Podcast

"Planet, I. Thank you to come up with a better name than Venire de. But what do I know quote? We think that Venus is a Russian planet so we shouldn't lag behind. Rogozin is a former deputy prime minister who told reporters last Tuesday. that. Quote. The Soviet Union was the first and only one to land a spacecraft on Venus, the spacecraft gathered information about the planet. It has like hell over there. And that's why he saying Russia owns it you know they're not known for exactly having the most pleasant region of. Eleven research published last Monday on the National Nature Astronomy Journal details British. American. Scientists, discovery of fussing gas, which I mentioned previously in the clouds around the Venus was considered a potential sign of life on the planet. The atmosphere of Venus is made up of almost entirely carbon dioxide and is considered to be the hottest planet in our solar system and it is not very close. This new study, of course, renewed public interest in Venus likely promoting the roscosmos chief to remind the world of the former Soviet Union's achievements in early space exploration NASA's Marne or to became the first spacecraft to fly by Venus and measure it's extreme surface temperature in nineteen, sixty two however the Soviet. Union. Launched Several VENIRE spacecraft and in nineteen seventy veneer, a seven became the first spacecraft to make a successful soft landing on the planet though it melted within about ninety seconds and I also believe the data they gathered only lasted. For like six or seven seconds nevertheless successor of near nine took the first image from the surface and the only one to date of the Manasian surface from the ground level perspective quotes the huge gap between Soviet Union and its competitors in. Venus. Reserves contributed to the fact that the United States called Venus the Soviet planet. Which is obviously a burn on Russia. After the Soviet Union kind of fell apart shortly after the study was published this week, a breakthrough initiative program supported by the Russian billionaire Yuri millonaire announced that it would fund a study into the possibility of primitive life in Venus's clouds led by Sarah Sager from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology by the Way Sarah. Sager is the coolest name ever doesn't sound like a marvel super villain anyways last month rego's in declared Venus a quote more interesting planet than Mars suggesting that studying the planet could help scientists understand how to address climate change on earth. Of course, spokespersons of global warming have always cited Venus as a prime example of what Earth could end up like if the atmosphere. Of Earth to into carbon dioxide. Would not be pleasant and speaking of unpleasant. We have to go to a break by God stay tuned in the next segment where I will give you my top ten unsolved mysteries. So stay tuned for that..

Soviet Union Sarah Sager Russia Prime Minister Massachusetts Institute Of Tec National Nature Astronomy Jour Rogozin United States Nasa Yuri Millonaire Rego
Understanding the Auroras

Innovation Now

01:07 min | 3 d ago

Understanding the Auroras

"Is a research astrophysicist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. She depends on technologies to help her understand the process that creates the Auroras or northern lights are ways that chronology advances specifically to the Siamese. As, science is. Also discovered that I can meet some other for example CDs that are devices recieving reinvented for astronomers to be able to look saw Dallas is much much better ways they wish in is inside me I've been is the Laura the images we use are also basic knowledge, but they've also the way they hire world communicates exchange information as technology evolves. So does the way we do science and former really a- that only makes new discoveries even better I, remember i. Somehow every time I kind of excited again like a little kid. Reminds us all that reduce looted art when sex origin and that's a good thing for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer Pulley inovation

Nasa Goddard Space Flight Cent Jennifer Pulley Dallas Laura
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

02:47 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

"I'm just saying I make sure that the there's nothing flying in the area when they actually. If what if? Some do refine and playing and his radar. Do he cinema Baba was broken and he wasn't you know tone anybody where was Someone who would have done it carrie. McCullogh. Coming on soon because yeah. Yeah. So so if it if it Smacks into the plane and it explodes all that nuclear stuff is gonNA come down to Earth. Jeez. Okay. Then a cost was a Chinese mission that put a Lander Rover and lander. To the mood yeah, which is pretty cool which is pretty cool. Well, all of its predictable. Video of that? Well, this photos about show there's video as well. Yeah. But it's just like the moon but the front of it really well, no but I'm just saying, are we sure they did it like do they have? Like counters Americans didn't actually go land on the moon. Do they have proof that they actually landed on Dr citing suppose it depends on what you to improve. Doesn't it? Because you know you could say that what the Americans have guys proof but. corded over there the telemetry data I mean, that's pretty. That's Obviously didn't use their rocket science. Yeah someone come. On come over and they went what the what the fuck of you why if you want to be taped over, that is not fucking rocket science. The rocket scientist doesn't even have rocket scientists stuff whatever email rocket scientist he failed he only squeaked by in his class. Yeah He's apprenticeship in yeah you gotTA. On just barely made it. Okay. So NASA, scientists also learned to by Earthquakes Moss, which they didn't know about before I didn't know about earthquakes. Omar's while they can you call earthquake so because we're on earth so they'll be called disgracing quake Sunday tectonic plate there was a Japanese spacecraft that landed on the surface of an asteroid last year, which is, which is absolutely bizarre the voyager two spacecraft that she left our solar system and entered the depths of interstellar space that happened we got on the fact that scientists actually discovered a planet outside of our solar system that they said could probably be the most logical place where we would find life because it was so close to Earth or close. So close to us. So, close to. Another solar. Environment and Habitat as woman in December last the European Space Agency launched a new telescope into orbit which was designed to look more into exoplanets the horizon telescope published. It's first ever image of a black hole. There was something recently in the news about a black hole I. Think Cameroon are so well, they even last year find an unrecorded black hole devour in a neutron star. which has never been seen before. A neutron stars who it's a super dense remnant of a star. So says the in March spacex lunched the crew dragon, which is obviously a commercial spaceship, and then of course this year they actually did the test they..

Scientist European Space Agency Earthquakes Moss Baba Carrie Cameroon Nasa TA Omar
NASA Training Astronauts for Landing on the Moon

Innovation Now

00:59 min | 4 d ago

NASA Training Astronauts for Landing on the Moon

"Doug Wheelock is a veteran test pilot and retired US army colonel who was accumulated one, hundred, seventy, eight days in space. Recently, we lock was selected by NASA, to lead the human landing system joint testing. The testing team will determine the best ways to train astronauts to return to the surface of the moon. NASA has an idea about what these missions. Should look like the big picture for living on the Moon or Mars. But astronauts may be asked to do something never done before or gain knowledge of a piece of equipment being used for the very first time. We lock approaches that kind of challenge by imagining he's putting together a jigsaw puzzle. He looks for the corner pieces and connective parts. I don't believes that ordinary kids from ordinary places grow up to do extraordinary things like work on the moon and he is doing his part to make sure they have the tools and training they need to succeed.

Doug Wheelock Nasa United States
Fresh "Nasa" from 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:08 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh "Nasa" from 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

"NASA traffic in transit, every intimate with one's breaking traffic alerts whenever they happen. I'm Kelly Dylan on 10 10 Wings. Now the official 10 10 wins AKI Weather for Day forecast for that. Let's go to meteorologist Carl Eriksen, who has this live report. Good evening. Good evening, Mario. Pretty quiet weather the next several days chilly out there tonight as temperatures dipped down a 48 in midtown closer to 40. Many suburbs, and those clear skies will then give way to plenty of sunshine for your Sunday will be a cool, very fault. Like day high 62 clear chili again Sunday, not back into the upper forties and sunshine more of the same in the Monday high 65 than the official start of autumn. They're on to stay. Lots of sunshine. Warmer temperatures, although very pleasant Hi near 70 currently 57 clear humidity, 31% and winds north at five MPH repeated the current temperature of 57 going down to 48 in mid town. I make you weather meteorologist called Eriksson on New York's weather station. 10 10 Wins wins News Time 11 33 in the 80 years since we built our first Jeep vehicle, we've been.

Official Kelly Dylan Carl Eriksen Nasa Eriksson New York
NASA Tunes in the Sounds of Space

Innovation Now

01:18 min | 5 d ago

NASA Tunes in the Sounds of Space

"Space is vast beautiful and fascinating. The one thing it isn't is loud. This is innovation. Now bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas, emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shaped the future movies rarely get sound right in space. But if you've spent a fortune on filming dramatic battle between Star cruisers, you probably want the audience to hear it with no atmosphere for sound waves to travel through the real sound in space is mostly silence. But that doesn't mean there is no sound in the universe anyplace with an atmosphere we'll have sound on Mars for example, because the atmosphere is much less dense than earth's sound will be higher in pitch but sound waves aren't the only noise in space today astronomers know that stars and quasars emit radio waves different than sound waves, radio waves or a low frequency electromagnetic wave. On, the far end of the light spectrum. So while no one might be able to hear you scream in space with new radio astronomy instruments scientists are able to tune into the static hiss of distant galaxies and listened to what was points the sounds of silence for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer polar innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through collaboration with NASA.

