37 Burst results for "Nasa"

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

00:35 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Innovation Now

"You stories behind the ideas that shape our future. Spacesuits protect astronauts from harsh environments beyond earth. Although more advanced than the suits worn by Apollo astronauts, today suits are still cumbersome and often uncomfortable. Now a project funded by NASA innovative advanced concepts or niac program is looking to develop a unique futuristic space suit concept. The smart suit is more than just a novel suit. It is an entire spacesuit intelligent architecture, specifically designed for EVAs or operations outside a spacecraft on planetary surfaces like Mars. A full body soft robotic layer within the gas pressure I suit increases mobility and dexterity while reducing spacesuit fit injuries, fatigue and discomfort. An outer layer made up of a flexible self healing skin is embedded with soft transparent sensors that display information about the suit to the wearer, and provide feedback about the surrounding environment. While not all niac funded early stage developments become part of actual NASA missions, the smart suits certainly has the potential to create breakthrough technologies for future astronaut gear. For innovation now, I'm Jennifer pulley. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace. Through collaboration with NASA..

Nasa Jennifer Pulley National Institute Of Aerospac
Powerful Memories (MM #3912)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 21 hrs ago

Powerful Memories (MM #3912)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. We all have people places things that provide powerful memories for us throughout our lives. It could be something so simple as the birth of a child, or it could be visiting a place like the Grand Canyon that you just look at its majesty and are just in awe of what can happen throughout nature. But one of the most powerful memories for me in my life wasn't something I was expecting to be powerful. It was visiting the USS Arizona memorial. The Pearl Harbor memorial, if you will, back about 20 years ago. Hard to believe it's been 80 years today, since we were bombarded by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor and our world changed, we entered World War II, and of course, well, you know the history. I was on vacation Hawaii, going to go to the Pro Bowl, could enjoy the beach and decided just to go to the memorial. And to be honest with you, I could have spent 6 8 hours there. Just watching and reading and learning and just staring into the water above the USS Arizona and hearing the lapping of the water during the lapping of the waves and just looking at that little oil bubbling still from that ship 80 years later. Truly one of the most powerful memories of my life.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Uss Arizona Memorial Nasa Grand Canyon Pearl Harbor Hawaii Arizona
Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Kottke Ride Home

Kottke Ride Home

01:16 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "nasa" discussed on Kottke Ride Home

"Speaking of telescopes, that's another thing that starship could do, launch telescopes better. Right now, huge telescopes like the upcoming James Webb space telescope have to be folded up, which is an endlessly complicated and error prone process. With starship, no folding would be required. There's also an idea from Philip lubin a physicist from the University of California Santa Barbara that starship could be used to break up an asteroid to prevent it from hitting earth. Quote, such a mission could carry enough explosives to rip apart an asteroid as large as the ten kilometer wide rock that wiped out the dinosaurs. It's fragments would harmlessly burn up in the atmosphere before it had a chance to reach our planet. There are tons of ideas being thrown around right now. But first, starship has a complete its first full rocket launch, booster, and all. If all goes well there, starship could go to Mars for a test flight as early as 2024, and maybe take some NASA probes back there in 2026. And of course, the lunar lander version of starship will be landing the first woman on the moon in 2024, or more likely 2025 or later. But speaking of which NASA just yesterday announced ten new astronaut candidates who are joining what the agency is now calling the Artemis generation, they join 18 others who are announced a year ago and a few of them may end up being the first ones to walk on the moon.

Philip Lubin James Webb Santa Barbara University Of California Nasa
Powerful Memories (MM #3912)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 21 hrs ago

Powerful Memories (MM #3912)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. We all have people places things that provide powerful memories for us throughout our lives. It could be something so simple as the birth of a child, or it could be visiting a place like the Grand Canyon that you just look at its majesty and are just in awe of what can happen throughout nature. But one of the most powerful memories for me in my life wasn't something I was expecting to be powerful. It was visiting the USS Arizona memorial. The Pearl Harbor memorial, if you will, back about 20 years ago. Hard to believe it's been 80 years today, since we were bombarded by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor and our world changed, we entered World War II, and of course, well, you know the history. I was on vacation Hawaii, going to go to the Pro Bowl, could enjoy the beach and decided just to go to the memorial. And to be honest with you, I could have spent 6 8 hours there. Just watching and reading and learning and just staring into the water above the USS Arizona and hearing the lapping of the water during the lapping of the waves and just looking at that little oil bubbling still from that ship 80 years later. Truly one of the most powerful memories of my life.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Uss Arizona Memorial Nasa Grand Canyon Pearl Harbor Hawaii Arizona
Brian Stelter Hosts Panel Asking if CNN Has Lost Trust With the Public

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:53 min | 1 d ago

Brian Stelter Hosts Panel Asking if CNN Has Lost Trust With the Public

"This is Brian stelter. Asking if CNN has lost the trust of American. Now let that question for just a moment. They're sitting there looking at each other saying, have we lost the trust of the American people? Check this out. Ultimately, this is about trusted media, as Sarah was referring to. Trusted media has CNN lost trust as a result of this Arabic. Well, you know, I don't know. That's hard to say if CNN has lost trust. I think this really Brian goes to the heart. And Sarah's right, these relationships are out there. People know about them. And it is one of the things that makes people not wary. They don't trust the press because they think it's elites dealing with elites taking care of elites. We say we're watchdogs, but we watch some people harder than we watch other people. They're our Friends. There were relationships. There are people trying to court favor with powerful people for information. Here's the problem. We've really lost sense of media ethics. In our profession, especially in the last few years, you have to ask yourself first, and this is the mistake that Chris Cuomo made and in some sense, I think CNN made this same mistake and not forcing him NASA's. Who do you work for? Who do you serve? Obviously, you serve and you work for your employer, or you don't get a check. But beyond that, who are you talking to? You should be serving the public. That oftentimes put you at odds with people in power. I mean, it's just, I could take the ten seconds, the just the ultimately has CNN lost trust as a result of this, well, duh.

CNN Brian Stelter Sarah Chris Cuomo Brian Nasa
Hold On To History (MM #3911)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Hold On To History (MM #3911)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, having worked in the round country music for the last 40 odd years, I've come to appreciate history, understanding where we've come from to get to where we are today. The country music of today doesn't even come close to resembling the country music of yesterday, let alone when I started in it back in the late 70s, early 80s. Back then, the group Alabama now the most successful country band of all times was considered two rock and roll. Nobody thought they were country. Grand old opry singer, Stonewall Jackson passed away a couple of nights ago. He was 89, that most people couldn't name a couple of Stonewall Jackson hits. Maybe Waterloo, if you're a big fan, but the bottom line is, people like Stonewall Jackson need to be remembered, need to be admired. We don't hold on to history enough, because people complain about that in Nashville, the new Nashville. They're tearing down old buildings and trying to pretend the past didn't exist, something we need to think about in our world today. If we hold on to our history just a little bit on our history just a little bit, perhaps we'll be more appreciative when things change and we look for ways to improve things, or maybe just make them different

