38 Burst results for "Napster"

"napster" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

Twenty Thousand Hertz

02:44 min | 19 hrs ago

"napster" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

"Existential threats <Speech_Female> and technological <Speech_Female> changes in <Speech_Music_Female> still manage <Speech_Music_Female> to keep going <Speech_Music_Female> albeit in a <Speech_Music_Female> much diminished capacity <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> these days. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Today <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> musicians might make <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> a fraction of a cent <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on every song streamed, <Speech_Music_Female> but <Speech_Music_Female> the number of income <Speech_Music_Female> streams has grown <Speech_Music_Female> exponentially <Speech_Music_Female> and technology <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> has allowed artists <Speech_Music_Female> to reach audiences. <Speech_Music_Female> Directly <Speech_Music_Female> Music <Speech_Female> is an art and <Speech_Music_Female> business and it <Speech_Music_Female> will never be insulated <Speech_Music_Female> from the future. <Speech_Music_Female> So without <Speech_Music_Female> I say <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> bring <SpeakerChange> it robots. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> This story came <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from the spectacular <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> podcast called <Speech_Music_Male> spectacular <Speech_Music_Male> failures <Speech_Music_Male> in each episode host <Speech_Male> Lauren Ober tackles <Speech_Male> in epic business. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> what could have been done to avoid <Speech_Music_Male> it subscribed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to spectacular <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> failures right here <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in your podcast player. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Twenty Thousand <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Hertz is produced <Speech_Male> at the studios of defacto <Speech_Male> sound. The <Speech_Male> sound is team dedicated <Speech_Music_Male> to making television <Speech_Male> film and Games <Speech_Music_Male> sound incredible <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> find out <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> more at defacto <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> sound dot com <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> spectacular <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> failures <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> as a production of American <Speech_Music_Male> public media. <Speech_Music_Male> It's written and hosted <Speech_Male> by Lauren over <Speech_Music_Male> and produced. By Whitney <Speech_Male> Jones, the shows <Speech_Male> editor is Phyllis <Speech_Male> Fletcher and David <Speech_Male> Jaw is the assistant <Speech_Male> producer. <Speech_Male> Their theme music is <Speech_Male> David Shulman <Speech_Male> and original music <Speech_Male> comes from Gin, champion <Speech_Music_Male> and Michael Cormie. <Speech_Music_Male> A Christine <Speech_Male> Lopez is <Speech_Male> their audience engagement <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> editor and Lauren <Speech_Music_Male> D as their executive <Speech_Music_Male> producer. The <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> concept is by Tracy <Speech_Male> Mumford the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> general manager of APM, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> studios is Lily <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Kim. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you have any <Speech_Male> stories about how napster <Speech_Music_Male> changed your relationship <Speech_Music_Male> with music, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you can tell us on twitter <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> facebook read <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at four by Riding High <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at twenty <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> eighth dot Org. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listening. <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Hi this is <Silence> Harry Windsor. <Speech_Male> I want <Speech_Male> to tell you about my <Speech_Male> new podcast <Speech_Male> into the zone. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> It's a show about <Speech_Music_Male> opposites <Speech_Male> how borders <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and never as clear as <Speech_Music_Male> we think. <Speech_Music_Male> I go from Berlin <Speech_Music_Male> to Paris <Speech_Music_Male> from <Speech_Male> high to Charlottesville, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> looking <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for the grey <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> areas between <Speech_Male> life and death. <Speech_Music_Male> East <Speech_Male> and West <Speech_Music_Male> Black and white. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I, mean philosophers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and pumped musicians <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> new age <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> gurus and space <Speech_Music_Male> explorers <Speech_Music_Male> and they give me <Speech_Music_Male> new insights into some <Speech_Music_Male> of the biggest issues <Speech_Music_Male> of the day <Speech_Music_Male> issues like immigration <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> privacy and cultural <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> appropriation. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to mention whether there's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> life on the mood. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Join <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> me for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> journey into <Speech_Music_Male> the borderlands. <Speech_Music_Male> One thing <Speech_Music_Male> turns into its <Speech_Music_Male> oxen. <Speech_Music_Male> Listen to <Speech_Music_Male> into the zone from Pushkin Industries wherever you get your podcasts.

Fresh update on "napster" discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

Twenty Thousand Hertz

00:17 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "napster" discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

"But WHO WOULD WANNA public domain only napster that mostly just had old classical music educational reportings and a million versions of the national anthem. The services main selling point was free access to a massive inventory of songs. So by July two, thousand, one napster was functionally done. It had settled its cases with Metallica Dr Dre and agreed to a settlement with the RIA for copyright violations. When it ended there was a feeling of disbelief in the ranks Elliott says Napster really thought the labels get on board we honestly felt like they would come around that. They're just not understanding the power of this not understanding the technology behind it they're not understanding. What they could do with this and how important this is for them and that Gosh if they shut us down. There are others and those others aren't going to be friendly we are but the labels were like now we're good. This is where the Napster story typically ends. Music Industry takes down bad boy file-sharing pioneer but a lot of napster's wounds were self inflicted Shawn Fanning uncle owns seventy percent of the company and that caused some bad vibes because it meant company executives. From CEO to the Shawn's themselves had no real power to make any business decisions. And that led to a lot of executive turnover, which is in great when you're negotiating with music's biggest power players. Still, napster unlocked a desire music lovers not only do they want access to a huge volume of songs, but they also wanted to access it whenever they wanted and for practically nothing and that meant that even when Napster failed, there would be a million other services waiting in the wings to fill the need. There's a Bob Dylan lyric doesn't take a Weatherman to know which way the wind blows it wasn't as if this wasn't obvious to everybody of the people in the record business. and. So while there furiously trying to shut down napster, they're all these napster clones popping up everywhere. And they're playing a game of whack a mole and myself and lot of people I knew were going. This is just absurd. Why don't they just own it instead of one of the by Napster, there can be no clear evidence that people want their music digital in the wake of Napster. Some is a bunch of copycat peer to peer file sharing services popped up. G-. Rockstar stream cast, lime, wire new Tele Kazaa. The list goes on. Years later they were supplanted by I tunes, which allowed users to legally buy music Allah card for dollar a song. Today the vast majority of music listening happens via some kind of streaming service. Defy Pandora or apple music. In, Twenty nineteen twenty years after Napster got off the ground. American. Stream more than one trillion thoughts in record stores. What even are those in the post napster decade more than four thousand record stores closed in the US including massive chains like tower records which shuttered in two thousand six. So well, Napster only operated for two years. It's influenced seems immeasurable. Napster cracked open the door to a world of music free of physical media and just plain free people made it clear beginning in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, seven that they were only gonNA listen to music for free many many people, millions and millions of people around the world. That we've seen with the popularity of Youtube has never changed. There is a contingent, a large percentage of people who are going to WanNa get the music for free napster caused massive upheaval in the music industry but the music industry has been reinventing itself. As long as there has been an industry is weathered.

Napster Music Industry Dr Dre Shawn Fanning Bob Dylan Youtube Wanna Elliott CEO Executive United States Apple
"napster" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

Twenty Thousand Hertz

07:04 min | 19 hrs ago

"napster" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

"Albums because they were getting them for free on napster. Revenue Stream dammed up. So the musicians fought back leading the charge was METALLICA's drummer. Lars Ulrich in July two thousand he testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee on the future of digital music in a forty eight hour period where we monitored napster over three hundred thousand users made one point four million free downloads of METALLICA's music. Napster hijacked our music without asking they never sought permission. Our catalog of music simply became available for free download on the Napster System, and this was a problem because most artist a barely earning a decent wage and need every source of revenue available to scrape by also keep in mind that the primary source of income for most songwriters is from the sale of records. Every time napster enthusiasts, downloads a song, it takes money from the pockets of all these members of the creative community. All Rick Wasn't the only musician opposed the idea of napster. Dr Dre was a vocal opponent as were Christina Aguilera Garth Brooks Bon Jovi's mclachlan Hanson Elena's Morris at and our bow out Lewis's favorite nineties band the bare naked ladies. All those folks were part of a loose group called artists against piracy. Medallion Dr. dre ultimately sued napster the metallica suit claimed that napster quote divided and distributed software whose sole purpose is to permit napster to profit by abetting and encouraging and quote Dr Dre position was even clear quote. Stealing Music But other artists like moby Henry Rollins, and perhaps most famously Chuck d felt like this was the direction music needed to head in. That's as a situation or the connection between file sharing with Cisse's. and downloadable distribution as power going back to the people I also look at this as being a situation. Where for the longest period of time? The industry had control technology. Therefore, the people were subservient to that technology. And at whatever price rains that the people would have to pay for the whole debate over Napster Crescendo in September of two thousand when Shawn Fanning appeared MTV's video music awards wearing a Metallica t shirt. He was clearly trolling the band who sat in the audience rolling their eyes meanwhile I'm sitting in my chair rolling my eyes Carson Daly's INDRO. Everyday myself smack DAB in the middle of a war between fans. I? Try. To justify hip hop pop. Alternative to mainstream and rap to. Rock. But what I do is nothing and the battle with China part of is nothing compared to the battle of this next guys fight in the last year this teenager has developed technology that has revolutionized the way we all get our music and he is here tonight, ladies and gentlemen creative Napster Shawn Fanny. Just a month after fainting paraded across the Vienna stage, he was in a courtroom dealing with a massive lawsuit filed against Napster by eighteen record companies all members of the Ria they claim the Napster Service allowed. It's twenty million plus users to violate copyright and was thus responsible for the infringement. Eileen. Richardson, says she tried to reason with the labels and make deals that would keep them alive but it was a non-starter. Hilary. Rosen was running the Ria then and she. She was on sort of the warpath meeting with all the artists like look at this. Look at this. Look at this you know life as you know, it is about to end. But you know when I talked to I was like the horses out of the barn. Can't go back. Let's like figure something out but it wasn't happening the legal battles against Napster move forward. So the company had to get strategic. One of naps, offenses was VCR see back when the VCR's came out film and television exerts all clutching their pearls anyone with a VCR to record anything they wanted from the TV and that they figured violated their copyrights and would be way bad for business. The VCR manufacturers on the other hand we're who cucumbers. Look all we're doing is making a device and people could be using that device for totally legal recording. In one thousand, nine, hundred, three, the two sides made their arguments in the landmark Supreme Court case Sony Corporation of America v Universal City Studios Inc. we didn't do a single thing to affirmatively induced the copying respondents programs unless you want to count the bear act of making the machine there nothing between any of the petitioners respondents. Is the rule that if you know the Machine is going to be used for infringing use and you sell it is that enough? If, you know that the machine is going to be used and know that the news is to be infringing. That is a facet of a contributory infringement test. Alternately Sony prevailed, the court decided that the company could not be held responsible for VCR owners use of the device. So Napster pulled that precedent out in its own court case, and that argument almost would have worked except for three little snags. The I was that Napster allowed millions of users to download Jillian songs the sheer volume of copyrighted material being shared. Meant that napster was very different from a VCR which was only occasionally used to record a TV show or movie. And then there was the issue of Napster search index in that they had one professor Jennifer Jenkins. So say I was looking for Madonna right. There was a search index where I would go and so they had that index that they would know that there was a song called Madonna like a virgin on basically the courts held that napster new copyright infringement was happening because they had a search index full of copyrighted material. So all the service wasn't engaging in copyright violations directly it was giving violators a big boost. There was one final whip sees that really bang the last nail in the napster coffin and that was a little internal email Sean Parker sent specifically one-sentence quote. We are not just making pirated music available but also pushing demand and quote the operative word in that sentence is pirated says Steve knocker Sean Pirker in his private statements on an Z. Males was actually directly acknowledging that napster was a medium for piracy and that turned out to be important in. Court later, because the record industry busted him for it at this point, napster didn't have much of a leg to stand on but the judge in the case offer them a lifeline. He basically said if you can prevent copyrighted material from being downloaded using napster, you can stay afloat if you can't you're enzo and they couldn't..

napster Dr. dre METALLICA Lars Ulrich Carson Daly Henry Rollins Shawn Fanning Senate Judiciary Committee China Sean Parker Madonna Chuck d Cisse Sony MTV Rick Christina Aguilera abetting
Fresh update on "napster" discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

Twenty Thousand Hertz

00:08 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "napster" discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

"Albums because they were getting them for free on napster. Revenue Stream dammed up. So the musicians fought back leading the charge was METALLICA's drummer. Lars Ulrich in July two thousand he testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee on the future of digital music in a forty eight hour period where we monitored napster over three hundred thousand users made one point four million free downloads of METALLICA's music. Napster hijacked our music without asking they never sought permission. Our catalog of music simply became available for free download on the Napster System, and this was a problem because most artist a barely earning a decent wage and need every source of revenue available to scrape by also keep in mind that the primary source of income for most songwriters is from the sale of records. Every time napster enthusiasts, downloads a song, it takes money from the pockets of all these members of the creative community. All Rick Wasn't the only musician opposed the idea of napster. Dr Dre was a vocal opponent as were Christina Aguilera Garth Brooks Bon Jovi's mclachlan Hanson Elena's Morris at and our bow out Lewis's favorite nineties band the bare naked ladies. All those folks were part of a loose group called artists against piracy. Medallion Dr. dre ultimately sued napster the metallica suit claimed that napster quote divided and distributed software whose sole purpose is to permit napster to profit by abetting and encouraging and quote Dr Dre position was even clear quote. Stealing Music But other artists like moby Henry Rollins, and perhaps most famously Chuck d felt like this was the direction music needed to head in. That's as a situation or the connection between file sharing with Cisse's. and downloadable distribution as power going back to the people I also look at this as being a situation. Where for the longest period of time? The industry had control technology. Therefore, the people were subservient to that technology. And at whatever price rains that the people would have to pay for the whole debate over Napster Crescendo in September of two thousand when Shawn Fanning appeared MTV's video music awards wearing a Metallica t shirt. He was clearly trolling the band who sat in the audience rolling their eyes meanwhile I'm sitting in my chair rolling my eyes Carson Daly's INDRO. Everyday myself smack DAB in the middle of a war between fans. I? Try. To justify hip hop pop. Alternative to mainstream and rap to. Rock. But what I do is nothing and the battle with China part of is nothing compared to the battle of this next guys fight in the last year this teenager has developed technology that has revolutionized the way we all get our music and he is here tonight, ladies and gentlemen creative Napster Shawn Fanny. Just a month after fainting paraded across the Vienna stage, he was in a courtroom dealing with a massive lawsuit filed against Napster by eighteen record companies all members of the Ria they claim the Napster Service allowed. It's twenty million plus users to violate copyright and was thus responsible for the infringement. Eileen. Richardson, says she tried to reason with the labels and make deals that would keep them alive but it was a non-starter. Hilary. Rosen was running the Ria then and she. She was on sort of the warpath meeting with all the artists like look at this. Look at this. Look at this you know life as you know, it is about to end. But you know when I talked to I was like the horses out of the barn. Can't go back. Let's like figure something out but it wasn't happening the legal battles against Napster move forward. So the company had to get strategic. One of naps, offenses was VCR see back when the VCR's came out film and television exerts all clutching their pearls anyone with a VCR to record anything they wanted from the TV and that they figured violated their copyrights and would be way bad for business. The VCR manufacturers on the other hand we're who cucumbers. Look all we're doing is making a device and people could be using that device for totally legal recording. In one thousand, nine, hundred, three, the two sides made their arguments in the landmark Supreme Court case Sony Corporation of America v Universal City Studios Inc. we didn't do a single thing to affirmatively induced the copying respondents programs unless you want to count the bear act of making the machine there nothing between any of the petitioners respondents. Is the rule that if you know the Machine is going to be used for infringing use and you sell it is that enough? If, you know that the machine is going to be used and know that the news is to be infringing. That is a facet of a contributory infringement test. Alternately Sony prevailed, the court decided that the company could not be held responsible for VCR owners use of the device. So Napster pulled that precedent out in its own court case, and that argument almost would have worked except for three little snags. The I was that Napster allowed millions of users to download Jillian songs the sheer volume of copyrighted material being shared. Meant that napster was very different from a VCR which was only occasionally used to record a TV show or movie. And then there was the issue of Napster search index in that they had one professor Jennifer Jenkins. So say I was looking for Madonna right. There was a search index where I would go and so they had that index that they would know that there was a song called Madonna like a virgin on basically the courts held that napster new copyright infringement was happening because they had a search index full of copyrighted material. So all the service wasn't engaging in copyright violations directly it was giving violators a big boost. There was one final whip sees that really bang the last nail in the napster coffin and that was a little internal email Sean Parker sent specifically one-sentence quote. We are not just making pirated music available but also pushing demand and quote the operative word in that sentence is pirated says Steve knocker Sean Pirker in his private statements on an Z. Males was actually directly acknowledging that napster was a medium for piracy and that turned out to be important in. Court later, because the record industry busted him for it at this point, napster didn't have much of a leg to stand on but the judge in the case offer them a lifeline. He basically said if you can prevent copyrighted material from being downloaded using napster, you can stay afloat if you can't you're enzo and they couldn't..

