26 Burst results for "Nasa Johnson Space Center"

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:24 min | 2 weeks ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"The NASA Johnson Space Center episode one, Sixty, five astronaut and microbiologist I'm Gary Jordan and I'll be your host today. If you're new to the show, we bring a NASA experts to talk about all different parts of our space agency and sometimes we get lucky enough to bring astronauts to talk about their story. So today we're talking with Kathleen. Rubens she goes by Kate. She's a US astronaut who is about to launch to the International Space Station, this October twenty, twenty, four, her second long duration spaceflight she I, launched just four years ago for expeditions forty, eight and forty nine where she lived and worked in space for one hundred and fifteen days. For this podcast We're GONNA be talking about her education studying molecular biology cancer in virology. We talked about her first base flight and sequencing DNA in space for the very first time and we talked about her expedition, this upcoming mission where she may have a few extra helping hands joining her after launching from American soil. So here's a little bit about astronaut Kate Rubens enjoy. County. You. have out there. Kate.

Kate Rubens NASA Johnson Space Center International Space Station NASA Gary Jordan Kathleen Kate
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:25 min | 3 weeks ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Of the NASA Johnson Space Center episode one, sixty, four, eat like a Martian. I'm Gary Jordan and I'll be your host today. On this podcast, we bring in the experts, scientists, engineers, astronauts also, let you know what's going on in the world of human spaceflight. Are, Mars, monthly series continues last month we chatted with Chelsea strong grin. What to pack inside of a Mars Transport. On human, mission to Mars. Well one of those critical items that you'll need to prepare for not only the trip to Mars. But something you'll need on Mars and back from Mars is food and plenty of it on this episode will be focusing on how we're thinking about food for Mars, what kinds of food, how to preserve it, and even if they will farm it. Here. To go into detail on food for a human mission to Mars is Dr Grace Douglas Lead scientist for NASA's advanced food technology here at the Johnson Space Center Ope, you're hungry because we're about to eat like a Martian with Dr Grace, Douglas Enjoy. County. You. have, out there. Dr.

NASA Johnson Space Center Dr Grace Douglas Johnson Space Center Ope Gary Jordan Dr Grace NASA Chelsea scientist
Water, Water, Every Where  And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From

Environment: NPR

02:30 min | 2 months ago

Water, Water, Every Where And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From

"Water is everywhere on Earth the clouds, the rain, the oceans and rivers even our own bodies were all that water originally came from is a bit of a mystery NPR's Nell. Greenfieldboyce reports that scientists may have found the answer inside some rare meteorites the earth formed four and a half billion years ago, compared to other planets in emerged pretty close to the sun there hot temperatures would mean, no water ice no ice to join with the swirling bits of rock and dust that we're running into each other and building up our young planet. That's. A. We do not know exactly were the what on Earth from why we need to find a source of water on Earth Laurette Peony works at a French research lab called CRP PG. She says that source of water could have been farther out in the solar system like maybe icy comments or water rich asteroids that hit the newly formed earth and watered it. This has long been the prevailing view to explain the the of the ocean and of the water engine on she wondered though if water could have been there at the start Sushi and. Some colleagues recently took a close look at a rare kind of meteorite. It doesn't look like anything special. It's like a gray rock, but it's also thought to have formed near the sun and is the same kind of primordial stuff that glommed together to create our planet and it turns out it contains plenty of hydrogen that's an indicator of its ability to contribute water to a planetary mix. In fact, if you built a planet out of this material, you'd have at least several oceans worth of water these findings described in the journal Science made on. Pay Liaise feel really happy I was happy because it makes it nice and simple. She's a planetary scientist at NASA's Johnson. Space Center in Houston Texas who wasn't part of the research team she says this old idea that Earth's water came from the outer solar system would have required something unusual like Jupiter having a little trip through the inner solar system to send water rich asteroids headed our way. So here we just don't need Jupiter. We're told me to do anything weird. We're just grabbed the material that was their form and that's what who are. Still, she says, even if most of the water was there at the beginning comets and such probably did deliver some of Earth's water later on Nell Greenfieldboyce NPR news.

Nell Greenfieldboyce Scientist NPR CRP Houston Nasa Texas Space Center Johnson
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

03:39 min | 3 months ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We all lined the street and so many contractors in that area. We were all lining that NASA road one while the motorcade passed us and drove into NASA Johnson Space Center for the memorial service and the flyover with the missing man formation. It was very impactful. You figured out at some point. Amy that you didn't want to be an engineer. You didn't want to sit in a small room and code. Yeah I did that pretty quickly. I think during my co OP program didn't want a minute to myself I. still wanted to play all this out, but I realized that this is not really what I wanted to do, and you also determined that you couldn't be an astronaut. Why So at the time as I found out while I was working in Houston. To be an astronaut. You had to have twenty twenty uncorrected vision. Old Problem was I couldn't see the big e on the charge and I could barely see my hand in front of my face, uncorrected corrected and I realized quickly that while that's GonNa be a problem if they don't allow correction. To get to twenty twenty how I going to do that unless they change the rules, this is not really a thing. I can't really do this. And so then in that case of my okay with being an engineer. And my answer and my head was no I didn't know really what else I was going to do. So you've graduated from purdue or you're about to graduate. You'll have a degree in aeronautical and astronautical, engineering. You can't be an astronaut, and you don't WanNa be an engineer. Right exactly a little bit of a dilemma, but there's this thing in your life from your tour of Washington DC. It's an eleven year old girl. Yes I wasn't hundred percent convinced that was really a possibility. But it was always in the back of my head, so in the meantime while I'm in the state of confusion. I decided to apply for the MBA program at Indiana University which had a great reputation. I went there to get my Mba that was my intent and try to figure it out. Sounds like a bit of stalling tack. It was yes, it was. And in that first semester, I thought why am I not looking into the FBI White? Why am I not pursuing that? Let me at least check into it. And turns out. They were looking for scientists and engineers. At the time they were specifically targeting. People with science and engineering backgrounds. What about the vision thing? Amy You have to have good vision to be enough the special agent that's true, not as good as an astronaut and even better, it could be corrected to twenty twenty, so you were fine. I don't know that I'd use the word fine as my story goes, went in for my medical, and the nurse was very nice to me when I went in or initial medical screening. And, I believe the qualification was like twenty, three, hundred correctable to twenty twenty for your eyesight well, I wasn't quite twenty three hundred, but the nurse who was administering this test. Essentially had me look at the chart and she kept asking me she said. Can you see that and I said? Sort of she said if you squint, can you see it? And I. I said I could see a better she has. What are those letters? Look like to you and I read them off as best as I thought, I could, and she said close enough. You're in I'm in or at least you've passed that part of the yeah, there's a whole battery of things of course that happened after that, but that was the initial test. When did you get to Quantico as a brand new FBI special agent that was January of Nineteen Ninety one. It took me a little less than a year to process, which is quick, it is yes, in retrospect..

