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23 Burst results for "Nasa Glenn Research Center"

Reinventing the Wheel: NASA's Spring Tires

Innovation Now

01:14 min | 20 hrs ago

Reinventing the Wheel: NASA's Spring Tires

"NASA engineers are reinventing the wheel. This is innovation now bringing you stories of revolutionary ideas, emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shaped the future during the mid two thousand. NASA worked with industry partners to develop the spring tire, an airless tire made of several hundred coiled steel wires woven into a flexible mash. When the Mars Curiosity rover experienced significant wheel damage, engineers thought spring tires might be a better solution, but the steel tires deformed as well. A moment of serendipity helped researchers spring into action. Here's Colin. Krieger a mechanical engineer at NASA Glenn Research Center. We have integrated a very unique material shape memory alloy, which are center is one of the world's leading experts then shape memory alloy as specific class of metals that can undergo a fully reversible solid to solid phase transformation. So you think of like water can go from a liquid. Liquid to solid and back and forth as essentially what this material does and with Spring tires made from this nickel titanium alloy NASA engineers are reinventing wheels that could roll across the moon and

Nasa Nasa Glenn Research Center Krieger Colin
SHIIVER: Changing the way NASA keeps its cool

Innovation Now

01:14 min | Last month

SHIIVER: Changing the way NASA keeps its cool

"We really want to go somewhere in space. If we really want to go to the moon we have got to figure out a way to keep propellants cold long enough. This is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shaped the future. Cryogenics is the study of things at very low temperatures. Here's Monica Kuzyk. An Aerospace Engineer at NASA Glenn Research Center to explain why NASA is changing the way they keep their cool so we want to store things like oxygen or hydrogen. If we make them really really cold they turn into a liquid and as we all know. Liquids are denser than gases so they're way more efficient to store when Artemis missions launched to the moon or Mars they will carry liquids with them for fuel and life support but ask. The extreme environment of space warms spacecraft. The fuels begin to or boil off. That's where cry. Oh coolers like shiver the largest cryogenic tank NASA has ever built come into play. Credit is really are in enabling technology to get to where we need to go when we improve cryogenic technologies here for space applications. It always a trickle down effect to the Earth for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer Paulie

Nasa Nasa Glenn Research Center Jennifer Paulie Artemis Missions Aerospace Engineer Monica Kuzyk
NASA reveals the new wavy Martian wheels it thinks can crush the red planet

Innovation Now

01:00 min | 2 months ago

NASA reveals the new wavy Martian wheels it thinks can crush the red planet

"During the mid two thousand NASA worked with industry partners to develop the spring tire. An airless tire made of several hundred coiled steel wires woven into a flexible mash. When the Mars Curiosity Rover experienced significant wheel damage engineers thought. Spring tires might be a better solution. But the steel tires deformed as well a moment of serendipity helped researchers Spring Into Action Colin. Krieger a mechanical engineer. At NASA Glenn Research Center we have integrated a very unique material shape. Memory Alloy which are center is one of the world's leading experts then shape memory alloy as specific class of metals that can undergo a fully reversible solid to solid phase transformation. So you think of like water can go from a liquid to solid and back and forth as essentially what this material does and with Spring tires made from this nickel titanium alloy NASA engineers are reinventing wheels that could roll across the moon and

Nasa Glenn Research Center Krieger
NASA is changing the way they keep their cool

Innovation Now

00:59 sec | 3 months ago

NASA is changing the way they keep their cool

"Is the study of things at very low temperatures. Here's Monica Kuzyk. An Aerospace Engineer at NASA Glenn Research Center to explain why NASA is changing the way they keep their cool so we want to store oxygen or hydrogen. If we make them really really cold they turn into a liquid and as we all know liquids and gases so they're way more efficient to store. When Artemis missions launched to the Moon or Mars they will carry liquids with them for fuel and life support but ask the extreme environment of space warms spacecraft. The fuels begin to or boil off. That's where cry. Oh coolers like shiver the largest cryogenic tank NASA has ever built come into play. Credit is really our enabling technology to get to where we need to go when we improve cryogenic technologies here for space applications. It always a trickle down effect to the Earth for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer Paulie

Nasa Nasa Glenn Research Center Jennifer Paulie Monica Kuzyk Aerospace Engineer Artemis
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:12 min | 4 months ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WTVN

"It doesn't say buyers kia we saw evidence of it when he was mayor of New York and I I have to confess well I was just bond at proposal after proposal being readily agreed to buy most of the citizens of New York we just step right in line proposing a limit on the size of soft drinks it's not a government business in any way shape manner mommy doesn't and the citizens of New York don't even protester the business is of New York don't even process just all fall in line with it they start talking about limiting the kind of vibe thing daughter and whatever else that people eat starts one the band this or that and the citizens of New York do not oppose any of it now I understand the citizens of New Yorker bunch a leftist there there were wild extremist left wing Democrats were written New York is a city where you can do anything New York is a city double slaying New York is becoming one of the most prohibitively antifreeze cities in the country when when Bloomberg ran it and they sat there like a bunch of acquiescence little farm animals were right along with it the guy has a basic misunderstanding of how communism works so I would be extremely concerned about Bloomberg's our foreign policy I just don't think is very bright and I know that cuts against the grains souls wrongly because most people my gosh rush you got more money in your we got more money and we've got more money but it can't be done and I'm I think there's a lot of these rich people folks are when it comes to flat out common sense are just idiots okay Jeff Bezos measles is not what is this business just bought a one hundred and sixty five million dollar property in Beverly hills the old Jack Warner state I'm told it's actually more than that that be is also asked for the number not to be honestly reported but no real estate agents in this sale it was strictly in bees awesome David Geffen I understand is more that Bezos was worried about negative publicity why sorry once you get the hundred and sixty five no okay what's a hundred eighty five million two hundred million whatever drop in the bucket so you know what results did next since we know he was concerned about negative publicity buying a house the cost that much money here came a news report that Bezos's house cost more than the amount of taxes Amazon will pay okay so business realizes he's got a problem that's a PR problem he needs people continue to patronize Amazon buy stuff there in these people using Amazon web services so what does he do he announces a ten billion dollar donation to fight climate change what does that do that buys off everybody that buys off the leftist barbarians at the gate that makes him a hero he can then go out and buy a two hundred million dollar house they will care you can do whatever you want you can not pay any taxes and they won't care because he's just donated ten billion to climate now how do you donate ten billion to climate change what do you spend it on what what would you think if you had okay yeah the amount of money to spend on climate change what would you do with it actually if you believe that all is malarkey what would you do spending whatever money to read what would you do I know you have no idea do you I'll tell you what he's done with it when we get back traffic and weather for Columbus radio listings ten WTVN extend WTVN Ellison lion dozens of contract workers at the NASA Glenn research center in Ohio are set to lose their jobs as vantage partner says they'll be eliminating two hundred people next month when their contract expires NASA says however those employees will be hired by the new contractor ten Ohio locations are among the four hundred and fifty pier one imports stores that will be closing as the chain filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy this week a month after they announced they would be reducing the number of their brick and mortar locations Cleveland Cincinnati and Columbus will see store closures the Ohio department of health says flu hospitalizations rose once again last week and new numbers today they say nearly one thousand people were admitted to for the flu between February second to February ninth all across the state that's a new high for the season and an increase of nearly twenty percent from the previous week your ABC six first warning weather cloudy and cold tonight a low of twenty five I'm Alison Wyant if so here's a story.

New York
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:40 min | 4 months ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WTVN

"Do to twenty five no purchase necessary void where prohibited traffic and weather every ten minutes on the tenth power by Sam star and customary and accepted at four forty I'm Johnny hill on newsradio six ten W. T. V. ABC six first warning weather chief meteorologist marshalling peaks as the patchy re freezing is going to happen tonight because we dipped to twenty five for the overnight low dry and partly cloudy thirty seven Wednesday but then sunshine and upper twenties so as a result wind chills will be in play for Thursday whether powered by the basement Dr it's forty three at your severe weather station newsradio sixty it is the news with for the very latest here's Alyson Wyant Speer one imports is closing ten Ohio locations including at least two in central Ohio the company is also up for sale after they filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection the Boy Scouts of America have also filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection overnight the one hundred and ten year old organization is facing hundreds of lawsuits meanwhile from men who say scout leader sexually abused them when they were boys dozens of contract workers at the NASA Glenn research center are set to lose their jobs vintage partner says they will eliminate the jobs for more than two hundred people in Ohio next month when it's technical services contract expires however NASA says those employees are said to be re hired by their new contractor investors are worried about the corona virus outbreak in they're putting their money in gold the precious metal top sixteen hundred dollars an ounce for the first time since two thousand thirteen today nearly nineteen hundred people have died from the corona virus more than seventy three thousand have been infected most of those totals are from China meanwhile on Wall Street the corona virus outbreak is also spooking investors as the Dow Jones was down more than two hundred points at times today at the closing bell it lost one hundred and sixty six points the S. and P. fell ten however the nasdaq had quite a few companies doing well to finish up two points today your A. B. C. six first warning weather mostly cloudy skies tonight it'll be colder low dropping down to twenty five currently it is forty three degrees I'm Alison why enter next report is coming up at five o'clock available everywhere what the I heart radio now number one for podcasting newsradio six ten WTVN radio station my parents always wanted me to be independent wish granted I was the five year old girl who wanted the white sports car instead of the pink tricycle the thirteen year old who played soccer with the boys in the thirty year old who started her own business today I still love to do my own thing.

WTVN Alison Boy Scouts of America Alyson Wyant Speer chief meteorologist W. T. V. ABC soccer Sam star China NASA partner NASA Glenn research center Ohio newsradio Johnny hill
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:46 min | 4 months ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WTVN

"Six dead it that's where you're going to find the perfect this is being said is a Democrat from this that's the point hang on gonna take a quick break again traffic and weather for Columbus radios W. ET and twelve thirty if there was a radio six ten WTVN here one imports is closing ten Ohio locations including at least two in central Ohio the company meanwhile is also up for sale after they filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection the Boy Scouts of America have also filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection overnight the one hundred and ten year old organization is facing hundreds of lawsuits meanwhile for men who say scout leaders were sexually abusing them when they were boys and dozens of contract workers at the NASA Glenn research center are losing their jobs they plan to eliminate the jobs of more than two hundred people next month when a contract expires but NASA says however those employees will be re hired by a new contractor your A. B. C. six first warning weather a chance of rain early this afternoon with temperatures falling to around forty two whether powered by the basement Dr I'm Alison Wyant windows APCO no down payment needed if you trust us we trust you visit APCO dot com for more information you is the place to go so you can try there's nothing like winter weather to let you know your roof is in worse shape than you thought but don't just get a new roof get in Norman rose no when roofing company dot com call now to be at the front of the line when the weather breaks eight nine own rules eight nine no roof sites Dave bad for best way cabbage you know I went out to see Mike at best way cabinets I spent the morning there we talked I've seen the cabinets I've been on the show room floor value and quality are the two key factors as a matter of fact Jan from Westerville backs that up as well when I looked at the prices of best way cabinets they were very competitive and I like the quality better than what the big box stores had so it really wasn't even a competition then of looking and trying to get other codes and trying to see whether people had I really just like the quality that he had you owe it to yourself to check out real wood cabinets and granite countertops for ten thousand dollars or less and Jan had this to add in closing I would definitely recommend best way cabinets to family and friends when I work with clients around the area here I always say to go try best way and see what they can do for you too because you'll be very happy with the quality check him out at best way cabinets dot com or call six one four seven seven one ten twenty four for best way cabinets warning.

