35 Burst results for "Nasa Administrator"

NASA Will Launch Two Spacecrafts to Venus

BBC World Service

02:04 min | 2 months ago

NASA Will Launch Two Spacecrafts to Venus

"Or Rupert Wingfield Hayes there? Now let's go back more than 30 years to a key time for space exploration. After a 15 month long cruise, the Magellan spacecraft will go into orbit around Venus Jelen will orbit Venus for one Venus Day equal to 243 Earth Days. Well, that was from 1989 1 of the most successful missions of its kind. It was the first spacecraft to take pictures of pretty much the entire surface of Venus before it burned up in the fiery atmosphere about five years later, now the US space agency Has announced to new missions to the planets. NASA's administrator is Bill Nelson. Very Tass Truth. And eventually, plus These two sister missions, both aimed to understand how Venus became an inferno like world capable of melting lead at the surface, So after all, the focus of late being on Mars Why Venus now question for our North America correspondent David Wyss. Despite the fact that Venus is the closest planet to earth and similar in size and mass and density and composition. It's received less attention than Mars and other destinations in the solar system in recent years, primarily because it's so hot, it's dense atmosphere traps heat from the sun, and that leads to temperatures. Of more than 470 degrees Celsius in some places, but scientists have long believed that Venus may once have harbored. Seas of surface water potentially suitable for life before unknown forces triggered that extreme greenhouse effect, and their interest was rekindled recently when astronomers said that they detected compelling evidence for the presence of a molecule in the clouds around Venus called Falls Feen, which would seem to

Rupert Wingfield Hayes David Wyss Bill Nelson Venus Nasa North America United States
NASA Picks Twin Missions to Visit Venus, Earth's 'Evil Twin'

1A

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

NASA Picks Twin Missions to Visit Venus, Earth's 'Evil Twin'

"Petitions at the courthouse. NASA has decided to send two missions to Venus, our closest planetary neighbor. NPR's Nell Greenfield Boys has details. Venus is sometimes called Earth's Evil twin. While Earth is largely temperate and teeming with life, Venus is a scorching hot, toxic place. NASA administrator Bill Nelson says That's why the space agency will send two probes there. As part of its discovery program. These two sister missions, both aimed to understand how Venus became an inferno like world capable of melting lead at the surface. One mission is called Veritas. It will map the planet's surface and see if it has active volcanoes. The other is Divinci. Plus, it will send a spherical probe down through the planet's atmosphere to analyze the

Nasa NPR Bill Nelson Venus Veritas Divinci
Debris From Chinese Rocket Has Fallen to Earth Amid Criticism

News, Traffic and Weather

01:07 min | 2 months ago

Debris From Chinese Rocket Has Fallen to Earth Amid Criticism

"Bring you up to date. You're about that China Rocket Space agency. They're saying of course segment of its biggest rocket re entered Earth's atmosphere in the Indian Ocean, and that most of it burned up early this morning, Harvard astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell, who tracked a tumbling rocket tweeted. An ocean re entry was always statistically, the most likely it appears China one. It's gamble, but it was still reckless. People in Jordan and Saudi Arabia reported sightings of the Chinese rocket debris on social media. With scores of users posting footage of the debris piercing the early dawn. Skies over the Middle East. Usually discarded rocket stages reenter the atmosphere soon after lift off normally over water. And don't go into orbit. NASA Administrator Senator Bill Nelson issued a statement saying quote it is clear that China is failing to meet responsible standards regarding their space debris and of quote Roughly 100 FT. Long rocket stages among the biggest space debris to fall the earth. China's space program with its close military links, hasn't said why it put the main component of the rocket into space rather than allowing it to fall back to Earth soon after discharging its payload. As his usual in such operations. This is common

Jonathan Mcdowell China Indian Ocean Senator Bill Nelson Harvard Saudi Arabia Jordan Middle East Nasa
SpaceX launches 3rd crew with recycled rocket and capsule

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

SpaceX launches 3rd crew with recycled rocket and capsule

"SpaceX uses a recycled rocket and capsule to launch for astronauts into orbit to lift off happened early Friday morning broadcast live on NASA TV server function once again it's the third crew flight in less than a year for SpaceX the company founded by Evelyne mosque will be part of advancing human spaceflight acting NASA administrator Steve juristic says this is an important trip to the international space station it's going to really celebrate the research and technology development are able do on station the astronauts from the U. S. Japan and France should reach the international space station by early Saturday morning following a twenty three hour ride in the same dragon capsule use five SpaceX debut crude last may they'll spend six months at the orbiting lab on my campus

Spacex Evelyne Mosque Nasa Steve Juristic International Space Station U. Japan France
Biden picks former senator who flew in space to lead NASA

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

Biden picks former senator who flew in space to lead NASA

"Is nominating a former Florida senator and astronaut to the NASA administrator. The White House says Bill Nelson has left his imprint on nearly every piece of space and science law. The Democrats served in Congress for 30 years. Chairing the space subcommittee in the House and the Senate space subcommittee. Nelson flew in the space shuttle in 1986 and oversaw NASA's space programs while in Congress. If confirmed, Nelson would be the second consecutive NASA chief to come from Congress. I'm al

Nasa Bill Nelson Senate Space Subcommittee White House Florida Congress Nelson House
Biden picks former senator who flew in space to lead NASA

Silicon Valley Insider with Keith Koo

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

Biden picks former senator who flew in space to lead NASA

"President Biden has selected a new NASA administrator who's John Scott. It's the former senator from Florida who flew on the space shuttle 78 year old Bill Nelson grew up near Cape Canaveral. He was a Democratic congressman when he launched aboard space shuttle Columbia in January of 1986 right before the Challenger launch accident. His commander was Charles Bolden junior who later served as NASA administrator under President Obama. Nelson was elected in 2000 to the Senate. Where he served until

President Biden John Scott Nasa Bill Nelson Cape Canaveral Charles Bolden Florida Columbia President Obama Nelson Senate
Biden picks former Senator who flew in space to lead NASA

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:33 sec | 4 months ago

Biden picks former Senator who flew in space to lead NASA

"You have. Former Florida lawmaker could be the next leader of NASA. President Biden could announce a Sooners today that he'll nominate former Senator Bill Nelson to be NASA's administrator and former senator, You know that? The three take terms is a Democratic Senator Nelson served on a space subcommittee and he was involved in several NASA related bills. Little Consider Marco Rubio treated yesterday that Nelson would be an excellent pick. That's nice. Like that. That's the spot that Rick Scott took. Remember when he'd be nothing.

President Biden Nasa Senator Bill Nelson Senator Nelson Sooners Florida Marco Rubio Nelson Rick Scott
Biden poised to tap former Sen. Bill Nelson of Miami to lead NASA

AM Tampa Bay

00:32 sec | 4 months ago

Biden poised to tap former Sen. Bill Nelson of Miami to lead NASA

"There are reports that a former U. S senator from Florida and space shuttle astronaut will be the next NASA boss. Technology website the verge sighting three sources says President Biden has tapped Bill Nelson for the job of NASA administrator with former astronaut Pam Melroy as his deputy. The verge reports, Senate and NASA staffers have been informally briefed. The reports have placed Nelson in consideration for the job, succeeding Trump Administration appointee Jim Brighton. Stein Nelson, who lost his Senate seat to Rick Scott, in 2018, also took part in a space shuttle

Nasa President Biden Pam Melroy Bill Nelson U. Florida Trump Administration Senate Jim Brighton Stein Nelson Nelson Rick Scott
Elon Musk Says He Tested Both Positive and Negative for Covid-19

Rush Limbaugh

00:35 sec | 9 months ago

Elon Musk Says He Tested Both Positive and Negative for Covid-19

"Space Ex founder Elon Musk may have toe keep his distance from tomorrow night's rocket launch after he tested both positive and negative for the coronavirus this week. Musk says he's awaiting results of a more accurate test. In the meantime, NASA Administrator Jim Brian Stein says contact tracing is underway. Now our astronauts Have been in quarantine for weeks on day should not have had contact with anybody. They should be in good shape. Space X is launching a four person crew on the first operational flight of a dragon capsule aboard a Falcon nine rocket. The astronauts who started six month mission aboard the International space Station.