Amy You engineer FBI NASA Johnson Space Center NASA purdue Houston Washington DC Nineteen Ninety Indiana University Quantico
May the Fourth Be with You

Innovation Now

01:26 min | 6 months ago

May the Fourth Be with You

"Watching films aboard the International Space Station is one way for the crew to bond and decompress and guess which film just became an astronaut favorite innovation now occasionally NASA is share some of the latest film releases with astronauts on the International Space Station to enjoy at their leisure. Imagine watching your favorite science fiction movie while literally floating in microgravity recently astronauts on station had the opportunity to watch star wars the rise of skywalker while two of the actors from the film got to visit Mission Control at NASA Johnson Space Center Kelly Marie Tran and Naomi. Aki are used to inhabiting galaxies. Far Far Away at least on screen but they spent the day learning about NASA's plans for exploring places a little closer to home. The pair got a chance to train like real astronauts and posed for pictures with some of NASA's robotic explorers while learning about the optimist program whether your favorite is the rise of skywalker or return of the Jedi take a cue from the astronauts and watch a movie today and for all you star wars fans out there may the fourth be with you for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer. Pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace through with NASA.

Nasa International Space Station Nasa Johnson Space Center Kelly Marie Tran National Institute Of Aerospac AKI Naomi
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

15:14 min | 6 months ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Scientists engineers astronauts all to let you know what's going on in the world of human spaceflight we have nearly twenty years of continuous human presence on the International Space Station. That's nearly twenty years of studying the human body understanding systems and fine-tuning operations for how to conduct human spaceflight missions not to mention the decades of human spaceflight missions and experienced before that a lot has changed over time based on what we've learned a lot of questions have come up that are important to understanding how things will change when traveling to Mars. You might think that's a lot of experience already. So why don't we just go to Mars? It's hard to imagine. Just how hard Mars is. It requires near absolute perfection and any deviation may be a risk to the safety of the humans on board or the success of the mission so the question is are we ready. You can even ask. How ready are we? Luckily we have an organization right here at the NASA Johnson Space Center and all across the agency looking at what we have and what we need to make Mars mission successful Michelle Rucker is a Mars. Integration lead at Johnson Space Center for the Mars Integration Group. A team that spans across all of NASA. She's a thirty-three year veteran of NASA joining in the aftermath of the space shuttle Challenger accident and supporting the investigation by conducting booster material tests and analysis. She has participated in a range of exciting projects such as the International Space Station. Environmental Control and life support systems hyper impact research spacesuit and spacewalking tools space station exercise equipment system engineering and Orion crew exploration vehicle testing and verification. She currently leads. The Mars. Integration Group developing crude Mars mission concepts. She holds two patents and has authored numerous technical publications so on today's podcast. Michelle goes over the details of what we know what we have what we need and how. Nasa's artist program That will establish sustainable. Human presence on the moon will help inform and fine tune the ideal mission structure for a Mars mission. And I hope you like this topic because there's going to be a lot more this month kicks off monthly episodes that are all about a Mars mission. And we'll call it to Mars monthly over the next few months or maybe even the next year we'll dive deep into the various elements. We discussed today with Michelle so here. We go preparing for a human mission to Mars with Michelle Rucker Enjoy County owners have the.

Michelle Rucker Mars Integration Group NASA Johnson Space Center International Space Station NASA Orion Environmental Control
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:56 min | 6 months ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Podcast we bring in the experts. Scientists engineers astronauts also. Let you know what's going on. In the world of human spaceflight we have nearly twenty years of continuous human presence on the International Space Station. That's nearly twenty years of studying the human body understanding systems and fine-tuning operations for how to conduct human spaceflight missions not to mention the decades of human spaceflight missions and experienced before that a lot has changed over time based on what we've learned a lot of questions have come up that are important to understanding how things will change when traveling to Mars. You might think that's a lot of experience already. So why don't we just go to Mars? It's hard to imagine. Just how hard Mars is. It requires near absolute perfection and any deviation may be a risk to the safety of the humans on board or the success of the mission so the question is are we ready. You can even ask. How ready are we? Luckily we have an organization right here at the NASA Johnson Space Center and all across the agency looking at what we have and what we need to make Mars mission successful Michelle Rucker is a Mars. Integration lead at Johnson Space Center for the Mars Integration Group. A team that spans across all of NASA. She's a thirty-three year veteran of NASA joining in the aftermath of the space shuttle Challenger accident and supporting the investigation by conducting booster material tests and analysis. She has participated in a range of exciting projects such as the International Space Station. Environmental Control and life support systems hyper impact research spacesuit and spacewalking tools space station exercise equipment system engineering and Orion crew exploration vehicle testing and verification. She currently leads. The Mars. Integration Group developing crude Mars mission concepts. She holds two patents and has authored numerous technical publications so on today's podcast. Michelle goes over the details of what we know what we have what we need and how. Nasa's artist program That will establish sustainable. Human presence on the moon will help inform and fine tune the ideal mission structure for a Mars mission. And I hope you like this topic because there's going to be a lot more this month kicks off monthly episodes that are all about a Mars mission. And we'll call it to Mars monthly over the next few months or maybe even the next year we'll dive deep into the various elements. We discussed today with Michelle so here. We go preparing for a human mission to Mars with Michelle Rucker Enjoy County owners have the.