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Your Space Journey

Your Space Journey

09:08 min | 7 months ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Your Space Journey

"Welcome to your space journey where we venture into the future of space exploration and the incredible edible leaders who are taking us there. Hello welcome to your space journey. It's my privilege to introduce our special guest today. Brian May Brian. As as you may know. Is the lead guitarist for the Rock Group. Queen he also has a doctorate in astro physics but before we get to his interview today led to introduce our segment. It again. Called your space turn. This is where fans like you call in and tell us their space journey. They tell us what they're excited about. Space and what. They're most looking forward to the future of space exploration. Here's Molly Kerns of the NASA. Glenn Research Center Telling Her Story Your Space Journey. Hi Hon Mall in Kerns analog with the space medications and navigations aren't mad at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland Ohio mice stay sternly began when I was very young. Both of my parents actually worked for Nas in my whole life. Interestingly enough isn't really when I got on invested in the space industry so when I was in my undergraduate school of college my parents encouraged me to apply for an internship internship at NASA and the field I was studying is marketing and digital and social media marketing so at first I didn't really see If I didn't think there was a spot for me at NASA so at first I wasn't actually on board with the idea but I actually applied turned out. There was some great internship opportunities that were in my field actually did align with arts and so I ended up getting an internship with the space communications and Navigation Internship Program Program so I completed two internships with them and it was a really great experience because they let me build the internship based off of why I was interested in I and what skills I had so I could provide the most value to their internship program. So that's actually the first place. I ended up doing any graphic design work and because the internship I realized I was really passionate about graphic design and specifically graphic design for space related promotional material. So so I was lucky enough that when I graduated with my masters last year the these mutations in allegations -partment or scan offered me a full time position where I now work and it's actually really awesome because I get to help out with the scan internship programs or set. The I was apart when I was an intern so now I get to help all all the interns like with career development and just all the great things that they helped me with when I was an intern. One thing that I'm really excited personally for the future as exploration Shen is just encouraging the next generation to get involved. One thing that I help out with a lot with scan as outreach events so we love to go around and inspire the next generation which we call the artist generation about now says upcoming missions. You know going back to the moon by twenty twenty four and eventually onward alert. Tomorrow's so I'm really excited just to see the world get inspired about this mission and got excited as your your space journey. Thank you molly for sharing your story. If you'd like to share your story with us we'd love to hear it. You can leave us a voicemail by calling three three one seven eight six to forty seven hundred or you can email us an audio or video clip at Info at your space journey dot com. Just be sure to give us your name. Tell us what inspires you about space. When you're most excited about for the future of space exploration please keep your stories to less than two minutes please? We'd appreciate that now onto onto today special guests. Brian may made a Christmas. Come true for me last year. I was fortunate to speak Bryant with Brian over the phone Just before Christmas last year about his incredible passions from going from from the rocket queen to moving into the realm of astrophysics if you I saw the blockbuster hit Bohemian rhapsody. That tells the story even more how he was working on his PhD in astrophysics and then Queen took off and so he took a hiatus. It is from that Until about ten years ago he went back and completed his PhD. And now. He's very active in that community After I had the phone conversations with him I I was very fortunate to actually meet him in person a week. Later for the fly. By of what's called Eric off now was ultimately back then. But we were at the Applied Physics Laboratory on New Year's Eve so I get to spend New Year's Eve As the countdown went on with Brian May and a few hundred other special folks in scientists in media representatives. Really cool thing one thing. That really impressed me the most about Brian is how he blends art and science together. Here's a clip from his press conference Gabe. APO last year talking about how he blends the scientists with art. Because I was brought up in school to believe that. If you're an artist you couldn't Abia scientists and if you're a scientist you could not be an artist. You couldn't be musician so I've kind of fought for that all my life so to me. It is very important and it's very interesting to do this. Yeah I get up every day and feel curious about everything and feel excited about stuff which has never been done before and it's starting to to blend together together more and more at this moment I think as as I stand here before you guys who are mainly scientists you know but all of you I know these are interested in the musical side in the artistic side and so many astronomers nowadays are musicians or artists and whatever astronauts to lucky enough to spend time with with a lot of astronauts most of them have some kind of artistic leanings and I feel that that mankind is kind of coming back together and putting the two halves of it's existence together and I think art INSCI- should be more connected and I think science will be more inspired if it allows itself to become more instinctive and music will be better for allowing doing science into science meaning knowledge. The original meaning of science is knowledge knowledge with what informs everything we do and as human beings we procreate we continue our species but if there's some other reason to be here then it somewhere in this area of discovering the world around us. I think that's the gift that mankind has been given before we get to my phone interview with Brian. Here's the clip. I WANNA share from his press conference in April where he talked about how to use your imagination to fuel your passion. It's great that we talk talk about Patrick. I think because he was the last of generation the last of kind. And if you talk to Patrick more about the moon it wasn't like a theory. It wasn't like Oh yes I can answer your question question if I go to this book or whatever it was like he was there he had been there. He had lived there in his mind and he used his imagination. To tell you what it would be like so I I would say my advice with two kids who are inspired by this stuff is allow your imagination to fuel you. Because it's it's not just about learning facts. It's not just in about being able to regurgitate facts or whatever. It's not just about figures it's not just about science in inverted commas. It's it's about asking the right questions and for that you need imagination. You need to be inspired by what you're looking at. It's like if you were allowed out in different countries. Suppose you were taken blindfolded info to a new country you never seen before you open your eyes it would be about just following your nose and being inspired and searching out what appeals to it. Wouldn't be about looking at a text book. It wouldn't be about looking at a map or ways about finding your own way in the world and to me. That's what science should to be. I think that's what's fueled someone like Alan who has an incredible imagination. Incredible unusual way of thinking thinking outside the box. That's that's what the best science is about is about to me. Well we all know that Brian is an incredible musician but where does his passion for Space Begin. Here's the phone interview. You where Brian was telling me how spacer and he began well. Childhood Passions I had a passion into music is a challenge and they also had a huge passion for the stars and probably the greatest inspiration of all was a program called the sky at tonight Which is an English program which ran for fifty years? Yes with the same presented. Do you know about you probably do. was that the one with I. Entree Patrick Moore or was it not. That's right exactly. Yeah and I used to bake my parents to be allowed to stay up and watch because it was quite late. It was ten o'clock at night uh-huh and to me that was the most inspiring thing in the world and to be able to see the world through his eyes and not just the well but the whole universe and Strangely enough I was very inspired by the music which he chosen to start the program as well by Belius so music and astronomy always. I.

Brian May NASA scientist Molly Kerns Patrick Moore intern Kerns Rock Group Glenn Research Center NASA Glenn Research Center Ohio Nas Queen Cleveland Applied Physics Laboratory twenty twenty Belius
Shape Memory Alloys

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Shape Memory Alloys

"NASA is working on airplane wings that fold as they fly innovation now a team of engineers at NASA's Glenn Research Center is investigating the feasibility of shaping shaping portions of an airplane's wings in flight although folding wings are not a new idea existing folding wings require an actuation system that is bulky and requires multiple parts including hydraulics and and Electric Motors but this team is working on designs that use a shape memory alloy made from nickel titanium blend the metal can be trained to return to a desired shape by applying heat much like ice melting outing and rephrasing this phase transformation is reversible allowing the wing to fold and unfold existing shape memory technology had to be modified to accurately control them at all and allow it to work in cold temperatures an upcoming test followed by full-scale ground tests could transform aircraft design and an interesting technology transfer this same shape memory alloy can be used as a groundbreaking.

Nasa Glenn Research Center Electric Motors
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on CodeNewbie

CodeNewbie

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on CodeNewbie

"I call it a pendulum swing because I've been seeing this for too long. But a lot of people think it's like this new thing, and I'm like well back in the day sys admins Rotana code. That's what they did. And then there came this time where there was a bunch of windows admins that just point click stuff, and like vigor things and that was like a, but that was like a height as and now we're back to like admits very technical people that understand the cloudy, and how to provision infrastructure through code and things like that. So we're kind of back to where we were at when I started. So when did you decide to call yourself in engineer, he has so that's like a kind of a hard question because I never probably use the word engineer. Itself to describe myself because in the context of that history told you like I would have definitely not call myself engineer when I started because those were only mechanical electrical engineers, but software engineers, we didn't really call ourselves at the time. You know, you either wanted to be a programmer or a and those were the two as and when I started the the path towards the path of coding seemed like all of the stuff was getting off shored and soon like we were all worried about being programmers. So that's how I kinda got onto the sys admin side of things early on. Because Unix was this cool thing in Lennox was getting super cool. So I called myself, assists, admin at the time right like, but I remember I was really scared to call myself that because because if you walked in the room with other sys admins, and you said, you were Adleman, and you weren't really assessment it was like, you definitely would be like. Yeah, you're in trouble. So was the point that you decided to own that title of Saddam probably for five maybe six years into my career. I was working at NASA Glenn research center, and I had been there for a while. And I had I had done a bunch of different things. I had written a lot of code. I had you know, program databases and normalize data and helped set up HPC clusters, high-performance computing clusters for like again, mechanical engineers that we're doing real engineering, at least what we call it real engineering at the time, and then, you know, even helped set up video conferencing labs in virtual three d labs that we did date analysis and all kinds of things. And so you just get pulled in and doing a ton of testing around that. And finally at one point you realize like you're at a bar sitting there, you know, afterward talking on your friends, and like you kind of see somebody over here what you're talking about. And they have no idea what you're talking about. And you and you look at them, and you see the look of confusion on like, you know, anonymous people's faces as you're having this, really. Deep conversation. You realize I guess, I am an engineer. So basically when you confuse the people around you, that's when you know, but not on purpose. Like, you're trying to explain it to them in a way that they understand. But they're just like, dude, I'm not getting this. I'm like. So when you finally decided to think of yourself as an star to call yourself that how did that affect your confidence? Yeah. It definitely helped like a lot. Because like again being adamant when I came up, or if you will like being minute was very prestigious thing. So like, you would meet these very like, you know, they were sage like wizard like people that you're like, I don't know how these people knew all this stuff. And I just couldn't even conceptualize like how they knew as much stuff as they knew. And so like, yeah, it once I finally realized I was like, wait a minute. I have a little bit of that. Maybe I've moved on from, you know, in the old days of the guilds apprentice journeyman, then master like, you know, I felt like maybe I was a journeyman finally like I could do things without googling them. I could just figure it out. I could dig into code and figure out what was going on port code from like one, you know, one platform to another. I could like get things to work, and I didn't. I do things that you couldn't Google and nutshell, and I felt good about that..

engineer Lennox programmer NASA Glenn research center Google Saddam Adleman six years
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

Your Online Coffee Break

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

"Get to another key component in human space. Exploration is propulsion. How do you get there? Now, we've used chemical rockets for years, but there's also been some advanced amazing research and demonstrations of alternative propulsion such as electric propulsion. Now, we were fortunate to go on a tour with Deborah waters space simulation facility manager for the NASA. Glenn center here. Debra explains. The benefits of electric propulsion. So it's an interesting slower technology. You're going to asteroid you've got yours. Go to an asteroid fury officiant. So this is ten times more efficient than can prop. So that's what makes attrac- if you put less less propellant up an air with you of the New Orleans view. So just from that aspect is a little cheaper. And it's and it's pretty reliable. Once you get there. Relax, you fifteen years. So that's the that's the good part of the much of convention. Now, making excellent strides in research and development comes only from excellent team members. But also leadership and NASA, Glenn is, no exception. Dr Janet L Cavani is the center's director and a leader in space exploration. She's a veteran of three space flights and a recipient of a presidential rank award to NASA outstanding leadership medals to exceptional service, medals and three NASA space flight medals. Here's Dr Cavani speaking about how to ensure our long-term presence on the moon and the technologies were using to get there. Can we can we extract that water and make it usable? Can we extract materials from the surface of tomorrow? So I wanna take materials from the surface of Mars atmosphere Mars, and they you'll from that will be able to make habitats from that. You know? So we'll be able to grow food in Jared, our own, you know, water and air and all those kinds of things that we need to do because you can. Ship everything back and forth. You'll have to able to make some of it yourself while you're there so learning how to do in thirty printing and things like that of exiting materials all those things that will try to do make sure that the equipment can last for long periods of time and those kind of dusty environments, and and we'll computers work with radiation over long periods of time. You know, so those those types of things we can check out in the lunar vicinity. First before we go on another exceptional leader. At NASA, Glenn is Brian Smith. The director of space flight systems. Brian has supported design and test activities for the international space station's power system and has also served as launch vehicle mission manager Brian has received numerous NASA wards, including NASA significant achievement medal and the prestigious presidential rank award for meritorious executives. Here's Bryant speaking about the plan to go back to the moon and on Mars I worked for NASA thirty years, and I can. Now that I can see it, and I can feel it right now. There's a confluence it wasn't here in the past my daughter few years ago saw NASA. Patch and said can I use that this will? Yeah. They've always been around house. She said, yeah, they have a NASA. Cool now. Now, what happened the last thirty years? Right. And so, but I think what I was picking up on his ears. This confluence the confluence comes from, you know, national policy it comes from international policy. It comes from a couple of cool billionaires that, you know, put a little a little star factor in it at the same time. So as a number of things people made money in space made billions in space. We're very reliant on everywhere everywhere, we look so you take that. And you had a few more things to it. You see the progression? That we've had with the the success we've had with that to be able to fly Americans from American soil. I mean, we have relied on the Russians quite a bit to get our astronauts in the space. So there is a confluence now and the administration has given that to us in a budgetary policy and financial policy, and I think it's I think it's a little it's special right now. So. That's what I say. And I think we're going to get some no successive from this in the future. While I agree with Brian definitely space is cool again for sure it's going to be incredible to see what happens over the next five years as we strive to meet this incredible goal of getting Americans back to the surface of the moon. I wanna thank everyone at NASA Glenn for inviting us in hosting us for their moon to Mars event. Also wanna thank NASA for just all their team members across the nation working so hard to do the incredible goals that they do and accomplish the amazing dreams that they do feel. It's learn more about the moon Amores program. Just go to NASA dot gov for slash moon to Mars island to thank you for joining us today, if you like to comment onto his topic just go to our website online coffee, break dot com. Or follow us on Facebook or Instagram at online coffee break. We'd also love it. If you'd subscribe to our series on apple podcasts, your favorite podcasts application, or of course, follow us on YouTube. And if you have a fellow space enthusiasts that you think could benefit from this discussion today just share this episode with them. Thanks again for joining us today. We'll see you next time. God bless.