Napster Dr. Dre Metallica Lars Ulrich Carson Daly Henry Rollins Shawn Fanning Senate Judiciary Committee China Sean Parker Madonna Chuck D Cisse Sony MTV Rick Christina Aguilera Abetting
"napster" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

Twenty Thousand Hertz

04:45 min | 19 hrs ago

"napster" Discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

"Engage with digital distribution Nassar Innovative chaps that they were already had the users and the platform for that distribution. The record labels would provide the music and the end result would be a paid service kind of like a proto tunes spotify. That was napster's goal but that's not what was nearly days in the eyes of the recording industry napster was just stealing music. They were pirates and you know how you've anquish pirates. You sue the bridges off them in an American court of law Er. Record labels weren't the only ones who had it out for Napster. Some of the biggest artists in the world were about to jump into the fight that's coming up after the break..

Fresh update on "napster" discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

Twenty Thousand Hertz

00:06 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "napster" discussed on Twenty Thousand Hertz

"He wrote that the song I came to his attention after a radio DJ in Minneapolis plucked the vinyl single out of a been because she quote like the sleeve three women dressed in party slips one wearing leopard skin another at. The third dog collar. which really is the most nineties look ever grill marcus was a very important writer. People really cared about you know his opinion and he wrote an article in interview magazine that was titled Pop when it's Perfect Not Not, that I've memorized it or anything but I do remember that the fact that Grill Marcus would decide to write about the his defense that was a total game changer. That's when the phone started to ring and people were. More than just our friends were asking us to tour with them and to play shows with them. The interview magazine piece got the Hissy fits the type of exposure that tiny indie bands dreamed up. They cut a record and didn't add for Levi's and toured around the country in a green two-door Ford. Explorer packed to the Gills amps and merch after their tour legendary rocker joy. Ramon asked the band to play at his party with rock and Roll Hall of Famer. Ronnie Spector. Wishes bonkers. That's how much clout these tastes makers had a critic like real marcus had an opinion about things and they would be very clear about their opinion and sometimes I would read a review and I wouldn't buy a record because I'd be like us. You know. So thought it was terrible. And they should know. Say Good. Bye. But all this started to change with the arrival of napster listeners could now download album for free and just decide for themselves that they liked it or not, and that meant that music's historical gatekeepers, the critics and the labels we're to have a lot less sway and that combined with plummeting record sales scared the pants off the industry. All this signaled that a huge bending was happening. See I didn't say disruption. Kids could access whatever music they wanted whenever they wanted and it would be free Joe Record Exotic John. Q. Critic would no longer be the ones calling the shots. Jeff Gold was VP at Warner brothers records in the years just before napster hit big he'd been banging on about music and the Internet for ages hoping to find a way for the two to coexist here members in one, thousand, nine, hundred, three of panicked assistant tore into his office to tell him that depeche mode album songs of faith and devotion had been leaked to an all chat room there went wait a minute. This isn't bad. This is great. We spend all our time trying to get kids excited about music, and in here it was happening on a talk. After the League Gold's team started their own rudimentary Internet talk show on AOL they want to own this emerging online space. They call the show cyber talk and feature different warner brothers artists doing text chats with fans one chat with Depeche, mode was apparently so popular, it crashed AOL. But goals were like don't forget your day job in the early days I was shouting into the void Geffen records was the second company to have an online presence. Fairly soon after us, but it wasn't anything anybody was doing and I was probably the most senior person in the record business thinking about this stuff. Most of the top record exacts where two decades older and didn't have computers on their desks lead low, know how to use them. So basically, they were my dad and they didn't see digital music as the way of the future especially while CDs were still flying off the shelves combat just forever. All this meant that when napster came on the scene, the record companies were like we don't know what this MP three sharing is all about but no, no as music going online and nowhere you're getting it for free and the kids were like y'All we are gramps and you can't stop us because you don't even know what a mouse is your burned. So Napster bows and existential threat to the record industry. But you know what? Pose next essential napster a little thing called copyright copyright is a branch of law that gives creators of all kinds, writers, filmmakers, musicians, poets, exclusive rights over their creations. In many cases, those rights don't go directly to the creators but are owned by the distributors, the publishers, the labels because those are the entities that historically have gotten the creative works from the authors to the public to us who are able to enjoy them. That's Jennifer Jenkins. She's a professor at Duke Law, school where she also runs the Schools Center for the study of the public domain. She's also the author of theft, a history of music a delightful graphic novel about musical borrowing. So copyright is totally her jam. Copyright came into being in the US in seventeen ninety. It's right there in the constitution. Congress has the power to pass laws protecting intellectual property and its creators. Since music protections were added to the Copyright Act in eighteen, thirty one, the medium is always created some challenges. This is largely due to the fact that technologies for listening have radically over the years I mean, the story of music is a story of new and disruptive technologies and the law sort of struggling to catch up with them the player piano, the gramophone, the radio all pushed the bounds of music copyright law obviously so did Napster. Copyright was at the heart of the IRA as beef with Napster. Basically, you can't offer up all these songs for free because you don't own them the end, but it wasn't quite that simple. We know that many napster users totally infringing. Copyright Law because they were uploading and downloading music hall songs without permission. But under what circumstances do we hold napster accountable for the actions the copyright infringement users Napster's argument was, hey, we're just providing a neutral platform for users to trade songs. You know like you trade cassette or vhs tapes with a friend, we're not music repository but as A big boss Hilary Rosen explained in a local news interview. She wasn't buying it. You can share music with a friend in you know email in an instant message in a hundred different ways. It's that's no different than tape trading has for. Years and years. The real difference on an is that a peer to peer system that would allow somebody to have thousands of files up on a directory distributing to millions of strangers. I just think there's no analysis that says that that's right that that's fair or that sharing now this is where it gets really tricky to hold naps reliable. We have to employ something called secondary liability? When do you hold a technology producer? Someone who provides software accountable for the activities of someone else your users? The Copyright Act is silent on that secondary liability is not in the copyright to the RIA and to the musicians fighting against what they saw as blatant copyright violations. The technology producers should absolutely be held liable for copyright infringement back. Then musicians like our friend Porsche from the Hissy fits made their money in basically two ways touring and album sales, and if people weren't buying.

Napster Grill Marcus Levi Minneapolis Ronnie Spector AOL United States Writer Gills Warner Brothers Hilary Rosen Producer Ramon Congress
Why Circular Conversational Design is Best with Alison Greenberg, CEO at aflow

Inside VOICE

07:09 min | 5 months ago

Why Circular Conversational Design is Best with Alison Greenberg, CEO at aflow

"Was reading online. That you have a pretty impressive background you went to Yell. And you studied anthropology you played in the Symphony Orchestra there. And then you did some work in the arts for Awhile and now you work in voice technology and there's been a lot of people that have come from the creative space so I'd love for you to talk about briefly your journey into how and why you got into voice technology years ago. Yeah absolutely well. One of my favorite things about this industry is how cross-disciplinary it is. There's really not one background of people who under boys and I don't think many different in that respect but I will say that really from the time I could talk. Language wasn't just the way I express myself it's Mike Currency and so music is something that I was always drawn to. I played music in high school and College. I still to this day. I studied anthropology because of how central language was to it as a social science. I didn't study English or history. I studied a social science because I loved looking at language as a tool and as a currency especially in ultra contacts and in the voice industry but actually with my company of flow we started with chat bots. Language is very much currency of conversational user. Interfaces or curious as we call them and so you know voice and chat go hand in hand they are. Interbay says that requires specificity precision and entertaining use of language but the design principles across voice and chat. Can you really different? And so- entering Voice Technology. You know it's kind of a misnomer. I didn't enter voice technology. I entered chat and that was because when we started flow. Mico Gandara South Miller was actually the driving force behind beginning not company and he was noticing automation taking he was noticing the role of AI in businesses in communications and he started to build the baht of an NBA all star name Russell Westbrook at the time of Oklahoma City Thunder and that was our first bought and then we started to build from there realizing that we scale communications we could even skill personas and brand identities into these conversational experience and so while we believed that automation and I were powering communication. We also believe that is really immature. I don't know if you hear this often but do people ever talk to you about kind of how I is lacking yes. That's definitely something that comes up and I know especially when it came out a couple years ago and consumers used it. There was kind of frustration and so I feel like there's now this like element of education and awareness of like. No it's growing and and we're working on it and getting people to understand that totally. Yeah I mean in technology. You hear a lot about the hype cycle rate. So we might be in that trough of disillusionment which is a piece of language. I just love it's kind of various the trump disillusionment makes sense. Alexa is a teenager. You know came out. In two thousand four chat bots really the dawn of chat bots was in the mid twenty tonnes. We are looking at technologies. That are not just immature in some time. They're immature in the sense of the amount of work that has to go into making them seem less so this industry needs our help. Our words and our design for it to actually work. It's not intelligent yet right so if a is a teenager you know. Teenagers can crash your car. Teenagers can make a lot of mistakes and do a lot of damage especially on the part of brands but teenagers can also change the world so just look at Greta. Van Ver look at the kinds of young people who are driving social change today. That's the approach that we take to chat and voice it'll flow and match. Why we built the concept of conversational design is because we believe that we have to work together with these systems and with the power moderation and conversation design is actually the most important part of Charlton boys today. If these systems are designed well technology to incredible but it's not going to work welter these her. Yeah which brings me to. You made a comment in another interview. You did how you talked about. Hamas boys conversations are linear and what you do out of flow as you really work on creating a circular conversational design. Can you describe the different? So people understand it and why it's important to what you do at a flow hersher. Yeah so out of what we developed. Circular Conversation Design as our attempts to fix these broken visual and verbal designs. Keeps the industry has kind of had to back dialogue into the tools that we have to build it. And so I think really voice and charter just like any industry were almost only as good as our tools and so what we do to kind of choose actualized or conversation design. We talk about a traffic circle. Have you ever been a England or actually you live in New Jersey? I was GonNa say we definitely have traffic circles in New Jersey? So yes perfect. Yes so we'll have talking to people who've been to New Jersey because you're intimately familiar with the roundabout traffic circle. You know you have to get on a certain point and then you make turtles people who aren't from UK or New Jersey. These very confusing carry. I've learned But the cool thing about around about or traffic circle as you can get on off any talk and so if you miss your exit you just keep going in the circle. You have another opportunity to make that exit once you exit you can drive through the backup but you always have an opportunity to get back on. And that's how human conversations work the tools of the trade up until now have kind of destroyed the potential conversations. I in my opinion because we've mainly used the decision tree right. So that's linear design thinking conversations as linear. But that's not how we speak. You know I could talk to you right now about projects for doing it a flow. We can pivot to women and boys. I could ask you what it's like to live in New Jersey. That's how communication works. There's so many circles within circles. There's so many overlaps in and crossed actions and so we had a great experience actually Boy Summit last summer we were really lucky to be part of Amazon's conversation design workshop. One got to take some great echo. Show fives and They disqualified anyone who designed using a decision tree. And so that kind of shows you the way that the industry has been. I know a lot of designer still used decision trees. And it's because it's how away to understand the computer logic but we don't conversational napster and we think of them as a set of nodes that are all linked to one another wherever and whenever possible in a circular fashion and just like that traffics. Are you have to be able to get on and get off at any point? In time we should be able to return to the part of the flow to the extent that the platform we build allows us to do so we should be able to return to order the flow midway through at via

Voice Technology New Jersey Mike Currency Symphony Orchestra Alexa Interbay Hamas Russell Westbrook Van Ver NBA Gandara South Miller Oklahoma City Amazon UK Charlton England
"napster" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