Michelle Rucker Mars Integration Group NASA Johnson Space Center International Space Station NASA Orion Environmental Control
Frozen on Return

Innovation Now

00:42 sec | 8 months ago

Frozen on Return

"Of scientists will continue the legacy of the Apollo missions by studying pieces of the moon that have been carefully stored and untouched for nearly fifty years. These samples specially curated at NASA's Johnson Space Center since they were brought to Earth are an investment in the future one of the samples is still encased in the drive tube that was pounded into the lunar regular with during Apollo seventeen the core not only preserves the rocks but also allow scientists in the lab to study the rock layers exactly as they existed on the Moon. Other samples were frozen upon their return. None of the

Apollo Johnson Space Center Nasa
Moon Rocks

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Moon Rocks

"NASA has selected teams from across the country to study untouched moon samples. This is innovation now. Now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future nine teams of scientists will continue the legacy of the Apollo missions by studying in pieces of the moon that have been carefully stored and untouched for nearly fifty years these samples specially curated at NASA's Johnson Space Center since they were brought to Earth are an investment in the future. One of the samples is still encased in the drive tube that was pounded into into the lunar regular with during Apollo Seventeen. The core not only preserves the rocks but also allow scientists in the lab to study the rock layers players exactly as they existed on the moon. Other samples were frozen upon their return. None of the samples have ever been exposed to Earth's atmosphere atmosphere by studying these samples for the first time with today's more advanced and sophisticated technology. A new generation of scientists will advance our understanding of our lunar neighbor helping NASA prepare for our return to the moon for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through Collaboration with NASA and is distributed by W H R V.

Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac Jennifer Pulley Apollo Johnson Space Center Fifty Years
What's the Buzz on Alcohol in Space?

BrainStuff

06:27 min | 1 year ago

What's the Buzz on Alcohol in Space?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks Nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm production. INDIVI- heart radio. Hey Brain Steph Lauryn bo-bottle here in September of two thousand eighteen. A new breakthrough in space technology was uncorked uncorked especially designed bottle that will make it possible to drink champagne in the microgravity environment of space. The bottle contains two chambers one for the Champagne and the other for valve that uses the carbon dioxide in the champagne to eject foamy little alcohol spheres which can then be scooped into long stemmed glasses for sipping and once inside the mouth the spheres turn back hawala into liquid champagne this space champagne as the agency France Press reported is envisioned as an Amenity for space tourists who someday maybe taking pleasure trips with private spaceflight operators. If future recreational astronauts astronauts do get the chance to savor some of the bubbly it won't be the first time that alcohol has been consumed in space the practice goes back to the early days of the Soviet space program when the USSR's doctors reportedly said cosmonauts into orbit with rations of Cognac one former cosmonaut told NBC News. We used it to stimulate our immune system and on the whole to keep our organizations intone later on cosmonauts were given a liquor containing Ginseng a root. That's a traditional herbal remedy for improving energy and concentration NASA in contrast generally has prohibited astronauts from drinking not just in space but also within sixteen hours of a space launch but the agency has wavered from its teetotalling stance at times. They're reportedly was a plan for example to allow the Apollo eight crew to drink a small mall ration of Brandy to go with their Christmas meal of Dehydrated Bacon Cubes in Turkey gravy stuffing but commander Frank Borman decided that they should forego the alcohol on the Apollo Eleven trip to the moon in nineteen sixty nine astronaut Buzz Aldrin did open a small plastic container of wine it was almost certainly the first food or drink consumed during the trip but it was so that he a Presbyterian church elder could take communion according to NBC News as former NASA food fellow burs Charles T borland and in Gregory elva detail in their book the Astronauts Cookbook Tales Recipes and more nothing considered providing astronauts on the Skylab mission in the nineteen seventies with Sherry packaged inflexible plastic pouches with built in drinking tubes but the idea was nixed for fear of negative publicity and because apparently the beverage although perfectly perfectly palatable on the ground fill the cabin with an intensely nauseating smell on a test flight that approximated low gravity with freefall in nineteen eighty-five five and that's our report titled Living Loft Human Requirements for extended spaceflight contemplated the pros and cons of drinking on space flights and in future settlements on the moon or other planets it noted it is unlikely that alcohol is a social beverage will find its way into space at least until relatively large and stable settlements are established published alcohol as a recreational drug may be keenly missed by space travelers since there is evidence that alcohol plays an important social role in exotic environments generally though today's space travelers have to wait until they get back to earth before they have a drink because alcohols chemical volatility that is its tendency to vaporize brise astronauts aren't allowed to have it on the International Space Station. We spoke by email with Daniel g hyo a spokesman at NASA's Johnson Space Center. He said that this ban is due to quote the negative effects that alcohol can have on the water recovery system which draws in water from a number of sources including cabin condensation patia the bed applies not just beverages but to any sort of product containing alcohol such as aftershave or a mouthwash. There's another tricky issue about drinking in space ace. Not much is known about the effect of alcohol consumption on the human body in these space environment which already is known to alter everything from the immune system to hand eye coordination and no official studies have been done so we really don't know whether the space environment would intensify the intoxicating effect of alcohol or how an orbital hangover would compare to to one that results from a bender on earth a while. We don't have much science on alcohol and space for what it's worth. There has been research on the effects of alcohol consumption at high altitudes on earth in nineteen eighty eight study for example. Some male subjects drink a quantity of one hundred per vodka adjusted to their weight for one hundred and seventy five. I Pat Man. That's about seventy nine kilos. It was about four shots and then they spent the day simulated twelve thousand five hundred foot elevation environment. That's about thirty eight hundred meters. They were then compared to other subjects who didn't drink and or who stayed at sea level the drinkers experienced impaired performance on a battery of tasks with older subjects performing worse than younger ones but there wasn't a significant difference between drinkers at high altitudes and those who stayed on the ground although not much alcohol has been consumed in space researchers are studying the creation of it on the ISS Scotch Maker Art Beg said samples of Booze and would up to study how whiskey might aged differently in space and Budweiser's sent along batches of barley seeds a scientific effort to understand the effects of microgravity on beer ingredients. Today's episode was written by Patrick J tiger and produced by Tyler claim to learn more about the history and science of Space Food and and beverages check out the episode of my other podcasts saver called ground control to Major Nam. Bringing stuff is a production eye radio's. How stuff works for more on this month of other tipsy topics picks visit our home planet has networks dot Com and from podcastone. My heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts wherever you listen to your favorite shows today's Day's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase. Your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

