31 Burst results for "Nasa Johnson"

"nasa johnson" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:41 min | 2 months ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"The official podcast of the nasa johnson space center episode to thirteen taking the temperature of earth. I'm gary jordan. And i'll be hosting on this podcast. We bring in the experts scientists engineers and astronauts all till you know what's going on in the world of human spaceflight. The international space station is a wonderful place to conduct microgravity science. And it's a hot spot for a lot of experiments because of this capability but the space station also allows us a great vantage point to look down at our own home planet. Pair that view with a very capable international laboratory with lots of power and data available and the possibilities sore or orbit. I guess one experiment onboard station right now is helping to see how effectively plants are using water across the planet. The experiment is called eko stress. Which is of course. An acronym for ecosystems space-borne thermal radiometer experiment on space station. Joining us from the jet propulsion laboratory is keri caused. Nicholson who describes more about this experiment. And how it's helping to understand how efficiently were using our water across different by oems and factoring in climate change. Also the way. It's helping with urban areas and volcanoes in even looking at wildfires across the western united states so let's explore earth science taking place right now on board the international space station. Enjoy.

nasa johnson space center gary jordan international space station jet propulsion laboratory keri Nicholson united states
NASA's Orion Spacecraft Accommodates Astronauts of All Sizes

Innovation Now

01:13 min | 3 months ago

NASA's Orion Spacecraft Accommodates Astronauts of All Sizes

"Nasr's orion spacecraft is designed to accommodate astronauts of all sizes. Who may need to spend weeks at a time. In the capsule this is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape the future. The orion spacecraft features advanced technologies that can sustain the crew during long space travel. Here's sarokin diani. A human systems engineer at nasa johnson space center on the ground engineers and astronauts simulate many of the tasks that will be performed in the crew module evaluating how astronauts interact with displays. Controls seat design sleeping at exercise. Accommodations and more the orion crew will be able to command the ical using three multifunction displays space shuttle crews had to use nearly two thousand switches and controls to command. The call astronauts will sleep in sleeping bags hung in several different places in the cabin to maximize space. There are even armholes so they can use their tablets before they go to sleep. All of these details are planned and tested to be sure that the crew can live and work comfortably and efficiently no matter how long they call the capsule

Sarokin Diani Nasa Johnson Space Center Nasr
"nasa johnson" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

07:57 min | 3 months ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on Houston Matters

"The first day of school. What's been on your mind. Well at first. I was very optimistic. Because i saw the cases going down and people getting back stated in starting toward their masks more but then esco approach cases got worse and people started arguing even more than before and so i began to worry knowing that the mass mandate was lifted at my school of how many people showed up without their masks People which is with their masks and help you would talk to each other like react to people. Not wearing masks or the people wearing masks. Now i wear a mask to school and most of my friends do. And i try to keep a close circle of people who i feel safe with within these hard times and i was very nervous and i remember the first day of school walking in. I felt like this huge way on my shoulders by my friend with a mask. And i was like. Oh i'm not. The only one looks good so going back to last year. What was your school year experience. And did you have to do most of this online. Did you do some of in person. What was it like living through an entire school year with the pandemic well last year. I did my first semester of school online. And then i transferred to in person but masks for mandated at that time and i remember just being really confused with what was going on because part of school was online and part of schools in person and most of the teachers didn't even know what was going on and we had a lot of technical issues so i would say to sum it up. It was very confusing. And honestly i think it really shaped me as a person today because now i'm very like motivated and i didn't think i was as self motivated as before because like all my school made. I had to make myself to the assignments. Teachers weren't looking over me. I had to do it in my room and do it on my own time and so it was kind of different but it was cooling away. 'cause i doubt self growth so well that's an interesting thing to think about because there's been a lot of discussion about the effect on students of this world of virtual learning and whether or not you know a certain subject can be effectively taught virtually and it of students will do well on the tests texas loves looking at its test scores but for you it sounds like you discovered something about yourself and you had some doubts about your level of independence. And whether you'd be able to stay focused on this but apparently you were. I do wonder though were there aspects of being virtual that were challenging for you that that made things a little bit more difficult than they otherwise would be very much so i kinda alone like isolated from everyone. I mean i would text my friends and call them. But it wasn't the same as like being in a school environment doing group projects online. It was very awkward with other people because we would do like group team meetings in like classes in. No one would talk in so it just felt isolated. And you said you're interested in theater. I have to imagine that was severely affected by the pandemic. This affected just about every art form possible. And we've talked a little bit before that you are looking to pursue this for the future you know as a career has this experience given you any pause or caution towards that at all. I sleep it really. Has i remember earlier this year. I was thinking of changing my career paths because oh so uncertain of what the industry would look like in everyone like going into it. How nervous we would all be. Because i remember talking to some fellow actors and they were like well. I don't know if i should do this anymore. Because of cova ahead. And we don't know the industry's gonna start back up again and what's gonna happen. I just was very nervous. But i realized that although it's scary and although the pandemic has set back the industry a lot i think i should try no matter what and pursue my dreams. You were talking before about being nervous about wearing masks and who was going to be wearing masks and of course. This whole pandemic has become a very divisive topic and there's all kinds of different attitudes towards what should and shouldn't be died. It's become very politically motivated. Are you invested in a lot of these conversations on these topics that explore things that go beyond the school that have bigger real world ramifications. I'm very invested in those conversations. I remember whenever for shutdown. I heard about the endemic. I was very nervous and it was like okay. What's right. And what's wrong and i remember. My grandma had a different perspective than me. And i would always like listen to her. Speak in all these things. But i always had something to stand up for and i do think it is important to do your car because i think not everyone should be vaccinated but it's very important to at least writer mask and what about your classmates. Are they engaged on the same topics or these things that you all discuss with. Each other is their disagreement. Even between you. And some of the the people you go to school with Yes actually especially since last year and even this year. There's been a lot of social media arguments that i've seen online and there's also been in faced arguments that i've seen people calling other people stupid or dumb or all these like mean things for having a different opinion but i also think it's important to look at the other perspectives in see what might be processing through their brain in They think is right and what you think is wrong. You should probably have an important discussion on and maybe you guys can agree on something. It seems like it's pretty common for younger generations to sometimes feel like they're maybe not being heard by the generations above them. You know the older generations tend to think. Oh i've gone through the hard times. I've got all this wisdom. I know things that you don't and they'll tend to discount what the generations below them are saying in discount some of the issues that they are passionate about and so from you as a young person in your generation. Are there ways that you feel like you could be heard in. Are there things that you wish people would pay attention to that. You are very passionate about in care a lot about yes. There's a lot of many important conversations. I especially had them with my family and i have very different political views and my cousins my aunts my grandma and as a member of the younger generation. I feel like they ignore my opinions. Because they think oh. She's on the media too much or oh she's too young. She doesn't understand but i do understand. I have done my research. So i feel like i've often been looked over because of my age but many important topics obviously krona virus. I think it's a very important topic very hot topic today. Black lives matter climate change. I mean that's happening. Rapidly in a somewhat. Family doesn't believe happening. Some thanksgiving arguments went on. That happened but yeah it's just important to have the conversations in maybe if you sit them down and talk to them and tell them to. Just listen as agenda That has worked a couple of times. And maybe they will end up understanding where you come from.