National Institute Of Aerospac Nasa
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

C-SPAN Programming

00:37 sec | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on C-SPAN Programming

"Astronaut Chris Cassidy, commander of the International Space Station opening 200. 60 miles above Earth, along with their NASA administrator, I'm honored to join you and celebrating the memorial dedication of our nation's 34th President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Under President Eisenhower's leadership, America created NASA, which brought our country to the forefront of space exploration. President Eisenhower understood what NASA could do for America as he provided the vision for the amazing things we do in human and robotic exploration today. Benefit all humankind back on Earth in Eisenhower's voice on the first broadcast from space in 1958 was the beginning of what is now part of our day to day life as we approach the 20th anniversary of a permanent.

Dwight D. Eisenhower Nasa Nasa Administrator International Space Station President Trump Chris Cassidy America Commander
There could be life on Venus, groundbreaking study finds

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 5 d ago

There could be life on Venus, groundbreaking study finds

"Astronomers have found a potential sign of life in the atmosphere of neighboring Venus. For years, people have been looking toward Mars and other response where extraterrestrial life could be hiding. But long written off is Venus, the closest planet to Earth due to its high temperatures dense atmosphere in hostile surface. But now some astronomers say they have detected the presence of Foss fiend gas in the planet's atmosphere, which could mean there's some form of life that produced it. NASA says it wasn't involved in the study and can't comment directly on the findings, but called it intriguing and says it looks forward to discussion about the possibility of life on

Nasa
There could be life on Venus, groundbreaking study finds

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 5 d ago

There could be life on Venus, groundbreaking study finds

"Have found a potential sign of life in the atmosphere of neighboring Venus. For years, people have been looking toward Mars and other spots where extraterrestrial life could be hiding. But long written off is Venus, the closest planet to Earth due to its high temperatures dense atmosphere in hostile surface. But now some astronomers say they have detected the presence of Foss fiend gas in the planet's atmosphere. Which could mean there's some form of life that produced it. NASA says it wasn't involved in the study and can't comment directly on the findings, but called it intriguing and says it looks forward to discussion about the possibility of life on Venus Corresponded

Venus Corresponded Nasa
There could be life on Venus, groundbreaking study finds

Terry Meiners and Company

00:43 sec | 5 d ago

There could be life on Venus, groundbreaking study finds

"Neighbour be the planet harboring life elsewhere in our solar system? Here's ABC is Mark Ramel ART. For years, people have been looking toward Mars and other spots were extraterrestrial life could be hiding. But long written off is Venus, the closest planet to earth due to its high temperatures, dense atmosphere in hostile surface. But now some astronomers say they have detected the presence of Foss fiend gas in the planet's atmosphere, which could mean there's some form of life that produced it. NASA says it wasn't involved in the study and can't comment directly on the findings, but called it intriguing and says it looks forward to discussion about the possibility of life on Venus. Marker. Malard ABC News governor Bashir's

ABC Governor Bashir Nasa
Antares rocket launch at Wallops Flight Centre set for Sept. 29

Innovation Now

01:12 min | 6 d ago

Antares rocket launch at Wallops Flight Centre set for Sept. 29

"The Northrop Grumman Antares rocket with cygnus resupply spacecraft on board will head to space. Later this month launching from the mid Atlantic regional spaceport at NASA Wallops flight facility. The Antares launch is the company's Fourteenth Commercial Resupply Services Mission. Cygnus will deliver NASA science investigations, supplies, and equipment to the International Space Station highlights of space station research facilitated by this launch include a plant habitat for radishes the test of a biologic drug that could be used for the. Treatment of leukemia and the Universal Waste Management System. A new compact toilet that astronauts can use on deep space exploration missions a new three, hundred sixty degree virtual reality camera from a Montreal based film. Studio will also be transported to the station. So astronauts can capture a future spacewalk in cinematic virtual reality cargo resupply from US companies insurers a national capability to deliver critical science research to the space station and significantly increases masses ability to conduct new investigations at the only laboratory in space innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley

International Space Station Nasa Wallops Antares Cygnus Jennifer Pulley United States Nasa Atlantic Montreal
Do Americans Trust Scientists

After The Fact

04:01 min | Last week

Do Americans Trust Scientists

"So much of the public focuses on discovery and they. Scientists going to influence their life scientists. Of course, love the search does that explain maybe just a little bit of the dichotomy I use I think sometimes feel between scientists in the public. View that actually people are quite fascinated by. Approach that scientists take in they're quite curious about it I i. think many of the of the television shows, for example, in books about science or or very very attracted to people and can help bring them in to science and even become scientists themselves. I don't really take a do view of things concerning trust I think trust house to start with the scientists themselves they have to really be. Truthful about their exploration about what they discovered they have to try to be bias free and politically in free free politics and free of self-aggrandizement and just want to pursue the tree. We were President of one of the best engineering schools in the country and have been involved in education but your role at the national science. Foundation. And now your role with the science philanthropy alliance a little little. Bit More of a cheerleader with FBI. Correct way of saying some of this in terms of trying to let people understand the need and support for basic science and our society. Yeah I think you always go back to your roots in at high school. I was cheer. So I think there are definitely a large group of people who liked cheer and that's a very, very important to do, and of course, it demands a different kind of skill set but there's a step beyond cheering. That is just incredibly important to do what I call move the needle to really make things change at sociologically culturally there are many many disparities that abound and they affect science as well as every other field of endeavor and Jake. It's important for institutions like the National Science Foundation's to. All sorts of approaches to to blossom into encourage them scientific discovery come through many many different approaches. And by the way I've Kurd a number of times that Isaac Newton did his greatest most prevalent work during a pandemic. So crisis can also bring about the environment for making a great discovery. You were the chief scientist at NASA. That's pretty cool. What did you take from that role and how did that guy your thinking in the broader scientific community? I really want to be a researcher and that's it. I wanted to explore science deep league. In particular attracted to the cosmos. And Mike Goodness on. There's just some mysteries that it offers and so I was very very focused on that I didn't want anything to take me away from that and so when I was giving the invitation invitation to join NASA as its cheat scientists asked various close friends and colleagues. If it was a good idea, all my department heads around the country who knew me? said, what about idea will take you out of your research because they knew empower engaged wasn't that but then I talked to some of my female colleagues like a colleague who headed the history of science? Department. At Penn State University and my mother who obviously knew me well, if people like that said, well, you can't talk about how important it is that women. and. Underrepresented minorities go into science, and then not take the opportunity to do something about out to have a platform where you can be a role model for that when you can actually affect changes in that.

President Trump National Science Foundation Mike Goodness Nasa FBI Isaac Newton Penn State University Jake Researcher Scientist
NASA wants to start a gold rush in space, so it’s putting a bounty on moon dirt

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

03:04 min | Last week

NASA wants to start a gold rush in space, so it’s putting a bounty on moon dirt

"To mine the moon and then sell lunar rocks and dirt to the space agency. For more. We turn to the KCBS Ring Central news Line and talk to CBS News Space consultant Bill Harwood. You'll soil and rock collection is this part of NASA's bigger plans to set up camp on the moon? Well, yes and no, it's it's really more of a proof of concept and an effort, you know, enticed companies to mind the moon, so to speak. What they're trying to do is set up a mechanism by which Company could go to the moon. They do some exploration find something interesting, and then NASA would buy it from them. So, so it is a mechanism by which a private company could then Tell something to the government that the government might want NASA views. This is a first step to setting up I don't know what to call it, not a lunar economy, but You know, private sector operation in space. You know, the outer space Treaty says no nation can claim a NASCAR nautical body. You can't go to the moon and say this is this belongs to me. Just like you can. You can own an ocean on the earth. You can pull fish out, right? And the same thing would apply to the moon. If you go look for ice, which is something that would help astronauts down the road kind of live off the land. Um, if you have a mechanism by which which companies could do some of the work for Dennis and then get paid for it is a private venture. That's the sort of thing this is looking to encourage. This sounds like a really big shift for NASA story is, if you think about it in the in the half century that people have been exploring space has never been Ah, framework by which you could do business in space. You know, everybody talks about what it costs. No fun to space program or whatever, but all that money is really spent between companies here on the ground. I think this is an attempt anyway, to encourage the private sector to think Maura about what they condemn in space and how they can make money doing it than the money in this case is very monitors between 15 and $25,000. For Little less than a pound of rocker soil. The companies would have to show exactly where it's located in market and photographic proof. They've got it in the nest. At some point down the road would go retrieve it and bring it back to Earth. So I think it's a little bit far out there right now, But it's a It's a step in that direction. And that's what mass is hoping to do with their Artemus Moon program, which is come up with a sustainable architecture for long term exploration. Interesting too, that the bidding as I understand it will be open. Not only just to U. S companies, but international ones as well. Yeah, that's right. Uh, certainly anybody can bid on this massive agrees to it. They pay you 10% up front. More when you prove you've actually done it, And then the final 10% when you get it when they get it back to earth, and look at it, Um again. I think this is ah. Pretty far out there in terms of what you or I would think of it as a business opportunity, considering what it would cost the company to get to the moon in the first place. I think it's more about setting up a framework by which you can do business in space. That's that's to go here. Always great to talk to you. That is CBS News Space consultant Bill Harwood. Sox