Starbucks Nasa Johnson Space Center International Space Station Nbc News Steph Lauryn Ussr Buzz Aldrin Frank Borman Dot Com Sherry Podcastone Apple France Press Pat Man Brandy
How Vanessa Wyche Made History as the First African American Female Deputy Director of NASA Johnson Space Center

In Black America

22:58 min | 1 year ago

How Vanessa Wyche Made History as the First African American Female Deputy Director of NASA Johnson Space Center

"From

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Have you have more control over and you can kind of immerse yourself in it but i do appreciate that frank. Thank you so much for were <hes> coming on the podcast. This was this is an interesting discussion <hes> because you read about the overview fact and you talk to astronauts who have who have had such a thing to talk about someone who's thought top to someone who has thought about it so so deeply end from so many different sources has been very interesting frank. I really appreciate your time. It's been my pleasure. Is your thank you so much uh-huh bringing in the space hey thanks for sticking around really good conversation. We had with frank white today about the overview effect. He got to talk to a number of astronauts to really get inside their head about what it was like to be in orbit and look down at the earth from space ace. We've done that a few times on this podcast to talking to a number of astronauts about their biographies and about their time and space. They're all kinds of episodes across the board board <hes> you can listen to them in no particular order. I think one of the more recent ones at this point would be episode ninety eight withdrew morgan who is currently on the international space station. You can see a little bit. What about <hes> what he's going to expect now that he is in orbit. There's been a few astronauts. We've actually talk to after they've landed as well. You wanna check out more nasa podcasts. We have website for that. Nasa nasa dot gov slash podcast all across the board. If you want to know something other than human spaceflight. We've got that covered. If you have a question for this podcast go to any of our social media pages particularly the ones for the nasa johnson space center <hes> just use the hashtag ask nasa on any one of those platforms facebook twitter and instagram to submit. The idea for the show to make sure to mention is for houston. We have a guest. This episode was recorded on june eleventh. Two thousand nineteen thanks to alex perriman nor moran and pat ryan. Thanks to mr frank white for taking time out of his day to speak with us. We'll be back next week..

frank white nasa johnson space center mr frank white nasa morgan alex perriman houston pat ryan facebook instagram moran
NASA Embraces New Developments In Virtual Reality Technology

Innovation Now

01:08 min | 1 year ago

NASA Embraces New Developments In Virtual Reality Technology

"Reality simulators. But these have limitations it's challenging to replicate how each aircraft feels. But a new virtual reality tool developed in collaboration with NASA Armstrong flight research center has adapted. A system that hooks into real aircraft. The fused reality simulator hooks into any airplane, providing the dynamics of the exact plane, the pilot is flying and with the aid of virtual reality goggles layers of virtual scene of the world outside the cockpit. But this spin off isn't limited to a virtual runway airplane manufacturers could use fused reality. As a marketing tool to show off how a plane performs NASA sees applications for long duration. Space missions to repair broken hardware or provide visual aids for medical procedures. And NASA's Johnson. Space center is investigating the system for use on the international space station. So astronauts can practice complicated maneuvers of the robotic arm for innovation. Now,

Nasa Armstrong Johnson
Fused Reality

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Fused Reality

"This tech transfer. Let's pilots practice without risking. An accident innovation now pilots have long been training on virtual reality simulators. But these have limitations it's challenging to replicate how each aircraft feels. But a new virtual reality tool developed in collaboration with NASA Armstrong flight research center has adapted. A system that hooks into real aircraft. The fused reality simulator hooks into any airplane, providing the dynamics of the exact plane, the pilot is flying and with the aid of virtual reality goggles layers of virtual scene of the world outside the cockpit. But this spin off isn't limited to a virtual runway airplane manufacturers could use fused reality. As a marketing tool to show off how a plane performs NASA sees applications for long duration. Space missions to repair broken hardware or provide visual aids for medical procedures. And NASA's Johnson. Space center is investigating the system for use on the international space station. So astronauts can practice complicated maneuvers of the robotic arm for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Nasa Jennifer Pulley National Institute Of Aerospac Armstrong Johnson
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on AP News

"But that the increases could be that they're getting better at identifying more cases. Overall, the agency believes food poisoning rates have remained largely unchanged. The report is based on ten reports in ten states, but it's seen as a national trend indicator. It highlights the difficulty in understanding food poisoning. Because so many cases go unreported diagnostic methods are inconsistent and production, practices and eating habits are constantly changing. The CDC says it's still working to confirm. How many increases in food poisoning cases can be chalked up to a new diagnostic method. It noted some results of a newer faster. Test could be false positives. Moon rocks collected decades ago will be analyzed by a professor at the university of Tennessee. In Knoxville NASA calls the project the Apollo next generation sample analysis program. It's part of the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the first moon landing in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine NASA kept the sample sealed hoping for better, research, technology, and wealth. That's happened. The rocks being analyzed right now where collected during the Apollo seventeen mission in one thousand nine hundred seventy two work begins next month when researchers will meet at NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas to determine how best to open the samples and transport them. Radio news. I'm Tim Maguire police and prosecutors in Sunnyvale California, say Iraq war veteran Isaiah people's intentionally targeted. The people hit with his car in the crosswalk believing. They might be Muslim.