cova texas
Ascension Island Telescope Tracks Fast-Moving Orbital Space Debris

Innovation Now

01:17 min | 7 months ago

Ascension Island Telescope Tracks Fast-Moving Orbital Space Debris

"Island a tropical paradise halfway between brazil and is the home for a nasa telescope with a special mission. And in this case location is everything is innovation now. The nasa air force research laboratory on ascension island houses a telescope with a very special mission to track fast moving orbital space debris the orbital debris program office at nasa's johnson space center collects the data from this and several other ground based optical and radar telescopes across the world. Reliable software tools are then used to predict the risk debris might pose to spacecraft earth and the international space station with more than seven thousand metric tons and millions of individual pieces of space junk orbiting earth tracking the debris is essential because orbital debris moves much. Faster than a sniper's bullet. Even a small piece can destroy satellites or spacecraft on impact but the ascension island telescope has a unique feature a double horseshoe mount designed to track fast moving objects and the view from this telescope gives scientists is on what had been a global blind spot

Nasa Johnson Space Center Ascension Island Brazil
NASA Is Lending A 3.9-billion-year-old Moon Rock To The Biden White House

Innovation Now

01:13 min | 9 months ago

NASA Is Lending A 3.9-billion-year-old Moon Rock To The Biden White House

"The request of president. Joe biden the lunar sample laboratory facility at nasa's johnson space center some monroe to the white house. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shaped our future. Triangular glass display case boasts photo glass sides than aluminum top and bottom and holds three hundred thirty two gram piece of the moon. The sample was returned to earth. And nineteen seventy two by the apollo. Seventeen astronauts ronald evans and moon walkers harrison schmitt. An eugene cernan. The last humans to set foot on the moon chipped from a large boulder located almost two miles from the lunar module. The sample surfaces contain tiny craters created as micrometeorites impacts that sandblasted the rock over millions of years the flat sides were created in the jc lab when slices of the rock were cut for scientific research. Now the moon rock has a place of honor in the oval office of the white house on loan to the current administration. It represents the accomplishments of an earlier generation and is a unique symbol of support for america's plans to return to lunar orbit and beyond

Johnson Space Center Ronald Evans Harrison Schmitt Eugene Cernan Joe Biden White House Monroe Nasa America
Moon samples to be studied

Innovation Now

01:02 min | 10 months ago

Moon samples to be studied

"Nine teams of scientists will continue the legacy of the apollo missions by studying pieces of the moon that have been carefully stored and untouched for nearly fifty years. These samples specially curated at nasa's johnson space center since they were brought to earth are an investment in the future one of the samples is still encased in the drive tube that was pounded into the lunar regular with during apollo seventeen the core not only preserves the rocks but also allow scientists in the lab to study the rock layers exactly as they existed on the moon. Other samples were frozen upon their return. None of the samples have ever been exposed to earth's atmosphere by studying these samples for the first time with today's more advanced and sophisticated technology. A new generation of scientists will advance our understanding of our lunar neighbor. Helping nasa prepare for our returned to the moon

Johnson Space Center Nasa
"nasa johnson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:18 min | 11 months ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Okay real quickly because I want to get to the E V market because it's so important, obviously with it with the advent of tests, but I have to ask you. I read about you guys being a development partner with NASA that can't have. That was a long application process, man. She's gonna be a good talk about that. Yeah, we've been actually women work with NASA says the nineties, so we were on the Thebes coverage program were on the Mercury Messenger. Just you know, it's a 20 plus year relationship with NASA Johnson Space Center JPL. We working with Marshall? Um, name's pretty much all of the NASA centers. The most recent work we work with them is on battery, little more battery safety. So a lot of work without their HRC and Dr Walker over changes I see. S so like I said, you know our parts on the international space station to keep the astronauts left a battery safe. Well, we also are working a project with Marshall Space Center to be able to three d print a safe battery pack eventually on the moon. So the big push for me, you know that's announced, uh, going back to the moon. The arguments project Thieve Asian. Is that once we put, you know I infrastructure on the moon. You have a battery is to go bad. You don't want to shoot the whole thing back up there. You want to do space men, You know, space manufacturing, So our solution on it will be a cost savings and a lot of much faster turned turnaround time. So that's obviously very exciting that I think that that would have Implications. Not just for, you know for space apple, you know applications but also for two terrestrial applications. Michael, I know you committed test for one second. I want to keep you over because because they It's so interesting and be, uh, talking to coming back with us. But I want to talk about TV. So I'm gonna keep you here for another another few minutes here because Um, you know, it's interesting because you can't help but talk about these type of things, especially when you are in his game without talking about Maybe it's testes. And which brings it to TV. Which is what you want about. I like the assemble in space. And maybe I get it. I like how he was just so presumptive.

NASA NASA Johnson Space Center Um Mercury Messenger Marshall Space Center partner Marshall HRC E V Dr Walker apple Michael
"nasa johnson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:07 min | 11 months ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Start thinking yourself. Are you in the business of moon landing here? Something that are using that technology to to advance roast stuff right here on Earth. What For? First of all, thanks for having me And thanks for putting the fund in the business shows is great, and we do thermal management. We've been doing that for space applications like for NASA for the aerospace industry for team has been doing that for last 30 years, so What you see on the website on the Mars rover. Our technology is on the Mars Rover 2020 perseverance on the way to Mars right now, I think land sometime in February on and we keep the laser and the sensors cool. You know, temperature nice, eh, so they can to find organic life. Amar's Wow. Our parts are also on the international space station to keep the to keep the astronauts. Uh, laptop batteries safe on it. We've been on think over 1000 different aerospace and defense projects. Our mission now is to take that technology that space proven qualified on Ben applying to the world about evey energy storage and new consumer electronic applications. So here's so here's my question for you and in the obvious question is this is it look at you know we've interviewed. Let's say we interviewed Steve Forbes and his he said, how you become successful. Steve was finding even fill it there. You mean you're in a business You're in a business where it's not a consumable business. You're dealing with aerospace and NASA. For example, how did you guys fare during covert? Because it seems to me and everything I've researched about you guys. He did just fine if not having a great year in 2020. Well, thanks. Um, no. At the beginning of 2020. We already hunger down the team. We weren't sure how the years going to turn out so we hunger down and we went back to our roots. Work with NASA Air Force different deal The organizations on got a lot of proposals in four contracts. So we came out 2020 to be OK on we finish our financing at the end of the year because their stock was getting more and more liquid in the market. We finished a million dollar financing. The last day of the year, which is which is almost like a Christmas came twice last year. Now we got the balance sheet. Gamble. Liquidity in the market way have more customer engagements. Now we're ready for hopefully, the bigger stage one of those little cars I just saw on your video. You want one of the cars itself? Yeah. Yeah, someone over. Hey, Michael blows our guest. He is the CEO of Cooler technology Kul. Are there publicly traded under that stock symbol, you could go to kul our technology dot com for the website. Um okay real quickly because I want to get to the E V market because it's so important, obviously with it with the advent of tests, but I have to ask you I read about you guys being a development partner with NASA. That can't have. That was a long application process match is gonna be a good talk about that. Yeah, we've been actually with me work with that assesses the nineties, So we were on the Thebes coverage program were on the Mercury Messenger. Just you know, it's a 20 plus year relationship with NASA Johnson Space Center JPL. We working with Marshall? Uh um, Name's pretty much all of the NASA centers. The most recent work. We work with them is on battery, little more battery safety. So a lot of work without their rate RC and Dr Walker over th E S. C. S so like I said, you know, our parts on the international space station to keep the astronauts left a battery safe. Well, we also are working a project with Marshall Space Center to be able to three d print a safe battery pack eventually are the moon. So the big push for me, you know that's announced going back to the moon. The arguments project Thieve Asian. Is that once we put, you know I, uh, infrastructure on the moon. You have a battery is to go bad. You don't want to shoot the whole thing back up there. You want to do space men, You know, space manufacturing, So our solution on it will be a cost savings and a lot of much faster turned turnaround time. So that's obviously very exciting that I think that that would have Implications. Not just for, you know for space apple, you know applications but also for two terrestrial applications. Michael, I know you committed test for one second. I want to keep you over because because they It's so interesting and be, uh, talking to coming back with us. But I want to talk about TV. So I'm gonna keep you here for another another few minutes here because You know it's interesting because you can't help but talk about these type of things, especially when you are in his game without talking about Maybe it's testes. And which brings it to TV. Which is what you want about. I like the assemble in space. And maybe I get it. I like how he was just so presumptive and say Well, when we have a.