NASA Glenn Brian Smith director Debra Dr Janet L Cavani Mars island New Orleans apple Facebook YouTube Jared Bryant Instagram thirty years fifteen years five years
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

Your Online Coffee Break

11:51 min | 1 year ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

"Just as the United States was the first nation to reach the moon in the twentieth century. So too will be the first nation to return astronauts to the moon in the twenty first century. And I'm here on the president's behalf to tell the men and women of the Marshall space Flight Center and the American people that at the direction of the president of the United States. It is the stated policy of this administration and the United States of America to return American astronauts to the moon within the next five years. Your online coffee break where we discussed bite-size topics that inspire educates and entertains here's your host a software. Innovator award winning marketer and astronomy and space bus shucks fields. Hello, thanks for joining me today for your online coffee break wall. Folks. The mandate has been set NASA intends to send Americans back to the moon within the next five years by twenty twenty four vice President Mike Pence analysis just last week at the national space council meeting in Huntsville, Alabama now just a couple of weeks before that NASA hosted their moon to Mars event at facilities throughout America. I was forced into attend this event. At the NASA Glenn research facility in Cleveland, Ohio over the next few minutes. I'm gonna take you with me on a journey as we go behind the scenes at NASA, Glenn talk to some of the people there and learn about some of the technologies they're developing to send Americans back to the moon. Online coffee break. Now may of us have heard of Kennedy Space Center in Florida. But again, NASA has facilities all across America. They're integral to their mission. Now, this is my first time at NASA Glenn in Cleveland, Ohio and let the tale a bit more about that incredible facility. First off the NASA Glenn research center was originally established in nineteen forty one when it was known back then as the aircraft engine research laboratory it quickly became a world class aircraft engine research laboratory, and then evolved in the nineteen fifties to research new types of propulsion in the nineteen sixties the center began helping with the space program with project mercury and helped train astronauts including Ohio zone. John, Glenn since then it's evolved into a state of the art facility for researching and developing innovative technologies for both aernautics and space exploration. Well, this was my first time attending NASA Glenn and have to say for the moon to Mars event. I was very impressed. We admit. Any special treats awaiting us. But one of the first things that really caught my was this one full sample from a lunar rock from Apollo fifteen. Here's John Oldham their exhibit specialist tongues a little bit more about that. Okay. John here. We are at moon to Mars program. You've got this wonderful astronaut suit behind us from Pala fifteen and a lunar sample over there. Tell us about the Apollo fifteen lunar sample so the Apollo fifteen hundred sample it's it's name fifteen o five eight point one nine two. It is a three point seven billion year old piece of lunar basaltic. So it was picked up on the Apollo fifteen mission nine thousand nine hundred seventy one correct seventy-one and brought back to earth has been studied extensively and we're still learning from lunar rock, especially fifteen o five eight it's out in the world being studied in small pieces, but we have a fairly large sample here over to now. What's fascinating to me is today. Obviously, we're at the moon Amores program. What do you foresee is jus-? Just going to happen for the next phase of moon, expiration Manasseh. So it's it's quickly becoming a very aggressive program to to get back in expiration further than lower orbit, which is awesome. And that will require steps processes new equipment untested and untried processes that that we're all working on and part of that will include getting back to the moon in a sustainable way. Which is one of the big mandates. We have now at NASA. So here at NASA, Glenn we are contributing to that. That effort in in a fairly decent way with a system to get us at the moon and be able to stay on site at the moon for length of time, which eventually will allow us to go back and forth to the surface backup to a local a local station if you will and then be able to get back and forth to earth. A lot of the things that we're going to need to do way out in deep space. We'll be able to test in fairly close space the moon is by no means, you know, next door, but I'm but a a great place for us to test. Some of the new equipment hardware and processes materials that that we're working on here at Glen right around the corner from John the Apollo fifteen lunar sample was this amazing VR experience. They had all kinds of headsets, and we can put them on and experience what it was like to float around the international space station or even walk on the moon. Now, those were provided by what's called Nasr's graphics and visualization lab they actually developed VR to help scientists. Allies data. Here's herb schilling. Computer scientist for NASA? Tell us a little bit more about what they do. Now. What's really cool right now, we have a lot of VR going around. He tell him more about just the different VR. That's being offered here today. Nasa going so a lot of what we do in our team these days related to VR AR are ways of explaining what NASA does to the public and key stakeholders and things like that. So we take people to win tunnels we show people NASA concept vehicles. We take them to moons of Saturn and things like that. In an interesting engaging way, you know, through VR, and hopefully we make it so that you can even interact with it. Sometimes like that one with the block. So it's it was fascinating. I got to play with blocks and fly around the initial space station, which I thought was great. So you guys are doing very great job here. Thank you so much. You're very welcome. Thank you for coming. Well, of course, being a computer program myself. I was very impressed. And I wonder if find out more, and they actually had this really awesome. Programmer Kevin Robinson who was there. And I asked him little bit more about what is that drew him to this field for working as a programmer for NASA? Here he is explaining that you mentioned earlier that it's more of the data visualization side of it. So what kind of drew you to that side? And what are you doing that field? Yes. So I think it was just mostly my skill sets at the time. I had an opportunity to learn python, and he's got really in the programming language, and I found that python. Normally works really well for putting together sort of small simulation small frameworks for researchers. And oftentimes researchers I support they're also asking for a little bit of data. Analysis as well. What are you most looking forward to for the future of space exploration here? Nasa man, I think definitely going to Mars just extending the capabilities that we have right now to return to the moon, and then what we can continue to do. So even we can actually reach Mars. It's really exciting. You know, I was thinking about that. When they have a base of Marsh. They're going to need software developers. And of course, I would volunteer for that. But you're probably way ahead of me on that. So if you've got the opportunity, will you gotta Marsha. I don't think. So I think I could probably do do a lot more to help out by staying down here. That means there's room for me. Thank you for your time. I'm not a problem. Thank you. But one of the directives for getting back to the moon is establishing a permanent human presence now instead of sending resupply missions, which would be cost prohibitive intra. While we need to take advantage of the resources. We have there. I'm going to show. How old I am here. But there used to be a game that I loved called Oregon trail. It was basically you had a covered wagon. It was old wild west. And you were traveling across America, you had to make sure you took enough supplies with you to make your journey successful. Well, when we go to the moon, and we go to Mars, sending all the materials, we need to survive over a long period of time would just be cost prohibitive after while. So it really saves some time save some money if we can take advantage of the resources we find their well, one key area within NASA is called issue or the institute research utilization. And we were fortunate to. A little bit more about that. As a matter of fact, we met research engineer, Julie clients in the slope lab here, she is talking about more about what they do. So it's a really exciting idea to land. Obviously, the the plane years didn't take everything but someday they used there was there. So use voted slow play up and are different facilities that the simulates we use. Obviously, the big problem is the only have so much lunar soil returned. So you can't use them for quantities a scale like this. And we're talking about became something like forty metric tons of propellant when we're talking about ours. We're talking about some ten metric tons of oxygen. If we're talking about the moon. So these aren't small quantities we're talking about to support humans. So you have to talk about big scale excavators and testing with large-scale soil. So we have different simulates that simulate things like the different chemical composition of the soil as well as different properties. So while these things are great for mobility simulates. They're not necessarily good or reacting with with ice, you purposes. What would've travel to the moon and to Mars power is a key component for human space exploration? Fortunately, NASA, Glenn is on the cutting edge for research into advanced power systems. We were fortunate get a very up close look about the alternate power systems that they were developing. Here's Wayne Wong. The acting branch chief for thermal energy conversion talking a little bit more about what they do. Amick power specifically, sterling and are very efficient. We actually Costra liens and charges founded fifty five to six toe watts at even higher certainly possible. But internally in our variety working on our systems balance without one and. Of these power systems of when you talk about system, Stanford below one kilowatts ideally of this seat for radio, I still power system or systems that require more than one what that's chill power, which is a one to ten kilowatts. Now, I was really fascinated by their demonstration of what's called a Stirling engine. This is a heat engine that operates by compression and expansion of air. So basically converts heat to power in a closed system. No, another power source is of course, nuclear here's research, associate max Chacon telling a little bit more about that the only other option for our space nuclear power due to the mathematicians of launching Dona launch up, you know, under the tons of fossil fuels that gas turbine on the moon or a goal are the mid. So what you have is you solar or nuclear for the most part. So what we do in. This is we designed our systems Balaton interface with a nuclear energy source to produce electrical power reduce heat, our that you can use various applications. As we mentioned there are two different types of nuclear power Disraeli's Tokes out you'll hear a little bit more about later. And then the the project that I'm working on is actually a vision nuclear reactor. It's a miniature version of those seen commercial Hartman green power. There's Xing's here in northern Ohio power as we speak. This'll be a kind of miniature baby version of those commercial the reactors. So if involves uranium involves, the fishing chain-reaction on all the different physics that goes behind that. There's very cool cut assistant benefits that you get

NASA Glenn America Ohio NASA Glenn research center Kennedy Space Center United States Cleveland John Oldham Marshall space Flight Center programmer national space council Mike Pence president Pala Huntsville
Electronics for Hostile Environments

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Electronics for Hostile Environments