Isaiah people NASA NASA Johnson Space Center Tim Maguire Knoxville CDC professor Iraq Sunnyvale university of Tennessee California Texas
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on AP News

"You're listening to the AP digital news network an exhibition to company Hamilton the musical has opened in Chicago and a likely traveled to others cities in the future. The producers of Hamilton the exhibition are touting it as three hundred sixty degree immersive experience. It has nineteen rooms that chronicle the life of founding father Alexander Hamilton, the exhibitions in temporary building and Chicago's northerly island along Lake Michigan Lin Manuel Miranda who wrote Hamilton is one of the narrators on the exhibits audio tour. Moon rocks collected decades ago will be analyzed by a professor at the university of Tennessee. In Knoxville NASA calls the project the Apollo next generation sample analysts program. It's part of the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the first moon landing in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine NASA kept the sample sealed hoping for better, research, technology, and wealth. That's happened. The rocks being analyzed right now. We're collected during the Apollo seventeen mission in nineteen seventy seventy-two work begins next month when researchers will meet at NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas to determine how best to open the samples and transport them. Age and the presidential race. I'm Tim Maguire than AP news minute. President Trump who is seventy two talks about age, a young vibrant, man. He tells reporters he feels a lot younger than seventy six year old Joe Biden, I look at yo I don't know about him. I don't know. I would never say anyone yesterday Biden announce season the race for the democratic party's presidential nomination today on a view, he defended his aide best way to judge me is to watch C if I have the energy in capacity, and I mean, it's just you know, this this show me business. I'd also joked on the view that if Trump looks young and vibrant compared to me, I should probably go home. The government reports the economy grew at three point two percent annual rate in the first three months of this year, much better than the one percent forecast in the early weeks of twenty nine thousand nine expectations are the second quarter growth will be roughly two percent..

Alexander Hamilton Hamilton Joe Biden President Trump NASA AP Chicago NASA Johnson Space Center Lin Manuel Miranda Knoxville democratic party Lake Michigan Tim Maguire professor Texas university of Tennessee two percent three hundred sixty degree
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"This is a program where you are employed by NASA directly as a student you spend a few semesters maybe few summers or wha- one or more centers across the US. And then if you prove yourself you'll into full-time gig with NASA. So today we're talking with Jonathan Abbari and Alexis Vance Jonathan runs the show as the program manager for the pathways program. He himself was once a co-op. Pathways intern which used to be co ops. We'll get into that. But Alexis Vance is currently an intern in the crew and thermal systems division. She has a pretty good perspective on what it's like to be a student and Anassa intern now in two thousand nineteen so with no further delay. Let's go right ahead to our talk with Mr Jonathan Abbari and miss Alexis fans. Enjoy. County. We have. Jonathan alexis. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast today to talk about the pathways, internships, something very near and dear to my heart. Yeah. Thanks for having us. All right. So what's nice about this episode is we were all or now currently are pathways interns at some point in our lives. So let's start with just where we came from. You know, I think. It's important to sort of go back and say, you know, there's there's certain minimum requirements that you can have to to get into the pathways internship. But you know, I think we all have sort of a unique story not everyone is the same so Jonathan where did you come from? Sure. So so my journey with NASA began actually whenever I was in high school. I went to a local high school in the Houston area and one of the opportunities that was available was like a high school internship with NASA were I my senior year of high school. I went to school for the morning and then for four hours in the afternoon, I actually came to GNC to to support the mission out here. And so it was a really great experience. After that. I actually ended up moving into the college version of that program. And then from there applied to the pathways internship program. And was fortunately accepted for that. And tried out a few different organizations during that stint and. Ultimately was given a fulltime offer for employment upon graduation from my undergrad degree. So it's been a really really cool were really cool road. The the pipeline of the student programs has been really exceptional as well for me. And and that's what's been really kind of cool seeing that that is something that continues to this day with the outreach programs that NASA Johnson Space Center offers to the country really helps us in sourcing an applicant pool that that builds in a group that's ready to do the mission. That's that's available for us here JSE..

Alexis Vance Jonathan NASA Jonathan alexis Mr Jonathan Abbari Alexis Vance intern NASA Johnson Space Center US program manager JSE Houston GNC four hours
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Well, Steve thank you so much for coming on the podcast today in describing propulsion. This is absolutely fascinating. And it sounds like you've thought a lot of this through in working with a great team to make sure everything comes together. So it's a very exciting. Thanks. It's been pleasure. Bring your. Myspace. Hey, thanks for sticking around. So today, we talked with Steve barsky about Ryan's propulsion systems. And how it's going to get us through deep space. So that wraps up all five of our technologies from the article the top five technologies needed for spacecraft to survive deep space. You can check out the episodes on Houston. We have a podcast in. No particular order episodes, sixty six was titled five thousand degrees Fahrenheit talked about. Ryan's heat. Shields episode sixty nine navigating deep space on the navigation and communication systems episode seventy-five on radiation, shielding and episodes, seventy eight called livable space on the life support systems. You can go to some of our social media accounts, especially NASA, Orion and the NASA Johnson Space Center, use the hashtag ask NASA on your favorite platform, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram submitting idea for the show and just make sure to mention Houston. We have a podcast we'd find it. This episode was recorded on November thirteenth two thousand eighteen thanks to out Spearman, nor Moran. Pat, Ryan, Greg wise. Men or Rashawn and Rachel craft. Thanks again to Mr. Steve bar see for coming on the show and taking the time out of his schedule. While he was here in Houston. We'll be back next week.

NASA Johnson Space Center Steve barsky Ryan Houston Mr. Steve bar Myspace Moran Greg wise Rachel craft Shields Facebook Rashawn Pat Twitter Instagram five thousand degrees Fahrenhe
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Eight part one. I'm Gary Jordan w host today. So if you're familiar with us, this is where we're bringing scientists engineers, astronauts, sometimes historians, and we tell you all the cool stuff about what's going on right here at NASA. Sometimes we take a moment to reflect on what we've done in the past. So again, if you've been listening to us, you may know that this is an especially good year for anniversaries, we've celebrated sixty years of NASA. Twenty years of the international space station and fifty years of Apollo exactly fifty years ago on the day that we released this episode. So it would be December twenty first nineteen sixty eight three brave men set course for the moon for the very first time. They were Frank Borman as commander Jim Lovell as command module pilot and Bill Anders as the lunar module pilot. It was the first time that humans traveled to the moon and the first time humans launched on the legendary Saturn five. Rocket putting NASA one small step closer to taking that historic giant leap for all of mankind. To recount this mission. We're bringing in some very special guests returning to the podcast is Dr Jennifer rosina's L are historian here. At the NASA Johnson Space Center, we go over not only what happened during the mission. But the landscape of the Apollo program at the time and surrounding details that you may have never heard before I also had the honor and privilege to speak with Apollo eight commander, Frank Borman and Apollo eight lunar module pilot Bill Anders about their historic mission. We'll kick off today's episode with commander Borman, I travelled out to Montana just about two years ago to discuss his involvement in the Apollo one fire investigation that helped to make changes to the Apollo capsule and get NASA back on course to meet president Kennedy's declaration of landing on the moon by the end of the decade after the tragedy..