NASA Steve Forbes NASA Johnson Space Center Mercury Messenger Marshall Space Center Michael CEO Amar Dr Walker Ben apple Marshall E V partner
"nasa johnson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:07 min | 11 months ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Start thinking yourself. Are you in the business of moon landing or something that are using that technology to to advance rose stuff right here on Earth. What For? First of all, thanks for having me And thanks for putting the fund in the business shows is great, and we do thermal management. We've been doing that for space applications like for NASA for the aerospace industry for team has been doing that for last 30 years, so What you see on the website on the Mars rover. Our technology is on the Mars Rover 2020 perseverance on the way to Mars Right now, I think land sometime in February on and we keep the laser and the sensors cool. You know, temperature nice, eh, so they can to find organic life. Amar's Wow. Our parts are also on the international space station to keep the to keep the astronauts laptop batteries safe on it. We've been on Think over 1000 different aerospace and defense projects. Our mission now is to take that technology that space proven qualified on didn't apply to the world about evey energy storage and new consumer electronic applications. So here's so here's my question for you and in the obvious question is this Is it look at you know we've interviewed. Let's say we interviewed Steve Forbes and his, he said, How you become successful, Stevie was find a need and fill it. Are you? I mean, you're in a business. You're in a business where it's not a consumable business. You're dealing with aerospace and NASA. For example, How did you guys fare during covert? Because it seems to me and everything I've researched about you guys. You did just fine, if not having a great year in 2020. Well, thanks. Um, no. At the beginning of 2020. We already hunger down the team. We weren't sure how the years going to turn out so we hunger down and we went back to our roots. Work with NASA Air Force different deal The organizations on got a lot of proposals in four contracts, so we came out 2020 to be okay on Do we finish our financing at the end of the year because their stock was getting more and more liquid in the market. We finished that a million dollar financing the last day of the year, which is which is almost like a Christmas came twice last year. Now we got the balance sheet. We got more liquidity in the market way have more customer engagements. Now we're ready for hopefully, the bigger stage one of those little cars I just saw on your video. You want one of the cars itself? Yeah. Yeah, someone over. Hey, Michael knows our guest. He is the CEO of cooler technology Kul. Are there publicly traded under that stock symbol, you could go to kul our technology dot com for the website. Okay real quickly because I want to get to the E V market because it's so important, obviously with it with the advent of tests, But I have to ask you. I read about you guys being a development partner with NASA that can't have. That was a long application process. Match is gonna be a good talk about that. Yeah, we've been actually with me Work with NASA says the nineties, so we were on the Thebes Discovery program were on the Mercury Messenger just you know, it's a 20 plus year relationship with NASA Johnson Space Center JPL. We working with Marshall? Um, name's pretty much all the NASA centers. The most recent work. We work with them is on battery, little more battery safety. So a lot of work without their HRC and Dr Walker over th E S. C. S so like I said, you know our parts on the international space station to keep the astronauts left a battery safe. Well, we also are working a project with Marshall Space Center to be able to three d print a safe battery pack eventually on the moon. So the big push for me, you know that's announced going back to the moon. The arguments project Thieve Asian. Is that once we put, you know I, uh, infrastructure on the moon. You have a battery is to go bad. You don't want to shoot the whole thing back up there. You want to do space men, You know, space manufacturing, So our solution on it will be a cost savings and a lot of much faster turned turnaround time. So that's obviously very exciting that I think that that would have a Implications. Not just for, you know for space apple, you know applications but also for two terrestrial applications. Michael, I know you committed test for one second. I want to keep you over because because they It's so interesting and be, uh, talking to coming back with us. But I want to talk about TV. So I'm gonna keep you here for another another few minutes here because Um, you know, it's interesting because you can't help but talk about these type of things, especially when you are in his game without talking about Maybe it's testing and which brings it to TV. Which is what you want about. I like the assemble in space thing. Maybe I get it. I like how he was just so presumptive and say Well, when we have a.

NASA NASA Johnson Space Center Um Marshall Space Center Michael Stevie Steve Forbes CEO Amar apple Marshall HRC partner E V Dr Walker
Astronaut Kate Rubins cast her ballot from space, joining millions of early voters

Innovation Now

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Astronaut Kate Rubins cast her ballot from space, joining millions of early voters

"Americans. Exercise their right to vote from all over the world and this year one American will do. So from space this is innovation. Now bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas, emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape the future astronaut Kate Rubens will be casting her ballot from space for the second time in her career kate occur an expedition sixty, three, sixty, four, crew member was serving on the International Space Station during the two thousand sixteen election as well on election day the county clerk who manages elections in Kate's Home County in Texas will work with a team at NASA's Johnson Space Center to uplink a secure ballot. Kate will. receive a separate email with credentials from the county clerk allowing her to access the ballot. Once her vote is cast, the ballot will be down linked and sent back to the county clerk who has a unique password required to open it. The process is quick and secure as NASA prepares for missions to the Moon and Mars. The agency will continue to ensure that astronauts like Kate can fulfil their civic duty to vote no matter where in the solar system they happen to be on election day

Kate Rubens Kate Nasa Johnson Space Center International Space Station Home County Texas
"nasa johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In case you're just joining us talking with Kayla, aka Vino Who's a vulcanologist talking about her adventures studying volcanoes. Scientists this week talk about having detected a giant gas cloud on Venus that they suspect that they look at the What it's made of could have been created by living things. What's what's your take on that is about as a vulcanologist. This is something that's so exciting. I have to admit I am Hashtag Team Venus on a huge Venus Damn! They've detected phosgene in the clouds on Venus, which is a really promising bio signature mean that it may have been put there by life on the authors of the work are saying that they feel this is a strong possibility it could have been generated in some Known biological process like some high heat reaction, but we just don't know. But as a volcanologist, the thing that really gets me is this blows my mind every time. We do not know if Venus is volcanically active. It's 2020. And we don't know if Venus volcanically active because we haven't sent the right instruments to make those measurements and we have some clues telling us that you know, it might be if I had to guess if I were a betting woman, I would say I would guess that Venus is volcanically active asset has been very focused on The search for life to the whole, like, follow the water. Pneumonic on DH has led them on a lot of places to Mars. Another looking for other places like you're open and Titan. But, yeah, Venus gets discounted for life, and so people tend to overlook it. S o. I'm hopeful that this ery well will help sort of open that up. And you know the public will get interested in and that will drum up some more support for good old Venus. Our sister Planet one last question for you, which I asked a lot of scientists and that is If you had a blank check. I don't have it in my back pocket. What would you use it for? What do you want to know that you don't know now about volcanoes or or the makeup of our planet or other planets? First of all, send some mystery, Mr Venus, but really the heart of what I would love to do. This is to to create models and systems that can tell us about when a volcano is going to erupt. And give us predictive capabilities. You know, something that can really make an impact in the world, I think and and it's it warms my heart when there's part of my research that can really have a direct impact on other people on the planet. There would be some money well spent there. Well, it's time well spent with you, Kayla. I want to thank you for taking your time to be with us today. Oh, thanks So much for having me IRA. Pagliuca Vino is an experimental patrol a gist for Jacob's at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston. He's featured in our second season of Breakthrough Portrait's of Women in Science video. Siri's will be premiering a new episode every Friday through October, and we're partnering with Alamo Drafthouse, where you can watch all the videos and listen to panels with the filmmakers and scientists. And you can watch the video. Yeah, You can watch the video and learn more at break through films dot war and it's a beautiful, beautiful.