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Stonewall Jackson Nasa Alabama Nashville Waterloo
Hold On To History (MM #3911)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Hold On To History (MM #3911)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, having worked in the round country music for the last 40 odd years, I've come to appreciate history, understanding where we've come from to get to where we are today. The country music of today doesn't even come close to resembling the country music of yesterday, let alone when I started in it back in the late 70s, early 80s. Back then, the group Alabama now the most successful country band of all times was considered two rock and roll. Nobody thought they were country. Grand old opry singer, Stonewall Jackson passed away a couple of nights ago. He was 89, that most people couldn't name a couple of Stonewall Jackson hits. Maybe Waterloo, if you're a big fan, but the bottom line is, people like Stonewall Jackson need to be remembered, need to be admired. We don't hold on to history enough, because people complain about that in Nashville, the new Nashville. They're tearing down old buildings and trying to pretend the past didn't exist, something we need to think about in our world today. If we hold on to our history just a little bit on our history just a little bit, perhaps we'll be more appreciative when things change and we look for ways to improve things, or maybe just make them different

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Stonewall Jackson Nasa Alabama Nashville Waterloo
Mini Corn Dogs (MM #3910)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Mini Corn Dogs (MM #3910)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I spent the holidays with my nieces and nephews, and we went to eat one night and what did they all have? Mini corn dogs. And I got a smile. I like corn dogs, but I don't like the mini ones quite as much. And I don't know why that is. It's a different consistency to me that there's a different breading on it. It's just something different, so I just kind of snickered and enjoyed their time with their mini corn dogs. And I wondered what made them think about many corndogs. Why did they see those and choose those? When they all seem to be chicken fingers and chicken tenders people. What did I notice the other day? The next day when I came home I was looking through some old Facebook stories or some Instagram stories or one of those things and I had a picture of one of my nephews from four or 5 years ago, eating mini corn dogs. I didn't realize many corn dogs were a thing for kids. In fact, we didn't have many corn dogs when I was a kid. I liked the big sized version. Now I've had a few corn dogs over the last half a dozen years or so and they're just not as good as they used to be. And it's not me that doesn't like it as much. It's something they're doing differently. Something has changed, and it's not the kids, and it's not me. It's the product. Mini corn dogs know, give me the big thing. I'd rather have that any day of the week.

Kevin Mason Nasa Facebook
Mini Corn Dogs (MM #3910)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Mini Corn Dogs (MM #3910)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I spent the holidays with my nieces and nephews, and we went to eat one night and what did they all have? Mini corn dogs. And I got a smile. I like corn dogs, but I don't like the mini ones quite as much. And I don't know why that is. It's a different consistency to me that there's a different breading on it. It's just something different, so I just kind of snickered and enjoyed their time with their mini corn dogs. And I wondered what made them think about many corndogs. Why did they see those and choose those? When they all seem to be chicken fingers and chicken tenders people. What did I notice the other day? The next day when I came home I was looking through some old Facebook stories or some Instagram stories or one of those things and I had a picture of one of my nephews from four or 5 years ago, eating mini corn dogs. I didn't realize many corn dogs were a thing for kids. In fact, we didn't have many corn dogs when I was a kid. I liked the big sized version. Now I've had a few corn dogs over the last half a dozen years or so and they're just not as good as they used to be. And it's not me that doesn't like it as much. It's something they're doing differently. Something has changed, and it's not the kids, and it's not me. It's the product. Mini corn dogs know, give me the big thing. I'd rather have that any day of the week.

Kevin Mason Nasa Facebook
Reruns (MM #3909)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 d ago

Reruns (MM #3909)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Way back in the days when we only had three TV channels, we used to have to deal with reruns come the holiday season. They only make so many shows each year, so interspersed throughout the year they'd have repeat episodes, and we hated those because we didn't know what to watch then. Our favorite show wasn't on them. We'd already seen that episode so why watch again? Well, I don't know if you've paid attention to network TV these days, but we don't have as many reruns anymore. They basically cram two shows into a period. So a Thursday at 7 p.m. show or Thursday at 8 p.m. shut runs, a partial season, and then they have a new Thursday at 7 or 8 p.m. show. That means no reruns. But the problem, you used to one thing and then have to switch and change to something else. It changes your viewing habits, multiple times a year. I'll be honest, I don't watch as much TV, and what do I watch when I do? Well, I watch reruns. Yeah, I watched streamed shows of all the old favorites I used to watch and things like Seinfeld, things like Friends, things like The Big Bang Theory, all those comedies, and what are you watching? Reruns. I remember when we just hit three choices, it was much simpler, even though much more boring at times.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Seinfeld
Reruns (MM #3909)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 d ago

Reruns (MM #3909)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Way back in the days when we only had three TV channels, we used to have to deal with reruns come the holiday season. They only make so many shows each year, so interspersed throughout the year they'd have repeat episodes, and we hated those because we didn't know what to watch then. Our favorite show wasn't on them. We'd already seen that episode so why watch again? Well, I don't know if you've paid attention to network TV these days, but we don't have as many reruns anymore. They basically cram two shows into a period. So a Thursday at 7 p.m. show or Thursday at 8 p.m. shut runs, a partial season, and then they have a new Thursday at 7 or 8 p.m. show. That means no reruns. But the problem, you used to one thing and then have to switch and change to something else. It changes your viewing habits, multiple times a year. I'll be honest, I don't watch as much TV, and what do I watch when I do? Well, I watch reruns. Yeah, I watched streamed shows of all the old favorites I used to watch and things like Seinfeld, things like Friends, things like The Big Bang Theory, all those comedies, and what are you watching? Reruns. I remember when we just hit three choices, it was much simpler, even though much more boring at times.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Seinfeld
Trauma Dumping (MM #3908)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 d ago

Trauma Dumping (MM #3908)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason yesterday I was talking about oversharing on social media. And then of course, late last night, a story pops up on the Internet because you know it's listening, talking about not only oversharing, but a new phenomenon called trauma dumping. After you've had a tough day at work or had a bad day or had a fight with your spouse or something like that, people turn to friends to offload their frustrations and their anger. But that becomes problematic when they dump it on places like Facebook because they're bringing people into their business as I said their oversharing, but oversharing to horrible extremes. And what happens is what we're seeing in the world today, where people tend to act in extreme ways, and because they're looking for people to feed them to tell them they're right. It becomes problematic when people start actually acting out of those things in real life. The reality is there's a lot going on, whether it's in family, whether it's with friends that doesn't need to be shared with many people, let alone your entire social media follower or friend list. It's kind of scary to think that maybe part of the problem of what's going on in our world today.

Kevin Mason Nasa Facebook
Trauma Dumping (MM #3908)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 d ago

Trauma Dumping (MM #3908)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason yesterday I was talking about oversharing on social media. And then of course, late last night, a story pops up on the Internet because you know it's listening, talking about not only oversharing, but a new phenomenon called trauma dumping. After you've had a tough day at work or had a bad day or had a fight with your spouse or something like that, people turn to friends to offload their frustrations and their anger. But that becomes problematic when they dump it on places like Facebook because they're bringing people into their business as I said their oversharing, but oversharing to horrible extremes. And what happens is what we're seeing in the world today, where people tend to act in extreme ways, and because they're looking for people to feed them to tell them they're right. It becomes problematic when people start actually acting out of those things in real life. The reality is there's a lot going on, whether it's in family, whether it's with friends that doesn't need to be shared with many people, let alone your entire social media follower or friend list. It's kind of scary to think that maybe part of the problem of what's going on in our world today.