Nasa Bill Harwood CBS Artemus Moon Consultant Nascar Maura SOX Dennis U. S
Astronomy from Mars: NASA's Curiosity Rover Snaps Images

Innovation Now

01:20 min | Last week

Astronomy from Mars: NASA's Curiosity Rover Snaps Images

"Occasionally. Even Nastase Curiosity rover stops to gaze at the stars. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future it was the two, thousand, seven, hundred, eighty, four, th day, or soul on Mars. NASA's curiosity rover aimed its mast cameras skyward about seventy five minutes. After sunset the purpose of the brief I session was to gauge the twilight brightness during this time of the year on Mars, there's more dust in the air to reflect sunlight making it particularly bright similar to bright twilights on earth after large volcanic eruptions on this particular evening the dust in the Martian. Atmosphere was thick enough that not even moderately bright stars were visible, but a to image twilight. Panorama reveals earth in one frame and Venus in the other both planets appear as mere pinpoints of light in the distance since landing in two thousand twelve, the rover has captured Blue Martian sunsets, passing asteroids and images of Mars two moons, Phobos, and Dimas as they transited across the sun and the images captured by curiosity make astronomers here on earth long for a chance at stargazing for months

Dimas Nasa
US Postal Worker Falls into Mail Sorter and Sent God Knows Where

The Topical

00:23 sec | Last week

US Postal Worker Falls into Mail Sorter and Sent God Knows Where

"More bad news for the US Postal Service today as Postmaster General Louis Joy announced that the US ps will need to continue removing mail sorters from all post offices around the country again after a postal worker and Raleigh. North. Carolina fell into one was flattened and then was mailed well better safe than sorry. No word yet on where the postal worker was sent to or if a return address was included

United States General Louis Joy Raleigh Carolina
Sephora Awarded NASA Contract To Give Moon Fresh, Fun Makeover

The Topical

01:06 min | Last week

Sephora Awarded NASA Contract To Give Moon Fresh, Fun Makeover

"Multinational cosmetics chain Sephora has officially landed the coveted government contract to give the moon of fresh fund makeover beating out core competitor Ulta to lead the two hundred billion dollar projects over our science reporter. Rebecca Neal joins us now from the scene welcome Rebecca Good Morning Leslie Rebecca I remember the Moon from way back when I was a kid so it Has To. BE GETTING UP THEIR? Age. Wise. At least seventy if I had to guess while the Hubbub now, base XS Dragon launch NASA has been recently partnering with more companies from the private sector to tackle their large backlog of projects without the massive bill. Here's Jessica Wilbur senior beauty adviser at the stones. River. Town Centre Sephora in Murfreesboro. Tennessee who will lead the astro dermatologist mission from the ground y'all. I can't tell you how pumped on you to lead this historic mission we at Sephora at work developing personalized skin care regimen for the moon because we can't stress enough that beauty starts with healthy skin the montanes toward the dry and crack side is the spectrum. So we're start by gently exploiting the surface with a natural sponge than hydrate hydrate,

Sephora Leslie Rebecca Rebecca Neal Rebecca Good Jessica Wilbur Reporter Ulta Nasa Murfreesboro Tennessee
NASA Shuttle Tire Sensors Warn Drivers of Flat Tires

Innovation Now

01:16 min | Last week

NASA Shuttle Tire Sensors Warn Drivers of Flat Tires

"The warning light on your dashboard is telling you your tire pressure is low. Did you know you can thank NASA for the alert? This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. At sensor is a small programmable electronic device that constantly measures the air in your tire. The sensor transmits information via low frequency radio waves to the vehicles on board computer. If the tire needs air, an amber warning light is illuminated on the dash during the space shuttle era proper tire pressure was crucial from orbit to landing the nitrogen filled tires weathered extreme temperature changes due to very heavy loads. Tires had to be inflated to three hundred, forty pounds per square inch, but in the early days of. The program there just wasn't a good way to gauge pressure inflight accurately. So NASA contracted with a company to build a tire pressure sensor specifically for the space shuttle after the company successfully delivered the device to NASA they adapted the sensor for use on cars today US law requires a pressure gauge on every car tire alerting drivers whenever the pressure is off

Nasa United States
The Power of La La Anthony

The Nod

05:35 min | Last week

The Power of La La Anthony

"PLA Anthony Welcome to the show so. How are you guys doing? Don't? Talk to you. So, people. Know, you got your start in radio at the age of just sixteen t talked to us about your journey I like to go to eleventh grade and I was just so until with this radio station and then went to an event they were having enormous like saw some interns like hanging posters with something that the Wu Tang clan was doing and I was like this could be really cool. So I applied for the program NASA I got him but I didn't really have a plan I just knew I. Love Music and my love for music has taken me where to where I'm at now I got somebody who has dj big. Fan You want not held it down. But it's been incredible to see your acting career just flourish and you play the character of dom on most recent season of the shy conduit for the money I, do it for the culture talk to us about what it was like to play. And get into that character shirish doubt I love lean away. She's amazing for our culture and she was like I might have something for you on which to come in addition and I was like I can't mess this up like I wanna be on the shy and I got the role of dom which I love because she's so different from leaky show empowered dom as a chef that's an entrepreneur and trying to get their business off of. The ground and really focused into keeping 'em it on point so they can build this amazing business together. So I think it was a great transition into go from working with great creators like Courtney Kemp and fifty to now be on the Lena and her crew has been just an incredible transition and so there and you've been acting in so many different types of roles for over ten years I'm curious like what type of role do you hope comes next I'm always looking for relieve rooted and grounded stories just stories that matter to us. Our culture stories that we can relate to stories that people aren't telling I'm attracted to that kind of material, which is why I'm also producing house well, because the great thing about producing, find your own material and bring it to life you're working on a new project that gives a behind the scenes. Look at the NFL. Tell us a bit about this new series and why you wanted to be involved. So fifty were executive producing together the book that we read that we love and it's more about like what goes on behind The scenes with sports, but it's mostly about the women. So many women just give up their own lives just to be there for their partner, who's an athlete losing sports, and what happens when you like I have my own life and I want to do my own thing and what effect does that have, but it gets really grimy and gritty in real and obviously you know sports and athletics or something you know I know a lot about so I was able to really give some of my stories and really gives some real. Really exciting content to the show. So we're excited we're excited to hopefully be in production really soon and get that oven going you're also working on. Producing Story About Sin Toya Brown long you know young woman who killed a man in self defense sixteen was tried as an adult given a life sentence was then finally offered clemency last year. Why was it so important to you to make sure that this story was told that just such a powerful story and I had been tracking it for a while and watching toys interviews and just what happened to her from young growth? Donau. Moe's fascinated at like what? Was Your Life like that. took you down these paths and then her completely changing her life and finding God and becoming the spokesperson for young girls and sex trafficking. I thought it was amazing. So that's something we're so excited about and wanted to be so careful with because now we're telling someone's life story. You don't WanNa, take it lightly or take that for granted art. So power was truly one of my favorite shows I've talked to breathe way too much. I still found myself wondering what carers from the show would do if they existed in the real world. So We'd love it if you could just indulge us in a little bit of a game. Okay. We're GONNA throw out a scenario and you tell us which character from power best fits the situation. All right. Okay. So we all know that Joe Biden made good on his promise to choose a woman to be his running mate. On the democratic. Ticket but we want to know which female character on power would have made a better choice as a running mate. Okay. So You already know off the top of the dump quick witted she's smart. She knows the system how to get through the system I. think he'd be a great running Angelo for sure I mean she kinda got caught up by the system that numerous through it and she knows the law whether she was part of breaking the law or not. She knows the law. So I think she would have been great. All, right. Second Question. So none of the men on power were necessarily winning awards in the a good boyfriend healthy relationships department lynch two men from power. Do you think could go head to head in a horrible boyfriends verses? Who would you like to see? I think draze caring. There was a horrible boyfriend who said the daughter the always mentioned that he didn't care what happened. Durham mom probably ghost I don't love how he handled the situation between you know Tasha Angela and how he did that I wouldn't say Tommy 'cause. You did kill Holly. You're right. Maybe that's what I was gonNA. Relationship you've really love Kisha and things that he would have never heard. Anything to protector. So he might not have been the ideal boyfriend, but I think he was getting to a place where he was really trying to eat. Better. But he did last gopher. No

Wu Tang Nasa Joe Biden Courtney Kemp Toya Brown Angelo NFL Kisha MOE Partner Executive Lena Durham Tasha Angela Holly Tommy
The Power of La La Anthony