Mr Venus Kayla Pagliuca Vino Vino Who Alamo Drafthouse Jacob Pneumonic Breakthrough Portrait NASA Johnson Space Center Siri Houston
Water, Water, Every Where  And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From

Environment: NPR

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Water, Water, Every Where And Now Scientists Know Where It Came From

"Water is everywhere on Earth the clouds, the rain, the oceans and rivers even our own bodies were all that water originally came from is a bit of a mystery NPR's Nell. Greenfieldboyce reports that scientists may have found the answer inside some rare meteorites the earth formed four and a half billion years ago, compared to other planets in emerged pretty close to the sun there hot temperatures would mean, no water ice no ice to join with the swirling bits of rock and dust that we're running into each other and building up our young planet. That's. A. We do not know exactly were the what on Earth from why we need to find a source of water on Earth Laurette Peony works at a French research lab called CRP PG. She says that source of water could have been farther out in the solar system like maybe icy comments or water rich asteroids that hit the newly formed earth and watered it. This has long been the prevailing view to explain the the of the ocean and of the water engine on she wondered though if water could have been there at the start Sushi and. Some colleagues recently took a close look at a rare kind of meteorite. It doesn't look like anything special. It's like a gray rock, but it's also thought to have formed near the sun and is the same kind of primordial stuff that glommed together to create our planet and it turns out it contains plenty of hydrogen that's an indicator of its ability to contribute water to a planetary mix. In fact, if you built a planet out of this material, you'd have at least several oceans worth of water these findings described in the journal Science made on. Pay Liaise feel really happy I was happy because it makes it nice and simple. She's a planetary scientist at NASA's Johnson. Space Center in Houston Texas who wasn't part of the research team she says this old idea that Earth's water came from the outer solar system would have required something unusual like Jupiter having a little trip through the inner solar system to send water rich asteroids headed our way. So here we just don't need Jupiter. We're told me to do anything weird. We're just grabbed the material that was their form and that's what who are. Still, she says, even if most of the water was there at the beginning comets and such probably did deliver some of Earth's water later on Nell Greenfieldboyce NPR news.

Nell Greenfieldboyce Scientist NPR CRP Houston Nasa Texas Space Center Johnson
"nasa johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"20th century. This was his rallying call in September 1962. We choose to go to the moon. Wake used to go to the moon. Wake used to go to the moon in this decade and do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are hard. Because that goal Welfare to organize and measure the best. Of our energies and skills. Because that challenge is one that we're willing to accept one we are willing to postpone and one we intend to win and the other two They chose to go to the moon, the most ambitious feat of exploration in the history of our species On remarkably, they got there within the decade, just as President John F. Kennedy had promised. This podcast is about how that incredible achievement was accomplished. Apollo 11 landed on the moon before I was born, but I grew up in the 19 seventies, surrounded by stories of this amazing adventure and to my parents, it was an idea big enough for us to talk about around the dinner table. So, like so many others, the Apollo stories set me on course for a life in science and my own adventures. I studied astrophysics and then medicine on eventually went to work with NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, the home of Mission Control. In so many ways Project Apollo set the direction of my life. In this episode, I'm going to explore why JFK challenged his country to send people to the moon before the end of the 19 sixties. But first I'll explain why I was chosen to focus on the final few minutes before Apollo 11 landed on the moon. Is because those 13 minutes like a showcase for all the hopes and dreams on the.

NASA Johnson Space Center President John F. Kennedy JFK Houston Texas
May the Fourth Be with You

Innovation Now

01:26 min | 1 year ago

May the Fourth Be with You

"Watching films aboard the International Space Station is one way for the crew to bond and decompress and guess which film just became an astronaut favorite innovation now occasionally NASA is share some of the latest film releases with astronauts on the International Space Station to enjoy at their leisure. Imagine watching your favorite science fiction movie while literally floating in microgravity recently astronauts on station had the opportunity to watch star wars the rise of skywalker while two of the actors from the film got to visit Mission Control at NASA Johnson Space Center Kelly Marie Tran and Naomi. Aki are used to inhabiting galaxies. Far Far Away at least on screen but they spent the day learning about NASA's plans for exploring places a little closer to home. The pair got a chance to train like real astronauts and posed for pictures with some of NASA's robotic explorers while learning about the optimist program whether your favorite is the rise of skywalker or return of the Jedi take a cue from the astronauts and watch a movie today and for all you star wars fans out there may the fourth be with you for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer. Pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace through with NASA.

Nasa International Space Station Nasa Johnson Space Center Kelly Marie Tran National Institute Of Aerospac AKI Naomi
Frozen on Return

Innovation Now

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Frozen on Return

"Of scientists will continue the legacy of the Apollo missions by studying pieces of the moon that have been carefully stored and untouched for nearly fifty years. These samples specially curated at NASA's Johnson Space Center since they were brought to Earth are an investment in the future one of the samples is still encased in the drive tube that was pounded into the lunar regular with during Apollo seventeen the core not only preserves the rocks but also allow scientists in the lab to study the rock layers exactly as they existed on the Moon. Other samples were frozen upon their return. None of the

Apollo Johnson Space Center Nasa
Moon Rocks

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Moon Rocks

"NASA has selected teams from across the country to study untouched moon samples. This is innovation now. Now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future nine teams of scientists will continue the legacy of the Apollo missions by studying in pieces of the moon that have been carefully stored and untouched for nearly fifty years these samples specially curated at NASA's Johnson Space Center since they were brought to Earth are an investment in the future. One of the samples is still encased in the drive tube that was pounded into into the lunar regular with during Apollo Seventeen. The core not only preserves the rocks but also allow scientists in the lab to study the rock layers players exactly as they existed on the moon. Other samples were frozen upon their return. None of the samples have ever been exposed to Earth's atmosphere atmosphere by studying these samples for the first time with today's more advanced and sophisticated technology. A new generation of scientists will advance our understanding of our lunar neighbor helping NASA prepare for our return to the moon for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through Collaboration with NASA and is distributed by W H R V.

Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac Jennifer Pulley Apollo Johnson Space Center Fifty Years
What's the Buzz on Alcohol in Space?