"With a surface temperature of eight hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit, a heavy. Carbon dioxide atmosphere at divall canes and deadly clouds of sulfuric acid Venus's tough world to explore. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future NASA is hoping to build on the success of the silicon based integrated circuits used on Mars Landers, but the target this time Venus once thought to be a likely place to find life the mariner and Russian venire probes in the nineteen sixties and seventies revealed, the harsh reality of Venus even spacecraft built today wouldn't survive much longer than the venero Landers with their massive cooling systems. None lasted more than one hundred twenty seven minutes on the blistering the news in surface. But a team at NASA Glenn research center is developing a new. Electronics technology that could survive more than five hundred twenty hours in the hostile environment. The electron IX made of silicon carbide circuits could not only make exploration Venus possible, but might be a hot prospect for aircraft engines and a range of other earth applications as well for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer pulley innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa Nasa Glenn Research Center Mars Landers Landers Jennifer Pulley National Institute Of Aerospac Eight Hundred Seventy Degrees One Hundred Twenty Seven Minut Five Hundred Twenty Hours
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:19 min | 1 year ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A and Mary Louise Kelley while border security remains a sticking point in negotiations immigration courts facing ever-growing backlog of cases, so we're really shutting down over ninety percent of pending immigration cases over a metaphor. And the NRA goes global. If you look at the people that are giving the most money to the NRA, it's not just individuals corporations. And some of those corporations are coming from abroad will look at the gun lobby's ties around the world and questions about the NFL's commitment to diversity when four minority coaches are fired at once now news. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. President Trump says the partial government shutdown they last months or even longer if that's what it takes to get the five point six billion dollars. He wants for southern border wall. Democrats who were posing any use of taxpayer money for wall and Washington Post columnist E J. Dion says there are signs that some Republican lawmakers want to end the stalemate, including the speaker of the Senate Mitch McConnell was notably a wall at the president's news conference, the House Republican leaders were there McConnell wiscon-. I think you're seeing a break-up of Republican solidarity very early on two Republican senators who are up for reelection in tough states have already said, let's pass the house bills and opened the government seven House Republicans broke with the party and voted for the democratic Bill in the government. He J Dion. Speaking on NPR is all things considered the national park service's a man died at Yosemite. National park on Christmas day as kqeDorg Monaco, summa yo reports there is little information on what happened. In a statement. The National Park Service says the man suffered a head injury near a trail between vernal and Nevada falls at the eastern end of Yosemite valley the area is not closed off to the public. The call came in on the afternoon of Christmas day Rangers were on scene with an hour and remove the man from body of water, they provided medical attention, but he died on scene. The statement did not provide more details. It says the investigation into what happened will take longer than usual because of the government shutdown. No press release was provided to the public also due to the shutdown for NPR news. I'm Monica Samaya in San Francisco. One of the longest currently serving US senators is retiring Kansas Republican Pat Roberts says he will not run for reelection. When his term expires next year. No mean Jia dean of the Kansas. News service has details. Roberts has spent almost forty years in congress. I. In the house of representatives starting in nineteen eighty then as a Senator starting in nineteen Ninety-seven, the eighty two year old is known for his conservative politics and his leadership on the Senate agriculture committee at a news conference Roberts said one of his proudest moments was receiving bipartisan support for last year's farm Bill when you achieve something like that. I don't think I can topic. Robert said he worries that spirit of collaboration could eventually disappear in today's political climate for NPR news. I'm no mean Ojea dean into Pika Kansas US, Senator Elizabeth Warren has made her first Iowa visit since announcing this week that she plans to seek the presidency last night. Warren told about five hundred people in council bluffs, Iowa that it is time to dream big and fight hard. Warren says she's running to take on government that she says favors the rich and powerful over the working poor and middle-class. You're listening to NPR news. US Labor Department figures show US employers added three hundred twelve thousand jobs to the economy last month. They gave investors much needed. Encouragement that economic growth is still steady. The December job gains came despite a trade war with China. The global slowdown and the partial federal shutdown board says it's recalling almost a million vehicles worldwide to take to replace Takata passenger side airbag inflators. Most of the recalled vehicles were sold in the US and include SUV's, sedans and trucks, dating back to the twenty ten model year. Ford says it doesn't know of any injuries and vehicles included in this recall Venezuela's, President Nicolas Maduro is scheduled to be sworn in to a second term next week as NPR's Philip Reeve's tells us many Medeiros Latin American neighbors, urging him to abandon his plans twelve Latin American nations want to cancel his inauguration next Thursday. The members of the Lima group of. Body set up to press for solution to the Venezuelan crisis before it causes even more have in the neighborhood, but dodo secured another six-year term in may in an election widely seen as rigged after meeting Friday. The limit group issued a statement urging him to hand over power to the opposition led parliament until new elections can be held, but doodo and his socialist party a short ignore this. They would have taken note though, that one big regional player abstained, Mexico whose position on Venezuela softened since left leaning president and Hispaniola Lopez open the door took power could it breathes NPR news. And I'm Shay Stevens. NPR news. In washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include X chair maker of the X to office chair with dynamic variable. Lumbar support and ten economic features to adjust and fit users of different shapes and sizes at X chair dot com or eight four four four X chair. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish. And we begin this hour talking numbers that start with four hundred twenty thousand that would be the rough estimate of the number of federal employees currently working without pay because the government has deemed them essential three hundred eighty thousand about that many federal workers are furloughed which means they're not working, and they're not getting paid to. That's the number of times, the president has met with party leaders in the White House situation room in the last seventy two hours sixteen that's the number of days. The twenty thirteen government shutdown lasted Democrats or Republicans were fighting over the Affordable Care Act and raising the debt ceiling twenty four billion dollars. That is that's a standard and Poor's analysis of how much that sixteen day shutdown cost the government if the current government shutdown lasts until Monday, it will be the second longest in history. We are going to turn to someone now who played a key role in that twenty thirteen government shutdown. Michael Steele was press secretary for then speaker of the house. John bainer. So we had a front row seat for that standoff. Michael Steele, welcome to the program. Good to be with you before we get to twenty thirteen and what happened then your thoughts on how this one is playing out. Trump is now saying it could last months or even years, which are reaction. President Trump is a president. Unlike any other in this is a shutdown. Unlike any other most government shutdowns result from congress, which under our constitution has the power of the purse trying to force the president to do something. This is exactly the opposite. This is the president shutting down the government is centrally trying to force congress to do something. It's kind of a blazing saddles approach taking himself hostage. You said a shutdown. Unlike any other, but Arthur lessons, we could learn how did you find a way out of it in the end in two thousand thirteen. The twenty thirteen shutdown was ultimately a mismatch between priorities and tactics. People believed that people oppose the Affordable Care Act of that time. It was not popular by any stretch of the imagination at the same time shutting down the government in an attempt to defunding was also not very popular. And what we ultimately did was whether the political attacks from Senate Democrats from President Obama until Republicans in moderate seats in the house were willing to join with Democrats to reopen the government and provide funding for the Affordable Care Act. This is a very different situation in the sense that it's hard to see any coalition coming together in either house really that would be able to pass a Bill that included funding the government and this additional five billion dollars that the president is demanding for his wall along the border one other thing that seems really different is the lack of urgency that we seemed. To be seeing now versus in two thousand thirteen where I mean now, we are two weeks. And there really hasn't been any real talks until the last few days. No, it's really strikingly different in two ways from from that point of view. The first is the the usual rule of government shutdown is the way you win government shutdown fight is by making the public convincing the public that you don't want to shut down the government. You have to show people that you've gone to every extent possible to avoid shutting down the government. And President Trump went exactly the opposite direction on that. He says that he is responsible with this shutdown. He wears it. Proudly he he's just he's accepting responsibility. Or blame in a way that hasn't been typical and the second ways. Yeah. As you said part of it is due to the fact that only a portion of the federal government shutdown. It's not a complete federal government shutdown silver critical areas, including the department of defense are fully funded, but it is really striking the degree to which there's not a sense of urgency. There's not a sense of emergency of there's not. That same sense of crisis that we've seen in past shutdowns. You have a lot of experience working with Republicans on the hill. As I want to ask you about one of the most perhaps the most prominent Republican on the hill this time around Mitch McConnell. The Senate majority leader who now is dealing with two Republican senators who have broken ranks, and are urging compromise is Senator McConnell arguably now under more pressure than anybody to Inness. No, Senator McConnell is actually kind of in the catbird seat. He has the way he usually does drawn a drawn a scenario where he doesn't think that the Senate should lead on this. There will be no more test votes. No more show votes. Nothing will happen until we have the proposal negotiated between House Democrats agreed to by Senate Democrats who have to provide at least ten votes in the Senate in order to get anything done are almost ten votes in order to get anything done and and President Trump himself. And while that position allows senators up for Republican senators up for reelection and potentially swing states like Colorado and Maine to favor opening the government it allows most Senate Republicans who look want better border security. They think that an additional five billion dollars is probably a pretty reasonable. Some. They understand that a physical barrier in some portions of the border makes a lot of sense. But they understand that politically shutting down the government to. Accomplish that goal is not popular. And also unlikely to succeed, that's Michael Steele. He was press secretary for speaker of the house, John bainer. He's now Hamilton place strategies, Michael Steele. Thank you. Thank you. All week. We've been hearing from people whose lives have been up ended by the partial government shutdown for Alex read in IT technician in South Carolina. The shutdown is standing in the way of his dream opportunity. An internship at NASA Glenn research center in Cleveland, the internship was actually for research and development of electric propulsion systems. It was going to be like a stepping stone for my career because what I've always wanted to do was be in research and development and having this opportunity presented to me. I felt like a kid on Christmas morning when he gets his first bicycle I didn't think it was possible that at my age that I'd get offered an internship, especially for exactly what I wanted to do. Alex read his age is thirty seven the internship was supposed to start this coming Monday. But it is now on hold read had already quit his job. But he says he's picking up some hours of work while he waits. He is hoping to hear good news from NASA soon, but so far communication has been minimal the way that they've ordered the emails is that will get an Email the day after the government opens up. I don't know how much time is going to give us to report for orientation. I'm hoping it's more than forty eight hours. But I have no idea because we don't have any information because they don't have any information read says he's not someone who follows politics. He had tuned out all the partisan fighting in Washington until now you go from not carrying not paying attention leading agendas be agendas, and you just mind your own business and take care of yourself to. Now, you have to try figure out what's going on if something's going to change when it's going to change. Because now it affects you it's frustrating, and it creates a lot of stress and anxiety. That's Alex Reid of South Carolina looking forward to the end of the partial shutdown. So he can start his NASA internship in Cleveland. Democrats took control of the house of representatives this week. And they're already changing the rules, every new congress the majority rewrites the rules that govern the chamber. And this time those rules affect everything from raising the debt ceiling to combat and climate change. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is tracking all of the changes. Welcome to the studio. So what are the most significant changes? The Democrats are making here two things that Democrats are doing aimed at essentially eliminating two of the major confrontations. We saw under the Republican majority. The first is they made it a lot easier to raise the debt ceiling the nation's borrowing limit we've seen this fiscal confrontation come up in multiple times in recent years. Essentially, what House Democrats are saying now is if they just pass a budget it makes the debt ceiling race through the fiscal year..