Kevin Mason Nasa Facebook
Oversharing (MM #3907)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 d ago

Oversharing (MM #3907)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, as you know, I've spent a lot of my life now 15 years plus on social media. I spend a lot of time reading and learning and listening. But one thing I've noticed here in the last couple of years and it's really starting to increase now is the amount of oversharing people do, how they bring you into their lives, more than what a casual acquaintance would. The reality is, we're not really necessarily Friends, even though we're friends on Facebook. I'm not sure I've got family members on Facebook, and they're more than Friends, they're family. And I've got friends. But then you've got people who you've connected with, whether you've met them at a conference, whether you've worked with them in the past or whether you've just connected with them somehow through the Internet, that share a whole lot about who they are about what's going on in their life and things that they probably wouldn't share in person if you were just a casual acquaintance. So sharing a lot over sharing perhaps, I wouldn't say it's concerning, but it's concerning. Why do you feel the need to share those things with people who aren't really that close to you? Is it a cry for help? Makes me wonder

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Facebook
Oversharing (MM #3907)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 d ago

Oversharing (MM #3907)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason, as you know, I've spent a lot of my life now 15 years plus on social media. I spend a lot of time reading and learning and listening. But one thing I've noticed here in the last couple of years and it's really starting to increase now is the amount of oversharing people do, how they bring you into their lives, more than what a casual acquaintance would. The reality is, we're not really necessarily Friends, even though we're friends on Facebook. I'm not sure I've got family members on Facebook, and they're more than Friends, they're family. And I've got friends. But then you've got people who you've connected with, whether you've met them at a conference, whether you've worked with them in the past or whether you've just connected with them somehow through the Internet, that share a whole lot about who they are about what's going on in their life and things that they probably wouldn't share in person if you were just a casual acquaintance. So sharing a lot over sharing perhaps, I wouldn't say it's concerning, but it's concerning. Why do you feel the need to share those things with people who aren't really that close to you? Is it a cry for help? Makes me wonder

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Facebook
No Worries (MM #3906)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 6 d ago

No Worries (MM #3906)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Yes, they was talking about how Gen Z and millennials don't like to use the phrase. You're welcome. They prefer no problem or no worries. I've always used no worries when somebody apologizes for something. How do you acknowledge an apology? I find myself using the phrase no worries when somebody's apologizing for something. So they're more worried about your welcome being associated with being too formal, and I've always worried that when I use the phrase no worries, I wasn't being formal enough. I wasn't acknowledging an apology in the right way. How do you recognize an apology from someone? And of course, a lot of times, hey, I'm sorry I did this or I'm sorry I made this mistake and you just reply with no worries, or at least I do. And a lot of times, let's be honest, when you apologize for something, you know it's not your fault, but it's just easier to say, hey, sorry for the confusion. Sorry about the problem. Sorry, you're doing more work or whatever it is. And I'm just the conduit. No problem. No worries. Maybe I shouldn't be using them in terms of an apology or using them now instead of you're welcome. I know I'm just so confused.

Kevin Mason Nasa Confusion
No Worries (MM #3906)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 6 d ago

No Worries (MM #3906)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Yes, they was talking about how Gen Z and millennials don't like to use the phrase. You're welcome. They prefer no problem or no worries. I've always used no worries when somebody apologizes for something. How do you acknowledge an apology? I find myself using the phrase no worries when somebody's apologizing for something. So they're more worried about your welcome being associated with being too formal, and I've always worried that when I use the phrase no worries, I wasn't being formal enough. I wasn't acknowledging an apology in the right way. How do you recognize an apology from someone? And of course, a lot of times, hey, I'm sorry I did this or I'm sorry I made this mistake and you just reply with no worries, or at least I do. And a lot of times, let's be honest, when you apologize for something, you know it's not your fault, but it's just easier to say, hey, sorry for the confusion. Sorry about the problem. Sorry, you're doing more work or whatever it is. And I'm just the conduit. No problem. No worries. Maybe I shouldn't be using them in terms of an apology or using them now instead of you're welcome. I know I'm just so confused.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Confusion
Space junk forces spacewalk delay, too risky for astronauts

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Space junk forces spacewalk delay, too risky for astronauts

"NASA NASA has has cooled cooled off off a a space space walk walk because because of of menacing menacing space space drug drug that that could could puncture puncture an an astronaut's astronaut's suit suit or or damage damage the the international international space space station station two two American American astronauts astronauts was was set set to to do do a a place place about about an an antenna antenna I I outside outside of of the the space space station station but but late late Monday Monday night night mission mission control control learned learned that that a a piece piece of of orbiting orbiting debris debris might might to to come come dangerously dangerously close close there there wasn't wasn't enough enough time time to to assess assess the the threat threat to to the the job job was was put put off off for for at at least least a a few few days days the the first first time time a a space space walk walk was was being being canceled canceled because because of of the the threat threat from from space space junk junk the the space space station station and and its its crew crew of of seven seven have have been been as as increased increased risk risk from from space space strong strong since since Russia Russia destroyed destroyed a a satellite satellite in in the the missile missile test test two two weeks weeks ago ago I'm I'm Charles Charles through through this this month month

International International Sp Nasa Russia Charles Charles
Monday Night Football (MM #3904)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Monday Night Football (MM #3904)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Back in the 1970s, when ABC created Monday Night Football, with Howard Cosell and Don Meredith and Frank Gifford, it was all the rage it was revolutionary. It changed the game of professional football. I talked a couple of months ago where I thought the game of well, not just professional football, but sports broadcasting in general changed thanks to the new mega cast that ran most Mondays on ESPN2. That's Peyton Manning and his brother Eli, basically, while hosting a party, I guess you'd say, with guests popping in and out and kind of talking about the game, we're watching the game, but it's not really the play by play, and I kind of don't know what to do with myself tonight because they're not on. They're not on every game this season. They're not hosting every game, but I found that I watch more Monday Night Football now than I ever have in my entire life. And that includes years where I had to go host Monday Night Football parties when it worked in radio. It's changed the way I watch sports. And again, I've watched more Monday Night Football this year than I have in well forever. I think it's going to change a lot of things. It'd be interesting for me to see NASCAR kind of try the same thing.