BrainStuff

06:27 min | 2 years ago

What's the Buzz on Alcohol in Space?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks Nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm production. INDIVI- heart radio. Hey Brain Steph Lauryn bo-bottle here in September of two thousand eighteen. A new breakthrough in space technology was uncorked uncorked especially designed bottle that will make it possible to drink champagne in the microgravity environment of space. The bottle contains two chambers one for the Champagne and the other for valve that uses the carbon dioxide in the champagne to eject foamy little alcohol spheres which can then be scooped into long stemmed glasses for sipping and once inside the mouth the spheres turn back hawala into liquid champagne this space champagne as the agency France Press reported is envisioned as an Amenity for space tourists who someday maybe taking pleasure trips with private spaceflight operators. If future recreational astronauts astronauts do get the chance to savor some of the bubbly it won't be the first time that alcohol has been consumed in space the practice goes back to the early days of the Soviet space program when the USSR's doctors reportedly said cosmonauts into orbit with rations of Cognac one former cosmonaut told NBC News. We used it to stimulate our immune system and on the whole to keep our organizations intone later on cosmonauts were given a liquor containing Ginseng a root. That's a traditional herbal remedy for improving energy and concentration NASA in contrast generally has prohibited astronauts from drinking not just in space but also within sixteen hours of a space launch but the agency has wavered from its teetotalling stance at times. They're reportedly was a plan for example to allow the Apollo eight crew to drink a small mall ration of Brandy to go with their Christmas meal of Dehydrated Bacon Cubes in Turkey gravy stuffing but commander Frank Borman decided that they should forego the alcohol on the Apollo Eleven trip to the moon in nineteen sixty nine astronaut Buzz Aldrin did open a small plastic container of wine it was almost certainly the first food or drink consumed during the trip but it was so that he a Presbyterian church elder could take communion according to NBC News as former NASA food fellow burs Charles T borland and in Gregory elva detail in their book the Astronauts Cookbook Tales Recipes and more nothing considered providing astronauts on the Skylab mission in the nineteen seventies with Sherry packaged inflexible plastic pouches with built in drinking tubes but the idea was nixed for fear of negative publicity and because apparently the beverage although perfectly perfectly palatable on the ground fill the cabin with an intensely nauseating smell on a test flight that approximated low gravity with freefall in nineteen eighty-five five and that's our report titled Living Loft Human Requirements for extended spaceflight contemplated the pros and cons of drinking on space flights and in future settlements on the moon or other planets it noted it is unlikely that alcohol is a social beverage will find its way into space at least until relatively large and stable settlements are established published alcohol as a recreational drug may be keenly missed by space travelers since there is evidence that alcohol plays an important social role in exotic environments generally though today's space travelers have to wait until they get back to earth before they have a drink because alcohols chemical volatility that is its tendency to vaporize brise astronauts aren't allowed to have it on the International Space Station. We spoke by email with Daniel g hyo a spokesman at NASA's Johnson Space Center. He said that this ban is due to quote the negative effects that alcohol can have on the water recovery system which draws in water from a number of sources including cabin condensation patia the bed applies not just beverages but to any sort of product containing alcohol such as aftershave or a mouthwash. There's another tricky issue about drinking in space ace. Not much is known about the effect of alcohol consumption on the human body in these space environment which already is known to alter everything from the immune system to hand eye coordination and no official studies have been done so we really don't know whether the space environment would intensify the intoxicating effect of alcohol or how an orbital hangover would compare to to one that results from a bender on earth a while. We don't have much science on alcohol and space for what it's worth. There has been research on the effects of alcohol consumption at high altitudes on earth in nineteen eighty eight study for example. Some male subjects drink a quantity of one hundred per vodka adjusted to their weight for one hundred and seventy five. I Pat Man. That's about seventy nine kilos. It was about four shots and then they spent the day simulated twelve thousand five hundred foot elevation environment. That's about thirty eight hundred meters. They were then compared to other subjects who didn't drink and or who stayed at sea level the drinkers experienced impaired performance on a battery of tasks with older subjects performing worse than younger ones but there wasn't a significant difference between drinkers at high altitudes and those who stayed on the ground although not much alcohol has been consumed in space researchers are studying the creation of it on the ISS Scotch Maker Art Beg said samples of Booze and would up to study how whiskey might aged differently in space and Budweiser's sent along batches of barley seeds a scientific effort to understand the effects of microgravity on beer ingredients. Today's episode was written by Patrick J tiger and produced by Tyler claim to learn more about the history and science of Space Food and and beverages check out the episode of my other podcasts saver called ground control to Major Nam. Bringing stuff is a production eye radio's. How stuff works for more on this month of other tipsy topics picks visit our home planet has networks dot Com and from podcastone. My heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts wherever you listen to your favorite shows today's Day's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase. Your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

Starbucks Nasa Johnson Space Center International Space Station Nbc News Steph Lauryn Ussr Buzz Aldrin Frank Borman Dot Com Sherry Podcastone Apple France Press Pat Man Brandy
How Vanessa Wyche Made History as the First African American Female Deputy Director of NASA Johnson Space Center

In Black America

22:58 min | 2 years ago

How Vanessa Wyche Made History as the First African American Female Deputy Director of NASA Johnson Space Center

"From

NASA Embraces New Developments In Virtual Reality Technology

Innovation Now

01:08 min | 2 years ago

NASA Embraces New Developments In Virtual Reality Technology

"Reality simulators. But these have limitations it's challenging to replicate how each aircraft feels. But a new virtual reality tool developed in collaboration with NASA Armstrong flight research center has adapted. A system that hooks into real aircraft. The fused reality simulator hooks into any airplane, providing the dynamics of the exact plane, the pilot is flying and with the aid of virtual reality goggles layers of virtual scene of the world outside the cockpit. But this spin off isn't limited to a virtual runway airplane manufacturers could use fused reality. As a marketing tool to show off how a plane performs NASA sees applications for long duration. Space missions to repair broken hardware or provide visual aids for medical procedures. And NASA's Johnson. Space center is investigating the system for use on the international space station. So astronauts can practice complicated maneuvers of the robotic arm for innovation. Now,

Nasa Armstrong Johnson
Fused Reality

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Fused Reality

"This tech transfer. Let's pilots practice without risking. An accident innovation now pilots have long been training on virtual reality simulators. But these have limitations it's challenging to replicate how each aircraft feels. But a new virtual reality tool developed in collaboration with NASA Armstrong flight research center has adapted. A system that hooks into real aircraft. The fused reality simulator hooks into any airplane, providing the dynamics of the exact plane, the pilot is flying and with the aid of virtual reality goggles layers of virtual scene of the world outside the cockpit. But this spin off isn't limited to a virtual runway airplane manufacturers could use fused reality. As a marketing tool to show off how a plane performs NASA sees applications for long duration. Space missions to repair broken hardware or provide visual aids for medical procedures. And NASA's Johnson. Space center is investigating the system for use on the international space station. So astronauts can practice complicated maneuvers of the robotic arm for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Nasa Jennifer Pulley National Institute Of Aerospac Armstrong Johnson
"nasa johnson" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on AP News

"But that the increases could be that they're getting better at identifying more cases. Overall, the agency believes food poisoning rates have remained largely unchanged. The report is based on ten reports in ten states, but it's seen as a national trend indicator. It highlights the difficulty in understanding food poisoning. Because so many cases go unreported diagnostic methods are inconsistent and production, practices and eating habits are constantly changing. The CDC says it's still working to confirm. How many increases in food poisoning cases can be chalked up to a new diagnostic method. It noted some results of a newer faster. Test could be false positives. Moon rocks collected decades ago will be analyzed by a professor at the university of Tennessee. In Knoxville NASA calls the project the Apollo next generation sample analysis program. It's part of the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the first moon landing in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine NASA kept the sample sealed hoping for better, research, technology, and wealth. That's happened. The rocks being analyzed right now where collected during the Apollo seventeen mission in one thousand nine hundred seventy two work begins next month when researchers will meet at NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas to determine how best to open the samples and transport them. Radio news. I'm Tim Maguire police and prosecutors in Sunnyvale California, say Iraq war veteran Isaiah people's intentionally targeted. The people hit with his car in the crosswalk believing. They might be Muslim.