13:24 min | 7 months ago

"napster" Discussed on TechStuff

"To text up. I'm your host John. Strict limit executive producer with iheartradio at a level attack. You know what guys. There was a time where I was absolutely enthralled with pirates but those reports on the high seas when I was in college there was a totally different type of piracy that was running rampant across the networks and that was the theft of intellectual property. So today we're taking a classic look at how Napster worked now. This episode originally published on April Third. Two thousand thirteen. So let's listen to this classic episode of Tech Stuff Napster and Napster's It's got a bad rap. It it it's kind of become synonymous with. At least the old napster. The original napster synonymous with things like piracy although the lawless days of the Internet just stole from Lars Alrich just in fact he. He ended up delivering a lawsuit by hand to still full gear. He was took this. I think sixty thousand pages. I don't know I don't know the I don't know that even a a a number of Metallica can carry a sixty thousand page by hand truck. I'm not sure I'm not sure by hand but share maybe on CD series of CDs. Yeah so anyway. Let's talk about what it was and what it is today because it's it's definitely changed quite a bit so it's a it's it's all about really all about music it's technically about file sharing but those files are were essentially music files. Mp three files and Napster Limited itself to MP three piles lots of other peer to peer sharing. That works used you. Could you could get movies all kinds of stuff games everything any kind of file napster was all about MP threes and and you have to understand like the the the days when we first start looking at this idea. That's way back in the late nineties back then. Music Was Not something that you could easily get on the Internet and was a first of all anything that was on. A webpage was mini based or whatever it was were MoD base. It was it was not anywhere close to CD quality. We didn't have an itunes store. That kind of thing yeah. There wasn't you know there were people who wanted I just say I completely I said that was founded. That's different show so anyway. There's a whole foods for a long time was just a jukebox type of program where you would manage the music that you already had. It wasn't a store where you would buy new music. It was it was a management system So really this time the way you would get if you were someone who wanted to get a music file. You would essentially have to search around for someone who was hosting music files on a website somewhere and download them and these. These websites were very much unreliable. And this is what got a certain guy thinking about different ways of going about it. The guy's name was shawn fanning. Yeah and as of Nineteen ninety-seven. He got his first computer very shortly after that Created NAPSTER. So that was yeah. It was within two years. He had gone from getting his first computer to creating one of the most influential and Torius web services and programs of all time. He got his computer from his uncle. John Fanning who ended up being. Oh Yeah Yeah. He provided the seed money for for Napster and a couple years. He was also not just interested in programming. Right off the bat but also interested in internet relay chat. I are searcy. Which is you know one of many different protocols that allow you to communicate over the Internet and an instant instant method. Yes yeah exactly. As opposed to like email or something along those lines and he got interested in the field of Internet security and He described himself at the time as a white hat. Not a hacker. So the idea being that he was interested in finding ways to make Internet. Security more robust. So you were in helping people not stealing from people right like not like he might look at a system and say oh you have a vulnerability here you need to patch it as opposed to. Oh you have owner ability here. Give me all your things. That was kind of his his. At least that's what he said and I I I have no reason to doubt him But he met virtually a fellow named Sean Parker Online. In those days and Sean Parker also becomes important in the Napster story so in ninety eight he was starting to think about this thing that Music files and by the way. This kid is a teenager. I'm Jacky if I'm using the word kid because I use that word for everybody because he was literally like seventeen to nineteen at the time. Yeah he was in one thousand. Nine hundred. Eighty was Well those when he was eighteen turning nineteen and he he was a freshman at northeastern university in Boston and he knew that there were a lot of kids his age really interested in music and they really wanted to find more music but again it really tricky to find it online because these websites that would host files they wouldn't last very long maybe someone stops stops monitoring it or maintaining it and the links are all dead or because of high traffic. You know everyone finds out that this is where this one file is. Everyone goes there and then it crashes the site it was really really tricky to find a way to reliably get those music files also important to note in one thousand ninety eight that was when the Digital Millennium Copyright Act went into effect. Yes very important that's congress enacted that and that was that was essentially Congress's way of saying we understand that intellectual property is important copyright is important and that the Internet age has dramatically changed. How easy it is to distribute material that is under copyright. So here are some rules to guide how we can How we can legislate this. Sorta stuff essentially criminalised the circumvention of any kind of digital rights management right and it also however created something called safe harbor which was very important. We've become extremely napster's case. Safe Harbor is a concept whereby it says if your site or service is not actively engaged in copyright infringement but the users are using your service in order to conduct copyright infringement you yourself are not at fault you cannot be held at fault for the behavior of your users because the users are behaving however they want to behave. You're providing a service as long as your service does not actively meant to circumvent copyright protection or to distribute copyright right materials illegally. Then you should be in the clear because you cannot be held responsible for what other people do and That's an important concept also won that ultimately you could argue was held up in the case of NAPA. Yeah Yeah Yeah other. While we're on the subject other concept that became important in this argument was the Audio Home Recording Act of nineteen ninety two. Which said that you are allowed to make unlimited copies essentially of any CDs and cassettes the own for personal use and for your friends as long as you're not receiving compensation right so again the idea being that if I own something I can make a copy of it. Usually it's considered a copy for backup purposes so for example. Let's say I own a CD. And I want to be able to make second CD in case something happens that I won because I mean I bought. That CD is yours. Mine And this this is. This is something that the music industry was not so pleased about. I mean every industry whenever any sort of invention has come up that allows people to copy material someway for instance. Vcr's DVR's the various industries. Get very nervous about it. Because they're afraid that well for multiple reasons but one of the reasons is. They are afraid that that's going to impact sales means that you're going to end up distributing stuff and then you cut out the The person or entity that is in charge of distributing that and they paid to make this thing happen essentially in the going to lose money yeah. It's huge huge thing when VCR's came out in the in the early eighties. Not that I remember. But why are you looking at me Lauren? Only because of your coasters because you actually know that I remember when. Vcr's came smile on her face tells me the answer all. I need to know folks how I need to know anyway but yeah so so that. That's kind of the state of digital copyright nine hundred ninety eight so meanwhile sean fanning is saying maybe there's a better way of being able to find and get the music files that you really want. And he starts to come up with this idea where the idea would be to create a centralized server and that servers job would be to search for an index music files and and the way would work is that you would subscribe to the service You'd essentially register yourself as a user with the service and then as a registered user. You would get a folder that you would put on your hard drive and that folder would be sharable folder. Anything you put in that folder could be seen by this service. The server the the centralized server could see whatever you put in there now in the case of. Napster talking. Mp three files so if you put a few had MP three files already on your machine and you put them in this folder it would mean that those would be discoverable by that centralized server so someone else who registers with Well it wasn't called Napster yet but when they register win the service and they search for a particular music file and you happen to have that music file in your folder. You're a link to essentially your machine would pop up and the server would facilitate a connection between the person's searching and your computer so that the file transfer could complete so lauren. Let's let's use. We'll use ourselves as an example Lauren. Let's say that you've heard about this band called common rotation okay all right. Common rotation fronted by Adam Busch former Actor in the buff vampire slayer right. Yeah he was. Lauren was Warren Nerd of doom. So Lauren you've heard of common rotation and you're thinking I really WanNa hear this one song. I've heard about that. Come in rotation does. It's called sit down before I fall down but I I don't have access to a way of finding the song otherwise I go into napster. It turns out that I- Jonathan Happen to have that song and I have it in the share folder for Napster and when you do the search it points linked towards my direction toward my computer. Okay you hit the download button. My computer uploads the file and your computer downloads. The file a direct transfer between the two computers. The centralized server just access kind of a traffic monitor. Okay and the the cool thing about this is that when my file gets to you by default. It's going into your share folder. You can change the settings or you could have changed those things back in the day or your service doesn't exist anymore or you can pull it out of that chair. Fold right right But you you don't you don't have to share everything you get but if you did that would mean that. Now there's another instance of that file two locations so that if you if you have trouble accessing the first location or if Chin Peters out yeah or if I'm not even online if my computer is off you cannot connect pewter but if Lauren is on and she still has that file on her folder that means person number three could come and get the file from Lauren. So every time that someone used napster they were actually increasing. Its Utility. So the service got stronger. The more people used it and the more the the larger the numbers joined the more powerful. This service became right right and so it was early in one thousand nine thousand nine fanning was was developing this this program and coating everything along with Sean Parker I think he did sixty straight hours of coding without sleep. That sounds like one of those terrific Internet myths. Although with with energy drinks which were renewed the red bull is brand new and they were downing them in case they were they were but so they uploaded this. Beta to a website called download dot com and and it really big people were so excited about. It was a very quickly became. Clear that this this thing that they had come up with joint really resonated really because there are a lot of people who are really interested in music and there's also the there was also this growing attitude of if I like one song but I don't like the rest of the album. Why should I album for one song and the problem at that time was that there was no real way to buy song by song unless the band had released specifically a single? Cd Cassette right other than that. You pretty much luck. You had to buy the entire album. And so that was why a lot of people are turning one of the reasons why a lot of people were turning to piracy because it allowed them the freedom to get what they wanted without getting all the other stuff and one of the big arguments people have put forward about..

Napster Lauren sean fanning John Fanning Sean Parker Napster Limited executive producer theft Lars Alrich Vcr Boston congress Adam Busch searcy MP Torius
Record labels rush to IPO amid music streaming boom

Techmeme Ride Home

02:42 min | 8 months ago

Record labels rush to IPO amid music streaming boom

"Last year was the year of the Unicorn. Ipo parade this year. Not so much where mostly just waiting to see what AIRBNB is going to do but there is going to be a bunch of new. Ipo's coming soon from a very specific space. A lot of the record labels are planning to go public warner music. Group filed to go public two weeks ago. Universal Music Group is planning to IPO in the coming years. It said in Vivendi earnings report last week. And there's all sorts of investment and acquisition and merger chatter across the whole industry. Why well suddenly thanks to music streaming? The music industry is feeling flush and bullish. It's not that record. Labels are making as much money as they did in the golden olden days before napster. It's just that the bleeding has stopped and the industry has turned around. The labels have seen double digit revenue growth for each of the last few years basically revenue is growing. The charts are all moving in the right direction. Finally things are going up not down. So people are rushing to cash in and the record companies also seemed to have gotten with the Times quoting axios. The record companies have transformed themselves into music entertainment companies that provide services to all artists at any stage of their career and regardless of whether they are signed to that label says Mitch Glazer Chairman and CEO of the recording industry of America in a phone interview with axios quote that kind of diversification expands. Revenue options creates more opportunity in the industry and creates more competition says Glazer Glazer notes that the record labels today provide everything from social media strategy to merchandising for artists not just distribution deals. Miller notes that in the digital era and not every artist will rely on a label for distribution quote labels are much more willing and in fact must meet the artists where they are and quote paid. Subscriptions are now eighty percent of streaming music revenue which is up from just twenty five percent only five years ago so people are finally paying for. Music again. No wonder the industry is feeling its oats. Still there could be a natural sealing to all of this people don't seem to be willing to pay anything more than about ten dollars a month for music. Subscriptions and unlike in the video space you cannot entice people with exclusive content because of people are paying for music they want all the music not just a subsection of it so once everyone signs up for streaming this all hit a brick wall quote. I think that's why these companies want to go public now. I think there's some growth limits to this model says Miller end quote

IPO Glazer Glazer Axios Universal Music Group Mitch Glazer Miller Vivendi Chairman And Ceo Napster America
Decentralization Philosophy Part 1  From Buddha to the Conquistadors

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

09:34 min | 9 months ago

Decentralization Philosophy Part 1 From Buddha to the Conquistadors

"I've been trying to figure out how to talk about this topic for a while because cryptocurrency is this really kind of strange flat structure. That has all of these little hierarchical structures built on top of it and you can take that analogy and you can really really zoom in on it or you can really really zoom out on it as kind of still true really regardless of how you're looking at it and I think a lot of this has to do with just the nature and sort of the oddness oddness of crypto currency and a Bitcoin as a community right as a movement and as technology that also is attached to people getting rich. Sometimes today I WanNa talk about a topic that I've been calling catalysts and CEOS and take a look at what the crypto currency space looks like. Today what it looked like in the past. Ask Talk about some of the different attributes that got us to where we are today. So Toshi said an interesting precedent. They led with their ideas and to a lesser extent their code and the early sparked a was association that contribution catalyzed first Bitcoin and then the crypto currency movement at large those who believed in that vision given an opportunity to get rich in some cases crazy rich rich and that combination of factors lead. I all coins coins than ICO's SAFT'S STO's and I don't think even talked about on the show before and who knows what will come next because clearly the path of innovation that's occurring here is not over at all but it also created what feels like a strange legacy that we're going to explore today as simply put are charismatic leaders who emerge from that flat structure that is the bitcoin protocol more or less dangerous more or less problematic more or less notable than the mark Zuckerberg's the Elon Musk's Jeff bezos. Goes and Steve. Jobs who really lead their movements. There's not that much of a difference between Associate Akimoto and a Jeff bezos except for the way that they fundamentally went about not inciting the change that now has kind of swept the world in one case kind of the e commerce site of and the other case this digital currency cryptocurrency or blockchain bitcoin movement. Or whatever you WANNA call it. Today's conversation is about decentralized catalysts and centralize CEO's the first thing I thought of when you said SA- Toshi contrasted to Jeff bezos. US was the difference. Between a certain personality type blended with introversion versus extroversion an extroverted rated person who is very smart and capable and intelligent and can see the future almost but wants credit and wants to be the face of an organization and is is comfortable in that role. You end up with someone. Like Jeff bezos. WHO's out there? And he's totally comfortable with that even though he retracts heat sometimes but but she didn't want the credit souto she wants to be behind the scenes and gets everything they needed from just being the mastermind. Mind who's kind of silent and letting other people be the face and I think that's really interesting. If you study personality types. Maybe even like the Myers Briggs. Souto Souto she is like your classic. I N T J personality type. They're like the mastermind architect but they don't need the credit and they don't need to be the face. Jeff Bezos as US would be like an E. N. T. J. who's like the CEO and the leader and wants to be the public face. I think that's a really interesting point. But I think that there's another factor here. Maybe okay which is that. Was it a choice. For Satoshi to take the type of catalyst like behind the scenes never revealed role or was that a factor of the not just the disruptive potential but what was being disruptive of course it was a choice. I mean Saito. She clearly thought through the implications of what they were doing carefully but if they really wanted credit they would have justified some way to take the credit and to be public about it. I think you always have a choice. I think another pretty good way to differentiate so Toshi from Jeff bezos is one of them make several hundred million a year contracting with the CIA Eh and the other one was never heard from one someone spoke to the CIA. I don't know who's point that supports but I think the big different factors that there was a legal path for Jeff Bezos to do what he did and even if he was an introvert. It still a good choice for him to do it. If it winds up that he has all the resources and success. I don't think we see that in practice very often where you have a founder. Who Comes in catalyze is a thing and then leaves before it actually becomes successful and their contribution bution isn't largely replaced by what comes after? I don't think it's so cut and dried that. What Jeff Bezos was doing or wanted to do with there was a legal path for him him? I mean he was doing something that nobody had ever done before. What was that avoiding state sales tax? This is another good point. Jeff bezos has been really interested in Star Trek. He wants to create a star trek future and some of the things he's been doing are totally unprecedented. And so it's not as though you can really say. Oh they're definitely legal because there's never been a legal precedent to establish that they are legal. You could say oh well Ijaz doing things that are a gray area or questionable. But he's he's not asking for permission and that's an admirable quality so you're talking about different levels of challenge and so with Jeff Bezos thing and with examples like like Uber. And other things like that. You are talking about companies that are doing very disruptive things but the question is who are they disrupting and in both of those situations the person or the entity. That's it's being disrupted their state governments and so if you're like a national company and you have presence in many many states that actually gives you the ability to play a bit of a game there. The thing that Uber did is kind of the reverse of what happened with napster. Napster was a decentralized network for file sharing then hit a bunch of national and even global organizations that suited everywhere but it was ultimately fighting these national or global organizations whereas Uber. They weren't fighting any global or national organizations they were fighting lots and lots and lots of little regional monopolies and it's to a lesser extent. Sure about Amazon to every state where they weren't collecting sales tax. Well that was an individual a fight so it's not like they had a problem with the United States. They had a problem with each individual state. Look at what's happened with projects in the lead up to the invention of Bitcoin and all of those centralized charlize alternatives. They were competing with the federal government for fundamentally monopolized right in the right to issue currency and control sort of the dynamics of the money that we all use news. And that's a place where it seems like you couldn't have done this as a CEO because people tried that and they basically all wound up getting arrested or getting all their assets season in many cases giving customers assets assets seized two so as we can see. There are definitely reasons why people do decentralized and centralized organizations whether it's from personal reasons just because they don't want the credit in some cases or in some cases because having the credit is dangerous and on the other hand the advantages of taking on that leadership role. Well the thing about a flat structure is that it's a flat unstructured. So even if you're on top of it still major basically at the same level as everybody else but organizations you know. Companies these are hierarchies for the most part and so if you have that role at the top of that structure well. It's a lot higher than you'd be if you were at the top of a flat structure. All of this comes back to one of my favorite books. It's really short and highly recommended. Did starfish and the spider by Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman. I read it actually before I became interested in Bitcoin and it was really kind of formation book for me. We've talked about on the show before but it's been like five five years so I figured it wasn't a bad topic to bring up again. The subtitle of the book is the unstoppable power of leaderless organizations. And if you're a fan of decentralized technologies but I've never read it I cannot recommended amended highly enough quoting from the book. A spider is a creature with eight legs coming out of its central body. It has this tiny head and usually eight is. If you chop off the spider's headed headed dies and that's exactly what happens with centralized organization a centralized organization has a clear leader. WHO's in charge? And there's a specific place where decisions are made if you get rid of the leader. You paralyzed realized the organization now. This contrasts with a decentralized organization. which is a fundamentally different animal? It's actually a starfish. At first glance at starfish looked similar to a spider appearance but the starfish is decentralized. starfish doesn't have ahead. The major organs are actually replicated through each and every arm and in reality. starfish is a neural network work. Basically a network of cells instead of having a head like a spider the starfish functions as decentralized network and you can even in nature see situations where a starfish fish has been wounded and for example in arm or even several arms have come off what tends to happen is that actually both pieces will then grow into a complete starfish and it's another another method that they can reproduce. You might say that that's inefficient from a biological perspective to duplicate or pent-up locate editor. How you even and say that word but to make five copies of all of your major orders and neural tissue? GAFFER's them this great advantage of being able to regenerate just from from a small piece it means that while starfish might not have perhaps some of the advantages that a spider does it also isn't vulnerable in the same way. That spider is to damage to you. Know very small parts of it because again it's just not centralized we're GonNa talk about this concept in a different way a little bit later. But what other comparisons do you like besides this kind of starfish in spider for decentralized and centralized organizations and kind of broader question that I wanna come to his how many companies do we actually think or how many any projects do we actually think like rough. ballpark percentage in crypto actually are starfish versus. How many might be using a network that is a starfish but in reality the are themselves