Kevin Mason Don Meredith Frank Gifford Howard Cosell Football Nasa ABC Peyton Manning Espn ELI Nascar
Monday Night Football (MM #3904)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Monday Night Football (MM #3904)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Back in the 1970s, when ABC created Monday Night Football, with Howard Cosell and Don Meredith and Frank Gifford, it was all the rage it was revolutionary. It changed the game of professional football. I talked a couple of months ago where I thought the game of well, not just professional football, but sports broadcasting in general changed thanks to the new mega cast that ran most Mondays on ESPN2. That's Peyton Manning and his brother Eli, basically, while hosting a party, I guess you'd say, with guests popping in and out and kind of talking about the game, we're watching the game, but it's not really the play by play, and I kind of don't know what to do with myself tonight because they're not on. They're not on every game this season. They're not hosting every game, but I found that I watch more Monday Night Football now than I ever have in my entire life. And that includes years where I had to go host Monday Night Football parties when it worked in radio. It's changed the way I watch sports. And again, I've watched more Monday Night Football this year than I have in well forever. I think it's going to change a lot of things. It'd be interesting for me to see NASCAR kind of try the same thing.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Don Meredith Frank Gifford Howard Cosell Football Nasa ABC Peyton Manning Espn ELI Nascar
"nasa" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:16 min | Last month

"nasa" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"A lot of NASA's work has to do with what happens here on earth, especially as we work to track and respond to the climate crisis. And at NASA's earth sciences division, much of the data collected by future missions will be stored in the cloud, hosted by Amazon. That's partly because the agency needs more, well, space. It has troves of images and readings from generations of satellites. The earth science archive currently stores about 40 petabytes of data in the next four years as it launches more missions focused on the earth and its climate, it's expected to generate more than 5 times that. For those not familiar with the petabyte, just one is enough space to store about 250,000 full length movies. Kevin Murphy is the chief science data officer for NASA. He says it may be more expensive to store data in the cloud, but it should make the data easier to access, and for researchers, businesses and maybe you and me to use. So, you know, we launch missions to address very specific science questions. So that's one type of user. But this information is freely and openly available for anybody to use to conduct citizen science activities to help plan how we work within the environment, how we make new discoveries on Mars or from the sun. So, you know, that information has so many other purposes that we need to make it broadly available. Part of this is you're moving a lot of NASA's data from various physical locations that are run and controlled by NASA and universities into the cloud. Why are you doing that? And we're doing that for a variety of different reasons. One, you know, we can take advantage of new types of technologies like AI or machine learning. And those environments a bit more easily. The second thing is that we can, especially with these very large amounts of data, remove some of the burden from the users of having to download the information and then you and kind of organize and manage it themselves. If you think about how hard it is to find photos in your photo album about specific events or activities, we can apply similar types of AI to do similarity searches for interesting events in this giant pile of data. So I want to try to help people wrap their heads around this by having you walk me through the sort of data story of a mission. And I was looking at this specific example of the S.W.A.T. program surface, water, and ocean topography. So can you tell me about that mission? And the type and scale of data you expected to generate. So this is going to be one of the first missions that we have that's really able to kind of look at large rivers and lakes and map those over time to see how they change. So it's going to be really important for a variety of different things that actually impact people on a pretty regular basis. And this is going to be one of the first satellite data streams that we have that are really cloud native. And this will allow people to access this the multiple petabytes that it collects each year in a much more interactive way. For people who don't necessarily spend a lot of time thinking about data and petabytes and how much NASA's collating and figuring out how to sort through what do you think is the most important thing for them to know about the work that you do? The most important thing to know is that these investments that we place in scientific instruments and satellites and rovers the data that come back from there is incredibly valuable. There are things that we don't know today about the information that we collected before. And through kind of well managed data programs, we can maintain that information for future generations to make their own discoveries. Kevin Murphy is the chief science data officer for NASA. In fact, he's the agency's very.

NASA earth sciences division Kevin Murphy Amazon
"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:52 min | 4 months ago

"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"But we believe that that has happened and in fact some scientists think even the neptune and uranus used to be the other way round. The neptune was was closer to the some so if there was another planet that is the probably the the origin of why iranians titova if there was some kind of gravitational interaction between the two and the most extreme gravitational interaction is a collision. So what happened to the other planet while always question is a great one. It almost certainly has been injected from the solar system We would probably never be able to identify. There are rogue planets out there that have been discovered but one of the theories for their origin is that they've been knocked out of a solar system somewhere but deciding whether one of the ones that's been found is anything to do with us is. It is a different matter. One of the issues is so so only raise the question of whether it was on the other side of our galaxy or even in different galaxy. I think he's what he said. Yeah the other side of the galaxy or even in other galaxies and the answer to that is almost certainly know comes about because the scale of the galaxy a so much bigger than the sky love our solar system when we think of planets. We're always thinking in millions or billions of killa maces and that is nothing on the scale of a galaxy a and they. They log all the analogy. Iowa's draw on it's just so mind-blowing is if you imagine a diagram of all galaxy map of the galaxy but instead of being on a piece of paper or something it is the size of the earth. Okay you've got a map of our galaxy. The size of the earth on that scale. The separation of the earth and the sun is one millimeter. So that just tells you so. Think of one millimetre on this Compared with the size of the earth. That's telling you just how much bigger galaxies than solar systems. So even if you know four point six billion years ago This planet got kicked out of the solar system. It won't be that far away on on the scale of a galaxy. It's still around somewhere announced or he comes to curve ball. Could it be planet nine. Who knows that's a really good question. planet nine still hypothesized as being this very distant objects that is in a curiously long gated obeys. Yes it's possible And that's underlining what. I've just said it's not gone very far. Still a now someone system i think Planet nine is proving extremely elusive. We really don't know whether it's there or not Some scientists have come to the party and said there's no need to theorize that there's a planet nine because it's these allegations of of the orbits of distant icy asteroids. Basically illusory is just because we're not saying all of them so it's still in the melting pot italian and i'm sure you will revisit pundit nine at sometime in the future whether it's through mentioned it for long times so i thought i'd better. It came to mind with respect to always question..

Iowa
"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

05:52 min | 4 months ago

"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts

"But we believe that that has happened and in fact some scientists think even the neptune and uranus used to be the other way round. The neptune was was closer to the some so if there was another planet that is the probably the the origin of why iranians titova if there was some kind of gravitational interaction between the two and the most extreme gravitational interaction is a collision. So what happened to the other planet while always question is a great one. It almost certainly has been injected from the solar system We would probably never be able to identify. There are rogue planets out there that have been discovered but one of the theories for their origin is that they've been knocked out of a solar system somewhere but deciding whether one of the ones that's been found is anything to do with us is. It is a different matter. One of the issues is so so only raise the question of whether it was on the other side of our galaxy or even in different galaxy. I think he's what he said. Yeah the other side of the galaxy or even in other galaxies and the answer to that is almost certainly know comes about because the scale of the galaxy a so much bigger than the sky love our solar system when we think of planets. We're always thinking in millions or billions of killa maces and that is nothing on the scale of a galaxy a and they. They log all the analogy. Iowa's draw on it's just so mind-blowing is if you imagine a diagram of all galaxy map of the galaxy but instead of being on a piece of paper or something it is the size of the earth. Okay you've got a map of our galaxy. The size of the earth on that scale. The separation of the earth and the sun is one millimeter. So that just tells you so. Think of one millimetre on this Compared with the size of the earth. That's telling you just how much bigger galaxies than solar systems. So even if you know four point six billion years ago This planet got kicked out of the solar system. It won't be that far away on on the scale of a galaxy. It's still round somewhere announced or he comes to curve ball. Could it be planet nine. Who knows that's a really good question. planet nine still hypothesized as being this very distant objects that is in a curiously long gated obeys. Yes it's possible And that's underlining what. I've just said it's not gone very far. Still a now someone system i think Planet nine is proving extremely elusive. We really don't know whether it's there or not Some scientists have come to the party and said there's no need to theorize that there's a planet nine because it's these allegations of of the orbits of distant icy asteroids. Basically illusory is just because we're not saying all of them so it's still in the melting pot italian and i'm sure you will revisit pundit nine at sometime in the future whether it's through mentioned it for long times so i thought i'd better. It came to mind with respect to always question..