The Nod

03:37 min | Last week

The Power of La La Anthony

"PLA Anthony Welcome to the show so. How are you guys doing? Don't? Talk to you. So, people. Know, you got your start in radio at the age of just sixteen t talked to us about your journey I like to go to eleventh grade and I was just so until with this radio station and then went to an event they were having enormous like saw some interns like hanging posters with something that the Wu Tang clan was doing and I was like this could be really cool. So I applied for the program NASA I got him but I didn't really have a plan I just knew I. Love Music and my love for music has taken me where to where I'm at now I got somebody who has dj big. Fan You want not held it down. But it's been incredible to see your acting career just flourish and you play the character of dom on most recent season of the shy conduit for the money I, do it for the culture talk to us about what it was like to play. And get into that character shirish doubt I love lean away. She's amazing for our culture and she was like I might have something for you on which to come in addition and I was like I can't mess this up like I wanna be on the shy and I got the role of dom which I love because she's so different from leaky show empowered dom as a chef that's an entrepreneur and trying to get their business off of. The ground and really focused into keeping 'em it on point so they can build this amazing business together. So I think it was a great transition into go from working with great creators like Courtney Kemp and fifty to now be on the Lena and her crew has been just an incredible transition and so there and you've been acting in so many different types of roles for over ten years I'm curious like what type of role do you hope comes next I'm always looking for relieve rooted and grounded stories just stories that matter to us. Our culture stories that we can relate to stories that people aren't telling I'm attracted to that kind of material, which is why I'm also producing house well, because the great thing about producing, find your own material and bring it to life you're working on a new project that gives a behind the scenes. Look at the NFL. Tell us a bit about this new series and why you wanted to be involved. So fifty were executive producing together the book that we read that we love and it's more about like what goes on behind The scenes with sports, but it's mostly about the women. So many women just give up their own lives just to be there for their partner, who's an athlete losing sports, and what happens when you like I have my own life and I want to do my own thing and what effect does that have, but it gets really grimy and gritty in real and obviously you know sports and athletics or something you know I know a lot about so I was able to really give some of my stories and really gives some real. Really exciting content to the show. So we're excited we're excited to hopefully be in production really soon and get that oven going you're also working on. Producing Story About Sin Toya Brown long you know young woman who killed a man in self defense sixteen was tried as an adult given a life sentence was then finally offered clemency last year. Why was it so important to you to make sure that this story was told that just such a powerful story and I had been tracking it for a while and watching toys interviews and just what happened to her from young growth? Donau. Moe's fascinated at like what? Was Your Life like that. took you down these paths and then her completely changing her life and finding God and becoming the spokesperson for young girls and sex trafficking. I thought it was amazing. So that's something we're so excited about and wanted to be so careful with because now we're telling someone's life story. You don't WanNa, take it lightly or take that for granted art.

MOE Wu Tang Nasa Courtney Kemp Toya Brown NFL Lena Partner Executive
As the Hubble Telescope Turns 30, What's Next for Space Telescopes?

The Naked Scientists

05:15 min | Last week

As the Hubble Telescope Turns 30, What's Next for Space Telescopes?

"Has been looking at a project that set to be the successor to the Hubble Space. Telescope arguably one of the famous telescopes of all time. and. The. Hubble Space Telescope is iconic sent into space in nineteen ninety, the images Hobo sent back are amazing and captured the imagination of millions, but it is thirty years old. It's getting on a bit. So a new generation of telescopes are being clowns to attempt to fill herbals sizable bids. One of them is the Nancy Grace Roman telescope named for the first female executive of NASA. This telescope will seek to continue hobos legacy. I spoke to Dominic Bedford Program scientist for the telescope. We designed the Roman Space Telescope to be able to conduct the kind of survey that astronomers haven't been able to do with any of the sets of tools they have. Had during the past generations and that is to focus on being able to take very sharp images of wide areas of the sky with tremendous sensitivity being able to see very very distant objects and also optimized in the near infrared, which is wavelengths just slightly longer than what our eyes are sensitive to because the near wavelengths penetrate dust better. So we will allow us to see further into our own galaxy and also we'll. Be. Able to see the red shifted light from very very distant galaxies. So we've been able to see farther and so this combination of being able to see far into our own galaxy and far out into other galaxies and to be able to do this very quickly very efficiently means that we can start conducting surveys where instead of looking at a few objects, a few galaxies refused ours we can start studying monitoring and understanding. Millions even hundreds of millions of galaxies and millions of stars all the same time to be able to conduct surveys that are more demographic where we really understand the whole the entirety of these aspects of the universe all at once. That means the Nancy Grace Roman telescope is designed to be more like a wide angle lens for space instead of a Zoom Lens. But how is it going to carry out its mission? The Romans Space Telescope surveys are designed to be able to answer pressing questions both in cosmology. And in Exit Planet Science for Cosmology, we will take number of surveys of the distant universe so that we can understand the distribution of galaxies and how the universe has expanded over cosmic time from a time when the universe was only a few billion years old to the present when the universe is now thirteen point seven, billion years old. And through watching the way, the galaxies evolved how they form how they move towards an away from each other, we can infer the effects of dark matter, which is a a large unknown components of the mass of the universe and dark energy, which is a recently discovered mysterious force that appears to be pushing the universe apart and therefore pushing all the matter in the universe away from all the other matter. and. It will be able to take definitive measurements of this kind to understand the effects of these so that we might understand better the fundamental physics that drives the universe in its evolution. What about our own galaxy? What can be achieved when the telescope is pointed to the center of the Milky Way we plan on conducting where we will look at the Galactic Bulge of Milky Way, which is where most of the stars in the galaxy can be found. So we'll stare at a wide patch of our Milky Way Galaxy tracking the brightness of millions of millions of stars. Taking images every roughly fifteen minutes over of course, many many months. And we will look for the chance encounter when a star happens to pass in front of some other background star. and. When it does because of general relativity the light from the background star, we'll be focused much like a lens by the foreground star and focused on us. As the stars move slowly through the galaxy and that brightening is something that we can measure and by measuring the Brighton time, we'll be able to infer. What the the foreground star was like. If the foreground star has planets, we'll see brightening from those as well, and in fact, even if these planets have a large moons will be able to see the writing for the moons planets around those stars and by doing with millions of stars will be able to track enough plants thousands. We think of planets around other stars that we'll be. Able to make a complete demographic census, all what planetary systems are like in our own solar system we have the eight planets and that we can see essentially all planets like that around another star, maybe not mercury because it's very small enclosed in but certainly every other planet even planets like Mars we'll be able to detect around such stars be able to answer the question definitively. Our solar system common in the galaxy is it rare the galaxy or may even be unique? and. Doing this, you'll understand our own place in universe Harris or got to be the way it's.

Nancy Grace Roman Telescope Hubble Space Telescope Roman Space Telescope Romans Space Telescope Hobo Nasa Dominic Bedford Harris Scientist Executive Brighton
Human Factors in NASA -An insight into HF on the Orion Programme. - What is orion

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

01:04 min | Last week

Human Factors in NASA -An insight into HF on the Orion Programme. - What is orion

"We are designing developing a spacecraft that it's capable of taking people Beyond low-earth orbit for the first time since nineteen seventy-two. The last time we landed on the moon as part of the Apollo program or the Iraq program is just one small element of the overall Artemis program through which we're trying to get returned humans to the moon for the first time since those days. So our focus is on the Orion spacecraft will carry the crew we can support for astronauts in space for up to 21 days in the Orion spacecraft. So that's are designed to parameter for that Artemis includes not just a riot includes thoughts. Let's rock. It includes the ground systems that will recover the crew launched the cruise recover the cruise. It also includes the lunar Gateway space station as well the human Landing system wage. So much we will use in future missions for more lunar exploration. So the quite a complex an operation then to have it could be quite motivated to have such a such challenge.

Artemis Orion Iraq
Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:51 min | 2 weeks ago

Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

"America's working class has been cheated is an assertion that has been getting a lot of currency lately are last presidential election went deep on that claim in both parties by the way and the culprit most often blamed for that. It's that monstrous five syllable word globalization, the philosophy and the practice of free trade which has been great for companies and for shareholders but has had a devastating impact. It is argued on the American working woman and. Man Well Economist do agree that in the past four decades the American working class, which we're defining tonight as people who lack a four year college degree. They have seen flat wages and a steady disappearance of good jobs. But is globalization a main reason that that's happening to those workers and for those workers is globalization entirely bad. Well, we think this has the makings of a debate. So let's have it. Yes or no to this statement globalization. has undermined. America's working. Class I'm John Donavan, and I stand between two teams of experts in this topic who argue for and against this resolution globalization has undermined America's working class as always. Our debate will go in three rounds and then our live audience here at the Saint Regis Hotel and Aspen Colorado where we are appearing in partnership with the Aspen Ideas Festival will choose the winner and as always if all goes well civil discourse, we'll. Also win a resolution once again, globalization has undermined America's Working Class Jared Bernstein you have debated with us before. So welcome back you're a senior fellow at the center on Budget and policy priorities. You were Vice President Joe. Biden's chief economist. The last time you debated with US interestingly Jason Furman who is your opponent at the other table tonight was your debate partner as a team you were formidable formidable I, almost want to use the French pronunciation. Formula, so are you planning to use your insiders knowledge of Jason's debate battles against him to very much am the way to do that with Jason is to make a lot of sports analogies because they repealing confusing. All right. Thank you and I see you detail to Aspen. You were a to aspen well I. Think the guy with the tie is the guy you want to listen to, but I'll let you decide. All right. Thanks very much. Jared Bernstein and can tell us who your partner is. This someone I've known for twenty five years she's a dear friend of mine and I consider her my mentor in this topic feely gentlemen feeling. Theo welcome to intelligence squared your president of the Economic Policy Institute. You've spent two decades as an economist for the AFL CIO, which is America's largest federation of unions. It represents some twelve point, five, million working women and men. You've spent twenty five years working on trade policy. So what got you interested in trade? Well, when I came to Washington in the early nineties I got drawn. INTO THE NAFTA debate the North American Free Trade. Agreement. And I realized pretty early on that. This was not some kind of a dry text book discussion about tariffs but it was a transnational battle over democracy good jobs, workers, rights, and regulation. So I was hooked because a lots at stake a lot is at stake. Okay. Thanks very much thelia once again, team arguing for the motion. And motion again, globalization has undermined America's working class. We have to debaters arguing against it, I Jason Firm. Welcome back to intelligence squared Jason you're a professor of the practice of economic policy at the Harvard Kennedy School you're a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, you were Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama tonight. As we said, you're going to be debating your former colleague Jared Bernstein on the impact of globalization. So is this the first time you to have debated the globalization issue with each other jared and I agree on I'd say about ninety five percent of economic issues and my goal tonight is to bring to one hundred percent. Thanks very much Jason and can you tell us who your partner is someone I've only known for a few years and every single thing. He's ever told me I have believed James Manica Legitimate James Manyika. Welcome the first time telling squared you're a senior partner at McKinsey, and company you're the chairman of their economics research arm, the McKinsey Global Institute, your first time debating with us. But not your first debate you debated at Oxford I did you studied robotics and computers earlier in your career you were visiting scientist at NASA. So how do you go from very eclectic from robotics and space to thinking about trade policy? In American. Workers I've always been fascinated by the kinds of technologies that drive innovation and growth, but also affects what will people in the real world actually do. So when you put that together with the economy, these issues around trade and workforce become very, very important. Those are the issues that motive a great perspective to bring here and then once again, thank you. Thank you again to the team arguing against them.

America Jared Bernstein Jason Partner Senior Fellow Jason Furman Economic Policy Institute President Trump Chairman Aspen Jason Firm Vice President Saint Regis Hotel Chief Economist Colorado John Donavan Senior Partner
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Hey everybody welcome back act to nasa in silicon valley live. I'm your host abby taber and if this is your first time joining us nasa in silicon valley live is a conversational show out of nasa's ames this research center where we talk about all the nerdiness news you need to know so right now we are simultaneously live on twitch youtube facebook and periscope but but if you want to join in the chat and ask our guests questions you need to do that on twitch so join us at w._w._w. Dot twit dot.

nasa abby taber Dot
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I think something that's really beautiful here with having all the women that we've had on the show. It's you know, there's there's we were talking about running when show Suni Williams earlier, and she famously ran the Boston marathon in space, but there's another marathon runner Chalene Flanagan and she wanted to New York City marathon last year, and she had this great article talking about her bring other women into this running club. And she said it's not so lonely at the top. If you bring others along, you know, and and that passion, you know, talking to one another making room for more women in science technology, engineering and math like we we have a responsibility to pull each other in and say, look what she's doing. Well. She's amazing. Yeah. Get a chance to highlight. Other wonder woman in your life. Absolutely. Okay. We'll be wrapping official run out of time. Thank you for joining us. And also, thank you at home for joining us. You can learn more about women at NASA by going to women dot NASA dot gov, and this has been massive Silicon Valley live a conversational show out of Nasr's Ames research center with the various scientists researchers and engineers and all all the room. Cool folks here at NASA where we get to talk about all the nerdy. Nasa news that you need to know about. And if you like that, you can find us on twitch, she YouTube Facebook and NASA TV, and if you can't catch us live that is no big deal. We will have the video on demand after the show is over and you can also catch the audio version of this podcast through services throughout these submitted beyond and huge. Thank you to our guests, and everyone that joined us on the twitch chat. We'll be back next week on Thursday November fifteenth where we'll talk about heat shields in how they help spe. Crafts by atmospheric entry and tell that until next. Thank you for watching..

NASA Chalene Flanagan Suni Williams NASA TV New York City Boston Ames research center YouTube official Nasr
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"So this is like, that's that's my like technologies on on the forefront are really about. How do we how do we go to deep space? I mean, it's it really is exciting. It is cool. It was just what about the question. We wanted to ask do you guys have a favorite bass craft or air draft. Could you choose out of terrible choice to force you to make? A terrible choice for me to have to make. 'cause I love well, I like aircraft and spacecraft. So the x fifty nine low, boom. Fly demonstrator is one of my favorite aircraft right now. Just because it is exactly what NASA does does the work to create the next industry in our country, which is really amazing. And that's the plan is to playing. Create a supersonic plane that reduces the noise of the boom and and can fly over land and open to civilian so just open centers. Thirty minutes. I love I love spacecraft and right now, my favorite is deployable entry vehicle. I guess I have to say these TV having working so. So I don't think we have picture for it. But it's side by side aircraft took on sip. These like looks like a helicopter, but I said of one Mingo three two rotors and these wrote of overlap, but they're synchronized so like the blaze. Yeah. Kasich until they're on these overlapping, we were still working the need. But ah looks like a improve deficiency by twenty percent in cruise flight. Oh, so cool. That's really. Yeah. That's cool. Yeah. That might be soon. What about you? I I'm Sarah. We all lift, Lloyd. So anything that flies through the air or just in love with. So I'm worth seeing actually air is a fluid. We said that up in the beginning. Yeah. As fluid amasis aerospace engineers, we consider anything that's gas or liquid anything. That's deform -able. My hands. Yeah. Yeah. My favorite's happened to be the ones I've worked on. Yeah. The really exciting piece of that is like, you know, in my career, so far I've gotten to work on the Ryan space vehicle. We've applied the PSP there. SOS at trespassing swing is one of the experimental aircraft that we are testing and collecting a lot of date on assessing. And I think the really interesting part. I remember when we did EM one of the Orion spacecraft and woke up early because you know, it was launching at Kennedy. So it was like three o'clock in the morning here woke up early, and I've been here maybe four years at that point. So you're just shy and and excited. But yeah, it was like magical in my heart because you know, my fingerprint was on that. Yeah. And it's really cool. And like each one of us here have our fingerprints on something like that. And I think it's a wonderful example about NASA that it's like not any one of us creates an Esa less or an a dead or drone. But it's like this community of experts across many fields, including the two of all that like it's important to get the PR out there and do shows like this show. This is what now is doing. So we have our fingerprints on the knife. Because we all have a little piece of the story. Yeah. And it's all about telling her story. Yeah. We have some questions about your careers. But a quick technical question for Sarah. How is it going to reduce the super sonic, boom? So that would be the xfinity nine experimental plane. So the way it reduces the boom is by virtue of its geometry. So you can design the the vehicles geometry to create a pressure wave does that does not have as much of allowed boom when it reaches will when it when it creates that shockwave. The geometry of the plane. Yeah. And if we can think of that, it was like that pressure wave that we hear the sonic, boom. That's energy coming from the airplane and hitting our ear. So if we can distribute that energy over like a longer nose, which will look at the hill, get pictures of the x fifty nine see how long the nose is. Then we're not decreasing the energy. That's coming to us to our ears. We yeah. So that's why it's called a low, boom. There's still a boom we changed. Visit. We have tried. Cool. Okay. Well, I do have a comment from the chat. They said these women are such inspiration..