Jeff Bezos Sa- Toshi CEO United States Souto Souto Cryptocurrency Mark Zuckerberg Napster Steve ICO CIA Myers Briggs Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman Amazon Satoshi Saito Ijaz Founder
Woman Caught On Camera Walking Naked Through Miami International Airport

Woody and Company

02:57 min | 9 months ago

Woman Caught On Camera Walking Naked Through Miami International Airport

"Did you see footage of this woman walking through the airport stripping her clothes off didn't see the footage is still a saw a still photograph of it moments ago due to actually witness just see it I actually saw the video it was pixelated so I you know the woman is actually from what I could tell you know like an average looking woman nothing really stands out about her I mean she looked fit she's just if you she's casually removing her clothes and she's walking through Miami International Airport and when I say casually she didn't break stride she's walking you I think it picks up about where she's got on a broad panties and she's continuing to walk then the camera then is kind of a a back angle of her kind of walking away she reaches her hand back behind us Napster brawl it just takes it all doesn't even break stride just continues walking and then she just pulls are just pull some office she's walking steps out of them interest continues to walk it's easy to get bogged down in an airport so I I can understand you know she was in a hurry you want to keep stride you wanna keep your moment forward momentum you can't miss our flight legs moving ahead running back just drive fall forward get more yards moments later the here's the interesting part she's on top of a police car near the exit she jumps off of that into traffic she runs over to a waiting police officer who takes her into custody at that point and then they're saying she was in coherent and delusional at that point when they're speaking to dilute you think I mean I don't know that anybody of sound mind would just be walking through an airport stripping off their clothes when you started talking about that you sadly you go either she's whacked out on drugs and I'm watching it right now yeah and or or she's having some sort of mental break which is also set I thought it was also interesting that they were saying nobody all the people who saw nobody stepped in to help let me ask you this question let me pose this question to you if you were in now Miami International Airport in your walking and you see a woman coming at you who is either naked or is stripping off her clothes the last thing you're probably going to do is run up and say do you need help you're probably going to be standing there stunned because you're not expecting something like I'd be looking around to see if I get in film there's there's there's like punk or something along those lines I think I would probably look you know does she have something in our hands does she have a gun or a knife it and if she didn't then maybe go Hey are you okay can I help you but I would I do that from about thirty feet away so you would be running up trying to put your coat around or or no yeah hello she said can you help me or or yeah and but she's been evaluated now and once again do not Google is on your work computer just a

First cargo-carrying robot now available for consumers

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

First cargo-carrying robot now available for consumers

"It's call Gaeta and it looks like a large round red cooler on two oversized wheels it can transport groceries or just walk with you says co founder Jeffrey sh Napster reaching for the keys to the car and go out for a walk with Jesus the points as co founder Greg Lynn is to be both functional and fun we decided to focus on helping people be pedestrian and outdoors rather than giving them another thing to ride on at just over three thousand dollars it's not for everyone but analysts JP Gallagher says this is robot future they're not going to look like what we have imagined in the movies meaning it doesn't look like a human or animal instead an object or even just a voice in a device like a lex up for Sears I'm Julie Walker

Gaeta Greg Lynn Jp Gallagher Sears Julie Walker Co Founder Jeffrey Sh Three Thousand Dollars
Fired Up!

The Sustainable Futures Report

06:03 min | 1 year ago

Fired Up!

"But increasingly read comment while ago posted about the sustainable futures report. The correspondent was concerned that i was trying into politics. The truth is everything is political while we can all do something toward solving the climate crisis. It is only governments and politicians who can make the changes of the magnitude that will make a difference. We are talking about system change after all. I know that many of you listening thing to the sustainable futures report are not in the u._k. I think that even you would have noticed that you k- politics are in some turmoil at the moment in fact this has been going on for three years but it's finally approaching day new mall. I say finally but everything may well have changed by the time you hear this anyway. They situation is the new prime minister has sought and received the authority of the queen to prorogue or suspend parliament of course she couldn't refuse but that's another story. The point at issue is that this would allow the prime minister to govern without parliament and allow how him to complete brexit the u._k.'s departure from the e._u. As he chooses i happen to believe that leaving the ear would be a disaster. Komo concerned if this prime minister can sideline parliament than any prime minister can do it on any issue. That's the reason i spent tuesday in london with your for europe and the yorker remain voice clap. I hope you saw us and hurt us on the evening news on bbc you see i tv and channel. Brexit is a sideshow by comparison with the climate crisis while breaks. It dominates u._k. Politics antics little of significance will be done on climate change all on many other issues that we've been neglecting over the last three years worrying agreeing also is the fact that many permanent brexit tears pacifica's climate deniers if i'm being political in opposing them and so be it in the climate crisis news this week the amazon fires why they're not the only fires why they he may not be as bad as you think a why they may be much more serious in ways you don't expect the future of the consumer society professor ian boyd retiring chief scientific advisor defa has set out his thoughts which looked very much like system change to me and the flying prince. I'll all common offsets making his travel common neutral the fun as in the amazon have been making big news news over the last couple of weeks that destroying the rainforest sante threatening an area which produces twenty percent of the world's oxygen on the amazon amazon rainforest is the lungs of the earth. Isn't it well. Yes no i strongly recommend that you listen to more or less a statistics sticks programme on bbc radio four which is available online and has carried out a detailed analysis of the situation they spoke to daniel net stunt of the earth innovation institute who explained that the fire houses have been identified by satellites are not burning rainforest generally the rainforest doesn't burn because it's so damp and humid what can happen is that low level fis can burn the leaf litter on the forest i flow and this can scorch the trunks of the trees and callum off these files are not visible from space and their effects are only evident once the trees have died off which may take a euro reversed point then is that the fires may be more extensive than we know at present. The fires that we can see from space are carrying on land which is being cleared. It's common practice for farmers to burn off weeds. Where land has been recently cleared. The trees are left to dry out and then abundant. One of the major consequences of these files is smoke soot in the atmosphere leading millions of people to seek treatment for respiratory diseases smoke from the falls code sao paulo which is mulling one thousand miles away from the amazon to be plunged into an apocalyptic darkness in the nineteenth of august the new president of brazil k. A. bowl sonata has taken a very hard line on the amazon weakening the brazilian environment ministry and turning a blind eye to illegal logging and deforestation he the amazon as a resource to be exploited by minus farmers and loggers as reported recently when the brazilian satellite satellite monitoring agency revealed significant increases in the rate of deforestation. The president denied that it was true on the director of the agency was dismissed. Does the amazon produce twenty percent of the world oxygen. It depends how you calculate but according to daniel napster it consumes a lot as as well and the net effect is more or less neutral. He sees the most important function of the forest as cooling effect as every every drop of water transpired by the trees evaporates. It cools the atmosphere you the effect of this across the whole forest is enough to have an effect on the climate of the whole world. Let's not forget the consequences of the fires and the deforestation policies for the indigenous peoples of the amazon amazon basin. They see the homes that food sources their way of life destroyed tribes that have been wolf generations a coming together against a common enemy enemy. Surely the global community should take that pont in our own interest as well as this president bolsonaro initially initially suggested the ngos had deliberately set the forest on fire in order to embarrass the government rejected the twenty two million dollars that politicians titians attending the reason g seven summit in biarritz pledged to help fight the fis. Can the world afford to stand by and let this destruction attraction continue. It's claimed that attention to the amazon leads the world over the fact that there are far more fis in africa but it's not the same thing writing in courts africa kolin bill senior lecturer in ecology university of york says fire is an essential part of the savannah savannah. The first to know is that the impact of a wildfire depends more on wet and what it is burning than how big it is or indeed how many fines there are the vast majority of the african fires currently earning seemed to be in grasslands and exactly the places we expect to see fires of this time of these files are usually by cattle famous as part of their traditional management of the savannahs where the animals graze some files are started to to stimulate new growth of nutritious cross for their animals others are used to control the numbers of parasitic takes own manage the growth of thorny we scrub without fuzz many savannahs and the animals they support wouldn't exist and lighting them as a key management activity in many any of the iconic protected areas of africa for instance. The sarah getty in tanzania is known worldwide for safari animals and all inspiring hiring builder beasts migration and i'll work shows that around half of its grasslands each year most foss both in the amazon was an ad in africa therefore deliberately started by humans as part of land-management b._b._c. news reports wildfires ravaging parts of the anti with areas of siberia alaska greenland and canada engulfed in flames and smoke satellite images

Amazon Prime Minister Brexit President Trump Daniel Africa London BBC Biarritz Europe Sao Paulo Savannah Savannah Komo Siberia Alaska Greenland Tanzania Sarah Getty Earth Innovation Institute Bolsonaro
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 1 year ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
Remembering CD-Rs

Talking Tech

04:29 min | 1 year ago

Remembering CD-Rs

"Hiring is challenging but there's one place you can go. We're hiring is simple and smart. That place is ziprecruiter where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates. Let's try it for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash tech talk ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire kids remember C._D.'s CDs because I stopped by my local C._B._S.. Store the other day and was pretty shocked to see big row of C._D.. Artists in jewel cases cases happily stocked on the shelves. It's been a long time since I opened a blank CD. How about you so on today's talking tech? Let's remember yesterday's yesterday's technology with fondness. I'm Jefferson Graham for those of you who don't recall well once upon a time. We've been mixed tapes on cassettes. You know those tapes tapes with their round holes Liane Sony Walkman units which if you don't recall tended to be bright and yellow the Walkman is forty years old this year although you'd probably have have a hard time finding any of them in stock anymore what was cool about them was that for the first time we could hear music on our terms sure I could take a crappy sounding in cassette of an album and listen to it in the car or at home but the Walkman let me take the music and my mix tapes anywhere but I digress at the turn turn of this century Napster showed us how to turn any song into an M._p.. Three file and create playlists on our computer. This was twenty years after the CDs came out convinced us to buy our old vinyl records all over again the music industry began to fall apart due to napster and the ease of making our own C._D.'s. He's on recordable media you could rip a C._D.. On your computer and converted to M._P._3. Files and then put them onto a recordable Aim Sort of recordable media that C._V._S. selling today at around twenty dollars a spindle we spent hours on this taking the C._D.'s into the trays of our computers using burning software to handle the transaction and waiting a good ten to fifteen minutes for the process to bleed itself oftentimes the disc would fail and we'd have to do it it all over again now. Of course we can do it with just a few clicks on spotify or youtube music in have a living breathing playlist that can be accessed by simply asking Alexa Lisa or the Google Assistant to play it and we could also listen to other people's playlists on those same subscription music services. It's great now the C._d.. D._V._D. C._D.. Home era was killed by apple went around twenty ten to disk drives stopped appearing on computers other computer manufacturers followed quickly and then came streaming so I must admit I don't Miss Physical media in disc form or even on vinyl. They were too finicky. The ease of streaming and calling up something thing with your fingers is just too great in. I never ever get disc error messages anymore. How long has it been since you've burned to CD? I'd love to hear from Look for me on twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham. You've been listening to talking tech. Please subscribe to the show. Wherever you listen to online podcasts I will be back tomorrow with another quick it from the world world of tech hiring used to be hard it was and still is one of the biggest challenges businesses face before it meant dealing with endless stacks of resumes ace flipping through them and hoping the perfect candidate would jump out at you and the manual review process wasn't any easier but in today's high tech world hiring can be easy and you only have to go to one place to get it done ziprecruiter dot com slash tech talk with their powerful matching technology ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find the most qualified defied contenders for your job and actively invites them to apply. Ziprecruiter is so effective that eighty percents of employers who post on the site get a qualified candidate within the first this day and right now talking tech listeners can try Ziprecruiter for free at this exclusive web address ziprecruiter dot com slash talk. That's ZIPRECRUITER DOT COM com slash T. E. C. H. T. A. L. K. ziprecruiter dot com slash tech talk ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire.