Iowa
"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

05:11 min | 4 months ago

"nasa" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"My name's andrew dunkley your host and today on the program a warning from nasa that the moon is approaching sokoll that When combined with climate change not say some high tides exceeding flood thresholds and not talking the distant future. Either it's pretty soon. And the insight mission on mars has revealed clues about mas quakes and the core of the red planet. They think they've got that figured out and it's quite astounding plus audience questions. We'll hear from ali in south australia. He wants to know what not. Uranus flat on its back and with at seeing is now and matt from chattanooga is asking questions about that Recent virgin galactic flight and how they attend zero j and was it a free full or something to that effect and the whys and way for the trip so we will revisit that as usual joining me is astronomer lodge professor fred. What's hullo fred. i andrew. Good morning this morning as we record this considerable yes now. I'm going to different location today. Idea love might tell wool. It looks like it looks like a green screen for figure getting a good background. Don't tv there. Yeah it's very nice. Yeah it does doesn't it. it's yeah it's just. Somebody painted the entire office that i work in tale. It's a main. If i turn the camera showed you every wall in the place that will be that cala rather dreadful anyway. We carry on regardless now out. Fred di hey going with Look down and oscillation yet with still in isolation here thanks to going to buy a milk in the wrong show at the wrong time week. Last saturday it turned out that That particular was was a a contact point. Ten spots which means that we got ping by newsouth services new south wales and said yet. You're in isolation now may get tested twice more in fact. We've been tested three times altogether. The final wants tomorrow but out of lockdown at the weekend sorry out of isolation at the weekend however with the the the sydney is still in lockdown..

andrew dunkley nasa south australia chattanooga ali Fred di matt fred andrew new south wales sydney
"nasa" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:13 min | 4 months ago

"nasa" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"The story of nasr's birth in its evolution is tremendously profoundly inspiring right now there are so many people listening who wanted to be astronauts right when they were kids and then there are other people who chose a career a lifelong stem career. Science technology engineering math based on their early fascination with nasa star trek all the hits really quickly. it'd be like the propagandistic side of that. You know that. I talked by the. I don't want to overstate. I mean these are all very aspirational american goals. That did inspire young minds and get people into stem. when maybe it wouldn't have otherwise gotten into it. So i don't wanna like cheap in the whole thing because i mean it really is an absolutely massive undertaking and the fact that we've been able to do this stuff But the kind of propaganda. We're gonna talk about i. Think a little more insidious than what. I mentioned No still hasn't been to space camp and we remember that remember is good as the movie. It is as remains leading. Somebody sent me a shirt but was way too small. I story the people from the good folks at book and at one point both sent me the shirts. Those great amazing book. It's a fantastic program. Got buddy cousins. Yeah because reading is a way to travel to your final frontier. Oh wow more you know. So we're accurately painting the emotive side of this. You know what i mean. And it is a truly noble endeavor but there is another side to the story of nasa. Its version that you won't hear as often at space camp or at the gift shop at the kennedy space center other agencies working for uncle..

nasr nasa kennedy space center
"nasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"nasa" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NASA with one thousand start they're trying it out in classrooms like Mary Burke Mara's in Lincoln Nebraska she helped the teens in her earth science class work with a web based interface called easy G. C. M. S. stands for global climate modelling Chandler built it so anyone could operate and understands the complicated modeling process what do you think money is right with the snow and ice cover and you know it's more than a thousand Lincoln public schools students have used the program over the last three years Mara says there's no agenda other than asking students to reach their own conclusions it's more of a geo inquiry process were rather than just kind of being given the information they notice wonder and start driving the wrong questions Morrow who's been teaching climate change for the past decade previously had to develop our own lessons as she went along she says her students respond much better to hands on projects like easy G. CM allows the students to do things that are like way above the capacity of like a normal classroom so it's really exciting the team developing the climate modelling curriculum is recruiting more Nebraska teachers for summer workshops on how to use it in their own classrooms next school year I'm so excited that you all Nebraska doing this this is so exciting Andres Enriquez is an education researcher who helped the national Research Council develop next generation science standards now being used in twenty states and I think teachers are hungry for this kind of work they're really hungry for this kind of curriculum there's just not a whole lot models out there it when the National Science Foundation grant ends next year the climate modelling curriculum being developed in Nebraska will be available for sale to classrooms anywhere in the world for NPR news I'm Becca Costello it's All Things Considered on WNYC former Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein was sentenced to twenty three years in prison today his lawyer called that obscene I am overcome with anger at that number I think that number is a Howard lead number together Weinstein was convicted last month of rape and sexual assault we will have the details coming up after news headlines it's a fifty five degrees right now in New York City expecting mostly cloudy skies overnight and said I will drop down to a lower right around forty degrees WNYC it's five thirty coronavirus and inequality were most worried at the moment about workers who are struggling to pay their bills people who maybe can't make friends are can't make their car payments if they lose a paycheck or two in the coming weeks look at the resources available for people who don't have much money during this pandemic unto our teacher of the know and that's next time on the take we do afternoons at three a ninety three point nine FM WNYC supporters include Kripalu center for yoga and health a retreat center in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts that offers tools for mind body wellness information at K. R. I. P. A. L. U. dot org W. NYC independent journalism in the public interest ninety three point nine FM ten AM eight twenty NPR news and The New York conversation live from NPR news in Culver city California nine to Wayne brown New York governor Andrew Cuomo says he will send in the National Guard to help stem the outbreak of corona virus in a suburb of New York City from member station WNYC Jake often hearts reports from.

NASA Mary Burke Mara Lincoln
"nasa" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on The Changelog