Isaiah people NASA NASA Johnson Space Center Tim Maguire Knoxville CDC professor Iraq Sunnyvale university of Tennessee California Texas
"nasa johnson" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on AP News

"You're listening to the AP digital news network an exhibition to company Hamilton the musical has opened in Chicago and a likely traveled to others cities in the future. The producers of Hamilton the exhibition are touting it as three hundred sixty degree immersive experience. It has nineteen rooms that chronicle the life of founding father Alexander Hamilton, the exhibitions in temporary building and Chicago's northerly island along Lake Michigan Lin Manuel Miranda who wrote Hamilton is one of the narrators on the exhibits audio tour. Moon rocks collected decades ago will be analyzed by a professor at the university of Tennessee. In Knoxville NASA calls the project the Apollo next generation sample analysts program. It's part of the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the first moon landing in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine NASA kept the sample sealed hoping for better, research, technology, and wealth. That's happened. The rocks being analyzed right now. We're collected during the Apollo seventeen mission in nineteen seventy seventy-two work begins next month when researchers will meet at NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas to determine how best to open the samples and transport them. Age and the presidential race. I'm Tim Maguire than AP news minute. President Trump who is seventy two talks about age, a young vibrant, man. He tells reporters he feels a lot younger than seventy six year old Joe Biden, I look at yo I don't know about him. I don't know. I would never say anyone yesterday Biden announce season the race for the democratic party's presidential nomination today on a view, he defended his aide best way to judge me is to watch C if I have the energy in capacity, and I mean, it's just you know, this this show me business. I'd also joked on the view that if Trump looks young and vibrant compared to me, I should probably go home. The government reports the economy grew at three point two percent annual rate in the first three months of this year, much better than the one percent forecast in the early weeks of twenty nine thousand nine expectations are the second quarter growth will be roughly two percent..

Alexander Hamilton Hamilton Joe Biden President Trump NASA AP Chicago NASA Johnson Space Center Lin Manuel Miranda Knoxville democratic party Lake Michigan Tim Maguire professor Texas university of Tennessee two percent three hundred sixty degree
"nasa johnson" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on AP News

"In Knoxville NASA calls the project the Apollo next generation sample analysis program. It's part of the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the first moon landing in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine NASA kept the samples sealed hoping for better, research, technology, and wealth. That's happened. The rocks being analyzed right now where collected during the Apollo seventeen mission in one thousand nine hundred seventy two work begins next month when researchers will meet at NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas to determine how best to open the samples and transport them. As the two thousand twenty presidential race gears up AP's, Ben Thomas reports a new poll shows healthcare is emerging as an issue that favors democrat the latest Associated Press NO RC center for public affairs research poll finds Democrats enjoy a seventeen percentage point advantage over Republicans in American success of whom they trust more to handle healthcare. Forty percent of respondents said Democrats compared to twenty three percent, trusting the GOP more the poll also finds many Republicans backing one of the Democrats top ideas, a government insurance plan people can buy into those support for Senator Bernie Sanders Medicare for all plan is concentrated mostly among Democrats. Ben Thomas, Washington. Age and the presidential race. I'm Tim Maguire, the AP news minute, President Trump who is seventy two talks about age young, vibrant, man. He tells reporters he feels a lot younger than seventy six year old Joe Biden, I look at Joe, I don't know.

Democrats NASA NASA Johnson Space Center Ben Thomas Joe Biden Senator Bernie Sanders Medicar Knoxville Tim Maguire President Trump Associated Press GOP AP Texas Washington twenty three percent seventy six year Forty percent
"nasa johnson" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"This is a program where you are employed by NASA directly as a student you spend a few semesters maybe few summers or wha- one or more centers across the US. And then if you prove yourself you'll into full-time gig with NASA. So today we're talking with Jonathan Abbari and Alexis Vance Jonathan runs the show as the program manager for the pathways program. He himself was once a co-op. Pathways intern which used to be co ops. We'll get into that. But Alexis Vance is currently an intern in the crew and thermal systems division. She has a pretty good perspective on what it's like to be a student and Anassa intern now in two thousand nineteen so with no further delay. Let's go right ahead to our talk with Mr Jonathan Abbari and miss Alexis fans. Enjoy. County. We have. Jonathan alexis. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast today to talk about the pathways, internships, something very near and dear to my heart. Yeah. Thanks for having us. All right. So what's nice about this episode is we were all or now currently are pathways interns at some point in our lives. So let's start with just where we came from. You know, I think. It's important to sort of go back and say, you know, there's there's certain minimum requirements that you can have to to get into the pathways internship. But you know, I think we all have sort of a unique story not everyone is the same so Jonathan where did you come from? Sure. So so my journey with NASA began actually whenever I was in high school. I went to a local high school in the Houston area and one of the opportunities that was available was like a high school internship with NASA were I my senior year of high school. I went to school for the morning and then for four hours in the afternoon, I actually came to GNC to to support the mission out here. And so it was a really great experience. After that. I actually ended up moving into the college version of that program. And then from there applied to the pathways internship program. And was fortunately accepted for that. And tried out a few different organizations during that stint and. Ultimately was given a fulltime offer for employment upon graduation from my undergrad degree. So it's been a really really cool were really cool road. The the pipeline of the student programs has been really exceptional as well for me. And and that's what's been really kind of cool seeing that that is something that continues to this day with the outreach programs that NASA Johnson Space Center offers to the country really helps us in sourcing an applicant pool that that builds in a group that's ready to do the mission. That's that's available for us here JSE..

Alexis Vance Jonathan NASA Jonathan alexis Mr Jonathan Abbari Alexis Vance intern NASA Johnson Space Center US program manager JSE Houston GNC four hours
"nasa johnson" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Well, Steve thank you so much for coming on the podcast today in describing propulsion. This is absolutely fascinating. And it sounds like you've thought a lot of this through in working with a great team to make sure everything comes together. So it's a very exciting. Thanks. It's been pleasure. Bring your. Myspace. Hey, thanks for sticking around. So today, we talked with Steve barsky about Ryan's propulsion systems. And how it's going to get us through deep space. So that wraps up all five of our technologies from the article the top five technologies needed for spacecraft to survive deep space. You can check out the episodes on Houston. We have a podcast in. No particular order episodes, sixty six was titled five thousand degrees Fahrenheit talked about. Ryan's heat. Shields episode sixty nine navigating deep space on the navigation and communication systems episode seventy-five on radiation, shielding and episodes, seventy eight called livable space on the life support systems. You can go to some of our social media accounts, especially NASA, Orion and the NASA Johnson Space Center, use the hashtag ask NASA on your favorite platform, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram submitting idea for the show and just make sure to mention Houston. We have a podcast we'd find it. This episode was recorded on November thirteenth two thousand eighteen thanks to out Spearman, nor Moran. Pat, Ryan, Greg wise. Men or Rashawn and Rachel craft. Thanks again to Mr. Steve bar see for coming on the show and taking the time out of his schedule. While he was here in Houston. We'll be back next week.