Elon Musk Administrator Jim Brian Stein Musk Nasa International Space Station
NASA Discovers Evidence That Life Could Exist Outside America

The Topical

01:02 min | 10 months ago

NASA Discovers Evidence That Life Could Exist Outside America

"Centuries man is looked to the stars and wondered are we alone in the universe? Well today that question may have been answered top researchers at Nasa held a press conference today to announce that they have recently discovered new evidence that life could exist outside of America for more on this extraordinary developments. I'm joined by opr science reporter Rebecca Neale Rebecca, I'd be lying. If I said this didn't give me chills. Well, you're not alone there Leslie. This is truly Monumental. Here's Deputy NASA administrator Thomas daines at today's press conference announcing what could be one of the most significant scientific discoveries in the mystery of our species early data collected already showed that several X will countenance maintain conditions that could support Life as we know it. We now know that the atmosphere of Asia is made up mostly of nitrogen and oxygen. It's just like America and Hubble Telescope images show what appear to be bodies of water like liquid located on the surface. In fact scientists are close to determining whether humans can survive there while sending a dog To another continent. I never thought I'd live to see the day Rebecca

Rebecca Neale Rebecca Nasa America Nasa Administrator Centuries Thomas Daines Hubble Telescope Reporter Leslie Asia
NASA keeping close eye on Hurricane Isaias ahead of bringing astronauts back to Earth

Kim Komando

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

NASA keeping close eye on Hurricane Isaias ahead of bringing astronauts back to Earth

"The threatening weather, NASA says the weather looks good for a Sunday afternoon splash down in the Gulf of Mexico near Panama City, Florida It'll be the first water landing for Astronauts in 45 years. Doug Hurley and Bob Benton took part in a farewell ceremony today at the International Space Station hours ahead of their plans. Departure on a space X Dragon capsule. NASA Administrator Jim Brian Steen making an appearance on Fox's Neil Cavuto live discussing what would happen if the crew can't undock from the international space station tonight. We're not gonna undock and unless we're very sure that they're going to be able to return as planned, that's number one number two. If something happens if there's Anomaly or something. We have about 36 hours of life support so they could continue orbiting for a period of time.

Nasa International Space Station Administrator Jim Brian Steen Doug Hurley Panama City Bob Benton Neil Cavuto Mexico Florida
NASA reveals how Perseverance is doing as it hurtles toward Mars

Hugh Hewitt

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

NASA reveals how Perseverance is doing as it hurtles toward Mars

"NASA administrator Jim Brighton, Stein says shortly after it's Thursday morning lift off the Mars rover perseverance went into a safe mode. After a temperature alarm. There was also a communication glitch. We do need Tio No. Fine tune our receiving stations on the ground, but both have been resolved. If all goes well. The rover will land on Mars in February and pick up a rock samples to be retrieved in 2026. China and the United Arab Emirates also have spacecraft and route to Mars after launching last

Mars Nasa Administrator United Arab Emirates Jim Brighton Stein China
SpaceX and NASA’s Crew Dragon set to return to Earth on August 1

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

SpaceX and NASA’s Crew Dragon set to return to Earth on August 1

"A Space X rocket now know when they'll be coming back to Earth. When Bob Franken and Doug Hurley lunched in May there test flight of the Crew Dragon capsule had no in date now. The NASA administrator says the capsule dubbed Endeavor will undocked from the space station August 1st and splashed down off the Florida coast the next day. Exact time will depend on sea conditions are come on news time. 5 26

Bob Franken Doug Hurley Nasa Administrator Florida
"nasa administrator" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"C. news this afternoon the chair of the congressional black caucus California congressman Karen bass saying police reform is a monumental issue the American people are waiting for us in the whole world is watching us the democratic claims that African Americans like George Floyd and Eric garner who died in police custody would still be alive if the bill had become law Louisiana Republican congressman Mike Johnson says president trump did his part by issuing an executive order and claims Republicans had no input on the bill being considered by the committee NASA preparing for the first ever Mars return mission and NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine says it's ready to launch next month what I really hope that people watch this mission and that they are inspiring that we know that we can strive and achieve even in the midst of a very challenging times NASA plans to launch its Mars perseverance rover into orbit on July twentieth it is expected to land on the planet in February and despite the corona virus pandemic Breitenstein says that the mission was heavily protected because the earth and Mars a line on the same side of the sun only once every twenty six months rotavirus hospitalizations are spiking in orange and Ventura counties prompting health officials to consider putting a pause on their re opening I see you hospitalizations due to cover nineteen have jumped seventy six percent in Orange County seventy five percent in Ventura county in just the past few weeks health officials are monitoring hospitalization rates to determine whether they need to change the county's reopening plans but they haven't made any adjustments yet a federal judge says the U. S. department education can't place restrictions barring undocumented students from corona virus financial aid the department was sued last month for placing arbitrary restrictions blocking them from carers act funding meant to help with educational costs the ruling currently only benefit students in the states community colleges a spokesman for the department says they plan to appeal that particular ruling well coming up on R. K. P. K. afternoon news we'll do the hand off from the afternoon news to the Pat Walsh show.

Ventura county Pat Walsh R. K. P. K. U. S. department Ventura executive president Louisiana Eric garner California Karen bass Orange County Jim Bridenstine NASA administrator NASA trump Mike Johnson congressman George Floyd
Miami - NASA Successfully Launches SpaceX Into Orbit From Florida Beach

World News Tonight with David Muir

01:19 min | 1 year ago

Miami - NASA Successfully Launches SpaceX Into Orbit From Florida Beach

"Very cute but Sarah as if American ambition ingenuity blasting off sending astronauts into space from US soil for the first time in nearly a decade or the first human ride for Falcon Nine? And it was incredible. Terrestrial nuts Bob Bankin and Doug Hurley. The day started with that famous walkout. After bad weather scrubbed the last launch Wednesday the to their designer flight suits giving the thumbs up their wives also astronauts and their children Hurley and wife Karen Holding Hands Benkin with a message for his son. The crew taking Tesla's to the launch pad with one final look before boarding the crew dragon and lifting off into history SPACEX created by. Ilan mosque became the first private company. To put astronauts into orbit a mission NASA administrator John Bryden sign says will change the future where proving that we can compound pharmaceuticals in a way that you cannot do on earth. We're able to create immunizations in a way you cannot do on earth. We're printing human organs in Three D. It's going to transform medicine here. On earth thousands gathering on the beaches of Florida to witness history.

Doug Hurley Ilan Mosque Karen Holding Hands Benkin Spacex Nasa Administrator John Bryden Tesla Sarah United States Bob Bankin Florida
Take 2 for SpaceX's 1st astronaut launch with more storms

Orlando's News at Noon

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Take 2 for SpaceX's 1st astronaut launch with more storms

"Launch yeah the historic falcon nine launch the crew dragon capsule with astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob banking was scrapped on Wednesday because of the stormy weather during a briefing today at the Kennedy Space Center NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine says he's been in touch with the two astronauts Bob and Doug are in great spirits they are ready to go we've been in touch via text and of course I'll be talking to them before they launch again as we continue our team coverage the company now hopes for the test mission to succeed on Saturday afternoon at three twenty two the weather forecast could cause more problems for the second attempt to launch a falcon nine rocket with two astronauts on board right now there's only a forty percent chance of acceptable weather conditions for tomorrow's launch storms for SpaceX describe Wednesday's attempt the test mission will pave the way for NASA to certify the crew dragon for regular crewed flights from KSC to the space

Doug Hurley Jim Bridenstine Nasa KSC Bob Banking Nasa Administrator
Weather outlook for SpaceX launch continues to improve

Jim Bohannon

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Weather outlook for SpaceX launch continues to improve

"At the Kennedy Space Center as of right now we are go for launch NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine announcing a sixty percent chance of favorable weather at lunchtime when a SpaceX falcon nine will loft to after not for the international space station first launch of US astronauts from U. S. soil in a while we are once again launching American astronauts on American rockets from American soil and this is a big moment time it's

Kennedy Space Center Jim Bridenstine Nasa Administrator Spacex United States U. S.
NASA human spaceflight chief resigns ahead of launch

Orlando's Evening News

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

NASA human spaceflight chief resigns ahead of launch

"And the man in charge of human spaceflight at NASA has resigned this comes about a week before a big launch next Wednesday two astronauts will launch from U. S. soil to the space station for the first time in nearly a decade Douglas love arrow had served as the chief of human exploration at NASA for seven months although the agency announced that he resigned two sources tell politico that he was pushed out over disagreements with NASA administrator Jim

Nasa Politico Nasa Administrator JIM U. S. Douglas
Ethics of Commercial and Military Space