"Don't even stop <Speech_Music_Male> in space that's <Speech_Music_Male> I remember member <Speech_Male> when that happens. I was <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Music_Male> it was in second grade <Silence> when the <Speech_Music_Male> When <Speech_Music_Male> the explorer blew <Silence> up on the way <Speech_Music_Male> had not <Speech_Music_Male> been it <SpeakerChange> was such a <Speech_Male> such terrible day and and <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> Columbia <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Columbia? <Speech_Male> I can't recall. <Speech_Male> Jody might remember. It <Speech_Male> was in second grade. You <Speech_Male> probably <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> probably <Speech_Male> three. You don't know of <Speech_Music_Male> this <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> you don't know <Speech_Music_Male> how old is second <Speech_Music_Male> grade <Speech_Music_Male> Sixty seven <Speech_Music_Male> years. Old <Speech_Music_Male> Seven <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> yeah. It was it was <Silence> <Speech_Male> either <Speech_Music_Male> way all right. It was the <Speech_Male> day and we let the <Speech_Male> lucky charms. <Speech_Male> And that's right <Speech_Male> that's right sucking <Silence> my thumb. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Awesome <Speech_Male> talking to you. I mean this has has <Speech_Male> been an amazing <Speech_Male> journey <Speech_Male> for you as you mentioned <Speech_Male> earlier. Just <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> come from school to <Speech_Male> open source. <Speech_Male> That opened up a <Speech_Male> significant door to <Speech_Male> NASA. Asa <Speech_Male> In exploring <Speech_Music_Male> your career further now <Speech_Music_Male> into from a bachelor's <Speech_Male> degree to <Speech_Male> a mess of <Speech_Music_Male> science and working <Speech_Music_Male> at NASA in <Speech_Male> a mission that <Speech_Male> may very well <Speech_Male> change as <Speech_Male> the world because the intention <Speech_Male> is to go from the <Speech_Male> moon learn <Speech_Male> and then be able <Speech_Male> to take that learning and <Speech_Male> got to Mars which <Speech_Male> is what a lot <Speech_Male> of mankind is looking <Speech_Male> for in terms of <Speech_Male> future space travel avalon <Speech_Male> future <Speech_Male> opportunities to <Speech_Music_Male> do <Speech_Male> different things. There's a lot of opportunity <Speech_Male> on on Mars <Speech_Male> that is being explored <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> in a lot of hope <Silence> there for it to <Speech_Male> yeah <Speech_Male> and and <Speech_Male> I really want to drive home. <Speech_Male> You know. It's not just <Speech_Male> about I <Speech_Male> think with NASA <Speech_Male> specifically. It's not <Speech_Male> about who you <Speech_Male> know. <Speech_Male> I think anybody can contribute <Speech_Male> No <Speech_Telephony_Male> matter where you are where we <Speech_Male> come from <Speech_Male> a now more than ever. <Speech_Male> We need a lot <Speech_Male> of that. If <Speech_Male> we as a nation are GONNA <Speech_Male> make this mission <Speech_Male> a success in <Speech_Music_Male> even through the decades <Speech_Male> continue to make it a success. <Speech_Male> It's gotta be all all <Speech_Male> hands thing. This isn't <Speech_Male> some Luke <Speech_Male> project this <Speech_Male> is you know <Speech_Male> this has to come from all <Speech_Male> of us and <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> you check out the <Speech_Male> easy razor project <Speech_Male> and try to get that up <Speech_Male> and running. I think <Speech_Male> it's a good visual way to <Speech_Male> see. Certainly one <Speech_Male> of the projects <Speech_Male> that are being worked <Speech_Male> on at NASA. <Speech_Male> And see if you like it if <Speech_Male> you have an interest in robotics <Speech_Male> maybe even <Speech_Male> check out that space space <Speech_Male> robotics <Speech_Male> challenge face to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> see. If that's something you would <Speech_Male> like to participate <Speech_Male> in. It's it's free to join <Speech_Male> free <Speech_Male> to free <Speech_Male> to be a part of <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> yeah. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> The future is <Speech_Male> bright. I really <Speech_Male> liked tagline Ash. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But I <Speech_Male> think that's just because <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You know there's a lot of things <Speech_Music_Male> and AH <Speech_Male> spaces <Speech_Male> is giant. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> Discussions about <Speech_Male> space are generalists. <Speech_Male> But <Silence> it's not big enough <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> exclude <SpeakerChange> people. <Speech_Male> Anybody can try. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Is there a link to this challenge <Speech_Male> because of civil put <Speech_Male> shuts. Yeah <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> it's the centennial <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> challenge. I can certainly <Speech_Male> send <SpeakerChange> you guys the <Speech_Male> link to yes we can put <Speech_Male> in the show notes. We'll <Speech_Music_Male> do that. <Speech_Music_Male> I I agree. I think <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <hes> <Music> <Advertisement> spaces big <Music> <Advertisement> obviously <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I think it's an <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> interesting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thing to set your mind <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on because there's so many a <Music> <Advertisement> cool things seem <Music> <Advertisement>

NASA Jody NASA.
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Making space for technology development presented by science science at NASA the International Space Station or ISS is Earth's only orbiting laboratory. That's important because it not only allows us to conduct research that benefits all of us on earth it also provides the only microgravity environment in which which we can test technologies critical to our deep space exploration in the near and far term future. Here engineering models can be validated and and new technologies and systems for future missions can be demonstrated without risk to crew members. Historically the mercury program enabled the Gemini Gemini Program which in turn enabled the Apollo program through technology and systems advancements. Today the space station is giving us a similar experience. In Long Durations spacecraft operations and serving as a test bed for new technologies and upgraded vehicle systems which are enabling future missions. Dave Hornak is neces-. I assess technology demonstration research portfolio manager. He notes the ISS. Lets US demonstrate that technology algae works as intended in a spacecraft environment demonstrations on the space station inform operators and flight crews how the system operates proves interoperability interoperability with other systems and demonstrates system safety and reliability. There are many technologies and capabilities that need to be developed as as we move forward to the moon and to Mars for example researchers have recently tested a new design of solar array. That will be used on the first module for the Deep Space Gateway Our Future Space Station that will serve as a home base. For astronaut expeditions to the Moon Solar Arrays in operation. Right now need to unfold fold before becoming active. But new designs allow future solar arrays to roll out and also retract. They were tested for strength and durability on the I assess and were designed to be more compact than current rigid panels. NASA's Orion multipurpose crew vehicle is a four person exploration exploration craft designed to take astronauts farther in space than anyone has gone before it's back up navigation system uses a new technology that is optically based it captures images of the moon or earth and based on their size and angle. An Algorithm Determines Ryan's location these optics optics can't be tested on earth because our atmosphere would distort the images enough to make the algorithm inaccurate aboard the ISS however the Algorithm was confirmed to to work properly a secondary benefit is the system was tested at spacecraft speed making for a realistic navigation scenario as as people traveled deeper into Space Ville need solutions to a variety of safety challenges for instance if a fire breaks out. How fast can it grow. and spread in a micro gravity environment. NASA spacecraft fire safety or Sapphire Program has already conducted a series of experiments on three Isis. Cargo vehicles calls to measure flame growth oxygen use and combustion products results are helping to improve spacecraft fire detection response and extinguishment. Englishman's and crew protection ultimately says Hornak Technology and operations demonstrations.

International Space Station ISS NASA Dave Hornak Hornak Technology Sapphire Program portfolio manager Apollo Ryan
"nasa" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on AP News

"To NASA the St Louis post dispatch says experts use hundreds of eyewitness accounts from as far away as South Dakota and Minnesota along with two videos to calculate the information about the meteor they determine the approximately two hundred twenty pound rock travel through the sky Monday night at nearly thirty four thousand miles an hour causing a sonic boom NASA weather satellite help the agency confirm it was brighter than Venus in the sky making it a fireball the national media right environments office in Huntsville Alabama through the broken to pieces twelve miles above the ground Kentucky principal who once made headlines for trying to ban books with what he deemed inappropriate content has been indicted on child **** charges news out let's say a grand jury charged fifty four year old Phillip Todd Wilson principle of the Clark County area technical center with seventeen child **** possession and distribution charges WKYT TV reports the education department no longer employees Wilson the Lexington Herald leader says when Wilson was the principle of Montgomery County high school in two thousand nine he fought to ban books with what he labelled homosexual or otherwise inappropriate material including sex abuse and drugs the latest college football playoff committee rankings are out A. P.'s at that a cap reports the big win by Ellis you push the Tigers to the top Alice you Ohio state Clemson in Georgia make up the top four in the second edition of this season's college football playoff rankings Alice you took the top spot with the big when it Alabama will the Buckeyes led to number two Clemson in Georgia make their top four debuts after the Crimson Tide dropped to number five and Penn state fell all the way to nine that hit the lions were upset by the undefeated Minnesota golden gophers to improve nine spots and check in at number eight Oregon and Utah come in sixth and seventh well Oklahoma rounds out the top ten I'm Deni count impeachment hearing I'm to McGuire with an A. P. news minute William Taylor top U. S. diplomat to Ukraine says one of his aides heard president trump asking about Ukraine investigations well on a phone call with the US ambassador to the European Union Gordon someone trump when asked by a reporter at the White House about the call said but never heard this in any event it's more second hand information but I've never heard Taylor also told the house intelligence committee someone told him the president was pressuring Ukraine's president to order investigations of an already disprove Ukraine interference in the twenty sixteen election and Joe Biden's son hunter Biden you said the president trump wanted presents a Lynskey in a public box by making a public statement about ordering such investigations in Oakland retiree Paul Sanford says what he wants to see and what is likely to happen are two different things our bills what about our office I hope so impeach him and the victim in the Senate but I don't expect it I'm Tim McGraw AP digital news back in a moment L..