NASA Kasich Orion Lloyd Sarah Kennedy Thirty minutes twenty percent four years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"All right. Teams that we have again run out of time. And while we would love to spend the rest of our show with you guys. We, unfortunately have to think you and sake. Thanks, guys. So remember, you guys are watching us in Silicon Valley live today. We're celebrating national stem day by talking to some of the amazing wonder women of NASA. And if you have any questions for our guests, fill free to write them in the chat. And if you wanna learn more about women at NASA, you can go to women dot NASA dot gov. All right. So let's go now to our fabulous 'aeronautics crew. Let's bring out Nettie Patricia and Sarah come on out. Share having way too much fun. So I think I can you ladies introduce yourselves. And I know you guys are all aerospace engineers, but what exactly do you do? Okay. I'll start. My name's Nettie route. Airspace engineer, and I lead our pressure sensitive paint technology here at NASA Ames. Okay. Three seven through two. I'm gonna space in euro. So. Supercomputing supercomputing awesome. My name Sarah Sousa, and I designed guidance and control systems for spacecraft. All right. Should we find out where you go from? Origin stories have how did you know you wanted to do this? So I will claim that I knew when I was eight months, eight months. Kid when I was why kid is because when I was a freshman in college are sorry sophomore in college. I was able to get a internship at Johnson Space Center and work alongside astronauts who were on the space shuttle and many years later. My sister was going through our photo album. And she she sent me a picture as a picture of my mom, holding me when I was a baby and with a picture of the space shuttle in the back room, and I just I just think everything I've done throughout my life has been influenced by my family, and what we did as kids. I've always space, and it's always been something. I love your parents did. Copy of the day. My dad took the picture. Dad is very much a space enthusiast and a dreamer. And I definitely get that for my dad too. Pretty cool. So what about you Patricia? I remember took me to the planet Tanya when I was like four years old. And then so surprised but all stars you could see. And so I thought that Boeing that I wanted to something space today to and then when you know, when they always ask it's what do you wanna do when you're like a grownup? I was always saying, but then when I was in high school, I was pretty good in math physics. So I decided to go for engineering well like with space outerspace space engineering. Okay. So we have a photo of a young you can we get that front. Well, he's not old voting. Yeah. That's two years old. He's a was thinking, I think one moment after I started my internship here names on the first time, I visited this computer on. I was so surprised he was so big unload. Super Peter happened to have a name that we may know about. Yes. So this super computer. But yet anes we have another supercomputer that he's called Electra. We're actually building a third one Lewis cool those platies and electro rate. So what about unity like, what's what's your origin story? Yeah. I grew up in Tennessee. Remember going to see a see the Saint Louis arch. And I remember driving across the bridge and going to the Saint Louis arch. And I just you know. Lifted both of these things that are studying drafting in high school, and how these are extremely impressive. I wanna do whatever it is that can produce something like this. So I went into college started studying mechanical engineering, and then found fluid dynamics thermodynamics. Wow. You're speaking, my love language, the world made sense at that moment and just kept. We're going my way that had an internship as well here at NASA. Ames we go my way over to the Winton divisions. Wow. This is really cool. Yeah. These giant compressors radiators and all the things that you had studied there in your in your textbooks. We here in life and huge. Yeah. And then I found my way over to pressure sensitive paint, which which was just a a great melody like hardware-software wind tunnel. So really my happy place. A photo of young Nettie..

Nettie Patricia NASA Sarah Sousa Johnson Space Center NASA Ames Saint Louis arch Silicon Valley Boeing Peter engineer Ames Tennessee Lewis eight months four years two years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"So the bay focus that we do is billing planning scheduling tools is so I get to actually learn about everybody else's job in order to create these offer tools. So and then I get to test field them in different places. So I get to learn about how trainers might be teaching astronauts how to do their job. I get to go to mission control. Learn how they control robots how they manage the international space station, how they schedule astronauts time, and all we take all that information in order to build and design our tools, and then we get to test them in different environments. We've gone to test them everywhere from underwater in the extreme environments of analogues. We also work in analogs, but these analogues Dona -sarily have to. To simulate a planetary environment. It is simulating some aspect of mission control. So they have a slightly different or they're trying to push some aspect of human spaceflight, maybe 'isolation. So we give them our tools, and we get feedback. I've gotten to go to places like volcanoes and the mission under the water in underwater. The Arctic mission control of Johnson Space Center. I'm sorry tool has been up in space station. So that was also very exciting. Pretty cool mission control is the the brain of the space missions, right where they're controlling. How would you describe it? Yeah. So mission control. So we have astronauts up in space ation, and they're super busy and the whole entire space station is manage by a huge team of controllers back on ground. And so they're located physically in Johnson Space Center, but there's also different smaller mission controls. I'm in Europe in Japan, and we have another one in Alabama. We also actually have one here. Nasa Ames, and they all coordinate to make sure that the space station is healthy that all the science payloads are working and that we're keeping the science the sorry. The astronauts working if they have any questions, we keep them healthy. So did you bring a photo? I think she did. And this one has a really cool background story. Yes. So this is a picture of me in at NASA Johnson Space Center in mission control. So this is when we did our first appointment of our tool up in space station. So I got to sit down in mission control. And I got to talk on the loops, which is just the the way they talk that the the communication loops that they have and. Yeah, it was very excited. We got to talk to the astronauts and work with them that whole week that we were there through your voice is forever like down in the NASA record. So I was actually very hesitant to talk during during the mission and one of my colleagues was sitting in the front room. So there's actually multiple not only are there thousands of people that multiple rooms so sitting in one of the back rooms and someone in the front room calls over, and it's like, please give me a status on playbook. That's our tool and so forced me to actually talk on the loop. So that might Boyce was forever. Tempted to say Houston, we have a problem. I actually very hesitant about talking because it is they are listening to so many conversations that I didn't want to like add to that problem or add to that workload. So I was actually very much like I'm gonna just be here. Unless I have to talk them only gonna talk, but he called me out..

Johnson Space Center Nasa Ames NASA Johnson Space Center Boyce NASA Europe Arctic Houston Japan Alabama
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I ever got. It was absolutely true. Right. That's simple comment. Relies on that kind of person engineering. Awesome. Pretty cool. Cool. What about you, Jessica? So I have always been interested in science and love learning and math and ever since. I was a little kid. And I remember my dad taking me to see the Haley's comet when it was passing. And so I would always had this interest in science, but it wasn't until I got to undergraduate, and I was sitting engineering at that point that I really understood how I can contribute to NASA in how I can contribute to the space program. So it was actually through an internship here. Nasa Ames, and I learned about how NASA work what kind of careers are involved in engineering or the different aspects that I could work on in order to contribute to human spaceflight. And then that let me to apply to grad school, and that's where I really started focusing on the intersection of humans, and engineering so understanding how we can develop and create tools. That support people in a very complex aerospace system. So my focus is always how do I make this tool better for people? And that's how I I. That's what I do. Now here in nessa aims. Okay. Well, let's bring up Jessica's origin photo. Because this is also a cool one. Yeah. So this is a picture of me back in nineteen ninety eight I did my, internship and this cohort of class. We had a research project. We got to visit different NASA centers. This is a picture of visiting the space shuttle, Atlantis when it was being refurbished, and it just got me really excited about working with people in human spaceflight, and there several people in there that also already now still work at NASA. So it was a pretty great sett- teams. Not only at NASA. But didn't you mention that a lot of them are here at Ames as well. Yeah. Like, our whole little cohort was really titan. And we all got the space, bug and. Yeah, some of us work here. Some of us work at Jan Johnson. Space center. Yeah. And then our mentor for that program. Also helped me get my job. So it was quite a life changing, internships or agree. We to get started. Awesome. About you. Cathy, I had to a hominid. I think I one was when I knew I wanted to be a biologist. So my background my educational background's a little unconventional I completed sixth grade, and then my father moved my sister and I over seas. So that was pretty much the end of my education. Until I moved back to the states, and I started at community college, and I took a biology class because I had no idea what it was really about. And I remember just sitting learning about the inner workings of Sal, and it's like a whole nother world whole universe inside of of us that I had no idea even existed. So that's when I was fascinated with biology, and I was sold how to do biology, and then for when I decide I really wanted to be an Astro biologist was I.

Nasa Ames NASA Jessica Jan Johnson Sal Cathy
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"And and so when it's going to reenter, it's going to come in into shell shallower angle and it's not shallow shallow, just kinda grazes skipping a rock. And and it's a small spacecraft as he saw, it's only about one hundred thirty kilograms hundred pounds. And so again, if you wanna make a splash through a bigger rock, right? The rocket better and and it was going relatively slow because it was in orbit it it's top speed was only about one point, eight kilometers per second, which is slow. It doesn't flow. He's a slow. So all those things lead to probably very small splash. So not a lot of material got up if hardly any. It didn't just have to splash splash enough of it to get into sunlight so that the Hubble space telescope could see because it can see in the dark. So that's where, again, the next NASA impact emission. The next NASA Ames mission to the moon, comes in three out of the five lunar missions manage her aims. This, this. First one, man, it aims is actually quite a leader in Linda research. I just want to mention that my questions are not looting at the moment, so I don't have any questions from the chat for you just yet, but hopefully we'll get those up and running before the end. So we can through a lot of questions. So we can put you hot. Questions. Now l. cross just mentioned is a special mission for the to view, right? Yes. Tell us how you were involves. Tony's Tony's ideas. I held it. Crazy idea. Nine told him about and she said, yeah, that's crazy enough. It could work. So what does that stand for cross? No. Lunar crater observation sensing satellite. That's part of the quiz. Not the the sport. L. crow..