president NPR President Trump Senator McConnell Senate Washington US Michael Steele congress Shay Stevens National Park Service Mary Louise Kelley NRA Senator Alex Reid Senator Elizabeth Warren
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:05 min | 1 year ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish. And we begin this hour talking numbers that start with four hundred twenty thousand that would be the rough estimate of the number of federal employees currently working without pay because the government has deemed them essential three hundred eighty thousand about that many federal workers are furloughed which means they're not working, and they're not getting paid to. That's the number of times, the president has met with party leaders in the White House situation room in the last seventy two hours sixteen that's the number of days. The 2013 government shutdown lasted Democrats or Republicans were fighting over the Affordable Care Act and raising the debt ceiling twenty four billion dollars. That is that's a standard and Poor's analysis of how much that sixteen day shutdown cost the government if the current government shutdown lasts until Monday, it will be the second longest in history. We are going to turn to someone now who played a key role in that twenty thirteen government shutdown. Michael Steele was press secretary for then speaker of the house, John bainer. So we had a front row seat for that standoff. Michael Steele, welcome to the program. Good to be with you before we get to twenty thirteen and what happened then your thoughts on how this one is playing out. Trump is now saying it could last months or even years, which your reaction. President Trump is a president. Unlike any other in this is a shutdown. Unlike any other most government shutdowns result from congress, which under our constitution has the power of the purse trying to force the president to do something. This is exactly the opposite. This is the president shutting down the government is essentially trying to force congress to do something. It's kind of a blazing saddles approach taking himself hostage. You said a shutdown. Unlike any other, but Arthur lessons, we could learn how did you find a way out of it in the end in two thousand thirteen. The two thousand thirteen shutdown was ultimately a mismatch between priorities and tactics. People believed that people oppose the Affordable Care Act of that time. It was not popular by any stretch of the imagination at the same time shutting down the government in an attempt to defunding was also not very popular. And what we ultimately did was whether the political attacks from Senate Democrats from President Obama until Republicans in moderate seats in the house were willing to join with Democrats to reopen the government and provide funding for the Affordable Care Act. This is a very different situation in the sense that it's hard to see any coalition coming together in either house really that would be able to pass a Bill that included funding the government and this additional five billion dollars that the president is demanding for his wall along the border one other thing that seems really different is the lack of urgency. We seem to be seeing now versus in two thousand thirteen where I mean now we are two weeks in and there really hasn't been any real talks until the last few days. No, it's really strikingly different in two ways from from that point of view. The first is that the the usual rule of a government shutdown is the way you winning government shutdown fight is by making the public convincing the public that you don't want to shut down the government. You have to show people that you have gone to every extent possible to avoid shutting down the government and President Trump when exactly the opposite direction on that. He says that he is responsible for the shutdown. He wears it. Proudly he he's just he's accepting responsibility. Or blame in a way that hasn't been typical and the second ways. Yeah. As you said part of it is due to the fact that only a portion of the federal government shutdown. It's not a complete federal government shutdown silver critical areas, including the department of defense are fully funded, but it is really striking the degree to which there's not a sense of urgency. There's not a sense of emergency. There's not that same sense of crisis that we've seen in past shutdowns. You have a lot of experience working with Republicans on the hill. As I want to ask you about one of the most perhaps the most prominent Republican on the hill this time around Mitch McConnell. The Senate majority leader who now is dealing with two Republican senators who have broken ranks and are urging a compromise is Senator McConnell arguably now under more pressure than anybody to end this. No, Senator McConnell's actually kind of in the catbird seat. He has the way he usually does drawn a drawn a scenario where he doesn't think that the Senate should lead on this. There will be no more test votes. No more show votes. Nothing will happen until we have a proposal negotiated between House Democrats agreed to by Senate Democrats who have to provide at least ten votes in the Senate in order to get anything done are almost ten votes in order to get anything done in an President Trump himself. And while that position allows senators up for Republican senators up for reelection and potentially swing states like Colorado and Maine to favor opening the government it allows most Senate Republicans who look want better border security. They think that an additional five billion dollars is probably a pretty reasonable. Some. They understand that a physical barrier in some portions of the border makes a lot of sense. But they understand that politically shutting down the government to. Accomplish that goal is not popular. And also unlikely to succeed, that's Michael Steele. He was press secretary for speaker of the house, John bainer. He's now Hamilton place strategies, Michael Steele. Thank you. Thank you. All week. We've been hearing from people whose lives have been up ended by the partial government shutdown for Alex read, an IT technician in South Carolina. The shutdown is standing in the way of his dream opportunity. An internship at NASA Glenn research center in Cleveland, the internship was actually for research and development of electric propulsion systems. It was going to be like a stepping stone for my career because what I've always wanted to do was be in research and development and having this opportunity presented to me. I felt like a kid on Christmas morning when he gets his first bicycle I didn't think it was possible that my age that I'd get offered an internship, especially for exactly what I wanted to do. Alex read his age is thirty seven the internship was supposed to start this coming Monday. But it is now on hold read had already quit his job. But he says he's picking up some hours of work while he waits. He is hoping to hear good news from NASA soon, but so far communication has been minimal the way that they've ordered the emails is that will get an Email the day after the government opens up. I don't know how much time is going to give us to report for orientation. I'm hoping it's more than forty eight hours. But I have no idea because we don't have any information because they don't have any information read says he's not someone who follows politics. He had tuned out all the partisan fighting in Washington until now you go from not carrying not paying attention. Leading agendas be agendas, and you just mind your own business and take care of yourself to. Now, you have to try figure out what's going on if something's going to change when it's going to change. Because now it affects you it's frustrating, and it creates a lot of stress and anxiety. That's Alex Reid of South Carolina looking forward to the end of the partial shutdown. So he can start his NASA internship in Cleveland. Democrats control of the house of representatives this week. And they're already changing the rules, every new congress the majority rewrites the rules that govern the chamber. And this time those rules affect everything from raising the debt ceiling to combat and climate change. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is tracking all of the changes. Welcome to the studio. So what are the most significant changes that Democrats are making here two things that Democrats are doing aimed at essentially, eliminating two of the major confrontations. We saw under the Republican majority. The first is they made it a lot easier to raise the debt ceiling within the nation's borrowing limit we've seen this fiscal confrontation come up multiple times in recent years. Essentially, what House Democrats are saying. Now is if they just pass a budget it makes the debt ceiling race through the fiscal year. It takes away the need to have a separate vote on the house floor to do that the other thing they did is they changed the rules to make it harder to question. The speakers grip on power in office something that threaten John bainer speakership that ultimately forced him out. They changed the ROY. To say one member can no longer bring that to a question on the floor. You would now need a majority of an entire party ready to throw out the speaker to make it happen. That has the essential effect of neutralizing those two issues in the next congress in the area of climate change, what kind of role can they make that old indicate that's a priority. One thing. That's changing legislatively is the Democrats are much more interested in making climate change driving agenda issue of this congress one thing they did in these roles package is they have created a new committee that is tasked exclusively with looking at ways to combat climate change. There's been some grumbling within the party among progressives. Notably Alexandria, Cossio Cortez. New democrat from New York saying the committee doesn't have enough teeth. It won't have subpoena power. It can't bring bills to the floor. But it is tasked with coming up with legislation that democratic leaders say will get a vote in the next congress. I understand there are also stricter ethics rules. What are some of the changes there? So they are making it an annual requirement for all law may. Makers to take ethics training. Now. Now used to be when you were newly elected you are one and done. Now, they say you have to do it every single year, including senior staff, they have also added something that you might have thought was already banned. But it is not lawmakers are no longer allowed to sit on corporate boards. Lawmakers had been allowed to do that previously as long as they didn't take any compensation. It's a little bit of a nod to the fact that there is a sitting congressman Chris Collins from New York who is under indictment right now for committing securities fraud as he sat on the board of a pharmaceutical company. It speaks to the fact that Democrats I think are trying to make a good government anti-corruption campaign finance the main symbolic driving issue of this congress. They've designated HR one the first Bill of the congress to addressing all of those issues and the rules packages, a reflection of that it kind of reflects the priority of where they want the next two years to go a little less serious, the dress code what's going on there. So Ilhan, Omar is one of the women that one. One in the Blue Wave of two thousand eighteen she is one of two Muslim women who I ever elected to congress. She also wears a job the head covering traditional in the faith and house rules had never really accounted for this before. This isn't something that they've had to confront currently the house rules say you can't wear a hat on the house floor. That's come up occasionally when members want to wear a baseball cap or something else, but they hadn't been confronted with the issue of religious freedom. So they have a made sure that the house accommodates for the fact that religious headwear can now be war on the floor of the house of representatives. That's NPR's congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you for the date. You're very welcome. Thank you..

president President Trump congress Michael Steele John bainer Alex Reid Senate NPR White House NASA press secretary Senator McConnell Cleveland South Carolina
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish. And we begin this hour talking numbers that start with four hundred twenty thousand that would be the rough estimate of the number of federal employees currently working without pay because the government has deemed them essential three hundred eighty thousand about that many federal workers are furloughed which means they're not working, and they're not getting paid to. That's the number of times, the president has met with party leaders in the White House situation room in the last seventy two hours sixteen that's the number of days. The 2013 government shutdown lasted Democrats or Republicans were fighting over the Affordable Care Act and raising the debt ceiling twenty four billion dollars. That is that's a standard and Poor's analysis of how much that sixteen day shutdown cost the government if the current government shutdown lasts until Monday, it will be the second longest in history. We are going to turn to someone now who played a key role in that twenty thirteen government shutdown Michael Steele was press secretary for. Then speaker of the house, John bainer? So we had a front row seat for that standoff. Michael Steele, welcome to the program. Good to be with you before we get to twenty thirteen and what happened then your thoughts on how this one is playing out. Trump is now saying it could last months or even years, which your reaction. President Trump is a president unlike any other and this is a shutdown. Unlike any other most government shutdowns result from congress, which under our constitution has the power of the purse trying to force the president to do something. This is exactly the opposite. This is the president shutting down the government is essentially trying to force congress to do something. It's kind of a blazing saddles approach taking himself hostage. You said shutdown. Unlike any other, but Arthur lessons, we could learn how did you find a way out of it in the end in two thousand thirteen. The twenty thirteen shutdown was ultimately a mismatch between priorities and tactics. People believed that people oppose the Affordable Care Act of that time. It was not popular by any stretch of the imagination at the same time shutting down the government in an attempt to defunding. It was also not very popular. And what we ultimately did was whether the political attacks from Senate Democrats from President Obama until Republicans in moderate seats in the house were willing to join with Democrats to reopen the government and provide funding for the Affordable Care Act. This is a very different situation in the sense that it's hard to see any coalition coming together. In either house, really that would be able to pass a Bill that included funding the government, and this additional five billion dollars that the president is demanding for his wall along the border one other thing that seems really different is the lack of urgency that we seem to be seeing now versus in two thousand thirteen where I mean now we are two weeks in and there really hasn't been any real talks until the last few days. No, it's really strikingly different in two ways from from that point of view. The first is that the the usual rule of a government shutdown is the way you winning government shutdown fight is by making the public convincing the public that you don't want to shut down the government. You have to show people that you have gone to every extent possible to avoid shutting down the government. And President Trump went exactly the opposite direction on that. He says that he is responsible for this shutdown. He wears it. Proudly he he's just he's accepting responsibility. Or blame in a way that hasn't been typical. And the second way is as you said part of it is due to the fact that. Only a portion of the federal government shutdown. It's not a complete federal government shutdown over critical areas, including the department of defense or fully-funded, but it is really striking the degree to which there's not a sense of urgency. There's not a sense of emergency of there's not that same sense of crisis that we've seen in past shutdowns. You have a lot of experience working with Republicans on the hill as so I wanna ask you about one of the most perhaps the most prominent Republican on the hill this time around Mitch McConnell. The Senate majority leader who now is dealing with two Republican senators who have broken ranks and are urging a compromise is Senator McConnell arguably now under more pressure than anybody to end this. No, Senator McConnell's actually kind of in the catbird seat. He has the way he usually does drawn a drawn a scenario where he doesn't think that the Senate should lead on this. There will be no more test votes. No more show votes. Nothing will happen until we have a proposal negotiated between House Democrats agreed to by Senate Democrats who have to provide at least ten votes in the Senate in order to get anything done are almost votes in order to get anything done and and President Trump himself. And while that position allows senators up for Republican senators up for reelection and potentially swing states like Colorado and Maine to favor opening the government it allows most Senate Republicans who look better border security. They think that an additional five billion dollars is probably a pretty reasonable. Some. They understand that a physical barrier in some portions of the border makes a lot of sense. But they understand that politically shutting down the government to. Accomplish that goal is not popular. And also unlikely to succeed, that's Michael Steele. He was press secretary for speaker of the house, John bainer. He's now with Hamilton place strategies. Michael steele. Thank you. Thank you. All week. We've been hearing from people whose lives have been up ended by the partial government shutdown for Alex read, an IT technician in South Carolina. The shutdown is standing in the way of his dream opportunity. An internship at NASA's Glenn research center in Cleveland, the internship was actually for research and development of electronic propulsion systems. It was going to be like a stepping stone for my career because what I've always wanted to do was be in research and development and having this opportunity presented to me. I felt like a kid on Christmas morning when he gets his first bicycle I didn't think it was possible that at my age that I'd get offered an internship, especially for exactly what I wanted to do. Alex read his age is thirty seven the internship was supposed to start this coming Monday. But it is now on hold read had already quit his job. But he says he's picking up some hours of work while he waits. He is hoping to hear good news from NASA soon, but so far communication has been minimal the way they've worded the emails is that will get an Email the day after the government opens up. I don't know how much tying is going to give us the report for orientation. I'm.