NASA St Louis two hundred twenty pound fifty four year
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"<music> shedding light on black holes presented by i science at nasa black holes is one of the most highly searched terms about our universe. There's a fascination with the idea of a region of space having a gravitational pull so strong nothing can escape. It's deadly grasp not <hes> even a sliver of light. Well not quite in fact much of what we think we know about black holes turns out to be myths myth one all black holes or black as this photograph from the event horizon telescope demonstrated light can be detected -tective near a black hole event horizon. This is the boundary between normal space and the space affected by the black holes gravity from which no escape is.

"nasa" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"The words they actually answered what can the average person do to promote space travel a you had you had great info on another show about this stuff oh thanks man appreciate that a what could ever do person do to promote space travel nasa said it's a great question if they are already aware tell people about nasa social media accounts the follow them for information about all the space program by the way yeah follow every nasa program that you like which is pretty awesome like all their social media is really cool and you could see some really cool stuff and i follow all of them in you get like i get overwhelmed by so much stuff like all this stuff on the nasa channels i follow pretty much every nasa a social media channel some kind of have a crossover some don't but there are places where you know there's basically just tons and tons of stuff sometimes it does crossover but there are tons and tons of things that go on in i might switch by stream over to my youtube channel and a second just because 'cause i wanna test it so i'm gonna stop my twitch channel so i wanna wanna test my youtuber stream to give me one second to do that ever again and then i'm gonna switch over to my youtube channel which i believe there should just works.

nasa youtube one second
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Training laser light on earth sports presented by science at nasa the international national space station or i assess is sporting a new light fixture the global ecosystem dynamics investigation or djeddai will being down laser light on earth from orbiting laboratory to reveal more about our environment in men in how it is changing nasa's jet i sense laser pulses and a tree canopies imprecise only measures the light reflected back the timing it intensity of light bounces back to jeopardize telescope will reveal the height in density of trees and vegetation and the vertical arrangement of the leaves and branches with any overall canopy doctoroff the bio jetta principal investigator at the university of maryland says this instrument will map forests in high resolution in three dimensions revolutionizing the way researchers monitor them forested areas are an important part of our planet not only do forests provided a habitat for many species end a source of raw materials heels for human news such as paper and lumber they also play a key role in earth's carbon cycle deforestation enforced degradation in addition to other types of forests disturbances such fires in insect outbreaks leader increases in atmosphere carbon dioxide forestry growth sucks that carmen back down into trees and soils knowing how forests grow and change over time can allow us to better understand the contribution and that forced me to earth carbon cycle and help people better manage this important resource djeddai is the first base born instrument designed specifically to perform sustained mapping of the spatial distribution of the carbon content content a forest the buying notes one of the most portly quantified components of the carbon cycle is the net balance between force disturbance in regrowth jet i will help scientists fill in those missing piece by revealing the vertical structure of the forest information we really can't get with sufficient accuracy any other way djeddai will provide scientists with insights into the amount of carbon stored in forest when combined current in historical record's of changes captured by earth orbiting satellites such as lance at this information will enhance the ability of researchers to identify changes happening across our planet researchers also will incorporate jeopardize his observations along with those of the eagles stress instrument on the station with daddy from other current and future earth observing sensors these data will address important questions about relationships between for structure function composition opposition in changes in carbon content combining all of these datta will allow researchers to gain an unprecedented understanding of ecosystem dynamics in the role plants and trees play in earth's global carbon cycle these

nasa principal investigator lance eagles university of maryland
"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"On the cusp of understanding. Presented by science at NASA. Constantly shielding us from the sun's high energy particles is the earth's magnetic field. Many imagine this field as a circle slightly larger than our planet. But it's actually shaped like this and near our north and south poles. There is a cusp a point where two branches of occurred. Meet it's here that the magnetic bubble that surrounds us. Dips inward, creating a funnel of magnetic lines that touch down to earth this funnel allows the sun's high energy particles to race toward our planet and deposited selves in our sphere eighty two eight hundred kilometers above earth. We can even see the result. They create beautiful Aurora similar to the spectacular displays at night, but on the day side of earth and only visible to the naked eye during the long polar night. Now, scientists who want to learn more about effects of these particles are embarking. On a special initiative that is taking place from December twenty eighteen to January twenty twenty in a coordinated effort between multiple countries to understand the physics of the polar cusp, scientists from NASA and the US as wellness from Japan, Norway, Canada and Great Britain have launched the grand challenge initiative cusp a series of sounding rocket missions. That will provide the data needed to conduct nine unprecedent. Studies of near earth space at the polar regions this series will help scientists glean answers to a number of questions about the cusp. Why is our atmosphere leaking out into space from the cusp how and why do the turbulent hot patches of dense plasma that exist inside the Aurora region? Disrupt global communications, what's the stains, strong updrafts of atmosphere gas in this region that can cause enhanced drag on our satellites as. The orbit. Doug rolling space. Scientists that NASA Goddard Space Flight center explains. The cusp is a great natural laboratory to understand how earth's atmosphere responds to Direct Energy input from the solar wind. This kind of science can be done. Nowhere else on earth, twelve sounding rockets conducting the mind missions will launch from two sites in Norway and Ilya space center and small barred rocket range, in some cases, launches will be conducted at nearly the same time from India and fall barred providing simultaneous observations at different altitudes, and latitudes. Why use rockets instead of satellites or weather balloons, Doug rolling explains rockets are ideal for taking the measurements we need. These rockets will be packed with monitoring instruments to capture information as they move upward in an arc and on the way down to they can gather up to fifty. Eighteen consecutive minutes of direct measurements from a specific region of space, and you can launch them precisely you want your rockets to fly right through the auroras just as they're going off satellites cover a lot of area. But at high speeds, they don't spend as much time making observations of any one location balloons can't be launched high enough and their location can't be controlled as precisely as rockets the new data gleaned from the grand challenge initiative. Cusp will help scientists make better space weather forecasts and give us a better understanding of the particles responsible for one of the most breathtaking sights on our planet. Take the initiative to learn more by visiting science dot NASA dot gov.