Tony NASA Linda research L. crow one hundred thirty kilograms eight kilometers hundred pounds
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"I'm your host Abby Taber, and today we're going to be talking all about robotic exploration of the moon, and we have some really fascinating guests with us. But first let me introduce my co host, Cassandra bell. Hey, hi. So this is NASA in Silicon Valley. Live a conversational, talk show out of NASA Ames research center with various scientists, engineers, and researchers, and all around cool people at NASA to talk about all the nerdy NASA news. You need to know about if you like that we're simultaneously live on twitch. That is twitch. Dot TV, slash NASA, and we're also on Facebook and YouTube. And if you wanted to live in our chat, gotta catch us on twitch. But if you want, if you miss a live show, we will be on demand after the fact on. NASA TV, and we also have the podcast for an audio version if you like that better. So today we have with us, our guest Tony cola preach and Kimberly Eneco Smith. Thank you both for being here and can tell us a little bit about what you both do. Thanks. I'm a planetary scientist here at NASA. Ames have been here by fifteen years, almost exactly fifteen years and as a planetary scientist and mostly study planetary atmospheres, and surfaces really focusing on ISIS and and other volatile 's at freeze out. I also design and build instruments that go to different worlds and make measurements of the atmosphere is in surfaces and things like that. And can really thanks for having me. I'm a research astrophysicists here at NAS aims, and I've been here a little bit longer than Tony. I study the universe and I also build payloads or instruments, cameras, traumas that help us understand the universe around us both near and far. So I have dabbled a little bit in some of Tony's planets as well. Very cool. Most speaking of nerdy NASA news, NASA just turned sixty. Birthday now. Should sing. Oh, there last week we had cake. I had a lunchtime meeting. Cake, won't NASA turned one in October. First, that would six years would be Tober. I nineteen fifty eight. She doesn't know what actually happened to that point because like picture the president signed thing and then NASA suddenly existed or birth certificate. Must have been built on earlier research labs that existed at the time. It was 'aeronautics was the focus of what the laboratories did. They want doing space research yet, but they were very heavily into understanding arrow dynamics, aerospace engineering, and what not to help really the fledgling airline industry and aviation industry. You know doing the things that they couldn't do helping them do the research. They couldn't do pushing the envelope, you know, you know, see what else you could do, you know, by different designs. Yeah. And that was the NAC, right? Yeah, yeah, knack. Okay. Don't call it that. No national advisory committee for 'aeronautics is preceded NASA, right? And I've been scolded for calling it Neka we are NASA sow his NA. That's right. There are three centers time, right? It was one out of Langley Virginia, east coast, these coast. Now that's Langley. What's it called now. Langley laboratory to the Langley research center, one in Ohio. Was he has, no, I always forget this one was Vincent. What was it. Louis Louis, Louis, close movies. Now, of course, the Glenn research center, I know that. Yeah, and then our favorite, very favorite. I can't remember the third. Out here in California. Oh, the aims. You might have been there. The aims. So now known as Ames research center where we are right now. Yeah. And now we have ten field centers doing all kinds of amazing work. So to learn about the last six years of innovation, go to NASA dot gov, slash sixty. Yeah. So in this episode that we're going to focus on the moon research, the lunar research that aims has worked on over those years since NASA was founded. And if you have questions, be sure to leave them in the chat, and I'll be checking for those and trying to throw some those in leader. For example, already, we have questions from Zaza lavender is asking what things will you be exploring on the moon? We're gonna come to that. That's at the heart of today's episode. So to kick things off, we're going to go to our first segment. Let's play. Let's rule that..

NASA NASA Ames research center NASA TV Tony cola Langley research center Abby Taber Glenn research center Ames research center Dot TV Ames Cassandra bell Langley Virginia Silicon Valley Langley scientist Facebook Langley laboratory Louis Louis YouTube
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Follow the sun. Presented by science at NASA. The sun, it inspire songs warms us and grows our food life on land in the oceans, the daily weather and long-term climate patterns happened primarily because of the energy we received from our closest star. Even tiny variations in that energy can affect the workings of our planet's atmosphere. NASA uses instruments to follow the sun and monitor the amount of solar energy coming to us the latest instrument to do. So the total and spectral solar radiant, censor Tesis one makes those measurements with unprecedented accuracy. Tesis gathers information from its perch aboard, the international space station or the ISS flying on the platform that the orbiting laboratory provides has allowed teases to continue Nasr's forty year record of tracking the sun's radiant energy. One of the longest and most important climate data records gathered from space. Over the past several decades. Earth's ice mass has diminished, sea levels have risen drought, and precipitation patterns have changed, and growing seasons have shifted to understand the causes, including human influences of these changes and refine the models used to simulate earth's climate researchers must know the amount of incoming solar energy. Peter Paluska Tesis lead mission. Scientists explains when there's a balance between incoming energy from the sun and the infrared radiation earth emits climate remained steady. An imbalance means energy is either being stored in the system causing temperature increases or lost causing temperature decreases energy from the sun makes up half of the balance equation. Even though the measurement record shows at the sun solar energy output has not had a major influence in recent climate change that output needs to be monitored continuously. It is arguably the most important variable we need to know to understand climate says Paluska trying to understand climate without measuring. The sun's input is like trying to balance your checkbook without knowing your income climate is measured over longtime, spans decades to centuries and longer. Unlike weather that changes over small timescales to be able to connect measurements over longtime periods. Continuity and accuracy are key teases has to sensors the total radiance monitor as its name suggests measures all of the radiant energy from the sun and the spectral radiance monitor measures. How that energy is distributed over ultra-violet, visible and infrared wavelengths. The latter helped scientists understand where in the atmosphere, solar energy is being absorbed. For example, teases spectral radiance measurements of the sun's ultraviolet radiation are critical to understanding the ozone layer ozone in the stratosphere absorbs ultraviolet light. This heats the stratosphere and drives changes in atmosphere, wind flow that can propagate down to the lower atmosphere and impact climate. So many factors influence. Earth's climate says police key. We need to continue learning how they all interact teases is helping us characterize the son's behavior and how earth's atmosphere response to the sun for more science when the international space station go to WWW dot NASA dot gov, slash I s dash science to continue following our closest star, visit science, dot, NASA dot gov.

NASA Peter Paluska Tesis Tesis ISS Nasr forty year
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Your shoulders well i certainly go to sleep at night feeling lucky that i get to work on such an interesting problem but you know i think as donovan was saying the more you work on this the more you appreciate how infrequent these are how well are are atmosphere has protected us from from these events so i sti sleep pretty well it has been a great project has been a real a real gift to be able to work on the i i think think so so too too that community engagement we we find a lot of people that like this problem so much that they do it as a hobby because there isn't a lot of funding i would say that through other means and so i i would say that they tend to be happy that nasa is investing in this and to have a a project which is continually working on the problem well you guys have been amazing and i'm still looking forward to understanding a little bit more so is there anything that you would add to this conversation to let our listeners know not to be afraid or maybe not that but any advice or any encouragement to what you're working on so that it's not something they have to worry about right now a lot of and information stories out so there are ways that anyone interested can find out more about the specific work the simulations we do and they're wondering now so resources for that but one thing that was told to me early on in the project is this is a natural disaster that we could potentially know about an advance and do something about and arguably the only natural disaster that we could mitigate so put the infrequency on top of the potential to actually do something about it it is a threat that we want to be aware of and the ability to mitigate depends on knowing these this can happen and then having some predetermined strategies for dealing with it and so that's really part of the the effort of this project in the global us strategy go nasa that's awesome you've been listening to the nasa and silicon valley podcast if you have any questions on twitter we're at nasa ames and we're using the hashtag nasa silicon valley remember we are nasa podcast.

donovan nasa twitter nasa ames
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"New science from jupiter presented by science at nasa when nasa juno spacecraft recently flew over the polls of jupiter researchers were astonished as if eight never seen a giant planet before and innocence they hadn't the pictures were unlike anything in the history of planetary exploration junot entered orbit on the fourth of july twenty sixteen and later found jupiter's polls covered in merely continent size storms that are densely class tiered and rubbing together in a mind blowing swirl it's like a whole new jupiter says scott bolton juneau's principal investigator from the southwest research institute the clouds were amazing what's striking about jupiter's polar storms is that there are actually multiple cyclones at each pole so instead of having one polar vortex earth jupiter was observed to have as many as eight giants world's moving simultaneously on its north pole and as many as five on its south pole even more mazing things are lurking below researchers have long wondered about the giant planets hidden interior how far down do jupiter's continentsized storms descend and what is the exotic material near the planet's core deep inside jupiter high temperatures and crushing pressures transformed you leaders copious supplies of gaseous molecular hydrogen into an exotic form of matter known as liquid metallic hydrogen think of it as a mass up of tomic nuclei in a sea of electrons freely moving about jupiter's powerful magnetic field almost certainly springs from dynamo action in jupiter's interior the process by which the motion of this electrically conducting fluid is converted into magnetic energy the exact location within the interior is a mystery that researchers are still working to solve.