Astronomy Cast

08:47 min | 1 year ago

Ethics of Commercial and Military Space

"I'm Fraser. Cain publisher of University with me as always Dr Pamela. Gay a senior scientist for the Planetary Science Institute and the Director of Bus Hip Pamela. Hey doing I'm doing well. How are you doing fraser a once again? The weather's just getting better and better. The apocalypse has never looked so. Lovely Garden is getting out of control. Is the chief sentence. It is now in control and we've got to cut it back. There's just too many plants too much grass too much weeds. I got many weeks ahead of me at this point out in the garden. The day of the trip is trying to be upon you exactly every year. More and more people are making their way to space. Some private citizens have already gotten their astronaut wings paying for a trip to space out of their own pocket. What are the ethical implications of this as the cost of spaceflight? Come down so we've got a new series. We're going to do like at least a two part series. Maybe at most two part series home. But this week we're going to talk about private spaceflight and just what are the ethical issues with this? Next week we will talk about military spaceflight. We're GONNA talk about Space Force. Although I think if we got timing a little better we could do. The episode after Space Force COMES OUT THE NEW TV show. Oh Yeah we can pull that off. Can we may thirty first. So let's talk about today. We'll talk about space tourism. The new movie that is planned next week will look at the trade off between commercial space and scientific exploration from the ground. So issues like the iridium satellites and of space resources for economic purposes. And then we'll go to space force. Okay now we've done two episodes about space tourism to fourteen and four fifty one to cover too much ground. But I think the thing that I found very interesting was just the way you had proposed it. Which is let's deal with the commercial and the ethics of this situation and we'll sort of see where that gets US first. Let's just talk about like? How do you define private spaceflight? When the purpose is the economic benefits of the parent company and its shareholders over the advancement of science and exploration causes that benefit mankind rather than stakeholders and. I mean like one version. That could very well be space. Tourism that you've got a space tourism company that is sending people on flights and they're having fun in going to the zero g hotel and enjoying themselves or flying to the moon and printing about on the moon in that low gravity but that is really just a sub set of what private spaceflight could look like so when you think about that larger umbrella. What are some other examples of the kinds of missions? We'd be run privately. Well this is where we start looking at. And this is what triggered this for me Sending people to spaced film adventure movies rather than to do the normal peacekeeping educational and scientific endeavors that take place on the space station even space tourists up until now have pretty much been tasked with. We're going to train you like an astronaut. You're GONNA do education stuff while you're up there too. And Hey we may throw you a bone and give you a little bit of science to do right but right now. Tom Cruise is looking to partner with spacex to partner with NASA and this has been tweeted out by NASA administrator. Jim Breitenstein they're gonNA film a not mission impossible but certainly an impossible mission on the International Space Station. Yeah I can't even imagine how awful difficult that process is going to be. I think I had a chance to interview someone who took the Imax seventy millimeter imax cameras up on the space station and tried to make a documentary. They gable the gave the astronauts. They taught them how to use these cameras than they had to. Fly Up with these cameras and try to shoot what they were doing. While they're up there and then send the footage back down or it was on the space shuttle. Anyway it was tough. Because it's a great big bulky professional camera that shoots an enormous amount of film at this huge aspect ratio. And it's a real challenge and so same thing right. Does he do his own shooting? Do you send up another person. Who's who does can handle camera sound hair makeup fright to the Astros get involved so I just. The details of this are blowing my mind but I think when you when we look at just all of human existence today and we think about all the trips that human beings take the vast majority of them are private right. When you fly in an airplane you know ninety nine point nine nine. Nine percent of the airplane flights are for private purposes. You are on a trip. You are carrying cargo. You are doing this. And then every now and then some would fly the airplane to a hurricane or you know to take some aerial footage of a of a drought. And that's the scientific purposes but the vast majority into. Why wouldn't it be that into the future? This is where it starts to become a how the numbers work out. And what is the ethics of this kind of question and in the frame of reference? I'm using for this is when I was a graduate student at McDonald Observatory. We'd periodically get. Vip's coming through the telescope and no matter what we're observing for science at that moment we had to kind of put it on the back burner and yeah. We'd bang the keys that we needed to keep things more or less going in a timely fashion but we had to pay attention to these guests who might be funders who might potentially help keep our science going one more year with the money. They might give the Observatory. And this okay. We are a not for profit. Enterprise we exist thanks to the generosity of our donors thanks to our competitiveness in peer reviewed science funding opportunities and thanks to our benefit actors in the state government who give us line item budgets. We know that we exist by the grace of all of these different humans and so we have to dance like the dancing monkey when they appear to keep them happy. That is of the job that we are. All aware of and astronauts are fully aware that that is also part of their job. They are all given amounts of media-training they're given massive amounts of here are effective ways to communicate complex ideas how to work a crowd how to be this stem educator. Even though they may be training pilot an engineer a doctor a myriad of other different things geophysicist. But they're all trained to be educators in the role of astronauts and when they're on the International Space Station. They know part of their is going to be on video cons with girl scouts to Judge Science Fair from outer space to do all these different feel-good tasks that remind everyone. Hey we have astronauts so the funding keeps flowing. We know that's part of the job. But that's a few moments a few hours out of your day and what we're looking at here is filming a movie in Outer Space. We don't know how long Tom Cruise and whoever else might be on the International Space Station but what we do know is while they're up there there. It's a twenty four hour gig in a large way and so now. Instead of being there a stem professionals benefiting mankind inspiring engaging educating their crew on a movie that the movie's primary goal is to have a great storyline and earn a whole lot of profit. And so where is the ethics in having our astronauts instead of engaging people in Wasilla educate them about space having them work crew on a film

International Space Station Outer Space Tom Cruise Fraser Planetary Science Institute Dr Pamela Cain Partner Scientist Wasilla Publisher Director Spacex Jim Breitenstein Gable Nasa Astros Engineer
"nasa administrator" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on KOMO

"And public relations from right after the liner crash in October of two thousand eighteen the just a terrible congressional appearance perform went before Congress in October to defend his company against charges Boeing allow the Max to remain in service even though the company knew about potentially fatal flaws in the M. casts guidance software board chair David L. Calhoun takes over as Boeing president and CEO January thirteenth Corwin hake komo news always starliner space capsule landed safely at the white sands space harbor in New Mexico yesterday starliner touches down in the desert in New Mexico in historic landing in white sands New Mexico concludes the first flight test of Boeing starliner spacecraft the first time an American made human rated capsule is landed on land much like the Apollo space capsules of the sixties and seventies a starliner uses three parachutes to bring it in for a softer landing NASA's administrator Jim Breitenstein acknowledges the mission to the international space station didn't go as planned after a faulty timer because a spacecraft to miss the proper orbit he does say despite the flaws mission had a lot of successes including what he called a bull's eye landing an investigation under way after Pierce county deputy shot and wounded a man after an incident in the Gramm area last night deputy say the man suspected of domestic violence it was armed and suicidal according to the sheriff's office when deputies confronted him the man got it was Kerr and ram several parts troll cars as he got away detective it Troyer the sheriff's office as a blue out the car's tires eventually stopping the car before a deputy opened fire disliking nobody else.

Congress Boeing David L. Calhoun president and CEO New Mexico NASA Jim Breitenstein Kerr Troyer administrator Pierce county Gramm
"nasa administrator" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"It's this is the NASA administrator joins a growing list of academics and experts who believe Pluto should be promoted back to being a planet we just wanna let you know that we argue about everything these days well it's just it's just what but here's my question politics is planet size will is this some kind of activist thing we needed promoted back to a planet why we don't have to you know it was it was only discovered according to Brian Regan according to wikipedia and ninety percent of forty percent of everything on wikipedia is is half true discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in nineteen thirty that's kind of late in the game isn't it yeah or or am I just it might I don't know do I have a but my my number skewed or do I have it do in my thinking too much in terms of it just nineteen thirty that seems fairly recent and so for it to be demoted to as a to a Toyota include toys arts but pollutes Lloyd just a few years ago really doesn't have a clue toy yeah you're not even a real plan at the bit to Brian Regan does is very funny very funny on it but I don't know it's just I I where's where's the closets it just seems I don't know I tear it out because we have error of the causes something with climate change maybe well it's just if you're not a planet you can't well this evening but yes I am a change planners writing like the call in here is that we need to promote what do we we need that's not a bull horn moment make it a point to make hello make it a point is with us now still somebody asked trump this question today yeah exactly your eyes on the road.

NASA administrator Brian Regan wikipedia Clyde Tombaugh Toyota Lloyd trump ninety percent forty percent
"nasa administrator" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on Science Friday

"To think that the entire American public was solidly behind Apollo throughout the nineteen sixties. That was not the case a public opinion opinion polls show that public opinion was in fact divided but I think when it happened <hes> you know there's a famous story. Even about the the day before the Apollo Eleven launch <hes> Ralph Abernathy the Reverend Ralph Abernathy led led a group of protesters to space center in Florida and the NASA administrator. Tom Paine came out to meet with them and said you know I. I'm very sympathetic to your concerns about poor people in this country and if I I knew that I could help poor people in this country by saying let's not push the button tomorrow I would do that but that's not the way it is and Ralph Abernathy in return said a word of thanks and that he was humbled to be there and he actually got to see the launch. I think no matter what's your politics was that was a moment that just really got through the differences and and the other thing I want to mention and Mike Collins Seapower Toronto has been talking about this when they went on their world tour after the mission you know instead of hearing from people that they encountered in all these different countries instead of hearing something like you Americans you pulled it off people that they encountered sid we did it. They all felt that they had somehow been part of this great adventure interesting <hes> in the space race as we used to call it was really a political race between the Soviet Union and the U._S.. But of course there worse some legitimate science issues going on there. Were there not well when you say scientists use you mean the experiments in things that were that were tried and left on the moon. Oh absolutely science was not the driver for Apollo follow. The Cold War was however <hes> the scientists certainly realized that this was an incredible opportunity to study the Moon <hes> in sit to for the very first time and <hes> not only the experiments that we left behind signed the seismometers and so forth on the several different missions it wasn't just apollo eleven it was six different landings but the photography of the Moon from orbit from the surface and <hes> the samples the the lunar samples are another author of the great legacies of Apollo because they unlocked the door to deciphering the earliest history of the solar system and aren't they waiting to open up another sample that has not been open. They are <hes>. There's a core sample from. I'm one of the later missions that is going to be opened. I think maybe this year if I'm not mistaken but you know NASA has done a very smart thing they've kept a lot of the samples in a protected involves <hes> stored in in nitrogen <hes> to prevent any alteration because they understood that <hes> the technology to study those samples was going to improve with time so yes there have been pieces of the moon that have gone out to scientists for the past fifty years but there's a lot more that is waiting for better technology to be developed some been <hes> stuff in the news about the moon actually being seismically active and they left though seismic sensors. They're correct. They left them there but now you may remember this IRA. They actually turned off the the lunar science stations in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven to save money. You can believe that so don't get me started..