NASA Johnson Space Center Steve barsky Ryan Houston Mr. Steve bar Myspace Moran Greg wise Rachel craft Shields Facebook Rashawn Pat Twitter Instagram five thousand degrees Fahrenhe
"nasa johnson" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"With the international space station. Completing the first part of two stark demonstration one test flight, the docking with the opening opposite Hamady module is seen as a crucial test in essence plans to again transport astronauts to the space station from American soil instead of relying on lifts abode Russian Soyuz rockets from the bike and all cosmodrome in the central Asian Republic of Kazakhstan. The last American over the man mission was Estee one thirty five way back in two thousand eleven the final flight of the space shuttle Atlantis before the month. Balling of America's space shuttle fleet crew drag into tested its autonomy docking system during the final approach the space station moving forward and then backing off again before finally being instructed to undertake the full automated docking maneuver spacecraft as it approaches. The international space station for. A plan docking and to put into perspective just how fast everything's moving a commercial airplane usually cruises at about five hundred fifty miles per hour. Takes about five hours ago from L eight in New York City, if you're able to fly as fast as dragon you could cover that distance in just eight and a half minutes during this phase mission operators configure vehicle for on orbit operations and dragging executed a series of burns, which gradually raise its orbit to align. More closely with the ISS a final co lifted burn which started at about nine fifty nine PM here. Local time at Hawthorn place. Dragon into the same orbital plane of the ISS about two and a half kilometers below seven years behind which then prepared it for its approach autonomous docking maneuver, this is mission control Houston the dragon spacecraft now just about three thousand meters away from the international space station at this time, the international space station about to enter into an orbital nighttime two hundred sixty six statute miles above the earth, just south of Australia at this point dragon has. Completed its approach. Initiation. Burn where now an integrated operations few more milestones to hit just under eight minutes. This point we're looking for midcourse burn and approach initiation. Mid-course burn to look forward to not too long after that will enter into the one thousand meter or kilometer range from the international space station or dragon is getting very close. All right. And we just heard confirmation that dragon. His now inside of the keep outs fear. Now again, the keep outs. Fear is an imaginary circle around the international space Asian of about two hundred meters. He's an one dragon is resuming approach to way point to monitor per step seven in one decimal ones or to dragon approach in retreat. Mondragon is currently resuming its approach towards point to drag into full light with its nose cone. Open. Soft capturing deployed that rings extended above the hatch by six of arms that are all attached to dragon by springs. So that that will be the first part of dragging and make contact with the when it does those springs will. Compress an absorb and damp, any of the relative velocity differences between the space station and dragon this off capture system was actually subjected to extensive testing the six degree of freedom dynamic test system and NASA Johnson, and this is actually very same system. They used to test other systems at NASA. Twenty meter hold confirm performs eight and one does melt ones or to drag approach and retreat monitoring right now Dragonfly computer is using those Drako thrusters firing the one dragons presuming approach and is go for docking monitor per step nine and ten and one this one zero two.

ISS Kazakhstan Estee NASA Hawthorn place NASA Johnson New York City America Mondragon Houston Australia three thousand meters one thousand meter two hundred meters eight minutes Twenty meter seven years five hours six degree
"nasa johnson" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Airport as the stalemate continues over funding. The government federal workers in Texas are taking to the streets. This is Jim Ryan in Texas, Dr Pamela Dinkins is in aerospace, technologist and life. Science researcher. At NASA Johnson Space had at least that's her job title when the agency is funded. But now. Even if it's not financially impactful is emotionally and psychologically impactful because we are effectively laid off. She had other NASA employees have picked up hand lettered signs and staged a demonstration in front of the space center, urging support for a negotiated end to Washington's budget deadlock. Jim Ryan ABC news. Elon Musk says his company space x is pulling out of a planet had to build spacecraft in southern California SpaceX is abruptly canceling the lease it had with the port of Los Angeles for an eighteen acre site at terminal island located between Long Beach and San Pedro which would have been used to build a rocket for manned flights to Mars, no word on why they're backing out of that lease. But this comes one week after the company announced it would be cutting ten percent of its workforce. Six thirty eight thirty seven degrees in Boston time now for a check of business news with Bloomberg's Tracy jonky all that worried last year that fed rate hikes and trade wars would bring an end to good times at banks may have been for nothing. The biggest banks are either reporting record profits for two thousand eighteen or their biggest profits since the financial crisis, Goldman Sachs and Bank of America, led the way the Dow climbed one hundred forty one points. The NASDAQ was up eleven the s&p up six points. We lost stronger gains. The Wall Street Journal said the US is investigating Chinese phone maker hallway the charge stealing trade secrets could further fuel U S China trade tensions. I'm Tracy jonky. Bloomberg business on WBZ. Boston's NewsRadio another member of the Massachusetts congressional delegation. Maybe joining the twenty twenty race for president that story just.

Texas Tracy jonky Bloomberg NASA Johnson Space Boston Jim Ryan ABC Jim Ryan Elon Musk NASA Dr Pamela Dinkins Goldman Sachs researcher San Pedro Los Angeles terminal island Massachusetts president California
"nasa johnson" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard who is set to make it official later this week. There are a lot of reasons for me to make this decision. California's Senator Kamala Harris is also on the verge of launching a campaign. Do you have a timetable for making a decision, and then there's Minnesota Senator Amy klobuchar? I am taking my time to talk to my family. They are on board since the two thousand sixteen presidential election. Women have been making their voices heard they're protesting donating money and running for office in record numbers. Meanwhile, another Massachusetts lawmaker may be throwing his hat. In the ring for the presidency in two thousand twenty congressman Seth Moulton WBZ TV and radio political analyst John Keller points out that molten is forty years old something the congressman may use to his advantage. You would really be the Lynch pin of his candidacy, should it materialize. He's forty years old. He would certainly be among the youngest. If not the youngest candidate in the field. Should he decide to jump in and whole argument would be similar to the one? He made his failed effort to unseat house speaker Nancy Pelosi, which is that it's time for a new generation to step Hallward molten is a Marine Corps veteran currently representing the sixth district in the Commonwealth. Well, now back to our top story, the ongoing government shutdown democratic speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi is not cancelling the state of the union. But she says she's encouraging the president to consider holding it after the shutdown is over land Zack has more from the capital. Speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi is asking President Trump to find another date for his upcoming state of the union address, arguing that the secret service and department of homeland security have not been funded during the shutdown and now Republicans are responding minority whip Steve Scalise has tweeted that Pelosi's move shows, quote, Democrats are only interested in obstruc. Acting and secretary of homeland security Kirsten Nielsen tweets that they are quote fully prepared to support insecure at the state of the union. Lana Zak ABC news. The capitol. Meantime house minority leader Kevin McCarthy. Accused Nancy Pelosi of prolonging the government shutdown by passing bills to reopen. The government that would not be introduced in the US Senate what she's doing this week is political theater. It's going nowhere in the Senate is prolonging the shutdown. And I think now is the time to make sure we take this serious come together and find a place that we have common ground a package of bills to fund the government without money for a wall has already made it through the house. But Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell continues to say he will not bring them for a vote in the Senate because the president would not sign them as the stalemate continues over funding. The government federal workers are taking to the streets. This is Jim Ryan in Texas, Dr Pamela Dinkins is in aerospace, technologist and life. Science researcher. At NASA Johnson Space had reduced in at least. That's her job title when the agency has funded but now..

Nancy Pelosi Senate Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard Senator Kamala Harris Senator Amy klobuchar president congressman Minnesota California Lana Zak ABC NASA Johnson Space Kevin McCarthy Massachusetts Mitch McConnell John Keller official
Top Democrat Pelosi asks Trump to delay State of the Union

WBZ Afternoon News

00:40 sec | 3 years ago

Top Democrat Pelosi asks Trump to delay State of the Union

"Over funding. The government federal workers are taking to the streets. This is Jim Ryan in Texas, Dr Pamela Dinkins is in aerospace, technologist and life. Science researcher. At NASA Johnson Space had reduced in at least. That's her job title when the agency has funded but now.