Ziprecruiter C._D. Napster Jefferson Graham Sony Spotify Apple Google Alexa Lisa T. E. C. H. T. A. L. K. Fifteen Minutes Twenty Dollars Twenty Years Forty Years
Bruce Allen, President of the Washington Redskins, Talks Training Camp

Larry O'Connor

08:53 min | 1 year ago

Bruce Allen, President of the Washington Redskins, Talks Training Camp

"Get you're saying welcome to football season it's the third week of July for crying out loud the Napster for games out in playing very well it's it's hard to shift your gears but it's red skins well I'm sure here so I guess you know the great thing about training camp is you lose sight of everything because you're with the players from six AM to eleven PM yeah and we are we're inundating them with football football football understandable and then not not running with the bulls or anything like that no we had a talk did you have a conversation with Mister Norman about you know I wasn't a fan of you dancing you know with the debt limit stars yet but I have you dance with the women that dance with the book yeah I think it probably a good choice hi this is your fourth year now in Richmond for our six year is six I'm so sorry for under and and what it turned out it was today I we're on break right now but the fans will be coming back relationship still strong with the city here it's it's strong with the city with you know Richmond is really one of the big NFL markets there in the top ten in television ratings while for every Monday night game the Super Bowl the draft so there's a lot of foot NFL fans here and obviously this is rights can country can you know the time pretty well could you at the governor just won't come on my show I don't I'm not sure why he's been in the news a lot lately could you could you give me a hook up there we've we've heard from the office and we're expecting him to come to practice either Friday maybe this weekend so give me a heads up on that I'll swing by for fat all right let I got to talk about the Redskins in the season ahead of us who's your starting quarterback Jeez I was wondering if you'd asked me that question that hasn't been determined yet the Philly is anybody's job yeah that would Jay's been doing as you saw in the first practice is each player's a cold case and Wayne are all getting equal amount of wraps and they're working with the first in the second and the third groups and we're not going to worry about that for a while now I know why shouldn't loves a quarterback controversy as much as independent counsels yeah right now we're going to let him continue to work and continue to grow and and of course it was talking about do what's happening with your left guard right now the the offensive line seems a little a little different without without are at the heart of the team without Trent there what's what's happening there you have news on that old out no news on it he's not here we love them but he's not here and is everybody talking I mean either you having conversations at least to work through this yeah it's really Trent tranice explained his position to me and we'll see what happens but right now we have to focus on the guys were here well if it listed as we had a great time last season obviously it was an incredible start you superseded everybody's expectations of the B. first half of the year and then these injuries com and it does ask question in that it's got to kill you obviously when you see these injuries in these guys are a part of your family and and you get to know them so much what is it about the red skins it seems is it is it the turf is it the the the program that you've got for strength and conditioning I mean I've seen your facilities there their top of the line you know Larry we we brought in some independent people to try and analyze the different injuries and after spending about eight weeks of our time and their time they came back with the you know there's no correlation is just the fleet demand yeah you know if it was just pulled muscles are growing sin and things soft tissue type of things then it would be the training regimen but we broke some bones we separated some shoulders we pulled some calf muscles we pulled we did it we did a mall you got everything that we share it was hopefully goes in the cycle and and it and it all happened the cowboys I don't wish injuries on any but I do but not us our receipt with Bruce Allen president of the red skins here on day one of training camp that between now that Lester yeah the jets here and they they were thugs right they were day beaten up on our players and our fans what team comes in at the end of this season will be the bangles because that's the first preseason game it didn't work out with the bangles okay so we're we're not gonna have any team come to Richmond we're just we're gonna work is our our own units and then get ready to play the Bengals ran by the way you this goes through what August fourteenth I want to say off the top of my head I believe a right right in there if you guys want to come down here for a beautiful long weekend or just take a couple of days off Richmond is incredibly hospitable and it's a really cool atmosphere don't cost anything to come in the gate no it caught the cost nothing I I do know someone bought a beer a Budweiser very early this morning that that was that I just bought that for the picture I can actually drink the beer I'm workin Bros an hour but it's not it's not get me in trouble or allies I have more questions if you'd like me to ask the group if we're trying to get each other in trouble well no we appreciate the business thank you for let's let's talk about what your expectations are for this season I know on the first day of training camp everybody thinks that we got a chance at the Superbowl instructing the parity in the NFL is incredible but the if you read the press accounts you guys don't have a chance to make it past the first week it all and that's a good thing that's motivating right yeah it's it's it's our players understand that expectations with you don't national outlets is in great for us the the cowboys in the eagles on the eagles have been a very good team that won the Superbowl couple years ago but we can make our own history and that's that is the message here and if you see the shirts that the players are wearing they say everything matters and so we're gonna try and get the details down here in Richmond and trying to get ready for opening gaming and win again when I was talking to the fans here during the the first half of the day for the first practice they were all raving about the draft and do something about this draft in particular that has given so much hope and excitement to the fans odd that talk about your draft talk about the strategy that you have there and who you really look I mean obviously you want all of them to to start eventually but who are you really looking after this season from at twelve each day is very important for the young players and and any new player that comes in to to the red skins or any team because I got to learn the new terminology the new systems and learn their new teammates and what they can count on from their teammates so the young players it's very important for him they're working really hard and we are excited about a week we see great things for them here's where those so you you want to make it a starting quarterback right now is pretty much up for grabs a everybody yes several out of that out of the next ten minutes there goes that that career option starting running back kind of the same situation right even Adrian Peterson obviously coming back but he's not necessarily in you know every down kind of running back right we use a group runny back system for a number of years eight Adrian obviously looks beautiful and is the best body out here him in Vernon Davis it's a tie between who the best body is in any way once again you're not station but Chris Thompson's been such a valuable asset for us on third down and out of the backfield but getting various guys back yeah watching the compile competition for them I was injured right around this time like third day of training camp last one of the first preseason game against overstressed hatred and that and and awful awful but having various guys back and he's he's healthy hundred resign and he's he's healthy knock on wood please not cancel that service thank all right so no conversation with you is complete we're gonna have plenty conversations I understand we're gonna we're gonna you're gonna be a regular here on the program over the course of the year so what's going on with the stadium the stage where we gonna be where we gonna be we do not have that announcement yet you'll you'll get to hear when we do expect to make an announcement about a new stadium new home for the Redskins sometime this year I would say within a year of that if that is the time table we're looking at our deadline for making the decision is really twenty twenty two because our lease and in Maryland and sin and twenty twenty six and so yeah but they don't build around here like they do in Vegas like that they they made the that stadium for the raiders was built in like three months out there I it's going to take a longer to building here well there's history in this city for when they're motivated they can do anything they want to do when I interviewed the president and he said he'd like to come to a red skins game what was the reaction in the front office there an aspirin when you were when you were here and that we look at that residence we have we have pictures of red skin park of the presidents of come over the years and it's it's it's it's part of the greatness of this franchise legacy is we're in the nation's capital and we think that's remains as a present wants to go to a game the president redskin says you'd love to have him at the game so I got to be the mediator I got to work this out I get get everybody in the same room and a negotiated down your your on board for this yeah but I thought you had the secretary of state coming to the game no no I left him down and when is that our Bruce down as a present right you want the president to come to the game alright we got a lot of Redskins fans here want that T. R. Bruce thank you and I know you're busy have a good time with with training camp here thanks

Bulls Football Three Months Eight Weeks Ten Minutes Six Year
Dark Web vs. Deep Web

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

06:39 min | 1 year ago

Dark Web vs. Deep Web

"Into that let's get into the dark web because the dark web is shocking will tell you about that in just a moment but first there's the World Wide Web that's what all of issues you know W. W. W. you're on the worldwide web then there's the deep web and the dark web is not the deep web the deep web is any part of the internet that is it discover a bull by search engine I think that's the best way to say it yeah so for example you're on your banking site and you log in if you've navigated to a specific location on line that particular place online that is your account is not served up in Google results you go to your health care provider and you want to see the results of your last lab test that's not going to show up on on a Google search or whatever surgeons you're using so that is the deep web so we got the worldwide web the deep web I hope I I hope I'm doing you know your yeah you're you're you're putting it in the picture together perfectly then you've got the dark who had been this is I mean these are the blackest of waters folks the dark net the dark web this this is the peer to peer network whereas with this is this is where you find the kind of market places that ply their trade in illicit wearers these are basically hidden crime bazaars they can only be accessed through special software that obscures one's true location on line it's real this is not how good it if the I would say Katie I'll get your take on this I would say the dark web's much much larger than the W. W. W. dot web well you know that there there's a picture that goes around it's like the tip of the iceberg as the W. W. W. realm and then it that giant piece that you can't see above water and that's the rest of the internet it's the dark web so the dark web if you're on the dark web if you're using a crypto currency to do business that's what you do it's not you know it's not the dollars and cents it's a crypto currency and because there's so much money to be made on the dark web both legitimate and illegitimate are using these crypto currencies the one you've heard of probably is bit coin bit coin what did you say one bit coin is worth now ninety five hundred Bucks so crypto currencies these are decentralized virtual currencies that run on peer to peer computer networks big coin the largest the most traded so the crypto currency is digital it's a digital for money there's no central bank there's no central repository the money flows in and out of the system through the use of users computers it went you know as I think about it remember Napster Napster's going back but this is Napster was unique because you could trade MP three songs and videos here it only lasted a few years late nineties early two thousands that's exactly how crypto currency works your currency transactions are verified using super high powered computer equipment and it's all done on the dark web now this is the shocking part is Katie and I've gone there didn't purchase anything we just looked around and it was one of the creepiest experiences that I've ever been a part of I mean we're right here in the studio name a place on the internet where you can purchase a hit man for crying out loud yeah this was not a joke now and and and HK forty sevens and heroin I mean you name it you can buy it there it's a whole the hit man thing was again you're thinking come on this is it this is a joke no it was this was for real it was for this is that the types of drugs that are easily found and purchased on the dark web all the purchaser needs is a cryptocurrency use the big corn you get an address to ship your drug of choice and of course you need the computer smart phone and once you find what you want you literally click and by and proceed to check out just like you're on Amazon it's just it it's wild the way that this it and it's so easy to access it's so easy once you I mean once you I mean you can look at a you tube video how to access the dark web and I'll take you through it so you've got you've got the drugs and you've got the sax and you've got they they hit man and what's what's amazing is with the drugs you can have these drugs discreetly shipped directly to your home the U. S. P. S. literally they're using the postal service for this yep you can get all the stuff guaranteed delivery within twenty four hours this is how Fenton all comes in and out of the country major driver of the current opioid crisis in America it's all happening via the dark web where they'll legal firearms come from yeah I'm sure the FBI you know they they're not dummies they're getting involved but again this is such a dark and creepy part of our our world four one five eight zero eight fifty six hundred I'd love to hear from you about this four one five eight zero eight fifty six hundred but police agencies you know there trying to get involved because well is it and and and the other thing that Steve Steve you must which was making with us earlier tax attorney not all crypto currency users are criminals I have to make that clear but there is a lot of crypto currency involved in various crimes and that's was just absolutely shocking so it's a part of our world that is gaining in popularity and it's a part of a world that stinks I mean it's just putrid

Twenty Four Hours One Bit
Where are musicians making money

The Frame

03:32 min | 1 year ago

Where are musicians making money

"Ninety nine was a peak year for the music industry with sales reaching fourteen point six billion dollars in the US. And then, you know, the story Napster happened I tunes happened and the CD store died twenty years later. The music business is back to, quote one writer it's back like a zombie prime to devour the world on a massive scale because of streaming services, some projection show that music, revenue may soon surpass the benchmark set in the late nineties, here's pitchforks, senior, staff writer, Marc HOGAN, basically, your for years and years as has been widely publicized, the industry was doing really badly. But now has been finally growing again recently, thanks to the expected growth from a streaming. Goldman Sachs says forty one billion dollars annually by twenty thirty. Right. I mean, unless bear in mind that Leeman brothers in nineteen ninety nine also. Had these really rosy upbeat predictions for industry and the industry crashed and then leading others is now gone. So these, these predictions should all be taken with a grain of salt, but people seem to expect the industry to be healthy again. So that's the labels how Spotify doing Spotify. They keep growing. They have more and more users, they're expected to keep growing around the world, the revenues are pretty big, but they generally lose money. So Spotify struggling to turn all of these users into actual profits in your article, you do really great breakdown of where the revenue goes. So break it down for sure. Well, according to deutchebanks report, the earlier this year, for everyone hundred dollars consumer spending on CDs or vinyl of the labels profit is eight dollars for every one hundred dollars spent on down those on, I tunes, that's nine dollars. And for every one hundred dollars spent on streaming the labels profit is. Thirteen dollars. So the share that goes, the labels is actually bigger under your streaming than it was under the old physical formats, is that simply because of logistics cost of production. They don't have to make a thing cutting out the middleman. Yes, exactly, where's the rest of the money, go to well, I think, for musician it varies based on what they're deal is what I found the more people I talked with is just it really depends. And it's it's difficult to come up with a single simple number for what -sition gets now. Let's talk about musicians. How is this boom affecting, you know, the people who are actually, making the music the way, the boom, seems to be musicians is similar to what we're seeing across the economy, really where the upper echelon Hughes doing better and better, and the middle income, and lower income is issues are not doing this. Well, I talked to one you leibel head who said that the middle class for musicians has dried up. That's not really there anymore. What's the average musician making no days? Well, according to one survey, it was around. Around thirty five thousand dollars in two thousand seventeen but only about twenty one thousand three hundred dollars that came from activity related to music. So that's live gigs that streams merge live for the most common source of income. So these are professional musicians, who are not able to make a living doing music. Exactly. Yeah. I mean, that's kind of what we're seeing is getting harder and harder for the vast majority of people who actually make music to make living on the other hand, though. You've had some really interesting conversations with the indie rapper, Jay pick, Maffia what he tell you. Well, he's a very interesting guy all

Spotify Maffia United States Napster Goldman Sachs Marc Hogan Writer Staff Writer Deutchebanks Jay Pick Hughes One Hundred Dollars Twenty One Thousand Three Hund Thirty Five Thousand Dollars Forty One Billion Dollars Six Billion Dollars Thirteen Dollars Eight Dollars Nine Dollars Twenty Years
DutchChains Odyssey On Its Blockchain and AI Hackathon