Ralph Abernathy Apollo Tom Paine Soviet Union NASA administrator NASA Mike Collins Toronto Florida sid fifty years
"nasa administrator" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

08:52 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"What's interesting is that NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein said in a recent statement that we can expect to major asteroid impact event in our lifetime. However GPL says that NASA officially states that there will be no meteors, your sitting this earth within two hundred years time, but there is a simultaneous meteors strike scenario or exercise where a hypothetical near-earth objects hits the Atlantic and creed NAMI. It's really weird how that's that certain type of exercise is going on at university, California, Santa Cruz and is other one's going on where they are discussing this with NASA, the European Space Agency's. They makes you feel a little uncomfortable about the possibilities of rocks exploding in space go to berry. Alabama Highbury younger zero. Hey, nice to talk to you. Good to talk to you. Hey. And I started to Russia though, I remember your call. You gave me the play by play. Really appreciate it. And I've talked to you this way too. Yeah. Again on this mission that NASA has got one on launch it in twenty twenty seven. Talking about the dark dark mission. Yeah. Dart going out with SpaceX launch it, here's the thing that they're going to go for Diddy. Most. Did he most which is a large? Satirical, asteroid got a moon. Did he mean? Tells me it's large because I'm sitting here looking at that they. But they're hit net moon. Off a little bit. Little bit. Yeah. So many. First of all, let me just say something here, because, you know, you're right on the money here. First of all, dart stands for double asteroid, redirection test mission. Do you realize redirection mission? Do you realize what they're doing is similar to what they do with the L cross mission back when Barack Obama was president? And he decided they were gonna throw a Connecticut vehicle into the moon. And then they were going to take pictures of what was what debris that was set up through set of those any water in it this time. Go double asteroid Russian testers, one satellite that falls, another one. The other one hurls itself into the into the other asteroid or the asteroid, creating it to be knocked off course if that doesn't work, then they're going to try to go around it to try and get it to go, off course if that doesn't work equip, they maybe they ought to break all treaties, put a nuclear device in his thing and blow it up. They're saying that, you know this, this rock. Has hit the planet. Sometime. What was it twenty twenty five or twenty twenty seven or something? Twenty twenty two. Twenty twenty two is near near earth. Again, it took us three got really close. But it's not no small object. You're right. And say you hit it just playing pool or whatever or whatever you want to hit that on the wrong side. And it says it towards that largest which has heart. Real good, gravity is carrying a moon with it. And it gets close to but shoots and the gravity. Slice it forward. It could swing any direction. You know, any come out of orbit. The gravity is going to pull the Dan quicker either. We're going to create a new moon to create a new moon or that could be thrown out. Of course it could hit us. That's the scary part of it. Because that look at angles and everything is going to be on the other side away from the sun on the other side of the planet. You know in lieu. So you're messing with a lot of variables area. Could swing it towards earth is going to say after that, you know, it could either destroy it which I doubt it will large is almost a quarter of kilometer around. Right. And the other one's. Out of kilometer. Well, plus guessing say hit thank God for that common core. Math. They're teaching our kids because that way. Close. Yeah, it's more shoes. Probably. When you talk about scientists scientists trophy for, for even participating thank you, give them a trophy before the slams into the planet. Here's your here's your. Towards us. Now. Niko on it. We're going to toasted in ocean that even that small, that which is small, no is bigger than one hit show. The varying say. We will have a so now it's all I got to say is these guys will remember back what they were saying what is like two thousand two. February twenty nineteen. There would be a massive asteroid hit the earth. And they said, well, we were off. You know, we got it out of one thousand seven hundred some odd chance of having it hit us, we're off. And then that same day. I remember I took the day off to go to the kiss concert, right? Same day. They had an explosion, a huge media exploded over Venezuela. On february. No, it was over. It was over Cuba. And then there was another one that happened like nineties later over Venezuela. You know. Away with talking about that. The one that hit Russia. It was two hours three hours later, the one flew over Puerto Rico. That's right. Not of Puerto Rico, and it was lit up the Scott. I don't even know where it landed. They don't even know if it landed or made impact or whatever. But I don't know about great harbor. That was remember the great harbour incident that happened like what a year ago. Great harbor grays harbor in Washington. Huge fireball just goes across the sky. And it's like moving across the sky like a plane plane is on fire, and then swoops down really fast and then explodes, they think it hit the ground somewhere. And while they were looking at anywhere for this rocket couldn't find other people calling saying, CLYDE, that wasn't Iraq. That was a UFO. Did you say that video and the photos of that? Oh, yeah. Spacex was supposed to launch. It was the other one the other it didn't lies the big heavy. Oh, I don't remember. I know that something's supposed to launch that night, but something exploded or crash harbor Washington, and it caused it caused the rumble that we heard about in Virginia Beach. I it was the same type of rumble, and that's why I'm wondering about these rumbles too. I mean, what are they could be like, unseen, recording going back to record going back to listen for the learned that take up the Barry say they also got the photos of that one, too because was taking photos of that area at that time? And they got it and they show the street going to explosion. But they're going back and trying to track down. Yeah. Yeah. You don't have something hit the planet have problems. I mean, we could have some of the size of a minivan that explodes over, like Los Angeles immediately. We haven't EMP in whole town, a whole city that's completely destroyed. It can happen. It was the one that hit Russia, and what kind of damage it did. Right. If it'd been lower site, four miles, six miles, we would have had? Yeah. Got our, our meddle in it or very rare hard one, then is going to impact, I got the hold a chess or a piece of that meteoroid, and it was heavy real small heavy piece, so that media or it was heavy. Put it on the scale that they used the way. Houses. Hugh heavy superheavy. I could barely hold it up. It was it was like at least, you know, small Bing wing about eight pounds and it was just tiny anyway. I'm out of time berry. Thank you so much for calling the program. Course. Yeah. Well, the predictions have been made now bury your sworn to the prediction. I appreciate the call. Take care..

NASA Russia Twenty twenty NASA administrator Puerto Rico Venezuela Alabama California SpaceX Barack Obama Jim Breitenstein Spacex Bing European Space Agency Santa Cruz Cuba Dart Iraq Connecticut
"nasa administrator" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