president President Trump Michael Steele Senate Senator McConnell White House NPR press secretary John bainer Audie Cornish congress Mary Louise Kelley NASA Alex Arthur Obama
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:05 min | 1 year ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish. And we begin this hour talking numbers that start with four hundred twenty thousand that would be the rough estimate of the number of federal employees currently working without pay because the government has deemed them essential three hundred and eighty thousand about that many federal workers are furloughed which means they're not working, and they're not getting paid to. That's the number of times, the president has met with party leaders in the White House situation room in the last seventy two hours sixteen that's the number of days. The twenty thirteen government shutdown lasted Democrats or Republicans were fighting over the Affordable Care Act and raising the debt ceiling twenty four billion dollars. That is that's a standard and Poor's analysis of how much that sixteen day shutdown cost the government if the current government shutdown lasts until Monday, it will be the second longest in history. We are going to turn to someone now who played a key role in that twenty thirteen government shutdown. Michael Steele was press. Secretary for then speaker of the house, John bainer? So we had a front row seat for that standoff. Michael Steele, welcome to the program. Good to be with you before we get to twenty thirteen and what happened then your thoughts on how this one is playing out. Trump is now saying it could last months or even years, which your reaction. President Trump is a president. Unlike any other in this is a shutdown. Unlike any other most government shutdowns result from congress, which under our constitution has the power of the purse trying to force the president to do something. This is exactly the opposite. This is the president shutting down the government is essentially trying to force congress to do something. It's kind of a blazing saddles approach taking himself hostage. You said a shutdown. Unlike any other, but Arthur lessons, we could learn how did you find a way out of it in the end in two thousand thirteen. The twenty thirteen shutdown was ultimately of a mismatch between priorities and tactics. People believed that people opposed the Affordable Care Act of that time. It was not popular by any stretch of the imagination at the same time shutting down the government in an attempt to defunding was also not very popular. And what we ultimately did was whether the political attacks from Senate Democrats from President Obama until Republicans in moderate seats in the house were willing to join with Democrats to reopen the government and provide funding for the Affordable Care Act. This is a very different situation in the sense that it's hard to see any coalition coming together. In either house really that would be able to pass a Bill that included funding the government, and this additional five billion dollars that the president is demanding for his wall along the border one other thing that seems really different is the lack of urgency that we seem to be seeing now versus in two thousand thirteen where I mean now we are two weeks. And there really hasn't been any real talks until the last few days. No, it's really strikingly different in two ways from from that point of view. The first is that the the usual rule of a government shutdown is the way you win government shutdown fight is by making the public convincing the public that you don't want to shut down the government. You have to show people that you have gone to every extent possible to avoid shutting down the government and President Trump when exactly the opposite direction on that. He says that he is responsible for the shutdown. He wears it. Proudly he he's just he's accepting responsibility. Or blame in a way that hasn't been typical. And the second way is as you said part of it is due to the fact that. Only a portion of the federal government shutdown. It's not a complete federal government shutdown so critical areas, including the department of defense or fully funded, but it is really striking the degree to which there's not a sense of urgency. There's not a sense of emergency of there's not that same sense of crisis that we've seen in past shutdowns. You have a lot of experience working with Republicans on the hill. So I want to ask you about one of the most perhaps the most prominent Republicans on the hill this time around Mitch McConnell. The Senate majority leader who now is dealing with two Republican senators who have broken ranks and are urging a compromise is Senator McConnell arguably now under more pressure than anybody to end this. No, Senator McConnell's actually kind of in the catbird seat. He has the way he usually does drawn a drawn a scenario where he doesn't think that the Senate should lead on this. There will be no more test votes. No more show votes. Nothing will happen until we have a proposal negotiated between House Democrats agreed to by Senate Democrats who have to provide at least ten votes in the Senate in order to get anything done are almost votes in order to get anything done and and President Trump himself. And while that position allows senators up for Republican senators up for reelection and potentially swing states like Colorado and Maine to favor opening the government it allows most Senate Republicans who look want better border security. They think that an additional five billion dollars is probably a pretty reasonable. Some. They understand that a physical barrier in some portions of the border makes a lot of sense. But they understand that politically shutting down the government. To accomplish that goal is not popular. And also unlikely to succeed, that's Michael Steele. He was press secretary for speaker of the house, John bainer. He's now with Hamilton place strategies. Michael steele. Thank you. Thank you. All week. We've been hearing from people whose lives have been up ended by the partial government shutdown for Alex read, an IT technician in South Carolina. The shutdown is standing in the way of his dream opportunity. An internship at NASA Glenn research center in Cleveland, the internship was actually for research and development of electric propulsion systems. It was going to be like a stepping stone for my career because what I've always wanted to do was be in research and development and having this opportunity presented to me. I felt like a kid on Christmas morning when he gets his first bicycle I didn't think it was possible that at my age that I'd get offered an internship, especially for exactly what I wanted to do. Alex read his age is thirty seven the internship was supposed to start this coming Monday. But it is now on hold read had already quit his job. But he says he's picking up some hours of work while he waits. He is hoping to hear good news from NASA soon, but so far communication has been minimal the way they've ordered the emails is that will get an Email the day after the government opens up. I don't know how much time is going to give us the report for orientation. I'm hoping it's more than forty eight hours. But I have no idea because we don't have any information because they don't have any information read says he's not someone who follows politics. He had tuned out all the partisan fighting in Washington until now you go from not carrying not paying attention. Letting agendas be agendas, and you just mind your own business and take care of yourself to. Now, you have to try figure out what's going on if something's going to change when it's going to change. Because now it affects you it's frustrating, and it creates a lot of stress and anxiety. That's Alex Reid of South Carolina looking forward to the end of the partial shutdown. So he can start his NASA internship in Cleveland. Democrats took control of the house of representatives this week. And they're already changing the rules, every new congress the majority rewrites the rules that govern the chamber. And this time those rules affect everything from raising the debt ceiling to combat climate change NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is tracking all of the changes. Welcome to the studio. So what are the most significant changes? The Democrats are making here two things that Democrats are doing aimed at essentially eliminating two of the major confrontations. We saw under the Republican majority. The first is they were made it a lot easier to raise the debt ceiling the nation's barring limit we've seen this fiscal confrontation come up multiple times in recent years. Essentially, what House Democrats are saying now is if they just pass a budget it makes the debt ceiling race through the fiscal year. It takes away the need to have a separate vote on the house floor to do that the other thing they did is they changed the rules to make it harder to question. The speakers grip on power in office something that threaten John bainer speakership that ultimately forced him out. They changed the. To say one member can no longer bring that to a question on the floor. You would now need a majority of an entire party ready to throw out the speaker to make it happen that has the central effect of neutralizing those two issues in the next congress in the area of climate change, what kind of role can they make that old indicate that's a priority. One thing. That's changing legislatively is the Democrats are much more interested in making climate change driving agenda issue of this congress one thing they did in these rules package is they have created a new committee that is tasked exclusively with looking at ways to combat climate change. There's been some grumbling within the party among progressives. Notably Alexandria, Cossio Cortez. New democrat from New York saying the committee doesn't have enough teeth. It won't have subpoena power. It can't bring bills to the floor. But it is tasked with coming up with legislation that democratic leaders say will get a vote in the next congress. I understand there are also stricter ethics rules. What are some of the changes there? So they are making it an annual requirement for all law may. Makers to take ethics training. Now. Now, it used to be when you were newly elected you are one and done. Now, they say you have to do it every single year, including senior staff, they have also added something that you might have thought was already banned. But it is not lawmakers are no longer allowed to sit on corporate boards. Lawmakers had been allowed to do that previously as long as they didn't take any compensation. It's a little bit of a nod to the fact that there is a sitting congressman Chris Collins from New York who is under indictment right now for committing securities fraud as he sat on the board of a pharmaceutical company. It speaks to the fact that Democrats I think are trying to make a good government anti-corruption campaign finance the main symbolic driving issue of this congress. They've designated HR one the first Bill of the congress to addressing all of those issues and the rules pay package is a reflection of that it kind of reflects the priority of where they want the next two years to go a little less serious, the dress code what's going on there. Yeah. So Ilhan, Omar is one of the women that one. In the Blue Wave of two thousand eighteen she is one of two Muslim women who've I ever elected to congress. She also wears a job the head covering traditional in the faith and house rules had never really accounted for this before. This isn't something that they've had to confront currently the house rules say you can't wear a hat on the house floor. That's come up occasionally when members want to wear a baseball cap or something else, but they hadn't been confronted with the issue of religious freedom. So they have to make sure that the house accommodates for the fact that religious headwear can now be war on the floor of the house of representatives. That's NPR's congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you for the update. You're very welcome. Thank you..

president congress President Trump Michael Steele Senate John bainer White House Alex Reid NASA NPR Senator McConnell Cleveland South Carolina Audie Cornish Susan Davis
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