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

08:45 min | 1 year ago

DutchChains Odyssey On Its Blockchain and AI Hackathon

"The street has a crypto winter is finally Thorin most importantly, all blockchain projects remember, those that were all built on future promises and lies Leo culture. Well, the future is right here. We're beginning to see the first fruits from those icy hose from Lowe's future promises. So the future is already here. We're not talking about real partnerships real use cases and stories of early adopter businesses leveraging emerging technologies, but this daily tech podcast. It's not about buzzwords or fuelling hype of anything but hearing right from the heart of the tech world and how it's actually transforming multiple industries. So today, we have Rooker van Zuid dam on the show, and he's the founder and CEO of a company called Dutch chain, which is a leading ecosystem development agency for open. Public infrastructure and also odyssey an open innovation program, which provides a unique collaborative infrastructure for governmental corporate, a nonprofit partners to help them. Find breakthrough solutions to complex societal challenges all using blockchain and so many other emerging technologies. Exile installed Freud that Rooker also has more than fifteen years experience funding companies across communications digital media and tech sectors. And was also the co founder and commercial director of pay logic, which is a next generation ticketing and technology company based in Amsterdam. So buckle up and hold on tight. So I can be meal as all the way to the Netherlands. So we can speak with Ruka who's not only going to talk about everything I've just mentioned, but also ought to see hack twenty nine thousand nine which sounds incredibly exciting. So massive warm. Welcome to the show Rutger. Can you tell the listeners about who you are? And what you do. Thank you, Neil. So thanks for having me first of all, and yeah, I'm from from the Netherlands, and I'm the CEO of this chain and reorganized the one of the largest opening ovation programs in Europe called odyssey can can see everything about it on all the orc. And what we focus on is really the how how can all these new types of technologies like blockchain and a I serve our society in the best possible way. And what we found out is that there is a really interesting space to look at and we call it digital public infrastructure, and this is where we have managed to get corporates. Governments startups regulators. Scalable scientific institutes all on board in a in an open ecosystem that is focused on discovering the future by actually building it. And in this innovation program. We have a a highlights, which is the all the hacker Thon, and that one is taking place in in a week time and about fifteen hundred people from all over to will gather to to work with teams and experts on on solutions in the context of twenty complex challenges. So this is in a nutshell what what what we are working on with a with a team of of nine very very driven people from the deadlines. Tacitly so much to unpack this, I suppose we better start we do chain, which like you said you the founder and CEO of mine to stunning off. It's chinese. It's a leading ecosystem development agency for open digital public infrastructure. But can you begin by telling me a little bit more about that? And the kind of problems that you set out to solve a we'll put you on this path. Yeah. What's put me on this bath really is. And that goes way back to when I was a teenager and internet came into my life. So to say, right. The connection with the rest of the world, and all the creativity simply blew everything away in most positive sense of the word, and this was before Napster when there was no MP3. yet. You know, so but still this this new thing was was there. And then, of course, that evolve, and it was shaping our society more and more than a good way. But also in in ways, we we we don't really know how to cope with yet. I think and then off the social media came in mid and late two thousands. I came across a bitcoin and then. For me. Everything else was just kind of boring because all of a sudden, we we have this digital public infrastructure for a global payment network, and it is not owned by anyone, and it is absolutely independent and neutral, and this whole idea, I think we can take much further, and this is also whether it's basically at the core of what we're doing at other see, so that's that's basically how we came to it. Because what I was doing. When when when I came across bitcoin is both doing experiments with it like built all kinds of new chemical apps. Like, I was at a at a bitcoin conference one of the first ones in Europe organized by mode eleven I think it was in two thousand fourteen or so and then I couldn't pay my beers at the bar with bitcoin. And I was like what what is this? All right. So then we'd you Philip this point of sale system for for restaurants in boss where you could easily pay your base with with bitcoin. But we also. It was a time when when when Google gloss came out, and we connected to go glass to to a blockchain dot info wallet and Aucoin baseball, so then you could do hence free payments. So you could you could say okay glass. Make payments, and then scan QR code like RoboCop style, and then you could not wise, and it pays the actual Bill, and we had so much fun doing these things. But also we learned so much about how this. Bitcoin as an infrastructure system works. And it. It gave me the idea that you can actually discover the future by actually building. It's in a very good way. It takes you out of your comfort zone. It's not a fun. And I also have organized a couple of conferences, but it wasn't really satisfying enough for me because it's just talking. Right. So then I merged the two into this innovation program with the hacker Thon, and and turned it into a professional innovation and collaboration infrastructure. I'm so glad you mentioned you'll teenage years then the arrival lived in

Founder And Ceo Blockchain Netherlands Europe Lowe LEO Ruka Napster CEO Neil Co Founder Amsterdam Rooker Freud Google
Talking about the DMCA

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

04:56 min | 2 years ago

Talking about the DMCA

"You know, those music videos, you love on YouTube, and the memes you love to laugh at well. Proposed digital copyright laws in Europe and other countries kinda wanna make those a little less common, and they have their roots in a twenty year old copyright law here in the US called the digital millennium copyright act. So it's a big gnarly hairball of a law. Corey doctor was a writer and activist with the electronic frontier foundation. We reached him in his hotel room and Berlin, he and the F F have been talking about and litigating over the unintended consequences of the DMCA for almost twenty years. Now, the law was written at a time when it was newly possible to rip CDs and DVD's and put them online illegally downloading music was getting more popular Napster came out in nineteen ninety nine remember that and this big copyright law. The DMCA was designed to protect companies and artists from having their works, stolen and disseminated. All. Over the internet. But almost from the beginning critic said it was too broad doctor. Oh points to one section that covers the circumvention of tools that are designed to protect copyright the idea. Here was that if you like made a DVD player and he wanted to control whether DVD's bought in another country could play on it. You could make a little like code that check to see whether the DVD was bought in the same place as the DVD player, and if not you could refuse to play the DMCA made it illegal to tamper with things like that little code. But it basically said it was illegal to break any copyright locks in any product. And that's why you weren't allowed to open up your smartphone or your tractor to fix it which we talked about earlier this week. And so here we are twenty years later, and this tactic is now being used to lock third party ink out of ancient printers. It's in voting machines. And it's being used to punish security researchers who audit voting machines because they say if you reveal the defects in the voting machines, it might help. Someone bypass these copyright locks. Now, there is a provision in the law for a review every three years to consider exemptions one of those reviews just happened. It gave you more rights to fix your smartphone and your tractor and back in two thousand fifteen the library of congress did grant a limited exemption to protect researchers who were trying to find out if voting machines or other electric systems had security flaws as long as they were acting in good faith. However, there was a large catch the researchers can break through digital rights management DRM to find out if for example, a voting machine has a security problem. But if they describe the tools, they used to find those flaws they could get a huge fine or even go to jail, which means nobody else can verify the research. The DMCA should have been raised in the most common sense way imaginable, which is to say if you break the R M to infringe copyright. You're breaking the rules. If you're breaking DRM in your non infringing copyright. You're allowed to do. Do it refining. The DMC has been a long process, and it's not just academics. And researchers who want to fix it in two thousand sixteen major music industry organization said another provisions of the copyright law was making it too easy for sites like YouTube to keep hosting copyrighted music. And they wanted reforms to kind of ironic since the music industry pushed hard for the original law. And now for some related links related to copyright issues. Google is of course, a huge target of copyright owners. And yes, has let a lot slip through the cracks over the years, not even cracks canyons, really. But it put out a report yesterday detailing. It's twenty eighteen efforts to fight piracy. Google said it's invested one hundred million dollars in tools to spot infringing content. They actually scan uploads against a database of copyrighted material, which is something the proposed EU copyright law. Wants everyone to do in fact, and then if someone uploads copyrighted content, the original copyright owner gets ad revenue. From it Google said it's paid three billion dollars to copyright owners that way and another one point eight billion to the music industry in the form of revenue in its report. Google also said if you give people a way to pay for legitimate content. They are far less likely to steal it taking note TV. On demand people. Finally, if you're totally bored with smartphone designs, and I know you are because the biggest innovation in the last five years has basically been the notch. Then get yourself to the internet and watch video of Samsung's foldable smartphone, which it showed up yesterday at a developer conference. It falls out to become a seven inch tablet, and then closes up and there's a phone screen on the front. Google said, the Android operating system will support these crazy do hickeys Lenovo and Xiaomi and LG are also working on them willa work. I don't know. Do you want it? I don't know. All I know is it wasn't about politics. And I don't think it had a notch. I'm in

Dmca Google Youtube Corey Doctor Europe United States Berlin Napster Congress Writer EU Samsung Lenovo LG
Talking about the DMCA

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

04:56 min | 2 years ago

Talking about the DMCA

"You know, those music videos, you love on YouTube, and the memes you love to laugh at well. Proposed digital copyright laws in Europe and other countries kinda wanna make those a little less common, and they have their roots in a twenty year old copyright law here in the US called the digital millennium copyright act. So it's a big gnarly hairball of a law. Corey doctor was a writer and activist with the electronic frontier foundation. We reached him in his hotel room and Berlin, he and the F F have been talking about and litigating over the unintended consequences of the DMCA for almost twenty years. Now, the law was written at a time when it was newly possible to rip CDs and DVD's and put them online illegally downloading music was getting more popular Napster came out in nineteen ninety nine remember that and this big copyright law. The DMCA was designed to protect companies and artists from having their works, stolen and disseminated. All. Over the internet. But almost from the beginning critic said it was too broad doctor. Oh points to one section that covers the circumvention of tools that are designed to protect copyright the idea. Here was that if you like made a DVD player and he wanted to control whether DVD's bought in another country could play on it. You could make a little like code that check to see whether the DVD was bought in the same place as the DVD player, and if not you could refuse to play the DMCA made it illegal to tamper with things like that little code. But it basically said it was illegal to break any copyright locks in any product. And that's why you weren't allowed to open up your smartphone or your tractor to fix it which we talked about earlier this week. And so here we are twenty years later, and this tactic is now being used to lock third party ink out of ancient printers. It's in voting machines. And it's being used to punish security researchers who audit voting machines because they say if you reveal the defects in the voting machines, it might help. Someone bypass these copyright locks. Now, there is a provision in the law for a review every three years to consider exemptions one of those reviews just happened. It gave you more rights to fix your smartphone and your tractor and back in two thousand fifteen the library of congress did grant a limited exemption to protect researchers who were trying to find out if voting machines or other electric systems had security flaws as long as they were acting in good faith. However, there was a large catch the researchers can break through digital rights management DRM to find out if for example, a voting machine has a security problem. But if they describe the tools, they used to find those flaws they could get a huge fine or even go to jail, which means nobody else can verify the research. The DMCA should have been raised in the most common sense way imaginable, which is to say if you break the R M to infringe copyright. You're breaking the rules. If you're breaking DRM in your non infringing copyright. You're allowed to do. Do it refining. The DMC has been a long process, and it's not just academics. And researchers who want to fix it in two thousand sixteen major music industry organization said another provisions of the copyright law was making it too easy for sites like YouTube to keep hosting copyrighted music. And they wanted reforms to kind of ironic since the music industry pushed hard for the original law. And now for some related links related to copyright issues. Google is of course, a huge target of copyright owners. And yes, has let a lot slip through the cracks over the years, not even cracks canyons, really. But it put out a report yesterday detailing. It's twenty eighteen efforts to fight piracy. Google said it's invested one hundred million dollars in tools to spot infringing content. They actually scan uploads against a database of copyrighted material, which is something the proposed EU copyright law. Wants everyone to do in fact, and then if someone uploads copyrighted content, the original copyright owner gets ad revenue. From it Google said it's paid three billion dollars to copyright owners that way and another one point eight billion to the music industry in the form of revenue in its report. Google also said if you give people a way to pay for legitimate content. They are far less likely to steal it taking note TV. On demand people. Finally, if you're totally bored with smartphone designs, and I know you are because the biggest innovation in the last five years has basically been the notch. Then get yourself to the internet and watch video of Samsung's foldable smartphone, which it showed up yesterday at a developer conference. It falls out to become a seven inch tablet, and then closes up and there's a phone screen on the front. Google said, the Android operating system will support these crazy do hickeys Lenovo and Xiaomi and LG are also working on them willa work. I don't know. Do you want it? I don't know. All I know is it wasn't about politics. And I don't think it had a notch. I'm in

Dmca Google Youtube Corey Doctor Europe United States Berlin Napster Congress Writer EU Samsung Lenovo LG
A 20-year-old digital copyright law is still being fought about (and copied) today

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:12 min | 2 years ago

A 20-year-old digital copyright law is still being fought about (and copied) today

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU and by G, suite by Google cloud. A suite of cloud based productivity tools that includes g mail doc slides sheets and drive you can make real time updates to the same document without having to keep track of multiple versions. And since all tools are cloud based your whole team can access the same document and work on the same page at the same time make it with G suite by Google cloud. Find out more at G, suite dot com. Twenty year old digital copyright law is still being fought about and copied today from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. You know, those music videos, you love on YouTube, and the memes you love to laugh at well. Proposed digital copyright laws in Europe and other countries kinda wanna make those a little less common, and they have their roots in a twenty year old copyright law here in the US called the digital millennium copyright act. So it's a big gnarly hairball of a law. Corey doctor was a writer and activist with the electronic frontier foundation. We reached him in his hotel room and Berlin, he and the F F have been talking about and litigating over the unintended consequences of the DMCA for almost twenty years. Now, the law was written at a time when it was newly possible to rip CDs and DVD's and put them online illegally downloading music was getting more popular Napster came out in nineteen ninety nine remember that and this big copyright law. The DMCA was designed to protect companies and artists from having their works, stolen and disseminated. All. Over the internet. But almost from the beginning critic said it was too broad doctor. Oh points to one section that covers the circumvention of tools that are designed to protect copyright the idea. Here was that if you like made a DVD player and he wanted to control whether DVD's bought in another country could play on it. You could make a little like code that check to see whether the DVD was bought in the same place as the DVD player, and if not you could refuse to play the DMCA made it illegal to tamper with things like that little code. But it basically said it was illegal to break any copyright locks in any product. And that's why you weren't allowed to open up your smartphone or your tractor to fix it which we talked about earlier this week. And so here we are twenty years later, and this tactic is now being used to lock third party ink out of ancient printers. It's in voting machines. And it's being used to punish security researchers who audit voting machines because they say if you reveal the defects in the voting machines, it might help. Someone bypass these copyright locks. Now, there is a provision in the law for a review every three years to consider exemptions one of those reviews just happened. It gave you more rights to fix your smartphone and your tractor and back in two thousand fifteen the library of congress did grant a limited exemption to protect researchers who were trying to find out if voting machines or other electric systems had security flaws as long as they were acting in good faith. However, there was a large catch the researchers can break through digital rights management DRM to find out if for example, a voting machine has a security problem. But if they describe the tools, they used to find those flaws they could get a huge fine or even go to jail, which means nobody else can verify the research. The DMCA should have been raised in the most common sense way imaginable, which is to say if you break the R M to infringe copyright. You're breaking the rules. If you're breaking DRM in your non infringing copyright. You're allowed to do. Do it refining. The DMC has been a long process, and it's not just academics. And researchers who want to fix it in two thousand sixteen major music industry organization said another provisions of the copyright law was making it too easy for sites like YouTube to keep hosting copyrighted music. And they wanted reforms to kind of ironic since the music industry pushed hard for the original law. And now for some related links related to copyright issues. Google is of course, a huge target of copyright owners. And yes, has let a lot slip through the cracks over the years, not even cracks canyons, really. But it put out a report yesterday detailing. It's twenty eighteen efforts to fight piracy. Google said it's invested one hundred million dollars in tools to spot infringing content. They actually scan uploads against a database of copyrighted material, which is something the proposed EU copyright law. Wants everyone to do in fact, and then if someone uploads copyrighted content, the original copyright owner gets ad revenue. From it Google said it's paid three billion dollars to copyright owners that way and another one point eight billion to the music industry in the form of revenue in its report. Google also said if you give people a way to pay for legitimate content. They are far less likely to steal it taking note TV. On demand people. Finally, if you're totally bored with smartphone designs, and I know you are because the biggest innovation in the last five years has basically been the notch. Then get yourself to the internet and watch video of Samsung's foldable smartphone, which it showed up yesterday at a developer conference. It falls out to become a seven inch tablet, and then closes up and there's a phone screen on the front. Google said, the Android operating system will support these crazy do hickeys Lenovo and Xiaomi and LG are also working on them willa work. I don't know. Do you want it? I don't know. All I know is it wasn't about politics. And I don't think it had a notch. I'm in both of those related links are on our website. Marketplace tech dot org. I'm Ali would. And thanks for listening to marketplace tech Tele friends, so they can listen to. This is a PM.