14:42 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"There's no minimum listenership to start making money with anchor. So if you want to make a little bit of money while having a cool podcast, while download the crap or go to anchor up FM to get started and everybody. Here's familiar with how important the Canada arm has been and their robotics capabilities have been for the international. Space station, and those capabilities are going to have tremendous value at the gateway, which is that small space station in orbit around the moon that reusable command and service module in orbit around the moon. We're gonna use those capabilities to get to the surface. As a matter of fact, and we're gonna need their eventually. We're gonna need their robotics capabilities on the surface of the moon now. That's another negotiation for another day. But no, this they are with us. Never the first ones that have stepped up. But there are other countries that are stepping up and we're in conversations right now with the, the European Space Agency, ISA were in conversations with all of our partners on the international space station, Japan and Russia, another critical partner when it comes to space exploration, that a lot of people don't consider. It's important to recognize that since one thousand nine hundred seventy five the United States in Russia had a collaborative working relationship to live and work in space. I say since nineteen seventy five. Again. I've got to be clear. There have been some gaps. But if you go back to the Apollo Soyuz program, and then you go to the shuttle MIR program, and now you go to the international space station. This is a very unique channel of communication, when terrestrial geopolitics breakdown, we are able to continue living and working in space together, that's an important capability that the space community brings to our country. And there's so we're going to the moon. We're going sustainably. We're going with commercial partners were going with international partners. And this is a new policy. We are, in fact, going to utilize the resources of the moon. What does that mean? What resources are we going to utilize in two thousand eight and in two thousand nine we learned that there are hundreds of millions of tons of water ice at the south pole of the men hundreds of millions of times. What does that mean? That means there's. Life-support we're talking about air debris. We're talking about water to drink, but even better, we're talking about rocket fuel hydrogen and oxygen is the same rocket fuel that, powered, the ours, twenty-five engines, the space shuttle main engines, the same rocket fuel that willpower, the, the engines on the S L S rocket the biggest most powerful rocket ever built that will carry our astronauts to the moon, so hydrogen and oxygen available in hundreds of millions of tons on the south pole of the moon. That's an amazing resource opportunity, and it's important for us to get there and figure out how to how to utilize I know this is a space tech conference. That space technology that we need to develop, how do we get the use of those resources? So we're gonna utilize. And by the way, there's other resources we can get to later, maybe depending on time as long as I'm going that might not be the case. But here's here's here's where we're going. It's not just ULA sation of resources, either the last piece of space policy directive, one given by the president of the United States is to take this technology, take the capability that we're building to reduce risk to prove capability proved technology. And then as much as possible replicated at Mars, that's why we're building the gateway. This is a practical capability for not just a sustainable lunar return. But also in eventual journey to Mars where we will have access to the surface of Mars as well. So this is all embedded in space policy directive, one. Just a little little tasking that we have to get underway. So we're gonna need everybody in this room to help us out. But it's also important to remember that we put together a budget request based on those directives and then that budget requests, we decided that we were able to get humans to the surface of the moon in twenty twenty eight. The president and the vice president saw that. And they said that's not good enough. We need to go faster. The question is, why do we go faster and this is an important point? Why would we go faster friends? We would be on the moon right now. If it wasn't for a certain risk. Everybody is familiar, especially in this room. You are familiar with technical risk technical challenges technical challenges are not the reason we are not currently at the moon. The reason we're not at the moon right now is because of the political risk. We have tried this before the space exploration initiative of the nineteen ninety s priorities changed budgets, change Congress's changed administrations change. And ultimately that, that goes out the window, then we had in the early two thousands the vision for space exploration another effort to return to the moon. It was drawn out at took too long priorities change budgets. Change Congress's change administration change, and it gets zeroed out. And now we have another administration. It says it's important for strategic presence. It's important for international partnerships. It's important for resources. It's important for science that the United States beyond the moon, therefore in order to retire the political risk. We're going to go faster. So they said, what does it take to get to the moon within five years? They came to mess. What does it take to get to the moon within five years? And so we put together a budget request that we could send to the hill. We sent it to the administration. I and said, here's what we believe. It takes to get to the moon within five years. We were also very careful because these these the challenges that we've had in the past politically stem from a couple of things. If you try to fund the lunar exploration program out of the science mission directorate by cannibalizing science to feed human exploration. It creates all kinds of political allies, within geographic regions of the country. Maybe certain states than oppose other states. So it becomes a parochial issue. And in fact, it becomes a partisan issue. So we know that, that doesn't work then the question is, will could we fund it by maybe these scoping, the international space station and the amount of funding going there? Well, if you do that you're gonna make a lot of people in Texas upset you're gonna make a lot of people in Florida upset you're gonna make people in Alabama upset. So no. That, that doesn't work either. So what we got here in order to get to the moon in twenty twenty four was a new budget request that included an additional one point six billion dollars that doesn't cannibalize any part of NASA. And that is a unique moment in all of the decades that have led up to this moment, we should be on the moon right now. But we're not what have we learned from history? And how do we apply those lessons today? That's what we've done. Now this one point six billion dollars is a. Budget. It's an additional budget request on top of Nasr's previous budget request what for, for, for the year, twenty twenty I wanna be clear. I'm not saying we're going to the moon for one point six billion dollars. What I am saying what I am saying is if you take Nasr's budget, and you add an additional one point six billion. And then, of course you look at year, twenty twenty one and twenty twenty two and twenty twenty three all of those budgets were working through right now. But we have an amazing start to come out of the gate and actually get capability going to get us to the surface of the moon in the year, twenty twenty four. The administration France has been extremely supportive of that. And for that NASA, I personally am very grateful for all of their strong support. It's also important to note that the vice president by direction of the president at the last national space council, by the way, raise your hand. If you're in this room, and you're familiar with what the national space council is. Let's do the other way raise your hand if you're not familiar with what it is. And that's okay. There are folks. Okay. So we have under the law, the ability for the administration to create what we call the national space council. What that means is you take all of the different heads of agencies and the different cabinet secretaries that deal with space and you put them on one committee, and then they get together and they discussed and they make decisions on how to make sure that America is the preeminent spacefaring nation. And this is existed going back to John F. Kennedy had Lyndon Baines Johnson. Of course heading the national space council. Administrations that came after that, took it away. Others product back at one point, George Herbert Walker Bush, reestablished it. And then when he left office when away while the president brought it back, and he put the vice president as chairman of it, and of course, on this national space council set the secretary of defense, the director of national intelligence. Certainly the, the, the secretary of commerce secretary of transportation, the NASA administrator and others that touch space. We come together and we talk about how each one of us are working on space stations. So in this national space council meeting that we have the vice president announced that when we go to the moon in twenty twenty four and we and we very clearly, he said he, he said the next man, and this is an important point. The first woman that land on the moon will be Americans. He also said that we're going to land on the moon in twenty twenty four and he said, we're going to land on the south pole of the moon, which is where all of that water ISIS. But there's a critical thing that he said that I think caught everybody's attention, which is the next man and the first woman that's, that's a significant difference, then the Apollo program that we had in the nineteen six. And the early nineteen. Seventies. Why is it different because back then all of our astronauts came from the military. They were all fighter pilots, or not just fighter pilots test pilots. But the bottom line is there were no opportunities for winning. And now for the first time we're going to send a very diverse astronaut or to the surface of the moon to inspire the next generation. I have an eleven year old daughter. My eleven year old daughter. I want her to be able to see herself as having every bit of the opportunities that I had growing up. And this, I think, is a perception that we need to fix that every American has an opportunity to go to the moon now. Not everybody American is going to go to the moon. And I understand that. But when we see the cadre of folks, the very talented astronaut or that we currently have we know this that we can send people of all backgrounds race religion gender. They are. They're very diverse and very qualified. Which is one of the reasons that when we decided what are we gonna call this particular program? We thought about Apollo Apollo is an amazing historical achievement. We all remember it, those of us who are alive. And I quite frankly wasn't. But I've, I've read about it in books and seen it on TV. And I'm inspired by what it was happened before I was born. But we think about the Apollo program. Here's what's interesting. Apollo had a twin sister. His twin sister artists happens to be the goddess of the moon. What an amazing fifty year anniversary fifty years after Apollo we go back to the moon sustainably with commercial partners, international partners. We utilize the resources the moon. We'd prove technology. We want to plan to take it to Mars. We do it with this very diverse and capable astronaut corps to inspire every American to see themselves in that role and we name, it after the twin sister of Apollo Artemis. We friends in this room are the artists generation, you are part of the artists generation, we need to create a movement for the artists. Generation fifty years after Apollo the twin sister of Apollo Artemis is going to be the program that takes our astronauts to the moon. We're gonna watch a short video here and then I'll get into the please..

national space council president vice president United States European Space Agency Apollo NASA Congress Russia Canada Nasr secretary Japan George Herbert Walker Bush France partner S L S Texas
"nasa administrator" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Once again, these gentlemen, here are the beneficiaries of that tonight can only express the best that I can out proud all of America is of with with you are done represent the entire world is gonna guess launching again to international station this time when we do it. It's different in facts. Nasa has. And as a customer, we've become one of many that will be using this. If all goes, according to plan of a robust commercial marketplace Moore's basically and that person marketplace to be. Sovereign countries being individuals that want to go, maybe they face, I know south phrasing. But I'll tell you notice smokes out there. There's a lot of those that are ready for they have the same dreams, and visions that all of you in you're. Good the sickest. It would barely getting getting people back over. And. Yeah. Else lady. What really wanna see is you know, based on on the moon comedy applied even based on the moon and uh building city. That's like. See the beginning of that. Dial happy. Well, the the president's first space policy directed to me was go to the moon and the wording areas sustainably, how do we go? We don't want to recreate the Impala programs at they don't wanna leave flags footprints and come back from one ago wanna stay fine. I mean, Landers robots and humans. Yeah. As sustainable return, as it doesn't mean at this point running out, as you mentioned, you know, a city on the mood. But what needs we can put together all of the components that enable it eventually be sustainable and part of that ability. Tell me fundamental the fully reasonable will cost of of. A hundred times less per flights than an expendable vehicle. It kinda makes sense big of of any other motor transport three like Jeddah crops. Four cars bicycles forces every other motive, passports votes. All reusable. The only the weird one that is reusable is as faints. That's so imagine how excessive would be every time you flew in debt that you had to get a new jets as opposed to retool. The jet OB insanely expensive to fly jet who was single use. There wouldn't be anybody. Fly. Exactly, it'd be like a few research flights at extreme expense, and that's all the plan that would occur. So the absolutely fundamental breakthrough. That's needed is a fully reusable open class of breath facial system and needs to be fully and rapidly reusable. So the cost of of really must be very low and must deals have pirates rent. And then that's the fundamental breakthrough needed four minutes to become a species. And I think what are they able to? There was a program. We call commercial that went into place a while ago. And and with the vision was was it would have multiple providers competing on cost and innovation. And of course, that is now factor as as you are competing against others in this commercial marketplace, right? You have a huge incentive to drive down to Austin increase the access, and that's not realizing here on this fruit. Dragon that we're gonna see launch tonight. Yeah. I heard all about money at all. But I do care about us become his face breaks. Liz asian. Yeah. I do that. If we don't achieve fuller up freeze. So that's why the only reason actually one at old awesome. Guys. Thank you for being a part of this. And. It's an exciting night. Will thank you for watching watch this space. I'm NASA administrator, Jim Bryden Stein. You can follow me on Twitter at Jim Breitenstein. And of course, if you wanna watch this again, you can do. So at NASA dot gov slash watch. This space..