11:12 min | 1 year ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"This is K as Z you. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish. And we begin this hour talking numbers that start with four hundred twenty thousand that would be the rough estimate of the number of federal employees currently working without pay because the government has deemed them essential three hundred eighty thousand about that many federal workers are furloughed which means they're not working, and they're not getting paid to. That's the number of times, the president has met with party leaders in the White House situation room in the last seventy two hours sixteen that's the number of days. The twenty thirteen government shutdown lasted Democrats or Republicans were fighting over the Affordable Care Act and raising the debt ceiling twenty four billion dollars. That is that's a standard and Poor's analysis of how much that sixteen day shutdown cost the government if the current government shutdown lasts until Monday, it will be the second longest in history. We are going to turn to someone now who played a key role in that twenty thirteen government shutdown. Michael Steele was press secretary for then speaker of the house. I'm John bainer. So we had a front row seat for that standoff. Michael Steele, welcome to the program. Good to be with you before we get to twenty thirteen and what happened then your thoughts on how this is playing out. Trump is now saying it could last months or even years, which your reaction. President Trump is a president. Unlike any other in this is a shutdown. Unlike any other most government shutdowns result from congress, which under our constitution has the power of the purse trying to force the president to do something. This is exactly the opposite. This is the president shutting down the government is essentially trying to force congress to do something. It's kind of a blazing saddles approach taking himself hostage. You said a shutdown. Unlike any other, but Arthur lessons, we could learn how did you find a way out of it in the end in two thousand thirteen. The twenty thirteen shutdown was ultimately a mismatch between priorities and tactics. People believed that people opposed the Affordable Care Act at that time. It was not popular by any stretch of the imagination at the same time shutting down the government in an attempt to defunding was also not very popular. And what we ultimately did was whether the political attacks from Senate Democrats from President Obama until Republicans in moderate seats in the house were willing to join with Democrats to reopen the government and provide funding for the Affordable Care Act. This is a very different situation in the sense that it's hard to see any coalition coming together. In either house, really? That would be able to pass a Bill that included funding the government and this additional five billion dollars that the president is demanding for his wall along the border one other thing that seems really different is the lack of urgency that we seem to be seeing now versus in two thousand thirteen women. Now, we are two weeks in and there really hasn't been any real talks until the last few days. No, it's really strikingly different in in two ways from from that point of view. The first is the the usual rule of a government shutdown is the way you win government shutdown fight is by making the public convincing the public that you don't want to shut down the government. You have to show people that you have gone to every extent possible to avoid shutting down the government. And President Trump went exactly the opposite direction on that. He says that he is responsible for the shutdown. He wears it. Proudly he he's just he's accepting responsibility. Or blame in a way that hasn't been typical and the second ways. Yeah. As you said part of it is due to the fact that only a portion of the federal government shutdown. It's not a complete. Federal government shutdown sober critical areas, including the department of defense or fully-funded, but it is really striking the degree to which there's not a sense of urgency. There's not a sense of emergency of there's not that same sense of crisis that we've seen in past shutdowns. You have a lot of experience working with Republicans on the hill. As I want to ask you about one of the most perhaps the most prominent Republicans on the hill this time around Mitch McConnell. The Senate majority leader who now is dealing with two Republican senators who have broken ranks and are urging a compromise is Senator McConnell arguably now under more pressure than anybody to end this. No, Senator McConnell's actually kind of in the catbird seat. He has the way he usually does drawn a drawn a scenario where he doesn't think that the Senate should lead on this. There will be no more test votes. No more show votes. Nothing will happen until we have a proposal negotiated between House Democrats agreed to by Senate Democrats who have to provide at least ten votes in the Senate in order to get anything done are almost ten votes in order to get anything done in an President Trump himself. And while that position allows senators up for Republican senators up for reelection and potentially swing states like Colorado and Maine to favor opening the government it allows most Senate Republicans who look better border security. They think that an additional five billion dollars is probably a pretty reasonable. Some. They understand that a physical barrier in some portions of the border makes a lot of sense. But they understand that politically shutting down the government to. Accomplish that goal is not popular. And also unlikely to succeed, that's Michael Steele. He was press secretary for speaker of the house, John bainer. He's now with Hamilton place strategies. Michael steele. Thank you. Thank you. All week. We've been hearing from people whose lives have been up ended by the partial government shutdown for Alex read, an IT technician in South Carolina. The shutdown is standing in the way of his dream opportunity. An internship at NASA Glenn research center in Cleveland, the internship was actually for research and development of electric propulsion systems. It was going to be like a stepping stone for my career because what I've always wanted to do was be in research and development and having this opportunity presented to me. I felt like a kid on Christmas morning when he gets his first bicycle I didn't think it was possible that my age that I'd get offered an internship, especially for exactly what I wanted to do. Alex read his age is thirty seven the internship was supposed to start this coming Monday. But it is now on hold read had already quit his job. But he says he's picking up some hours of work while he waits. He is hoping to hear good news from NASA soon, but so far communication has been mental the way that they've ordered the emails is that will get an Email the day after the government opens up. I don't know how much time is going to give us to report for orientation. I'm hoping it's more than forty eight hours. But I have no idea because we don't have any information because they don't have any information read says he's not someone who follows politics. He had tuned out all the partisan fighting in Washington until now you go from not carrying not paying attention. Letting agendas be agendas, and you just mind your own business and take care of yourself to. Now, you have to try figure out what's going on. If something is going to change when it's going to change because now it affects you it's frustrating, and it creates a lot of stress and anxiety. That's Alex Reid of South Carolina looking forward to the end of the partial shutdown. So he can start his NASA internship in Cleveland. Democrats control of the house of representatives this week. And they're already changing the rules, every new congress the majority rewrites the rules that govern the chamber. And this time those rules affect everything from raising the debt ceiling to combat in climate change. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is tracking all of the changes. Welcome to the studio. So what are the most significant changes? The Democrats are making here two things that Democrats are doing aimed at essentially eliminating two of the major confrontations. We saw under the Republican majority. The first is they made it a lot easier to raise the debt ceiling the nation's borrowing limit we've seen this fiscal confrontation come up in multiple times in recent years. Essentially, what Democrats are saying now is if they just pass a budget it makes the debt ceiling race to the fiscal year. It takes away the need to have a separate vote on the house floor to do that the other thing they did is they changed the rules to make it harder to question. The speakers grip on power in office something that threaten John bainer speakership that ultimately forced him out. They changed the. To say one member can no longer bring that to a question on the floor. You would now need a majority of an entire party ready to throw out the speaker to make it happen. That has the essential effect of neutralizing those two issues in the next congress in the area of climate change, what kind of role can they make that old indicate that's a priority. One thing. That's changing legislatively is that Democrats are much more interested in making climate change, a driving agenda issue of this congress one thing they did in these roles package is they have created a new committee that is tasked exclusively with looking at ways to combat climate change. There's been some grumbling within the party among progressives. Notably Alexandria, Cossio Cortez. New democrat from New York saying the committee doesn't have enough teeth. It won't have subpoena power. It can't bring bills to the floor. But it is tasked with coming up with legislation that democratic leaders say will get a vote in the next congress. I understand there are also stricter ethics rules. What are some of the changes there? So they are making it an annual requirement for all law may. Makers to take ethics training. Now used to be when you newly elected you are one and done. Now, they say you have to do it every single year, including senior staff, they have also added something that you might have thought was already banned. But it is not lawmakers are no longer allowed to sit on corporate boards. Lawmakers had been allowed to do that previously as long as they didn't take any compensation. It's a little bit of a nod to the fact that there is a sitting congressman Chris Collins from New York who is under indictment right now for committing securities fraud as he sat on the board of a pharmaceutical company. It speaks to the fact that Democrats I think are trying to make a good government anti-corruption campaign finance the main symbolic driving issue of this congress. They've designated HR one the first Bill of the congress to addressing all of those issues and the rules pay package is a reflection of that it kind of reflects the priority of where they want the next two years to go a little less serious, the dress code what's going on there. Yeah. So Ilhan, Omar is one of the women that one. One in the Blue Wave of two thousand eighteen she is one of two Muslim women who've I ever elected to congress. She also wears a job the headcovering traditional in the faith and health. Roles had never really accounted for this before. This isn't something that they've had to confront currently the house rules say you can't wear a hat on the house floor. That's come up occasionally when members wanna wear a baseball cap or something else, but they hadn't been confronted with the issue of religious freedom. So they have a made sure that the house accommodates for the fact that religious headwear can now be war on the floor of the house of representatives. That's NPR's congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you for the update. You're very welcome. Thank you..

president Michael Steele congress President Trump Senate John bainer NPR Alex Reid White House press secretary Senator McConnell Cleveland South Carolina Audie Cornish
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:53 min | 1 year ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And a spokesman for the Afghan wise has gas main and water main have been ruptured. A construction site in queens, resulting in the partial road collapse of northern boulevard. The street is close to traffic in both directions between one hundred twelfth street and one hundred fourteenth street. There are no reported injuries. At this time fire and emergency service. Units are on the scene. This developing story, and we'll have more details as we can confirm them tonight. Rain after nine o'clock low around forty five degrees. Currently, it's forty seven degrees. Partly cloudy at five oh, six support for NPR comes from air table, a collaboration platform used by a diverse range of teams from documentary filmmakers to cattle ranchers for turning inspiration into innovation. So teams can start building at air table dot com. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley, and I'm Audie Cornish. And we begin this hour talking numbers that start with four hundred twenty thousand that would be the rough estimate of the number of federal employees currently working without pay because the government has deemed them essential. Three hundred eighty thousand about that many federal workers are furloughed which means they're not working, and they're not getting paid to. That's the number of times, the president has met with party leaders in the White House situation room in the last seventy two hours sixteen that's the number of days. The twenty thirteen government shutdown lasted, Democrats or Republicans. We're fighting over the Affordable Care Act and raising the debt ceiling twenty four billion dollars. That is that's a standard and Poor's analysis of how much that sixteen day shutdown cost the government if the current government shutdown lasts until Monday, it will be the second longest in history. We are going to turn to someone now who played a key role in that twenty thirteen government shutdown. Michael Steele was press secretary for then speaker of the house, John bainer. So we had a front row seat for that standoff. Michael Steele, welcome to the program. Good to be with you before we get to twenty thirteen and what happened then your thoughts on how this one is playing out. Trump is now saying it could last months or even years, which your reaction. President Trump is a president. Unlike any other in this is a shutdown. Unlike any other most government shutdowns result from congress, which under our constitution has the power of the purse trying to force the president to do something. This is exactly the opposite. This is the president shutting down the government is essentially trying to force congress to do something. It's kind of a blazing saddles approach taking himself hostage. You said a shutdown. Unlike any other, but are there lessons, we could learn how did you find a way out of it in the end in two thousand thirteen? The twenty thirteen shutdown was ultimately a mismatch between priorities and tactics. People believed that people oppose the Affordable Care Act at that time. It was not popular by any stretch of the imagination at the same time shutting down the government in an attempt to defunding was also not very popular. And what we ultimately did was whether the political attacks from Senate Democrats from President Obama until Republicans in moderate seats in the house were willing to join with Democrats to reopen the government and provide funding for the Affordable Care Act. This is a very different situation in the sense that it's hard to see any coalition coming together. In either house, really? That would be able to pass a Bill that included funding the government, and this additional five billion dollars that the president is demanding for his wall along the border one other thing that seems really different is the lack of urgency that we seem to be seeing now versus in two thousand thirteen where I mean now we are two weeks in there really hasn't been any real talks to the last few days. No, it's really strikingly different in two ways from from that point of view. The first is that the the usual rule of a government shutdown is the way you win government shutdown fight is by making the public convincing the public that you don't want to shut down the government. You have to show people that you have gone to every extent possible to avoid shutting down the government. And President Trump went exactly the opposite direction on that. He says that he is responsible for this shutdown. He wears it. Proudly he he's just he's accepting responsibility. Or blame in a way that hasn't been typical and the second ways. Yeah. As you said part of it is due to the fact that only a portion of the federal government shutdown. It's not a complete. Federal government shutdown over critical areas, including the department of defense or fully funded, but it is really striking the degree to which there's not a sense of urgency. There's not a sense of emergency. There's not that same sense of crisis that we've seen in past shutdowns. You have a lot of experience working with Republicans on the hill. As I want to ask you about one of the most perhaps the most prominent Republican on the hill this time around Mitch McConnell. The Senate majority leader who now is dealing with two Republican senators who have broken ranks and are urging a compromise is Senator McConnell arguably now under more pressure than anybody to end this. No, Senator McConnell's actually kind of in the catbird seat. He has the way he usually does drawn a drawn a scenario where he doesn't think that the Senate should lead on this. There will be no more test votes. No more show votes. Nothing will happen until we have a proposal negotiated between House Democrats agreed to by Senate Democrats who have to provide at least ten votes in the Senate in order to get anything done are almost ten votes in order to get anything done in and President Trump himself. And while that position allows senators up for Republican senators up for reelection and potentially swing states like Colorado and Maine to favor opening the government it allows most Senate Republicans who look want better border security. They think that an additional five billion dollars is probably a pretty reasonable. Some. They understand that a physical barrier in some portions of the border makes a lot of sense. But they understand that politically shutting down the government to. Accomplish that goal is not popular. And also unlikely to succeed, that's Michael Steele. He was press secretary for speaker of the house, John bainer. He's now with Hamilton place strategies. Michael steele. Thank you. Thank you. All week. We've been hearing from people whose lives have been up ended by the partial government shutdown for Alex read in IT technician in South Carolina. The shutdown is standing in the way of his dream opportunity. An internship at NASA Glenn research center in Cleveland, the internship was actually for research and development of electronic propulsion systems. It was going to be like a steppingstone for my career. Because what I've always wanted to do was be in research and development and having this opportunity presented to me. I felt like a kid on Christmas morning when he gets his first bicycle I didn't think it was possible that at my age that I'd get offered an internship, especially for exactly what I wanted to do. Alex read his age is thirty seven the internship was supposed to start this coming Monday. But it is now on hold read had already quit his job. But he says he's picking up some hours of work while he waits. He is hoping to hear good news from NASA soon, but so far communication has been minimal the way that they've ordered the emails is that will get an Email the day after the government opens up. I don't know how much tying is going to give us to report for orientation. I'm hoping it's more than forty eight hours. But I have no idea because we don't have any information because they don't have any information read says he's not someone who follows politics. He had tuned out all the partisan fighting in Washington until now you go from not carrying not paying attention. Leading agendas be agendas, and you just mind your own business and take care of yourself to. Now, you have to try figure out what's going on if something's going to change when it's going to change. Because now it affects you it's frustrating, and it creates a lot of stress and anxiety. That's Alex Reid of South Carolina looking forward to the end of the partial shutdown. So he can start his NASA internship in Cleveland. Democrats took control of the house of representatives this week. And they're already changing the rules, every new congress the majority rewrites the rules that govern the chamber. And this time those rules affect everything from raising the debt ceiling to combat in climate change. NPR congressional correspondent Susan Davis is tracking all of the changes. Welcome to the studio. So what are the most significant changes that Democrats are making here two things that Democrats are doing aimed at essentially, eliminating two of the major confrontations. We saw under the Republican majority. The first is they made it a lot easier to raise the debt ceiling the nation's borrowing limit we've seen this fiscal confrontation come up multiple times in recent years. Essentially, what House Democrats are saying. Now is if they just pass a budget. It makes the debt ceiling raised through the fiscal year. It takes away the need to have a separate vote on the house for to do that the other thing they did. They changed the rules to make it harder to question. The speakers grip on power in office something that threaten John bainer speakership that ultimately forced him out. They changed the. To say one member can no longer bring that to a question on the floor. You would now need a majority of an entire party ready to throw out the speaker to make it happen that has the central effect of neutralizing those two issues in the next congress in the area of climate change. What kind of role can make that old indicate that's a priority. One thing. That's changing legislatively is the Democrats are much more interested in making climate change driving agenda issue of this congress one thing they did in these rules package is they have created a new committee that is tasked exclusively with looking at ways to combat climate change. There's been some grumbling within the party among progressives. Notably Alexandria, Cossio Cortez. New democrat from New York saying the committee doesn't have enough teeth. It won't have subpoena power. It can't bring bills to the floor. But it is tasked with coming up with legislation that democratic leaders say will get a vote in the next congress. I understand there are also stricter ethics rules. What are some of the changes there? So they are making it an annual requirement for all law may. Makers to take ethics training. Now. Now, it used to be when you were newly elected you are one and done. Now, they say you have to do it every single year, including senior staff, they have also added something that you might have thought was already banned. But it is not lawmakers are no longer allowed to sit on corporate boards. Lawmakers had been allowed to do that previously as long as they didn't take any compensation. It's a little bit of a nod to the fact that there is a sitting congressman Chris Collins from New York who is under indictment right now for committing securities fraud as he sat on the board of a pharmaceutical company. It speaks to the fact that Democrats I think are trying to make a good government anti-corruption campaign finance the main symbolic driving issue of this congress. They've designated HR one the first Bill of the congress to addressing all of those issues and the rules package is a reflection of that it kind of reflects the priority of where they want the next two years to go a little less serious, the dress code what's going on there. Yeah. So Ilhan, Omar is one of the women that one. In the Blue Wave of two thousand eighteen she is one of two Muslim women who've I ever elected to congress. She also has a job that headcovering traditional in the faith and house rules had never really accounted for this before. This isn't something that they've had to confront currently the house rules say you can't wear a hat on the house floor. That's come up occasionally when members wanna wear a baseball cap or something else, but they hadn't been confronted with the issue of religious freedom. So they have a she made sure that the house accommodates for the fact that religious headwear can now be war on the floor of the house of representatives. That's NPR's congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Thank you for the update. You're welcome. Thank you..