Google Dmca Youtube Colgate ALI Colgate University New York Congress Corey Doctor United States Europe Napster Berlin EU Samsung
"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

"It used to be that people wanted to have curated content and Pandora's you're suggesting sort of follow that model. But if you look at Spotify or apple music, it's much more sort of rummaging around the place a bit more Napster ask maybe. Yeah. I think people want both. I mean, you know, Spotify has some Spotify curated playlist specifically there's one called wrap caviar hugely popular and listeners do want that curated experience. But I think they also want the ability to just go straight to Spotify and listened to the new low Wayne album, or whatever it is. I think they won both house the industry doing a whole. I mean, we've seen some interesting plays by people like for instance, we were talking about beyond say earlier, and she only makes her music available on title. And then you have Taylor swift who has gone back and forth when it comes to. Spotify. What difference does it make monetarily? For those artists makes a lot of difference to to answer the sort of macro question. I think what the record industry has tried and is trying to do is they were famously slow on downloading they famously fought it. I mean, that's what your whole show has been about with Napster, and they paid the price because downloading with here to stay and the record labels didn't accept it until it was too late. So I think with streaming which has basically supplanted downloading the labels and the record industry have tried to be more adaptive, and they've tried to get in on something close to the ground floor with streaming and to really sort of buy in to this whole new way that people listen to and I think it's working out well, in their view, the sort of various trade groups love to talk about how the record industry is after many years of contraction is expanding again and. Labels are making money. So I think the many people view the worst as being behind them. And now, it's a it's a point of time of growth and of trying to figure out how to maybe make more money where some is being made. But obviously, many would like to make more, you know, a have to throw this out is just a wild card because I didn't appreciate this until I actually was gifted a turntable and came to discover how much I actually enjoyed listening to vinyl. Of course, we're seeing a lot of record stores manage to stay open because of, you know, selling new and used vinyl is that a is that a novelty, do you think or is it possible that we might see an actual robust return of the physical recorded medium? The word robust is one to us. But it is certainly the case that at this moment the physical media. Market is you know, it's not insignificant. I think the question to ask is what is fueling it, certainly..

Spotify Napster Pandora Taylor apple Wayne
"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

"Sign up for free today. You know, we're talking about the fallout of Napster versus the record labels but returning to Napster itself for just a moment. We mentioned lime wire, of course, Napster had greater brand recognition. But there were other players. There was new Tele kazaa several of them didn't make it. What companies took the idea of what Napster created and successfully built on it. I mean, I don't wanna be too grandiose. But in some ways, you can look at all of digital content purveyors now and say that they trace back to now stir in some way, Netflix for instance, how is it that we as consumers got comfortable with the idea of getting content. You know over the internet, whether it's streaming downloading whatever how do we get comfortable with that? Without Napster Napster was sort of the one that got people used to. You know, wasn't authorized whatever that means legal. But it was easy. It was convenient. It was fairly easy to understand. And so I wonder without Napster. Do you get to the I tune store? Do you get to Spotify? Do you get to Netflix? I don't know. You know, that's an interesting thing. I was thinking about some of the other players in the streaming space. You know, sort of riffing on the Netflix model for the ears is some of them have worked. Well, I notably Spotify. But Amazon tried something like that. And it hasn't really flown. I tunes. I'm not sure I I don't think I tunes radio has really done that. Well, although once upon a time, I tunes was the top digital retailer, you know, Pandoro what about Pandora? I think Sirius XM purchased back in September something like that. Pandora's a really interesting sort of case to look at because in some ways, they were really ahead of the curve and kind of owning the streaming space. If Napster got people used to the idea of sort of the digitization of content. I think Dora did a lot of the work of getting people accustomed to the idea of streaming what that meant how it worked. What they didn't do until it was too late until their lunch had been eaten by Spotify. And apple music is that they didn't respond quickly to people desire for on demand listening, the Pandora model was sort of based on the idea that the Pandora brain would give you what you want based on what you've told it You liked. liked and many people many millions of people like that and likely still do but Spotify said, oh, we won't necessarily choose for you if you'd like to hear whatever we have it for you. And so that I think Pandora was just late in that space, and by that time the other companies were established, and and as we said with Napster versus lime wire versus the many other peer to peer networks were. There's only enough space for a couple of these businesses. What you say, you know, there's there's there's another element here too. And that's the curation..

Napster Spotify Netflix Pandora apple Dora Amazon
"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

"But it's done in a way that consumers except using the threat of annihilation at the hands of Napster successors. Like kazaa jobs extracts, a reasonable price ninety nine cents a song, the labels skipped two thirds of that. Which is a hell of a lot better than the zero percent. They get from the pirate services, but the days of forcing people to buy an eighteen dollar CD. When all they want is one hit are never coming back. In announcing the music store jobs pays tribute to Napster declaring that it proved the internet was made for delivering music while noting the dark side of stealing. Now, we acquire music off CDs, right go down by a CD, and we rip it, but we all know that starting in nineteen ninety nine there was this phenomenon called Napster shutdown in two thousand and one, but it demonstrated some things for us it demonstrated that the internet was made for music livery. And it's it's offspring kazaa is alive. And well today distributing lots of tracks. Now, there's a good side bad side of this. He adds there's no legal alternative worth beans. Job said, he was able to negotiate landmark deals with all of the big five music companies universal and then each one after the other, and I have to tell you we met some great people there, and they were willing to to do something with us to go change the world, and we were able to negotiate landmark deals with all the pig. Five music companies. It would prove a brutal transition.

Napster kazaa eighteen dollar zero percent
"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

"Fees to Napster's users that freezing, but the labels hated even more Napster doesn't yet have the technology. It says it will use. And even if it did the some it's touting works out to two hundred million dollars a year. Mir pennies per song in a press. Release Rosen declares the offer is dead on arrival. You claim you want to be legitimate and go sheet licenses based on real business models. Well, then active Cordingley stopped the infringements. Stop the delay tactics in court and redouble your efforts to build a legitimate system with no deal on the horizon berry does redouble those efforts. He hires new engineering managers to build a Napster filter racing to beat the courts June thirtieth deadline at first the filter blocks file names, entitled submitted by the labels, but the engineers grown when they see creative users deliberately mix up the names to avai the filters some of them even resort to pig Latin. On June twenty seven just days before the deadline, Napster deploys, a new software to the knocks out everything but one or two percent of the band songs, but that achievement still fall short of the court order Napster could be held in contempt of court. On july. First Napster pulls the plug. After all the struggle the lawsuits that deal making the wrangling John fanning the congressional hearings the old Napster is dead. Now, the founders and developers are slaving away at Napster to to create a version that filters out copyrighted material, but that's a double edged sword. Sure. A paid subscription version might attract the labels in. That is a very big might the more. Basic question is this with other pirates services popping up at the rock bottom? Price of free. Will restless fans remain loyal. Ready to start your business? Showcase your work. Start a blog make it stand out and do it beautifully and easily with a website from squarespace. You know, so many people.

Napster Cordingley John fanning Rosen two hundred million dollars two percent
"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Business Wars

"In our last episode of Napster versus the record labels. The insanely popular file sharing company staved off a preliminary injunction. That would have shut them down though, the outlook for Napster remains bleak. Napster's run out of heroes. Congress is not going to save the company when evidence shows it knowingly ignored piracy and go with the labels. Go sideways when Napster CEO hang berry. First jacks up the buyout price to two billion dollars. And then refuses to give the majority control, universal walks and the other labels follow. All that's left is Bertelsmann. You're listening to episode six fight to the death. Middle Hof has barely contained the rebellion in his own ranks over Napster. Now, he has to make sure that the heart and soul of Napster is truly on board as well. Middle Hof in by Shawn fanning to dinner at the post house in Manhattan, where the order steaks and a two hundred dollar bottle of cabernet middle Hof tries to put Sean at ease nut stirs an incredible achievement takes distribution so much further than where we were. I want you to know that I believe in it, even if my company seems bound to the past. I appreciate it Thomas, but I don't wanna feel like I'm selling out. You know, we've always been about getting artists music to fans without the labels keeping all their money and you own one. So it's a big risk. I mean, you could just shut us down. Look if I wanted to shut you out all of it would have to do is nothing you'd lose in court. So, you know, I believe in natural technology. All right. And I can't help it survive. I think we can spread the piece by getting the other labels. They see. Me as one of them. If we come together Napster and Bertelsmann we'll be in much better position to get them to sign up Napster agrees to the terms. Now, they have to sell this idea to the labels. At a New York hotel ballroom middle hop. Schmidt berry and Sean announce the deal Napster will develop a new paid service for music from BMG and other labels that join the old Napster will go away and BMG will then drop it's part of the record industry's lawsuit. Schmidt makes it clear he wants company the industry has not embraced file sharing. We are going to change that we invite everybody in the industry to work with us. She made it middle Hof think their peers will eventually come around and see that however distasteful it might be to work with Napster. The alternative is worse. If Napster doesn't get a chance to go straight users aren't going to turn to the legal services. They're going to go full pirate. But not only are the label. Chiefs unenthusiastic about the deal. They're downright insulted. They were supposed to be in this together and middle Hof broke ranks. This is the record industry were talking about old school tough guys. Now, they may criticize this strategy or the technology, but really they want to punish middle Hoffer. What they see as his betrayal. The day after the deal is made public universals. Edgar Bronfman calls middle Hof. You might a mistake Thomas. You don't have technology that will stop piracy, and you don't have a business model either. And you went in without us. If you think we're going to pay you to be part of this. You are mistaken, sir. Bronfman is right. No other labels step up. Meanwhile, Napster is still humming away on computers around the world. Moving music to millions of people who didn't pay. In February two thousand one Napster gets a crushing disappointment. And a Ray of hope the ninth circuit court of appeals rules that Napster users are violating copyrights and that the labels request for an immediate injunction to stop the site is warranted. But there's one thing that goes Napster's way the court rules that the labels must provide the names of copyrighted.

Napster Thomas Schmidt berry Bertelsmann Edgar Bronfman Congress Shawn fanning Sean CEO BMG New York Ray Manhattan two billion dollars two hundred dollar
"napster" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

The Nightly Rant

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on The Nightly Rant

"Both of us? We do this and slowly kids. First thing you go, oh, only those ninety socks right to Amazon, see how much it is like instantly, right. I opened my Amazon app more times than I care to think about. 'cause I'm either looking for a book and I wanna see if it's on the kindle and limited or. Or I wanna see something costs like with the price of something is. Right? And it's amazing for that. I think if I was on could fix audible to the point where it was actually, I don't know worth what the hell you pay for it every month. I would like audible allot. Okay. This is what I don't understand. If you think about it, there was. There was. Spotify. There was Napster and can't remember what the one with our was called. Remember what it was called. Oh, came from real media had the real player. Then he made a music service that started with an r and and I've subscribed all three in past author, and there's apple music as well who does. Now, there's music and there's Google points, and there's another one, the one that, but Mitchelson. What do you think is the draw to online music since it's a giant. Catalogue of everything you could ever want to listen to for one flat monthly fee..