Nasa Jim Bryden Stein NASA administrator America Moore Landers Twitter Jim Breitenstein president Liz asian Austin four minutes
"nasa administrator" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"And even some space shuttle mission. Today. We have a very special guest Alon musk the CEO of SpaceX. We are at the Kennedy Space Center at launch conflicts thirty nine which is a very historic. I would say not just launch complex earn his on Yamin for our country from this launch complex. We launched all of our missions to the moon. We also launched spatial 's. And we have a really exciting topic tonight. Which is the reason why we're here, which is tonight. We're gonna launch with what we call one which is a mission to international space station with crude dragon. In other words, it's it's not crude. But it is a test. Like all the way to the international space station where we are right now on launch complex thirty nine. We're on a while we call the crew art, which is the way the astronauts actually gonna get to the council so that they can fly the internet space. Now, that's not gonna happen tonight. Tonight. We're going to test the nickel all run. It's I have. I am thrilled honored to be here at this very historic site with the along Matz who has been an amazing partner for NASA for all of the years to get us to this point where what we wanna do this year. If onto Eric astronauts on American gets from Merican soil and getting point as United on. Was not something that came easy. It's not something back. But that by staff, you've got us to the point where we're ready almost take that next. I'd like to start by asking you the story that is out. There is that there was a time in your life. When you made a trip to Russia your intent was actually to I I guess an excess intercontinental ballistic missile about the without the new nothing. Good point. That's extra. Hey. So tell me about why you were there, and ultimately our resulted in this moment right now. Sure. Well. Originally, I was not going to start up company. I really wanted us to do. Space race in the and a mall penalties. And I I. If there's something I get public excited about. Sending people to Mars and cutting face based on the tropic mission to send a small greenhouse and service of the summating shot of green plants on a red background, and that would release fire the public in public expired about about sitting Morris than they would tell their centers appointment to people for us to do that. So my initial goal is actually increased budget. And then what I found was that Russia really charge. You want to try to be way more than I afford. They wanna choke woman to do the mission. And so that was really an option, and I thought well anyway to a a low cost of an especially useful system in the US as so I read every book hosting hit on propping sneering, Tom and decided to try. To go essentially to. Give. Four more over this technology technology hosts in the stable, essentially, it's make to to use in order to get into space and has these and he started with the much smaller rockets can want and what's your goal at that point. When he started the pumpkin once gets white where we had nine inch. Golden when I started space. I only thought goes navy ten percent chance of getting felt once who will not at all of this would happen as this short week. But I have to listen during rockets, and they August you've been near space since day one. And I don't anything which is why the Bush threw off his sales. And so the first three falcon once for SpaceX failures. Yes. And then tell me about. The both one so had actually only had money. So have to. Are probably every ranch to put together enough spare parts. And of course, the successful. And what would happen if it wasn't successful? Oh, we SpaceX tonight. So we would not be here right now at this moment..

SpaceX Kennedy Space Center Alon musk Russia Bush Tom CEO Merican Yamin NASA Matz US Eric Morris partner ten percent nine inch
"nasa administrator" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on Science Friday

"And this agency is so a bipartisan and members of the house members of the Senate on both sides of the aisle support what we do and we've had very good success in a bipartisan way achieving budgets that are going to put us in a path to go back to the moon. And this time we're going to stay let me quote from your American space for renaissance act. I'm quoting you want the United States to be among those who I arrive at a destination in space and open it for subsequent use and development by others. So as as China and others prepare to send humans to the moon is an imperative to you that Americans be the first to return there. Well, I think it's important. There's a difference between what I think China is doing and what we are doing China. Of course is interested in going to the surface of the moon. And so are. We our interest is going to the moon to stay we've already been to the moon. We landed on the moon in nineteen sixty nine we had six missions twelve people that walked on its surface. And so it's this is not a race. And you know, if people if people want to claim that it's a race, which I hear quite frequently. I'm okay with that. But but the reality is when they were landing on the far side of the moon. We were landing on the far side of Mars. And by the way, we were doing it for the eighth time in human history. And we're the only country that has ever done it weeks later, we were flying by ultimately in the kipper belt, which is, you know, past Pluto, we're talking about four billion miles from earth and taking beautiful images of ultimate ultimate in. And then of course, we entered orbit around an asteroid in deep space called Benue. And as everybody saw just a few days ago, we launched a SpaceX falcon falcon nine rocket with a crew dragon to the international space station where we have had people living. And working for now. Eighteen years in a row in space. So I would I would say we are in really good shape as a country. This president has put us in an even better position with his budget requests and bipartisan support in the congress. We're making great progress. When we go to the moon, though, the differences the president has said, we're going to be sustainable. In other words, we're not gonna leave flags and footprints, and then not go back for another fifty years this time when we go we're actually going to stay which means we need commercial partners. We need international partners. And we're getting great support from our international partners right now. And we also need reusability. We need rockets to be reusable. And of course, every piece of the architecture between here and the moon to be reasonable. Let's let's talk about the president's support for this space efforts of the twenty nine thousand nine NASA. Budget gave NASA was very generous gave Ness more than an ask for. But President Trump wanted to cut the w I telescope. The rope. Lander five missions that studied the earth, and that's as indication's programs congress gave you the money instead and more basically saying to the president know we disagree with your policy. So we can take each one of those. So here, here's the thing. Congress was very generous to us. They have given us a budget that funds. I think pretty much everything that you have suggested their budget was actually the president. Here's the thing. I come in is the NASA administrator and and the president's budget. Request takes NASA up a billion dollars. Well, no, his his budget. Request was actually about a billion on again. Yeah. It was it was bigger than it was a bigger than any budget in in my adult lifetime. And everybody was like, wow, he's serious. He wants to go back to the moon. And by the time that I was like thrilled. I'm like, okay. I'm going to go to the I'm going to go to NASA. And I'm going to advocate for a much bigger budget. By the time. I got here. Congress had already passed in a bipartisan way, a one point seven billion dollar increase. So it's it's interesting that I you know, I thought I was coming here to increase the budget..

president NASA congress President Trump China United States Senate SpaceX NASA administrator Benue Ness seven billion dollar billion dollars Eighteen years fifty years
"nasa administrator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:11 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Conflict with your neighbor. Now, how far that goes up the management chain it within Monsanto and now. Bayer I can't tell you. But I know locally that it that's the message several law firms now have filed a lawsuit on behalf of farmers arguing that Monsanto violated antitrust law by selling dot Campbell tolerance seeds, the lawsuit claims that the company understood that the risk of drifting dot com, but could drive competitors out of the market Baier has asked the court to dismiss that lawsuit decision is pending. Bayer declined NPR's request for an interview about this issue in its public statements. The company insists that if dot cameras used properly, according to all the rules. It won't cause any harm to neighbors. It says farmers are buying extend seeds solely because they offer better weed control and higher yields. It also points out that reports of damage were down. Sharply last year after the company and other groups held hundreds of training sessions for farmers. The company's critics though say fewer crops are getting damaged in part. Because so many farmers have decided to buy Bayer's product crops that Cambe can't harm, Dan. Charles NPR news. Today. Nasa is marking its day of remembrance memorials are being held at NASA facilities around this country. To honor astronauts and agency staff who sacrificed their lives for the mission NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein says this is an important moment. We think about the sacrifice and the human lives that were lost. But we also think about how the world is different today because of the sacrifices different in a very good way. Now this day of remembrance had been originally set for last week, but the partial government shutdown forced a delay. This event is held this time each year because of an odd twist of fate three deadly NASA accidents were clustered within the same week of the calendar. Even though they were decades apart. This is CBS news special report, America's first three Apollo astronauts were trapped and killed by flash fire that swept their moon ship early tonight during a launchpad test at Cape. Kennedy in Florida Virgil Gus Grissom was the late CBS news. News anchor. Mike Wallace speaking on January twenty seven nine thousand nine hundred sixty seven astronauts Gus Grissom, Ed white, and Roger Chaffee were killed and their deaths were on the mind of president Ronald Reagan in late January nineteen Eighty-six when he had to deliver difficult news to the nation nineteen years ago almost to the day. We lost three astronauts and a terrible accident on the ground. But we've never lost an astronaut inflate. We've never had a tragedy. Like this the nineteen Ninety-six tragedy was the space shuttle challenger, bursting into flame, seventy three seconds. After take-off seven astronauts were killed after the challenger explosion NASA, instituted a series of reforms to make the shuttle program safer, but on February first two thousand three a new generation was reminded that spaceflight is never completely safe. The space shuttle Columbia disintegrated as it reentered earth's atmosphere after mission another seven astronauts were killed. This is then President George W Bush, the same creator who names the stars also knows the names of the seven. Souls. We mourn today. The.