Democrats president congress President Trump Michael Steele NPR John bainer Federal government Senate Alex Reid Senator McConnell Cleveland South Carolina press secretary
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"I think there's going to be no end of the the desire or the drive by somebody or somebody's on earth to go live on these other planets and live there permanently. We've we, we've had no end of volunteers that says, you know, send me, I'll go on a one way trip. So that drive is going to be there and what what we're doing now is working on understanding what that environments like. So we can tell people what technologies are going to need to be able to live and work and and the joy themselves when they get there and eventually spend the rest of their lives. There. And so it so you know why we explore it. That's a very hard question to answer in a lot of times. It's the kindergarteners at ask that kinda question because it's a huge question. It sounds so simple. I have a real simple answer to it, right, right. But but there is no simple answer to that. So the past past two days, I was at a NASA Glenn research center working on a on a little project. That's why we had to delay this little talk and flying home. There was this this, this woman with her little eighteen month old girl, right? And I was sitting next to the window, but boy, that little girl wanted to look out the window. You know, she didn't say any words, but you could just look at our eyes and look at her face and she was amazed at what she was saying. And that's just this an innate quality in humans, write. We're curious about stuff. We want to know about things. We wanna see new things. We want to experience new things, and that's what you know a part of what expiration is about learning new things, experiencing new things. But then that that practical side that we were talking a little bit earlier about, maybe you know, platinum medals in space or helium three or whatever resources out there that we might be able to us here on the earth. You know that that that drive to to try to make life better here on earth to to to supplement what we have here on earth. So you know, we we can keep going is is critical. I think to our species because you know, this is a great planet. We're living on, but sooner or later we'll we will run out of our resources as population. It's bigger and bigger. So. What are those resources out in space and how can they help us live? And maybe you do have to go live on the moon to to utilize those resources or or to Mars, are you know, like on TV shows out at the asteroid belt? Who knows? But you know, that's that's hundreds of years from now, but we have to start somewhere, and that's kind of where we are right now. We're kind of at the start of all of that. If you know, it probably would have been fun to to go back in your way back machine and in land in the thirteen colonies in the United States and your at the start of a country and way back then they had no idea what we would eventually evolve to. Right. And so when it comes to space in in space, resources and people getting out there and living and working for long periods of time or at the very beginning, and it's really hard to say where it's all going to go, but we know resource utilization is going to be a big part of it. Exactly. You don't. You can't really predict the future, but you know that something good's going to come. Out of it. And so you just sort of truck on and that's why you crossed the Atlantic and start colonizing, and then you realize that maybe the, you know, there's more to this than just the coast, and so you expand west, you know, there's, there's you just do it and eventually good things kinda come from it. Kind of bouncing off your first point. I think one of the biggest things you said was experience, and I think though, you know, we can send robots, robots, give us a lot of data about what we sent them there to do, but in terms of experience, let severe human thing and I think that's, that's something that is really important whenever you're whenever you're actually going out and to other planets into the moon, you know, like we, we sent stuff to the.

NASA Glenn research center Atlantic United States eighteen month two days
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"You is just one component of the many things, huge component. I one one huge component of making this work, and so I kind of wanted to end with why. Why explore? Why do we send humans to do this? Why are we putting the effort into ISR you in the first place to to make it a possibility into put human boots on the moon and Mars. For you know, we get that question a live, Steve, jumping at the microphone. So I'm gonna let him go. I was hoping you would. The robots that we're sending to these other planets are are, are extensions of ourselves. People people have this internal need or drive to understand what's going on around him. What's over the next, he'll what can can I go and live there? You know, a lot of us are in the United States because you go far enough back in our ancestry that somebody came from different part of this world and settled here. They didn't have to. They could have remained way exactly where they were, but they moved that that same kind of drive his going on now. And eventually that will extend to other planets. So the the, the difference, big difference between dad example of coming from another. Another part of the earth to the United States is that these other planets are not like the United States or any place else on earth. For that matter. You can't just grow their and chop down a few tweet or go there chop down a few trees planet garden and and expect to live there you, they're going to be more work considerably more work involved in being able to stay there for for the rest of your life. If that's what you choose to do. So we're making progress along those lines. I us going to be a big part of that. You know, there's there's a permanent presence at the south pole, but no one's growing. There aren't acres and acres of of cornfields or cattle grazing McMurdo station at our south pole ourselves. I'm sorry. Actually, I'm talking about the geographic south pole there. There's a, there's a huge station here with a permanent presence, but everything has to brought their literally everything has to be brought there. So that's not someplace where you're gonna see a a real estate agent setting up shop to to sell you. You know the the four bedroom, family house or something along those lines is that UN treaty that kind of gets the real estate agents. Okay. But my point is that that humans know how to live and work in a lot of different places, a lot of hostile environments. If we're gonna be there permanently, we're making progress along those lines. Robots are helping us do that. Now there's going to be to get back to your question. I think there's going to be no end of the the desire or the drive by somebody or somebody's on earth to go live on these other planets and live there permanently. We've we, we've had no end of volunteers that says, you know, send me, I'll go on a one way trip. So that drive is going to be there and what what we're doing now is working on understanding what that environments like. So we can tell people what technologies are going to need to be able to live and work and and the joy themselves when they get there and eventually spend the rest of their lives. There. And so it so you know why we explore it. That's a very hard question to answer in a lot of times. It's the kindergarteners at ask that kinda question because it's a huge question. It sounds so simple. I have a real simple answer to it, right, right. But but there is no simple answer to that. So the past past two days, I was at a NASA Glenn research center working on a on a little project. That's why we had to delay this little talk and flying home. There was this this, this woman with her little eighteen month old girl, right? And I was sitting next to the window, but boy, that little girl wanted to look out the window. You know, she didn't say any words, but you could just look at our eyes and look at her face and she was amazed at what she was saying. And that's just this an innate quality in humans, write. We're curious about stuff. We want to know about things. We wanna see new things. We want to experience new things, and that's what you know a part of what expiration is about learning new things, experiencing new things..

Steve United States UN McMurdo NASA Glenn research center eighteen month two days
"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In the found square area and you're looking for a little bit of help with your kids for for the school year or perhaps you know somebody who lives in fountain square and they could use a little bit of help this is a great opportunity to get out there and meet and greet with some people in your neighborhood and some organizations that are there to help you just bring proof of residency so that we know that your within those zip codes but if you show up at the fountain square core on south shelby shelby street you can meet some of those local organizations the library and charter schools and all sorts of people who are there to serve the fountain square community and then at the end of your visit the kids all get a backpack filled with school supplies that are age appropriate engaged end grade appropriate so again that's coming up on saturday july seventh i hope that you can make it to it i did want to share one quick story with everyone out of akron ohio we talk about camp all the time here on the show and we talk about our hidden falls camp down in southern indiana and our day camp that takes place here in the city both at our eagle creek core and our fountain square core and in fact we have day camps going on all across indiana but all across the united states the salvation army has unique camps that serve their communities based on what that community needs and in akron ohio the summer slump that they talk about that that that time when kids start to forget everything that they have learned and they come back and they come back in the fall and they forgotten an entire semester's worth of of knowledge of reading skills of math skills and they noticed in akron that it was just it was a struggle a constant struggle struggle so the salvation army the akron citadel right there in downtown akron decided this year they were going to really tack that they were going to focus on that for their summer program and so what they did was there they're using the nasa glenn research center the stem based curriculum and stem of course it's science technology engineering and mathematics and they're making sure that the kids who are coming through this program are studying science learning about math continuing to engage their brains through the whole summer so that when school starts again they have not only are they not forgotten everything they learned last year but they also picked up some new skills they also have a literacy program that's going on at the same time which mont which is modeled after the one book one school national program and and i don't know if you've heard of this before but the idea is to pick one book and across multiple age levels a multiple great grade levels to teach the same book but it's appropriate the questions the conversations the projects are all appropriate for that specific age so what first graders are learning from a book is different from what eighth graders are learning from that book so this year they use the book poppy by abbey which is about a little deer mouse it's it's an adventure about a deer mouse who is up against this hotel tarian owl that rules over her society but it's a great story and it resonates with little kids and it resonates with older kids because there are lots of levels of meaning so they're using this one book one school program to teach this book as part of their day camp and it's just it's an interesting kind of snapshot of how a salvation army is able to because they're different in every single community they're able to adapt their programs to those specific community needs and we do the same thing right here in indianapolis and all across indiana every day camp is a little bit different because there are different needs here in indianapolis we actually have quite a few programs that are catering not to stick its but are also catering to adult and so i'd like to welcome onto the program right now our guest major k k matthews the executive director of this of asian armies harbor lights center over on the west side and doctorate dr gregory liz man who is a community leader here in indianapolis welcome to the program both of.

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

Sex is Not For Sissies

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"nasa glenn research center" Discussed on Sex is Not For Sissies

"Welcome to sex is not precedes radio i'm your host val of ford and i am so happy to be here because we get a chance to talk about things that are good for us to know sometimes things we might know have forgotten or just pay attention to but today our guest is maureen sepala and she is a person who has done a lot of rate work in looking at the whole issue of confidence competence imposter syndrome how to be an overachiever an under believer she's been my guest before and i'm happy to have her back marlene is a new york city native who transplanted to northeast ohio is in the ward winning speaker author in presentation coach she has a bs in mechanical engineering from university of notre dame and spent thirteen years conducting jet engine research yes that's right at the nasa lewis research center now the nasa glenn research center in cleveland ohio at nasa she became the first female and youngest manager of nasr's propulsion systems laboratory she's the founder of high attitude sorry high altitude strategies a speaking in coachie organization where she encourages exceptionally high performing people who struggle with the impasse ter syndrome the internal voices says i am not a smart is everyone thinks i am in two thousand nine she was in the top ten of thirty thousand contestants in the toastmasters international world champion of public speaking contests she's the author of great speakers are not born there built in his currently working on another book title overachievers under achiever how to metric confidence your confidence she's a member of the national speakers association in his the twenty seventeen twenty eighteen president of nsa ohio chapter she's also co authored the book buckeye reflections legendary moments from ohio state football that has recently been released so welcome marines apolo.

ford ohio nasa lewis research center founder president football maureen sepala new york university of notre dame nasa cleveland thirteen years