Frank Borman NASA NASA Johnson Space Center Bill Anders commander Apollo Gary Jordan Dr Jennifer rosina Jim Lovell president Kennedy Montana fifty years Twenty years sixty years two years
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"And I was blogging at the time I had my own website, and I was kind of doing these blogs, and I just remember I had gone up to the astronauts area where they had the offices for the astronauts, and I'm in the hallway, and I did this video where I blog about hey up here. This is really great against science communication too. Just sharing the experience. And then I posted. Online. And then I think the next day they called us all into the meeting room. And they said there will be no videos, take it in the drinking in my chair like up in the astronaut office area. Unlike ooh, my bad. They didn't call me out by name. But I was like, you know. So to me it was again about the science communication enjoying the experience and really kind of thinking win win. Are they sending me home because this is so so amazing do I really belong and kind of battling with that. Wow. And then you actually do go home. And the funny thing is ego home, and you wait you wait to find out. If you're going to be one of the finalist, they going to call you back, and it this is a really long process. I mean, I put in my application, they would do July of two thousand eight I think I found out that I was highly qualified probably around August. I wanna say of two thousand eight I didn't get my found. I knew I was interviewing I wanna say in November December probably when I figured I was going into the one ten because I remember going away for Christmas break and thinking I can't injure myself because I have my my I was going astronaut I was literally backpacking through Central America. And I remember going whitewater rafting, and I kind of tweets my, knee and. I thought oh, no this is it. I'm not going to be able to go and have become an astronaut. I messed myself up. And so then I had my interview for the one ten I wanna say, it was in January the end of January, and then I went home, and I waited and it's funny because you know, you start hearing that NASA is picking, you know, slots, filling up and in that ensued is getting to the point where they're not gonna have any more slots left, and then you phone rings one day. And it's so funny because I remember it like it was yesterday because it was early morning, and my mom is the only one who calls me early in the morning. So I thought it was her I didn't even three her grades. And I answered the phone, and they say, you know, this is NASA Johnson Space Center, and I just remembered going, oh, my God omega Huddah, you know, are you sure? And she's like, yes. And inviting me to come back for full week to John. Space centre because I was now going to be a finalist, and again, I couldn't believe it was that. When did you get back? Boy, I know you're waiting. It was around my birthday because and it was funny I turning thirty nine and and then I went in April. So as really close the end of March. Yeah. Couple months of weight and every time the phone rings think I may be may I just keep stepping back to you. Giving up.

NASA Johnson Space Center NASA Central America John one day
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on About to Review

"Now when you have been involved in so many of these projects over so many decades that those of us grew up watching. So many decades. Tell me about like the first time because you hear it all the time. Tell me about those first times when you heard somebody say, you drew my childhood. Oh, God, I can't remember, but it's it's, it's countless, it's wonderful. It really blows my mind that something that you know we did in our little cubicles and you know, windowless rooms and did all this stuff. And you know, we had no idea that you know the Saturday morning cartoons would that people would be so in them with and it's on. I love it. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you and thank you. So, yeah, I mean, it just it has been incredible, you know hanging out with you this whole weekend just to get to know that part of the process that again, we grew up watching. We grew up seeing the final version of these and then looking through your storyboards talking to you about it has been pretty incredible. So I really appreciate you taking the time and sitting down to talk to me about this. Will g. Thank you. And then with your with your current projects, where's the best place? People can go to see where you're going to be, you know, various cons and also the things you were working on. Now, Tucker tunes dot com. Talker tunes, you know, like cartoons dot com. Fantastic. I will. Thank you again. It Keith for taking the time. So lately, so evenly. Stephen Smith astrophysicist extraordinaire is joining the show. Welcome. Thank you. Thank you. It's good to be here. So you gave two panels? I did this weekend here. Rented city Comecon. Yes, I only caught the tail end of one. Sorry. I have been busy. No, no. Just look at shamed. It's fine. I mean, I always do so. I mean, you know. Another reason why? No cameras. That's right. That's why that you will trust me. He looked so ashamed right now. Right? Exactly. So in the world of astrophysics actually, technically in the universe of diverse youth, Astro physics, yes. So talk about some of the things that you mentioned on the panel. I couple of tailend of the Saturday panel right when he has we're talking about kind of resources in space, right? And how illogical it is to be like, oh, we should get all of that and bring it here. Right, right. Yes. So so I'm actually an education specialist at NASA Johnson Space Center. I work for the office of stem engagement, so our job is to go out and get people excited about science, technology, engineering, mathematics. I always throw in a little a in there because they're trying to be a little steamy when I can. Yes. Oh, we have drinks in front of us. See, no one can see. So there are a lot of logistical issues when you talk about traveling to the moon or traveling to Mars, or other places like that. And you know distance when when we're talking about these distances is hard sometimes to wrap your brain around really what we're talking about. So right now, the international space station is is flying overhead at about two hundred and thirty eight to two hundred and fifty miles..