Nasa Johnson Space Dr Pamela Dinkins Jim Ryan Researcher Texas
"nasa johnson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"In Washington DC Martin care there with world and national headlines, Mark, thank you. Lisa frustrations, financial woes wide, ranging effects are building across the country as the partial government shutdown drags on. No apparent resolution imminent in Washington. Not far from the White House celebrity. Chef Jose Andres is opening a kitchen defeat, struggling, federal employees. Who haven't been paid in about a month? It'll be open every day until six PM not person should has to go through the pain of not knowing what to feed the children. So we're opening a kitchen beyond the beltway. At NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston. Doctor Pamela Jenkins is an aerospace technologist when she's working nowadays. A protester carrying a hand. Lettered signed manning an end to the impasse. Even if it's not by manually impactful is emotionally and psychologically impactful because we are effectively laid off Houston's George Bush internet intercontinental airport today announced again that portions of terminal will be closed as many TSA agents are calling out instead of working without pay. Meantime, tens of thousands of furloughed feds have been recalled to perform vital tasks like sending out tax refunds and inspecting food and drugs the White House will welcome lawmakers from both parties to talks this afternoon. Sources tell Bloomberg senior North Korean official overseeing nuclear. Disarmament talks will meet secretary of state Mike Pompeo in Washington later this week. It's a sign a second summit between the two countries leaders could happen soon around of talk set for November was cancelled when the two sides fell to agree on next steps. Global news twenty four hours a day on air and tick tock on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven.

Washington Doctor Pamela Jenkins Houston White House Chef Jose Andres Mike Pompeo NASA Johnson Space Center Lisa Twitter George Bush Martin Mark Lettered Bloomberg manning official twenty four hours
"nasa johnson" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

07:01 min | 3 years ago

"nasa johnson" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Mark lean bay camp show on David van can't that is Scott Robbins Audi. Hi there. This is kind of a sad story. But it's a well, good advice. If you if you have some symptoms if you're feeling ill. Go get yourself checked out because it can't hurt. Right, right. This is a nurse in the UK shantelle Smits. She has been diagnosed with a brain tumor on brain stem goof now, she's a nurse again. She works, and she cares for patients with brain tumors. She's twenty two years old now she started suffering some minor symptoms like headaches and her first year as a nursing student in two thousand fourteen those headaches got progressively worse to the point where she was taking four and four Tylenol a day trying to combat the headaches that she was getting and then she would start to feel other symptoms that she described it in the New York Post. It felt like rain was falling on the on one side of her face, and she had heard about these symptoms. But she'd also heard that a lot of times people, especially new in the medical field can start to feel some of the symptoms that they tell patients about you have that you know, you you start to self diagnose your real problem for especially younger people in the medical field. So she thought it was just that then one day. She's at the hospital where she works every day. And she sees a poster. This is February of last year. She was reading a poster in the hospital wall was seeing the signs and symptoms of brain tumor brain tumors in young people, and then she realized what might be wrong with her. She says hang on a minute, headaches, constant fatigue. Occasional visual impairments. I have all of those. Maybe I should go to a doctor just in case she did. And they found a mass on a brain stem. Wow. That's in a position that unfortunately, can't be biopsy or taken out or anything. They don't know if it's cancerous tumor is large. She asked the doctor how big, but he just said, you don't need to know. She's had a bunch of more scans. It's monitored every three months, and so the good news is that it stable not currently growing the bad news, though is because of its position on her brain stem. It can't be biopsy. So she's still taking medications now to manage the symptoms and watch and wait policy when it comes to future treatment. So the only way that these types of tumors can be managed is with brain scans every three months brain scans every three months. That's what she's going through. Now. It's funny. How people in the medical community will sometimes wait themselves to see a doctor or to see someone else. I guess I'm fine. I can people ask me all the time. Did you know the diving symptoms that I was going to have a massive heart attack? Not really I didn't think I did. It was just tingling in my fingers. But I also realized to later up on later reflection on it that I was winded doing certain things, but I smoked that's just part of. And they just goes with it. But that wasn't that was part of the of the symptom. And if you go to web MD think you got everything. Yeah. That's the other side. Can't go to that. If you think there's something wrong, go to a doctor. Yeah. You can do that. That's better than the alternatives. I go on web MD. And I swear I've got everything. Right. I think I have hysterical pregnancy. Right. Exactly. I don't think that's possible rickets and how did that happen? Yeah. They do say though, doctors make their own make the worst patient. I would agree with that. Yeah. That's it. So that's that's really. Hopefully, it won't grow anymore and she can live with somewhat normal life anyway. And hopefully, a reminder that you know. Yeah. No kidding. Can't hurt. I remember man when you were telling me that after you got out of the hospital, and we were asking, you know, did you notice any symptoms, and he said the tingling my fingers scared the crap out of me because a lot of times in the morning. I'll wake up and there's tingling in my fingertips. I'm also aside sleep, right? Exactly. I I'll get my Dexter the cockeyed cat who likes to snuggle up. Right. So my arm is in a weird position. It's just asleep. Scared. The daylights out of me. Well, yeah. I mean, that's I mean, I've sold a lot of treadmill examinations. I mean, you know, I have that got me to quit smoking. Yeah. So I mean, that's, but that's what you don't know. And that's the that's the downside of women because I've had everything that must be shingles. What it is. I'll look on web MD. I'll do that's all it is. Yeah, here's a fun story from Newsweek. A Dutch astronaut has described how he accidentally contacted American emergency services on nine one one while he was in. Orbit above the earth. What Andre Kuypers is his name described the experience while speaking on a radio program about his missions and communications between the earth satellites and astronauts orbiting earth and Kuyper explained that he was trying to contact NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston. He missed one number and accidentally called US emergency services. He said that to get to the center in Houston orbiting astronauts have to dial nine for an outside line. Followed by followed by zero one one for an international line. But while floating around in space, it was a little bit trickier. He said been dialing a phone on the earth. He said I made a mistake and the next day. I got an Email message. Did you call nine one one is everything? Okay. You know, we have other ways to contact if you're in trouble. Take the EMT's to get there. I think they're still on the waiver right there. Yeah. The the local EMT's in Houston are still developing. That's what they say. I just find it weird. I can't even call my cell phone carrier provider from this studio. I can't get the signal. No. He's got a straight shot to the satellites. Wow, man. But this did set up a set off at the time. Security alert at the Houston center with emergency staff checking the room where the space station's line connected to earth. And then he joked around saying I was a little disappointed that they didn't come up. But this is a guy who's completed two space missions, totaling two hundred and three days. And he says, it's surprisingly easy to communicate with the earth while on this space station in orbit said, astronauts can reach terrestrial phone lines via satellite around seventy percent of the time because he just had that straight shot essentially said, you know, you'd have to deal with technical hurdles while trying to say Hello to friends on the ground. Like, there's a big time delay that can make it difficult to have a good conversation. Some people would hang up because they thought I didn't say anything so later on. I started to talk as soon as I dialed the last number. You gotta try to account for the right? Yeah. That might happen there who knew though, you can call nine one one from space. You can get a signal in space. But it does make sense, right? It should make do like streaming bird box on his vice bouncing around in space. That's awesome. Now, if he could do that would be a little pissed off because you know, I was in a hotel room trying to watch net flicks. And I kept getting the buffering going. Oh, yeah. Sorry. Boards. Whatever free wifi at the hotel. Anyway, we've got some more news to get to we got the shutdown debacle as it's being called now on CNN. The clock by the way, they stopped doing. No, not on right now is not on because we got a lot of other things. They're talking about both being take our.

headaches Houston UK New York Post Scott Robbins Audi David van NASA Johnson Space Center CNN MD US Houston center Newsweek Andre Kuypers Kuyper three months twenty two years seventy percent