Nasa Bayer Virgil Gus Grissom Monsanto NASA administrator President George W Bush NPR CBS Charles NPR Kennedy Ronald Reagan Jim Breitenstein Florida Cambe the market Baier Mike Wallace Dan Roger Chaffee
"nasa administrator" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on Liftoff

"Our thanks to story worth for their support of this show. And all of relay FM. All right Jason. So my understanding is basically anyone now can build a lunar Lander or Rover or something what what is going on here. What are we waiting for? It's let's make it happen because it's all part of something called CPS, which they have not yet pronounced clips. I think but it's it's going to happen which commercial lunar payload services. So there was a media event that happened where Breitenstein the NASA administrator did like his American idol kind of thing where he announced nine partnerships with companies that are finalists in this idea to have commercial access to the moon. We talked about this when we talked about the lunar prospector getting killed and this there's not an old man with a pick ax on the moon died. That's not what that's not what this is. But at the time that was a Lander concept and instruments and the idea was to check some stuff out on the surface of the moon. And they're like, no, no, no, we're going to do it with commercial partners. Instead. And this is the other part of that which is they're still working on some instruments. What they wanna do is basically provide incentives for companies who are trying to build lunar Landers the idea. That you could draw put stuff down on the moon surface. Maybe bring some stuff back out. And it's part of this kind of ratcheting up this plan to put gateway out in in lunar orbit with people on it. The new sort of the next international space station is instead this lunar space station. And then you had the commercial Landers that are being built for the moon. And then you'd have started to create kind of a a new commercial space ecosystem around the moon that is bankrolled by by international space agencies including NASA. So this was a weird event. There was a lot of filler. There was a long thing that was meant to be inspirational about like kids in the sciences, which was it was very nice. It was not news the nine partnerships. They basically had people walk out on stage and shook their hands, and they went and sat down, and they didn't really go into any detail in that part about what these companies were working on which was also very strange it. Was a super strange of the journalists who were there were all really grumpy about it. It was almost like a cross between a NASA event an apple event. And what it reminded me is that apple does a pretty good job with events because it was not not that great. But commercial services those nine companies include Lockheed Martin and eight companies you've never heard of. But the goal is to build Landers to bring payloads from gateway..

Landers NASA NASA administrator Lockheed Martin Breitenstein Jason CPS apple
"nasa administrator" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"So I was nervous slash skeptical. A NASA administrator could have major effects. Other than organizing very awkward press events. Like we saw the other day. But all in all I think he's doing a good job. I think he's saying interesting things that indicate a mentality change within NASA. Or at least a willingness to change the mentality within certain parts of NASA that haven't shown that in the past. So that's a good thing. And I'm very curious to see how the other day they had this announcement about the commercial lunar payload services, which we will be talking about an upcoming podcast. And I'm very interesting how that project goes because that seems like. If nothing else that could be the indicator of how the Brian Stein NASA does because that is kind of you know, they canceled resource prospector that was heading to the moon and they substituted. This commercial lunar services thing into it. They're going to break up those payloads in flight him on small Landers. And I think depending on how this goes this could be a good indicator for how Brian Stein's NASA is performing overall. And the second question from Mark not straying away. From the touchy subjects, do you think the US should cooperate with China on spaceman space missions or steer clear? We disagree with them on human rights issues. But their space program is showing impressive progress. Russia seems to be stagnating together we could achieve something truly great. I don't necessarily agree that they're showing impressive progress. I think they are showing something. But there there are I am very skeptical of some of the things going on there now because there's certain things that don't seem to making progress at all within China. There's a lot of talk about new launch vehicles new programs new this new that, but they don't appear to have the money for some of these things they're talking about and the human spaceflight program is incredibly slow moving within China and has always been so I don't know that they're making progress they're still catching up to a certain extent, they are doing some interesting missions. But overall, I don't know that they're showing like a massive amount of. Momentum. To russia. Yes. They certainly are. But that's because they're doing anything, you know. Russia doesn't seem to be doing that much overall. The question of whether we should cooperate on with them is an interesting one always has been because there's certainly security issues with China. You know, there's there's a lot of. Political drama over, you know. Obviously both directions here, but there's like security issues that they're trying to hack us. They're trying to hack them yada, yada. There's the intellectual property debate of like is China, stealing intellectual property from everywhere. If you look at some of their fighter jets and things like that..

NASA China Russia NASA administrator Brian Stein NASA Brian Stein US Mark
"nasa administrator" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

05:10 min | 2 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on KTOK

"I get to stay. That's been my contract is. Yeah. But I think I think I read Megan Kelly's walking out of the six point three million, and she doesn't have the fulfill. I think it was a four year deal. So. Nice work if you can get it. But if you get. Eight four zero one thousand star one thousand NewsRadio one thousand K T. Okay. We're going to be joined in a little while thirty minutes or so Michael Bauer. Tell us about that new package found by CNN. Reporter gay Batista is joining us for miles against Malam Noma about an hour. And then Bill Zimper will explain the troops down on the Mexican border. And what they can do if anything Jacqueline writes on social media, which by the way, I'm able at eight four one thousand star went Matthews at Katie, okay, dot com, and social media friend me on Facebook. I'll fringe back, but Jacqueline rights via social media Lee from the Oklahoma Oklahoma aeronautics commission Facebook posting we're going back to the moon at aerospace forum with Jim Breitenstein NASA administrator in a speech. He confirmed USA will soon launch American rockets from American soil with American astronauts to the moon and Mars and Jacqueline. I take it. You're excited to hear that. I am too. And I've known it for a while. But during previous administrations masses budget was cut to the point where nessa had to cut. I've got a very good friend of mine. I won't tell you any more than that. But I've known him since high school. We went our separate ways. He is brilliant, nothing short of brilliant. And it's amazing, and I remained friends because he's brilliant. He's so much on such a higher level than I am. He is a reservist in the air force as an officer. And he's also a high ranking official at NASA he had to take a leave of absence from NASA because his branch of work at NASA was put on hold because of budget cuts. So he's been working up at the Pentagon since then. Doing his thing up there. But I I was talking to him. And I said, hey, are we going to get back into the space game ever again as a country? He goes. Oh, yeah. Yeah. He says the country's just gotta get back to understanding that one percent of its budget has to be dedicated to NASA. And it's a good investment. One percent of our budget. One percent is all NASA needs. But he also told me they're getting back into this. You probably read if you read the book the Martian a lot of what is featured in the Martian is what NASA working on so yes, they're working on going to the moon again. And then they're gonna perfect going to the moon. And then they're gonna try to go to a further body, maybe a comet or maybe land something on an asteroid. That's flying by the earth. And then from there they're going to work on going to Mars. Now, it's still a long way away going to Mars, but they're going to get back into space exploration. If. It is not trimmed by future administrations and the past administration. I won't tell you the name because you know, who I'm talking about. Trimmed NASA's budget, so Jacqueline. Thank you for sharing. That. With me. I'm enthusiastic to everybody loves space travel who doesn't love the concept of space exploration. Who doesn't you know, if you don't if you think that's a waste of money. I don't wanna know you. To me that goes completely against our American drive to explore. Our human drive to learn all that is learnable. And to understand our our existence. Do you want to argue eight four hundred thousand star one thousand Eddie rights Lee. What do you think of the president trying to amend the constitution with an executive order any I gather you're talking about the so-called right to sit our birthright to citizenship. I was having this conversation earlier today with my co workers, and I will get into that in just a minute on NewsRadio one thousand Katie. Okay. It's about the fourteenth amendment and what I know about the fourteenth amendment. And I don't know that you maybe I'm just a geek. But I carry around a little pocket copy of the US constitution. It's not very big. It's not like you're going to sit down and take hours to read it. It takes maybe thirty minutes to read through my particular copy also has little notations of win. Each amendment was ratified. And I'll tell you what I think about this about the president and the alleged executive order that would end birthright citizenship. In other words, the concept that if you're born here in the United States, you are a citizen of the United States, and that's next on.

NASA reservist Jacqueline Matthews United States Facebook Megan Kelly NASA administrator president CNN Lee executive Bill Zimper Malam Noma Michael Bauer nessa Oklahoma Oklahoma aeronautics gay Batista
"nasa administrator" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"That's wonderful. This obsession exciting time, Jim and Mark. Thank you so much for coming on the show and and sharing these wonderful insights. It's really a pleasure to talk to you today. Thank you. Thank you so much, Gary. Bring your. Hey, thanks for sticking around. I had a great conversation with our administrator and Senator director here at Johnson Space Center talked to Jim, Brian Stein, and Mark Geyer they're both on Twitter so you can follow them specifically if you would like on Twitter, it's at Jim, Brian Stein for our NASA administrator and it's at director. Mark g for our Senator director here at the Johnson Space Center. There are a lot of other NASA podcasts that you can listen to Houston. We have a podcast is one of them another out at headquarters is gravity assist hosted by Dr Jim green. We have NASA in Silicon Valley out of the Ames research center and then rocket ranch out at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. You can follow us on social media NASA as a whole agency to see what we're doing. Just across all of these different areas. NASA is on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram under at NASA. You can use the hashtag, ask NASA on your favorite platform to submit an idea for this show Houston. We have a podcast just make sure to mention Houston. We have a podcast in their quest so we can. Find it. This episode was recorded on August twenty third twenty eighteen. Thanks to Alex Perryman Johnstone Pat Ryan. James Hartsfield Dylan Mathis and David bolt. Thanks to Matt Ryden and Johnny brick at necessa- quarters for helping this to come together. Thanks to Stephanie Custodio here at the Johnson Space Center also. And also thanks again to NASA administrator. Jim Breitenstein and Johnson Space Center director Mark Geyer for taking the time to come on the show. We'll be back next week..