NASA Johnson Space Center Comecon Stephen Smith Tucker Keith
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on KTRH

"Stray. Thunderstorm possible for the. Next couple of days it'll be. Rogue thunderstorms drifting off to. The north are overnight low tonight near seventy seven it is warm it is muggy out there straight storm for Friday to close down the work week again drifting slowly to the north where they do occur capable. Of dumping some heavy rain with all the moisture in the atmosphere ninety-five Friday afternoon and mainly dry this weekend low to mid ninety s I'm. Meteorologist, Scott Lawrimore at the Weather Channel it's clear in eighty two still feels like ninety. One, no KTAR h top tax defenders twenty four hour weather center to one our top story while the state of Texas joining. With members of congress and asking FEMA to extend the deadline for Harvey flood, victims to. File proof of loss claims the head of the Texas division of emergency management and state Commissioner of insurance are now asking for an extension of the deadline to December thirty first the usual deadline is a year, after the loss which is coming. Up August twenty fifth both flood victims of hurricane sandy and the two thousand sixteen floods. In Louisiana were granted previous Extensions Nick ranking bitch NewsRadio seven forty KTAR h. Vice President Mike. Pence will visit the Johnson Space Center in Houston next week NASA confirming the visit. Will, take place August twenty third but further details have not been released Pence also announced the visit on Twitter Thursday saying that, he's coming quote to talk about the future. Of human space exploration. Pence's head of the national space council which was. Revived by President Trump. Last year after more than two. Decades ole federal judge in. Montana's ordering the State Department to conduct a full environmental review of revised route for the keystone excel oil pipeline is could delay by years the project that would cross three states judge Brian Morris ruled this week. A full environmental review is necessary because the pipeline route and through Nebraska has been revised from the original path environmental groups native American tribes and. Ranchers, have all been fighting the pipeline for more than a decade KTAR h news time. Is, coming up on two oh three the Franklin the Queen of soul has died at the age Seventy six after a career that spanned seven decades As quickly as she made records she broke.

Pence Texas Johnson Space Center Scott Lawrimore Commissioner of insurance President Trump Vice President hurricane sandy Harvey flood State Department Brian Morris Louisiana Twitter Nebraska Houston Montana congress Mike FEMA
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:25 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Heard on Hillary Clinton. We look at the president's evolving explanations for the June twenty sixteen meeting at Trump Tower for Monday August, sixth, it's all things considered. Chang, and I'm Ari Shapiro this hour. We check in on the aftermath of a devastating earthquake that rocked Indonesia over the weekend we saw house, out, the house the house Utterly flattening also people in Denver. Are ready to jump into the housing market but there aren't. Enough houses to by investors who bought. Homes after the great recession won't let go of them as rental properties there is, not an unhappy landlord in the Denver metro area I can tell you that for sure and we take a look at how a, children's song became a civil rights. Anthem plus an account from the sole surviving member of the crew that dropped the bomb. On Hiroshima those stories after these, news headlines Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Janine Herbst. Manafort's financial fraud trial resumes, tomorrow today his longtime business associate Rick gates testified against his former boss NPR's. Carrie Johnson was in the courtroom in Alexandria Virginia gates told the. Court he committed crimes with Manafort and he misled accountants and banks. At manafort's requested manafort's direction the goal was helped reduce Paul manafort's, tax Bill or solve other financial problems gays pleaded guilty earlier this year to two felony charges and agreed to cooperate in special. Counsel Robert Muller's investigation into possible ties between Russia and the. Trump campaign homeland security secretary cures to. Nelson says President Trump intends to nominate a new director of US immigration and customs, enforcement he's Ronald the Telo who's currently the deputy director of ice NPR's Richard Gonzales has more Ronald Patillo was a former border Patrol agent who rose through. The ranks to become the acting deputy Commissioner of US customs and border protection in Juny was named both deputy director and acting director. Of ice replacing Thomas Hohmann who, retired Patillo has more, than thirty years experience in homeland security his nomination comes as democratic lawmakers have railed against ice some even calling. For it to be abolished. In the wake of increasingly, aggressive immigration enforcement not only at the southern border but also. In the nation's interior Richard Gonzales NPR news the Trump administration says it will, aggressively reimpose sanctions on Iran now that the US is out of a nuclear deal as NPR's. Michele Keleman reports the first batch of sanctions go into effect at midnight some. Banking restrictions are going back, into force in the US is going to prevent Iran from buying aircraft or. Trading in precious metals the US is giving countries and other ninety. Days to scale back their purchases of Iranian oil before You're facing US. Sanctions European countries trying to salvage the nuclear deal say they are determined to protect companies engaged in business allowed under the agreement but senior Trump administration officials say they are not particularly concerned by that they say companies have already been leaving Iran and they will work aggressively to enforce. American sanctions Michelle Kellerman NPR news the State Department in Ohio it's the final campaign push today for candidates in a closely watched special election to, be held tomorrow to fill a, congressional seat being vacated by retiring. Congressman Pat t berry. Republican state Senator ROY Alderson hopes to retain GOP control of that seat which Republicans have held for more than three decades he faces democrat Danny O'Connor Wall Street higher by the closing bell the Dow. Of thirty nine point stand at twenty five thousand five hundred two the NASDAQ up forty seven points end at seventy eight fifty nine. Yes and p. five hundred up ten points closing at twenty eight fifty you're listening to NPR news From Washington from kqed news, I'm Tara Siler, a Modesto man was. Sentenced to fifteen years in prison today for attempting to support a terrorist. Organization by talking to undercover federal agents about attacking a San Francisco waterfront tourist destination on Christmas. Day cake, UD's Alexandra, reports every Aaron Jameson came. To the FBI's attention late last year by liking and loving pro Islamic state posts on Facebook when an undercover agent posing as an ISIS higher up approached him Jameson suggested an attack on San Francisco's pier thirty nine involving explosives and automatic weapons, he tried to back out of the plan two. Days later after, an f., b. i. employee accidentally called his cell. Phone he was then arrested Jamison pleaded guilty in June he was also sentenced. To a lifetime of supervision after his fifteen year prison term I'm. Alex Emslie cake news Berkeley police say they arrested twenty people during a. Large gathering yesterday that was In position to. A much smaller rally by. Right wing extremists officials say most of the arrests involved potential weapons including sledgehammers homemade explosives and wooden signs three people suffered minor injuries and a number, of city cars were damaged but. Berkeley, mayor Jesse geen. Says police used a number of strategies to handle confrontations they literally were in the crowd working to intervene when conversations. Got a little heated and when there could have been a potential. For violence so I think all in all they did a great job in managing. Events ensuring that they were peaceful officials say the city's price tag for Sunday's events won't be.