NASA Aurora Norway Goddard Space Flight center Ilya space center Doug rolling Great Britain US Canada India Japan eighty two eight hundred kilom
"nasa" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Nasa says two companies were getting close to setting real live after data to space on commercial vessels NASA. And SpaceX say they're aiming for March debut of the first crude commercial space capsule. No one will be on board for the dragons inaugural test flight to the international space station. But if all goes, well, two, astronauts, we'll take a test flight in July, astronauts have been going into space from Kazakhstan, and this would be the first launch of US astronauts into orbit from US soil since NASA shuttle program ended Boeing's also working on a star liner space capsule that might be ready for astronauts as soon as August. I'm Jennifer king. That adult at American Airlines are engaged in an airlines arms race to grab. The most affluent customers now highly profitable after losing billions in the two thousands. They're plowing money into new planes fancy seats with more legroom airport lounges and other perks. Breaking news analysis at townhall dot com. European Council president Donald twos. Because blasted those who promoted Brexit without what he described as either a sketch of a plan of how to carry it out safely, really striking language. I thought also the sense of raw the gloomy doom doom-laden view of where this is all going saying that we're going to have to step up preparations for quite the of no deal again insisting that the EU was not up for renegotiating the withdrawal agreement also bemoaning the lack of effective leadership on the remain side in Britain. That's the BBC's Norman Smith rod appears to have attempted a second satellite launch. Despite you as criticism that its space program helps it developed ballistic missiles satellite images released Thursday suggest Iran has not acknowledged conducting such a launch US alleged such launches defy a UN Security Council. Resolution more of these stories at townhall dot com. Patrick fos. Oh, hey, hey, did you hear my friends company was the victim of an Email impersonation attack? It's a serious threat to every business. What if cybercriminals target us and trick accounting into making wire transfer? Don't worry we have barracuda. So where secured bear Khuda uses artificial intelligence to detect and block spearfishing and account takeover attempts..

Nasa US Donald twos SpaceX American Airlines UN Security Council Kazakhstan Jennifer king Patrick fos EU Boeing European Council Brexit BBC president Norman Smith Iran Britain
"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Everyday is dependent on space the way, we communicate the way we navigate the way we produce food the way we produce energy the way, we do whether prediction and understand climate the way we do national security and defense the way we do disaster relief banking regulate flows of power on the on the on the the power grid. All of it is dependent on space. And and all of those capabilities are available because of a trail that was blazed by NASA. And and for the very small budget that NASA has we have enabled a a human condition that is far beyond. Anything? Anybody would have imagined agreed completely mass as one of the best invest investments that that citizens make for you know, pennies and dollars relatively speaking. As are a no the weather service and others as well. I have one more question before I do that quick update. Because I know I set to is going to be going up soon. Everything going okay with that. Yeah. We're on. We're on schedule for for ice at two. And and it's a obviously a critically important mission for the United States to understand, you know, the the these sheets of ice in the Arctic that that people are concerned about where are they going and understanding our hydrogen fear, even even better than we already do. Yeah. No. We're looking forward to that. Final question. As I mentioned earlier, I spent twelve years at NASA and one of those years, I actually did a detailed down at NASA headquarters. And so got to look at the agency from that perspective as well. In your time at NASA, so far what has surprised you most about the agency the people there. The culture. I'll tell you the raw intellect. The smart people. There are the raw. And they're like I'm working in an agency where I know that everybody here is smarter than me. And that's a that's a good thing. And and I and not only that, but they're all opinionated. And that's even better. There's there's no shortage of people here who are willing to speak their minds and tell the administrator exactly what they think the administrator needs to hear. And so that's a very positive thing for NASA and for our country. Yeah. That that's the that's it is amazing. You know in the science culture there. You know, we can disagree and challenge each other and tell people how we feel, you know, at the end of the day, we go, and, you know, share drink across or do whatever we do. That's that's what I enjoy about the science culture and particularly NASA administrator brightens now, I really wanna thank you for joining us here on the weather podcast. And we wish you continued success in your current role in for your continued service to this country. We thank you. Thank you, Dr shepherd. I appreciate it. Thank you very much. And that's the way. Geese podcast. Thank you for joining us..

NASA NASA administrator administrator United States Dr shepherd Arctic twelve years
"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"nasa" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"It's just one of many examples of how Nastase program the breadth of it is really not only exploring and understanding, but also has practical benefit for citizens, and I'm gonna come back to more of that. But I want to just reflect on you for a while. Because when your name was put in its renomination as an acid ministration as you well know because you lived it. There is a lot of back and forth about the qualified. He's the right person, by the way, I wrote in Forbes, I and I very much thought you with the right person. So I was very supportive of that nomination. And I appreciate it. You were a navy fighter pilot for ten years flying over nineteen hundred hours more than three hundred aircraft landings, flew combat missions in Iraq and Afghanistan. You also flew f eighteen Hornets, you know, trying to fight the drug war. How is all of that prepared you to, you know, be a congressman and also lead the nascent space space agency. And I thank you for your service as well. Well, thank you. I I appreciate you saying that. So you know, when you when you think about what NASA is and whatnot. So does the first a and NASA is 'aeronautics a lot of people forget about that. And aeronautics is is critically important. Not just for national security and defense. It's important for our economy. We we, you know, a lot of people don't realize when you go flying on an airliner, you are flying with NASA technology and capabilities and wing designs, and you know, the the engine designs all of those things are developed by NASA in an open. In an open source kind of way. So that industry can take advantage of it and all two million helps the United States maintain its edge technologically. And then maintain it's it's, you know, a base of exports aviation for the United States of America is an expert. In fact, it's a net. Export. In other words, we export more than we import. And so when you think about the trade imbalance and a lot of people hear the president talk about the trade imbalance. A lot aviation is just the opposite. We have a trade surplus, and and so it's an offset to that trade imbalance, although it's not big enough to offset it entirely obvious. Right. But but the all that is possible because NASA and the US government has made investments into aviation, so and 'aeronautics. So that's I think of a big a big piece of it. The other thing is a member of congress. What I found is that when you start talking about things like the architecture for communications in space, and as a member of congress being a a former warfighter myself. Self. I would I would bring up things like, you know, we need. We need commercial satellite communications to be encrypted. So that the warfighter can take advantage of it. We need those satellites to be able to frequency hop. So that so that those signals can't be jammed by the enemy in other words, we the warfighter can take advantage of commercial satellite communications for a whole host of different capabilities. And what you find is that, you know, there's not a lot of members of congress that that speak in those terms. And so it kind of put me in a position where I could be the leader on these on these space issues and over the course of time it kind of turned out that I was leading on space issues quite frequently. And then the the day came when when President Trump got elected, and I got nominated to be the NASA administrator, and so you know, you never know how these things turn out. But I do think that whether it's my military pilot experience or my time in congress it all adds up to to prepare me for this for this. Particular position. Sure sharing. You also have a triple major in business administration economics and psychology from Rice University, an MBA from Cornell. And there were critics out there that said, well, you know, he's a he's a former politician. He's a former congressman he's not a fi intas. Should he be running nasty? You know, as you mentioned earlier before we came on. I spent many years twelve years at NASA. And I remember ministers like, Sean O'Keefe and Michael Griffin and others as well. So you know, I didn't have as much of a problem with the background because we've had a variety of backgrounds. We had Charlie Bolden and astronaut the most recent..

NASA congress congressman United States President Trump NASA administrator Forbes Sean O'Keefe Charlie Bolden Hornets president Iraq Rice University America Cornell Afghanistan Michael Griffin nineteen hundred hours twelve years ten years