NASA NASA administrator Johnson Space Center Jim Breitenstein Mark Geyer Twitter director Kennedy Space Center Houston Dr Jim green Ames research center Brian Stein Gary James Hartsfield Dylan Mathis Mark g administrator Alex Perryman Johnstone Senator Stephanie Custodio
"nasa administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"I'm sure you know this like right now in the United States, the average person who lives who lives in Oklahoma, the average person gets thirteen minutes of lead time on a tornado, right? That's not very much. Yes, not. And when you think about the fact that that's the average and has an improvement from what it used to be, but still probably not enough. It's absolutely not enough, especially if the average thirteen minutes that means half the people are getting less than less team that absolutely. And so you know, you think about the person's getting five or ten minutes of lead time and maybe they're not. They don't have the TV on or they're in a part of Oklahoma where they don't have sirens, you know the the, it, it, it becomes a very serious threat to their lives, and we should be well past that we should be giving. People over an hour of lead time based on technology that already exists. We just need to feel it. And part of fielding requires us to do these observations system simulation experiments. And so we put that in the Bill as well. What are we? What is your home? Sorry, I wanted to pick up for you. Move on the woods, your thought on some out there in our community and in the social sciences community that say that one hour lead time or too much lead time actually also has its problems too, because people be maybe let their guard down a bit too much. I'm curious about your thoughts on that. I think that is absolutely wrong. I mean, I can't tell you how wrong that hit. I'm gonna tell you from personal experience, more lead time is better. We have to understand people are smart. If people know an hour ahead of time, then they're going to do the right thing. And if they don't do the right thing, at least it's not because they didn't know. Right. And and and so we have an obligation to increase lead time, but you're absolutely right. I heard people tell me when I was a member of congress that we don't want to give people too much lead time because then they might play a video. Game and not and not move out of the way or might not take cover. And you know, I think that that is that is social experimentation that we don't wanna play. We want to give people the information they need and then allow them to make good decisions. Now, if they're not making good decisions, we can do things to increase, you know, their their decision making capacity if necessary. We can warn them as to, you know what the end result is. If they don't do the precautions that they're being told that they need to take. But but the last thing we want to do is restrict their information because they're not smart enough to make the right decision. While I wanted to just whether geeks of your listeners, how many NASA administrators, congressman. Have you heard talking about Mexico models and data assimilation and Aussie's clearly a NASA administrator in person and understands our community. So it's a pleasure to be to have the administrator on whether geeks I want to shift back around to the NASA wh. World now and kind of transition because NASA desert sciences. I again, I was a scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight center for twelve years involved in the global precipitation measurement or GPS mission. What would you say about Nasr's role in studying planet earth? Because there's some that say, will wise NASA doing that? Why is it? No. Are US GS doing that? What? What's your response to people that say that? So that's in Nasr's mission set, and it always has been and always will be. I mean, there's still so much. We don't know about our own planet and it's changing all the time. You know when I was a member of the house representatives. You're right. Some people suggested that I was a climate denier I, I heard that and and you know, all that stems from speech that I gave back in, oh, it was two thousand thirteen. In fact, it was after the Moore tornado, I, I had all these folks Twenty-one. Kids get killed in a tornado in Moore, Okla. Homa not just kids..

NASA Oklahoma NASA administrator Nasr NASA Goddard Space Flight cent United States Moore Bill congress congressman Mexico scientist thirteen minutes twelve years ten minutes one hour
"nasa administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"We're excited to welcome Yuli confirm NASA administrator, Jim Breitenstein, Jim hails from Tulsa Oklahoma, where he became all too familiar with extreme weather. So he understands the importance of improving our forecast capabilities will discuss the major piece of legislation. He helped past port expansion of weather research and forecasting. Plus we'll hear about the Evelyn of his on climate change and how the work at NASA can further our understanding of its impact. If that's not enough, we'll also get Jim dots on the future space exploration could include a visit to Mars. It's all next on the weather Deeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall shepherd from the university of Georgia. Thank you for joining us. Well, thank you for having me. It's good to be here. I want to jump right in with some science because NASA just launched a. Really interesting mission. The types the sun. Why is that important? And why? Why should all Americans be excited about that? And why is it important for us as citizens? That's a great question, and it's an important one. And a lot of people don't realize just in fact how important it is. So when you think about the sun, the sun actually creates what we call solar wind. So the sun is actually very responsible for what we call space weather. And of course, people are familiar with solar flares. Some people are maybe not so familiar with what's called a coronal mass ejection. So what happens is inside the sun, you know, it's, it's a nuclear fusion going on inside the sun hydrogen fusion, and from that charged particles are released. And of course, in some cases, they're released in the form of a solar flare, which means you got charged particles moving at a at a high rate of speed and another cases you can have. It's called a coronal mass ejection, which means there's a whole lot of charged particles moving at, you know, at a very, very rapid speed, almost the speed of light if you will. And so in this particular case, what happens is the the, the, the solar radiation, the radiation that comes from the sun can be very damaging not only to humans and other words astronauts that could be in deep, split deep space or could be on the international space station and lower orbit, but also very damaging for our our satellites. So when you think about how important the satellites are to to to to us as a civilization, the way we predict whether the way we understand climate the way we do disaster relief and national security, the way we do communications, we've got, you know, an entire architecture in geostationary orbit for over the horizon communications. Fact, many of your viewers might be listening to this on a on a podcast. They might download it on the internet. They could have internet from space. They could be getting it. You know, from from that architecture for communications in in geostationary orbit, the way we do navigation. When you think about GPS and how important that GPS timing signal is all of these satellites and that that GPS timing signals important for banking, it's important for regulating flows on the power grid and a whole host of other infrastructure, critical pieces of infrastructure for the United States and for the world. So all of these things are dependent on space, and when we have a coronal mass ejection, those things all be, they can all be put at risk. In fact, they could ultimately go away. They could be permanently damaged. And of course it's not just that. But you know if the lights go out on earth or our cell phones, quit working things get really ugly, really quickly as. Ashley, if they don't come back very fast. So what the what Parker solar probe is doing. It's going to help us understand how the sun works so that we can better predict those solar flares and those coronal mass ojection ze. Yeah, this is important stuff. When you hear the term space weather when I often mentioned it to people, I think they think, oh, a thunderstorm on Mars or something..

Jim NASA Dr Marshall shepherd NASA administrator Jim dots Tulsa Oklahoma Jim Breitenstein United States Ashley university of Georgia
"nasa administrator" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:53 min | 3 years ago

"nasa administrator" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"But who cares We need to. Do it all and but we've got a we've got a I like, being the guy at the head of the. Table I liked the US being the, the person at the head, of the table and. If you're not there inviting other people to come, along with you you're not at. The head of the table and when we. Talk, about other nations whether they're, adversaries or whatever Jim hinted this, we provided for the world and internet set of international docking. Standard so anybody. Who wants to go to the international space station or anything else in space. Today can use the international docking. Standards that he made available that's, anybody and they're available you, can go online, and get up I mean it's not secret it's not private. It's not anything and it says you Bill your spacecraft by these standards you. Can probably qualify to to doctor the international space station I want him, I want him docking on a US led. Place rather than somebody else's place it's, just kinda one little thing Charles Bolden. NASA administrator to nine through seventeen necessary brands I wanna go to you with. A I'm Jim okay all right Same. Question from the audience here this is, a tough. One. Get ready What's your view of repealing. The law that. Prohibits meaningful China US cooperation in. Space exploration and science so. It's interesting I don't know that it would necessarily require a repeal because it's done an appropriation Bill annually it's the wolf amendment. And. So you just? Don't have to put it in the next CJ has, appropriations Bill if I'm thinking about it right. Is that right Let me ask a question here because I. I appreciate the question the prohibition is not against collaboration in science the prohibition, against collaboration in human space correct because, you know we work, cooperatively and 'aeronautics and your traffic management. And science and geodetic and global characterization of glaciers and all kinds of stuff that was the last thing to congressman wolf did before he left the congress was he softened the language and said come. To the congress let us know what you wanna do tell us who's going to be there by name and guaranteed. Through all the intelligence, agencies that you're not gonna have any bad actors at the table mainly for human rights violations that was his passion. And. So I know That's exactly right In fact we just sent a letter over to congress indicating that I'm going to be meeting with some Chinese space folks over at, ACC. In Bremen Germany and, so so yeah we're going to have that dialogue because, as Charlie said we do. Have partnerships already The challenges going forward There's there's of course the law that, we have to follow. Which is critically important and then there's also a whole host of other challenges that we have with China to include the. Theft of intellectual property, and as Charlie mentioned human rights challenges and a whole. Host of other things and so the certainly to the extent that a deal can be hatched that ultimately puts other. Things on the table if it enables NASA to partner with China in a way that doesn't ultimately challenge our own national security than than I. Would be for that but I think that deal is going to be well above my pay grade And it would include things that could it could include direct ascent anti-satellite. Missiles it could include the air defense identification zone over the Senkaku islands it could include building islands in the South China Sea all of these. Things are outside the realm of the NASA administrator and I'm thrilled about that Yeah but, but I would imagine that You know, to to the extent that it changes it would be it would be. Inclusive of, a, number of other things so Oh. Okay Sean Charlie if you want to chime, in your what are? Your thoughts and should we be trying to cooperate more with China on human spaceflight and particularly plans going back to? The moon should we try to bring them in as a partner going? To, have Inhabitable in part? Because you've already created an open source system as it is Sean O'Keefe And he capacity right now you. Can research online and don't have to break through. Anything right there on, the NASA website you can find out all manner of different things what kind of characteristics..

China Sean Charlie Jim US NASA administrator NASA Sean O'Keefe congress Charles Bolden Senkaku islands South China Sea partner congressman wolf Bremen Germany Theft