scott bolton juneau principal investigator southwest research institute nasa
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Earth's magnetic fear. Presented by science at NASA. Invalid or planet and protecting us from the fury of the sun is a giant bubble of magnetism called the Magna spear. It deflects most of the solar material sweeping towards us from our star at one million miles per hour or more without the magnetosphere. The relentless action of these solar particles could strip the earth of its protective layers, which shield us from the sun's ultraviolet radiation. It's clear that this magnetic bubble was key to helping earth develop into a habitable planet. Compare earth to Mars a planet that lost its magnetosphere about four point. Two billion years ago. The solar wind is thought to have stripped away most of Mars atmosphere possibly after the red planet's magnetic field dissipated. This is left Mars as the stark barren world. We see today through the eyes of NASA orbiters Rovers by contrast, earth's Magnus fear seemed to have kept our atmosphere protected. After he is S two of the juice base physics laboratory at NASA Goddard Space, Flight center notes. If there were no magnetic field, we might have very different atmosphere left without life. As we know it. Understanding our magnetosphere is a key element, helping scientists someday forecast space weather that can affect earth's technology. Extreme space weather events can disrupt communications networks, GPS navigation and electrical Power grits. The magnetosphere is permeable shield. The solar wind will periodically connect to the magnetosphere forcing it to reconfigure. This can create a rift allowing energy to pour into our safe haven. These rifts open and close many times daily, or even many times hourly. Most of them are small and short lived. Others are vast and sustained with the sun's magnetic field connecting to earth. In this way. The fireworks start. Zest, says the earth need fear absorbs the incoming energy from the solar wind and explosively releases that energy in the form of ju- magnetic storms and sub storms. How does this happen? Magnetic lines of force converge and reconfigure resulting in magnetic energy and charged particles flying off at intense speeds. Scientists have been trying to learn why this crisscrossing magnetic field lines called magnetic reconnection triggers such a violent explosion, opening the rifts into the magnetosphere Nasr's Magnus Feerick multi scale mission or MS was launched in March twenty fifteen to observe the electron physics of magnetic reconnection for the first time bristling with energetic particle detectors and magnetic sensors. The four MS spacecraft flew in close formation to on the front side of the earth's Magnus fear where magnetic reconnection occurs. MS has since been conducting similar hunt. In the Magnus fears tail MS compliments missions from NASA and partner agencies such as thymus cluster and geo tail contributing critical new details to the ongoing study of earth's magnetosphere together data from these investigations, not only help unravel the fundamental physics of space, but also help improve space, weather forecasting for more on the active space around the earth. Stay tuned to science, NASA dot gov.

NASA Magnus Feerick NASA Goddard Space partner Two billion years
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Really long time ago so um and i'll i'll do a quick fastforward because when i was already add at nasa uh i was over at my mom's house one day and she she says greg i want to show you something she shows me this little thing drawn by a six year old who turned out to be a really long time ago and it was a drying of of a few space ships and and it said when i grow up i wanna work for nasa and this one is this miss during the gemena program and i remember the mercury program to although is really really young than so i kinda i i guess it was probably and the 31st chromosome somewhere somewhere in here you know kind of destined to be my my dad also was here my parents met here at nasa ames research centers my wife and i met here at nasa ames research center it's kind of the family business buried here we didn't well is a big fan of you the other would have had to convince my wife i think so my dad was the was the guy that proved that it was possible to navigate to the moon during the apollo era and this was rain around 19 sixty yeah yeah and and so fast for it a little bit to my teen years uh you know like like jim i was good in science and math and what not on my built my own observatory we have a family ranch about an hour and a half from here in and i built and observatory ground my own mirror in it and everything and use that for uh for a few years and so uh and then when i was out of graduate school i just was talking with someone and who happened to work here and and she said i need to combine meets and people and that was uh thirty three and a half years ago now why.

nasa nasa ames research center greg gemena jim i six year one day
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"And thus one way but deal that aspect of janabi is to really work actively with a investigator and collaborators to generate new data and so we we work with pi to have their funding from nasa twos fly of animal models plant microbes in its best issue and we we help them maybe get more information from their samples and make sure that all or makes gone to that abbas at the end who this is the side that i know a little bit about from working at aims hour by science department they work with researchers that other institutions right right who want to fly an experiment the space to do their science that's what you're talking about satan will help them carry out that experiment and then also we get to use the data absolutely so there is that aspect of a nasa aims were investigator will work with a principal investigator from uh that got funding to actually fly on the isis mission and and speaks week experiment so part of our work he's also there and i think do you do something new abidjan lab that as the new project manager i'm trying to push for he's ready i really think that ginned up should be serving three different communities so that that i repository by itself rudy that data really tux to the specialist the by information that can going there and donald did that i and work with man interpreted that specialists yes very very specialized people scientist but then you have another group which is the scientists in general which they don't know how to do the bioinformatic but did no ought to ask the right question and so we want to provide tools for them to be able to access to information without having to do all these very tedious and slow work so some of the repository did are being used to be processed to generate a new level of data that we would call higher order did add that can be interpreted and from their front since the idea would be he's dare a signature of cancer in some liver samples that i got from the space station so a specialist on cancer burden.

investigator principal investigator project manager scientist nasa abbas abidjan donald
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Which is i think very good is that nasa should be the custodian of the the knowledge of how live gets impacted in space and so there's a lot of studies that have been going on for twenty thirty years under the sponsorship of nasa and uh definitely we've got a big biosciences division here absolutely end so there's enough scattered for mission here and there and i think uh we're lucky to leaving though in a in a time where now we have these new technological or makes and so the you'll make sr you you hear about them every day it's actually looking at uh are you know specific changes in your in your gene oncall variance and the trying to interpret the slight different changes in eugenics in in your gene sequencing with respect to some risk to your health out that's one on meeks that so that's exploiting right now in the in the world about this although mix to have been going on for why one of them school transcript of meat which is ninety percent of the did i engine up our transcript to me data and their it's the idea of looking at the arne expression in tissues our in uh in microbes are any anything we looking at any specific will coming from the space station or from the space shuttle and up if they have been on ice for or make stat up into our reports he tori so jannati's that big riposted tori of information okay right gene gene loves the database is a it's a database but it's going to be more than a database this was the original thought for it basically let store all this information to one local place and so we've been very active in either identifying legacy that i said that should be in gin left from the get go from the past and we also very active with any new or meeks being produced on the isis of to make sure that those that comes into our repository and and we nani looking at one type of a meeks would looking out of many different oh makes this something else go proteome which is putting profile epigenetics which is how your dna gets degraded by a specific molecules that changes the.

nasa meeks jannati nani tori twenty thirty years ninety percent
"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"You're listening to nasa in silicon valley episode seventy in for the intro abby here with me again hello hello if this is a slightly interesting episode just for the sake that when we planned on recording this i got horrifically ill abby jumped into the last minute to go ahead and do the recorded that authorites ari tell us about your the conversation i had i rate road turned out to be very interesting i met with silvio cost he is the manager of the gene lab project here at aintree so you know how nasa does a lot of biosciences we do biology experiments up on space station so when those experiments end it does the science doesn't end because all that data goes into a repository which is open to the public it's open access for any researchers to use and right now they're developing tools and really building a system around it where people can come analyze this space biology data that nasa helped produce and looking for discoveries that they can make within it them so what else is for researchers if that's it that's your research or for citizens scientists who may be interested they'll be able to explore as well and get more out of the data than ever though it what sylviane describes it as is nasa as the custodian of knowledge about how life is affected in space which i think is sound super exciting hata before we jump on into a reminder for folks listening we have a phone number that six five zero 604 one four zero zero give us a call and leave a message and will try to add that into the future episodes um if you want to be digital we are on all the social media platforms reason the hashtag nasa silicon valley we are a nasa podcast but we are not the only mess a podcast so as a give a quick little shatah as to some of our friends over headquarters do gravity assist there's also another a weekly podcast called this week at massa and then of course our friends over in a jsc over the johnson space center that houston we have a podcast so that's where you could find all of our.

abby nasa sylviane massa johnson space center houston ari silvio social media
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Sheriff about twice each year of full moon winds up perfectly with the earth and sun such that the earth's shadow totally blocks the sons light which would normally reflect off the moon the literry clips on january thirty first will be visible daring moon set folks in the eastern united states where the eclipse will be partial we'll have to get up in the morning to see it notes petro but it's another great chance to watch the moon the moon will lose its brightness and take on an eerie fainter than normal glow from the scant sunlight that makes its way through earth's atmosphere often cast in a reddish hugh because of the way the atmosphere benz the light totally eclipsed moons are sometimes called blood wounds we're seeing all the earth sunrises and sunsets at that moment reflected from the surface of the moon says sarah noble a program scientist at nasa headquarters the january 31st superman will also be the second full moon of the month some people call the second former in a month a blue moon that makes it a super blue moon blue moons happen every two and a half years on average with a totally clips it will be a royal spectacle indeed a super blue blood moon sometimes the celestial rhythm sink up gest right to wow us he'd your calendar reminders on the three dates mark step out into the moon sent or moon rise and look up for a trilogy of sky watching treats to learn more about the many wonders of to moonnasagov for more of the many sky watching events to be found rally visit sciencenasagov.

united states petro scientist sciencenasagov sarah noble nasa moonnasagov