US NPR Paul manafort Iran Ronald Patillo Trump Tower deputy director Richard Gonzales Denver Hillary Clinton Ari Shapiro Trump administration ice NPR Indonesia president Berkeley Chang Carrie Johnson Robert Muller
NASA names first astronauts for Boeing, SpaceX spaceships

Mark Arum

03:43 min | 2 years ago

NASA names first astronauts for Boeing, SpaceX spaceships

"Turns up today. With her parents, in the New York borough of queens. She was part of a tour group officials say while visiting the World Trade Center in. New. York she was approached by a couple maybe, the same couple seem driving away with her from Reagan international that's where she hid excused herself to go to. The restroom emerging wearing a change of clothes with another woman Police are not. Releasing many details and will not say if an abduction actually occurred China says it is poised to. Impose retaliatory tariffs on sixty billion dollars worth of US imports if the US goes, ahead with its latest trade, threats, the items. That would be targeted include toffee Honey industrial chemicals China responding to, a US threats. To increasing tariffs on two hundred billion dollars a Chinese goods this will be the second round of. A dispute White House press secretary Sarah Sanders saying that instead of. Retaliating shyness should address longstanding concerns about it's unfair trading practices police say a. Man accused of killing one of former president, George, H W Bush doctors fatally shot himself during a, confrontation with police in Houston police, were called to the scene after a city worker reported seeing the. Man in the area officials earlier this week announced the man, was a suspect in the doctor's death last month Four forty have prosecution continues to. Present. Its case in the tax and Bank fraud trial of former Trump campaign chair Paul manafort's prosecutors spent the first two days. Of the trial setting the foundation for their case against Manafort describing his lavish lifestyle and, noting that he used wire transfers from Ford accounts to pay for everything from home improvements to. His wardrobe now witnesses such as manafort's former accountant testifying, that those foreign accounts never showed up on manafort's, business and, individual tax returns from twenty ten through two thousand fourteen the prosecution is expected to wrap up. Its case next week with testimony from its star, witness former, Manafort partner. Rick gates Bill Rakoff CBS news Washington lots of excitement today at NASA's Johnson Space. Center in, Houston as, the agency unveiled the names of the nine astronauts. Who will resume US manned flights they'll be on board spacecraft built by Boeing and. SpaceX that are due to take off next year great so you can be here with us today. As we announced the astronauts who are going to fly the first crewed missions law Launched from American soil since twenty eleven a great day one of the astronauts with the right stuff. Navy pilot Victor Glover from Pomona now to have the opportunity to work with these great companies, on something that, is so, important to, our nation, and, to NASA this is the stuff of dreams this is a. Test pilots dream and I'm just excited to get to work making it a reality listen, that excitement that test flights, to the international space station are due to start in the spring or. Summer. Next year is four forty one let's take you over to CBS to we're going to check in with Suzy Sam hi Susie Hi there, Mike and Jim coming up on CBS news at five. A horrible crash, near one. Of southern California's most popular beaches leaving two people dead today we are live there with the very latest plus a half naked passed out man, dragged off a blue line train you may have seen this video and he. Was also dumped on the platform we're going. To have the latest on this bizarre story and, renter's leaving apartment after twenty. Five years there and you won't believe the Bill management sent them after they moved out so they contacted. To on your side. And we, helped them out it's. All coming up on CBS news at five and. We hope you'll join. Us in just a bit we'll do Susie, thank you, that's all part of our in depth team coverage to we'll have more on these stories plus traffic and weather together coming up in three minutes and. We'll take a look at that. Problem that Susie saw had talked, about they have been watching that as well PCH we'll be overhead. With our eye in the sky just a few minutes away the one zero five away from LAX problem would. Welcome to Los Angeles that is. Coming up as well all just minutes. Away it's four forty two at ace we. Believe there's Nothing better than helping kids that's.

Paul Manafort United States CBS China Nasa Reagan World Trade Center Houston Susie New York York Victor Glover Manafort Los Angeles Rick Gates California Boeing LAX Ford
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Yes yes you want to be there to unbelievable hey david and paul thank you so much for coming on and kind of describing sos less and really spending so much time so we can do this in two episodes because there's so much to this story and honestly this was the first time that i've actually gone into this much detail for the rockets so i really appreciate you getting on and for the listeners please listen to parts one and two and get the whole story of what this rocket is all about guys thanks we have cut cast welcome to the official podcast of the nasa johnson space center episode to can you hear me now i'm gary this podcast bringing in the nasa scientists nears pretty much defense that stuff car neighboring here take risks so today we're talking to space with bill foster these things for sticking around listening to the whole story of the space launch system this was episodes i haven't listened to part wind mission back you can listen to many components about one and then just some general ideas about what s ls was otherwise you can go to some social media channels and website we'll start with the website www dot nasa dot gov slash esa less that's where you can get the latest and greatest otherwise you can follow some social media accounts on twitter it's at nasa underscore l s l s on facebook it's nasa sos or you can actually go on the web and searched sms today.

david twitter facebook official nasa johnson space center nasa
"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson space center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"The envoy absolutely <music> in life hey army on their dream at the mall my of guarding the wringer ringing langer not among the ever here hey thanks for sticking around so today we talked with dr duck middle filled about some of the cooler infamous meteorites that have been discovered throughout the years and then some interesting stories about an article and how he's finding them it's really a cool processing he works with a uh a ends met is there an arctic search for meteorites so if you want to learn more about an smet and some of the adventures that are going on in an article on some of the curious findings in these meteorites especially some that nair may not be life as it turns out that there were some you know fate meteorites at the end of their which is kind of disappointing but that's okay you can go to aries dot jse dot nasa dot gov to get the full scoop on all of these cool meteorites and and you can learn how to get your hands on winning these meteorites samples to study them uh if you go to uh social media on the nasa johnson space center accounts or if you go to a aries or astra materials nasa astra materials we got um pages on facebook twitter instagram where we like to share these stories i just use the hashtag ask nasa on we're pleased on your favorite platform to submit an idea or if you have a question about meteorites or if you want to submit a new topic off with shouts meant make sure to mention its for houston we have a podcast so this podcast was recorded on january eighth 2018 thanks to alex perry men greg wisemen tracy cow hoon and jenny nuts and thanks again to dr duck metal phil four coming on the show we'll be back next week

aries houston langer nasa johnson space center facebook alex perry greg wisemen jenny nuts