Amazon Mitchelson Napster apple Google Spotify
Tesla Chief Accounting Officer Dave Morton resigns after just a month

The Breakfast Club

02:06 min | 2 years ago

Tesla Chief Accounting Officer Dave Morton resigns after just a month

"Jason. I've got breaking news. That's tesla related. So maybe Tesla's chief accounting officer doesn't like the idea of Ilan smoking weed because he just resigned Dave Morton just resigned after one month at the company if your teeth accounting officer goes after one month, don't you feel like that's somebody who walked in and went what did I get myself into? And then bails write a certain kind of show if you will don't forget to this week. The biggest short seller against tesla is suing Yvonne musk over his take the thing private stock manipulation too. So there is that. And then you have kind of a brain drain apples been hiring a lot of the of the car technology and engineer people not just the software people, but the hardware people too. So he's under a lot of stress with the company. He did admit in that podcast that this is what? Keeps him up at night. He said SpaceX is no walk into park. But a car companies really really hard. Okay. Now help me on the trying to go back and walk through the timeframe in my mind. It was this guy. Dave Morton was the announcement that Elon Musk taking the company private that was within this month. So that happened under this guy's watch. Right. Yeah. I happen to I. Yeah. About a month ago? Yeah. The first week of August is when the tweet came out two weeks later, the SEC said, hey, we're interested in what you have there. And then the blog post came out that walked it all back. Okay. So I'm wondering did. Do you think this guy brought that idea in or was this idea unveiled right after he came through the door? Wow. This this kind of its opening a whole new Pandora's box. It it is it goes towards the brain drain friend seems to be happening there, and yeah, you're right. It does not look good. So another optics hit for tesla slash Musk's today. If if the if that financial officers splits after only one month, it's not because he didn't like his corner office. No, no, no. You didn't like what he was walking into. And I don't know they usually pretty well on both sides at that level. When you're the sea level, you're vetting on both sides to make sure it's a fit because you don't want this kind of Pat headache with your shareholders. Because now there's going to be looked like there's two -bility in all the corner offices now and you coming off of a bad optics of, you know, pulling on a blunt

Spotify Youtube Joe Rogan Yvonne Musk Tesla Jason Middleton SEC Dave Morton Margot Neil Degrasse Tyson Starbucks Marijuana Napster California Ilan Cilla Simon Alon
Family demands answers after police shift story in fatal shooting of 20-year-old man

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:14 min | 2 years ago

Family demands answers after police shift story in fatal shooting of 20-year-old man

"A request for an independent investigation into a deadly police shooting in savannah georgia twenty year old ricky boy was killed outside his house the official explanation has changed several times here's marks rosman and then boom ambon he's he's he's shy he's falling to the ground jamila smiley has seen the body camera video of police shooting her son twenty year old ricky boyd right outside the family's front door back in january they don't have to watch much get gunned down police wanted to question boyd about a recent homicide minutes later he was dead interim police chief mark revenue the day of the shooting the suspect he initiated gunfire towards officers napster's return gunfire hours later they said boyd had a gun but never mentioned he fired it state investigators later said it was only a bb gun did you ever see a gun that he held in that video nassir family lawyer william and says this photo shows a bb pistol lying in a neighbor's yard the body is here.

Savannah Georgia Jamila Smiley Ricky Boyd Napster Official William And Twenty Year
"napster" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on The Changelog

"Right and it was totally in the area of like napster and downloading music when it was you know you did it not because you wanted to steal you did it because it was new it was i never i don't maybe i was i was probably poor them too but so probably had to i couldn't afford it but i don't think i did it because it was like i want to steal your stuff it was more like that's how you do it now i guess i mean it's the world's changing i don't know mp threes give it to me that's right yeah i think it's hard to untangle the the experience of of win amp from the experience of you know digital media digital audio being available for the very first time and sort of just skyrocketing into the mains mainstream and suddenly this huge availability of of music and the ability to just ingest in music from all over with very little friction i think i think everybody who went from you know through that transition from a you only get music at a cv store when you can drop you know ten fifteen bucks on a cd to you know everything is suddenly available to me at my fingertips and i think that feeling is probably very is probably a very important potent part of the emotional reaction that people have to win i would guess and not just music that you could buy at you know at the at the cd store is that the cdc's see store that's interesting or music store a record store records or that's yes.

napster cdc
"napster" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"With what is it crypto currency like what is so really currency is a way for people to transact between two parties without a middleman and so instead of using a bank for example or any other sort of you know middleman that interacts between two people to facilitate a transaction whether that be financial transaction or a service based type of transaction may be uber uber for examples middleman for connecting drivers you know something like that so like crypto currency and what's called a distributed ledger really allows you to transact between two people with no middleman so i can send you know a bitcoin to you and it's all done in mathematics and cryptography and it knows that if i sent one bitcoin from my wallet or my count to your wallet your account that i have one less bitcoin and you have one more bitcoin and that's really all it is and so there's nobody in between taking any fees out or anything like that it's all done just pure peer to peer you know for example like when napster when something like that came out in the beginning where we would share music peer to peer we could do that between two parties and that's really will bitcoin is it just allows us to transact and do different types of transactions more than just financial transactions between each other without a middleman okay susie using math matic's okay thank you for that it makes it makes sense on a level what i've only struggled with is where's the value in a currency that can't be used in his not easily accessible for drawl.

napster
"napster" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"In napster and all that in the early days of the internet helped shape the free adsupported information content of the internet today like people got trained on the idea that it wasn't really stealing because you know i can't remember who this is but there was once a comedian i heard doing a comedy act about those old piracy commercials that are like you wouldn't steal a car a why would you why would you steal music but the comedian said you know i would steal a car if all i had to do was touch the car and then an instant copy of the car would be created and i could have it and the original person could keep their car and you know is he created the sense because it was digital information that could be copied without consequence that you weren't really taking from any body you're just getting a copy of a thing yeah it's out there in all i am doing his breathing it in as if it were air yeah and so it like trained people on this idea that that you know information should be free in as as has been said information wants to be free but it's led to this world where okay to produce information you have to spend money right to like in anything that is made on the internet if you want to run a website if you want to write an article if you want to create a podcast if you want to create a video almost none of this can be done for free you have to invest in it and so that's gotta be paid for somehow and so the way everything works including us here is that you pay for things by running ads that's right i mean in the old and that's not even getting into the idea that people were putting their time into creating things in that time has to come out of your life right and you in the individual the individual creator has bills to pay and a roof to maintain and the needs to have food to eat right and so the way technology companies and digital media companies can pay for themselves is to run advertisements in the way they can increase the amount of money they're making and that they can charge advertisers is basically twofold i think one is simply by.

napster
"napster" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Tell you this is perfectly legal it is not and now there are wall suits coming from every direction at the people marketing and selling these boxes my only question what took you all this time to get around to getting off your rear ends and doing something about this because now who knows how many millions of these boxes have been purchased anour in people's homes so uh movie studios amazon net flex who knows who else or filing suits against the various companies and the other question i have where's law enforcement where somebody going after people selling these pirate boxes that allow the end user to steal movies television sports whatever it is this is very similar to what went on a generation ago was stealing music with mussa thing that people used to napster bets right napster and then there was one knit that followed after napster got shut down you remember like lime wire was really big for awhile okay was at the one you used to film yes exactly today the music market people accept the idea that you rent music with a subscription service or that you listen to a free.

napster
"napster" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"Which was really about uh tunnel maja went to society would be like if it were organized on the same principles as like napster you know early peertopeer file sharing uh technologies where there was no scarcity 'cause the cool thing about napster is that the more people there were trying to get a file the more places there were two downloaded from and so the easier was to get at which was really interesting right normally the more in demand something as the less there is a vet up with napster and then later with bittorrent demand actually create supply which is you know nothing short of miraculous um and then with with makers it was about increased efficiency in making right that the ability to make things better so there's a frequent observation that uh if everyone in the world were to live with the quality of life of americans that we would need six planet earth worth of raw materials to supply that life and that may be true but the other thing that's true is that markets for the last several hundred years have been steadily reducing the myth cereals labour an energy embodied by our physical goods because the less of that all of us things are expensive and so the lesson that there is in a in a finish good that less the good cost to make more profit there is unless you can charge threatened better you can compete and so there's a great study by these two bank of canada economists where they use these old ikeya catalogues his data sets their spouses had been nagging them to get rid of their huge collections of ikeya catalogues and what they found is that the the biggest predictor of a single item appearing in an eye care catalogue from year to year is that each year it gets lighter it has fewer countries of origin and it packs into fewer cubic inches so that is to say in embodies less energy fewer logistics less fuel and less material and so to billy bookcases separated by a decade look identical by you know under their skins in terms of their material science in their origins they are absolutely different animals and they're they're kind of a miracle of engineering each one so.

napster bittorrent canada hundred years
"napster" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

Bertcast's Podcast

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

"Horse was his name i disguised did on some level i the first guy i remember that came to a show because he found me on the internet that ashley came to see me rather than coming to see comedy i'm coming and are of two and a half hours in ohio to see me where only eighteen other people were lido to see me and i felt bad for him like oh i guess you thought us for popular he was the he found my she had on the internet napster days but you were you were touted as the next hicks well before in the uk but what about this i know the states as well in two thousand one i knew you were the next x the guy i knew that were result i should on hicks because of that yeah but like ever like work this is a fait i'm sorry i'm just like fucking pound on hicks like hicks fucking the same we hedberg just every time they said he's the new stephen wright no he's way better than that now better he's different is did but he was a human being hailed heard was he was steven right ask in two he added one liners but he was a human being in the pauses in between man whoever filling a party you did you did what party folic also this and this is not accurate but i will say that i i get compared to its l 'cause i drink i is get a compared to a tell you have not been a comic for as long as it tell has not drank a tells a eleven years sober eleven years ago you're late shuffling your feet gone how do i do comedy your new shit selfish but like but a bootleg bully probably don't know that'll tell doesn't drink but part of be goes like part of me says.

ohio uk stephen wright ashley napster steven eleven years
Brendan discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast - Episode 858 - Lizzy Goodman / Dana Gould

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

00:35 sec | 3 years ago

Brendan discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast - Episode 858 - Lizzy Goodman / Dana Gould

"Y you know and i are you going to have your on tv show i'm going to be rich no not anymore still have to go out you ask me in minneapolis and do a weekend uh but on that but i am on executives over tv show yeah i know is no actually no but you should plug your the mc's comedy special goes he didn't get one earlier all you'll have a commie i have many of them you of another what what i found what must have you feel about this moment where like i did the comedy stars would netflixing was good i was glad that i got the opportunity sure yeah but then you hear about like you know sign fokker's rock and louis this is like the ah they just gave jerry seinfeld half a billion dollars thank god because we need who was learning it's not i'm not even jealous but it's sort of like give me like a maybe maybe like five percent yeah yeah i'm not complaining but if you're throwing money away yeah exactly i'll take a little no i was a you know i they were it was one of those things where i was going to tapered and then i was gonna do it with the company that i did my last russia with and then there were the dates were confused and then there were like well we can only do it on this date and i was getting ready to go into production on season two of the show and i you know you can feel the material right inning and reaching pugh tressens sure and you feel like dying yeah exactly and i was i was looking at some nick i was looking at a new products that list as they go i really wanted to get it down ago and i have a really great agent at william morris them silvio lund who's really a terrific guy and he goes let's just do novel and he called up this record company in damn nailed it and and get it in and i do find the audio lives longer than the video so people listened comedy on the radio they listen to comedy on their phone i it's rare that they will sit down and watch a special again that's true that's true i l walsh asif yeah yeah exactly but all listen to especially again all this shit you always in the comedy records i've heard before i listen to because because now uh you know you have that done than you're getting ready to go back on the road and yet you've got to frantically get new shit guinness shit yeah i mean i i'm not i don't believe it has to be one hundred percent new but it should be you really not believe that or you just tell you i really i know i really do but uh i'm i'm much lower than the percentage that it should be i think people want to hear one or two hundred families that you know like i i dunno i got the idaho 'cause i think you and are similar in that in that whoever's judging that whoever saying i this year from the record whoever saying that usually we make them up and you out now there are no there are a couple of those is ideal hit that twenty percent of the suv his new wave that why do we listen to that guy because he's the guy that hates us as much as we do he sees this is already just the way we are with a little disappointed with this was never the almost you'll has got it but not quite right but i i you know i probably saw george karlin i don't know a dozen times my life and i would always love it when there was a oh well he's going to do baseball and football great disease and you go this is great listen to this i sure i i listen i like hearing beats like he because this museum it is a form of music digitally form of music when you know like i hear who i can was due over and over again if it comes up in 'cause i got the shuffle gone on ma if schimmel comes up and mike because like the ear was such a master of this very specific type of timing kind of like morose jewish he you know who it's it's the disease descended joan roma jackie veronica yep that good good poll well he told me although yeah and you know who else was heavily influenced by jackie vernon let me guess who stephen wright sure that makes a lot of ads yeah i love jackie vern yeah jackie o'brien was amazing scr i saw he was the guy i saw my parents took museum when i was like eleven oh my god where that's what change to me because i saw him on tv do the slide show and then he came to albuquerque and i saw it in the paper at out in albuquerque was a lounge in the hilton hotel phantom my parents took me that's fist of it and that was what i was like that's when i knew it whenever you but what if he opened bush and soon turkomans should they would have been fine but what we were close enough just to see like you know he's a hold and he's like you saw all of it is in this and that it was not afraid i was like this is still good i have this conversation with somebody is really really interesting is talking about how much i love rickles yeah and i was talking to a a younger com we'll they're all younger and owes quoting some rousseau stuff and this goes help us us laura his own because he so unworkable because it has nothing to do with that yes all music i love the ud in the rhythm of the music and i remember seeing him sometimes he said things that didn't even make sense but because no i will give you a beautiful example i was with your friend and mine rob cohen at the desert in and they had just had a giant renovation of the desert in and it was sweltering in the show room when he goes out a forty milliondollar renovation they get a great airconditioning system two facts on the roof of the peace looseleaf paper glenn doesn't mean a gut dim thing he could have said tortoises zeroed onesyllable i tell you and could as a bear as you know i'm not laughing because i am straight and therefore i'm exerting my heterosexual privilege via in a derogatory way no eases thought of that of that part of that of that and that's what i have yet but the weird thing is we give you isn't something like schimmel who is usually the victim of his own joke yes in his life had the life of fucking job yeah and then the political whatever's politically incorrect about it itself offering a software threat and then i don't like he is the victim of every jew every joke has a victim and symbols act it was him yet in something somehow that can elevate ivan i agree i agree yeah i don't know if i have these discussions but like i for some reason i'm just able the separate i i don't know that you know revisionism is necessary just because times change in terms of what you you you feel personally attached to her what you like i don't i don't odds visa will difficult but but i can says it already owned for me i can still you know i don't do we delete all that stuff do we delete are emotional connection to right i i don't see how that's possible tackle and it's like when we damn my have hitler's paintings i have to separate you have that book on i have the coffee table excuse called raspberry lauda angles lot of hard angles not a lot of people but a lot of beautiful buildings oh i used to joke about that it's like well you know hitler was vegetarian but but yeah there's an i think i also in a lot of it is just being the soldier nostalgia for being too beating a kid a like watching rickles on the dean martin roast and every but it's a totally different school of show business than new and i grew up with golfway told me the story that when he worked with reckles rickles would would just roast him all day uh and then afterwards a poolside now you set a small lead money the eu is a very carrying well that lowvolume that's where my grandmother said she go see him in vegas and he has yet on everybody but he too she's she put it like this he apologizes very nicely renault but the only thing with bob did he couldn't understand is that that he wore jeans onstage right easily bob you can't you have to get the dress nice addressed and that's the general that's the thing that broke for that generation like these kids they they would do about those things that was karlin the kid he's talking gripe but what i'm saying is in that era in for us it's i think it's like we understand that he's seeking safe haggar he gets it whatever and it doesn't have any leasehold me we gotta shoulder that and if it's like a you can attack me for y'all still respecting somebody who is not of david his original like and that's in and that's and that's a that's a valid point that you do have to update in and he didn't he didn't need he i was watching him i went down it was yuri lewis rabbit telling when he died oh yeah and i was watching the jerry lewis rose from 1968 rickles was on it with the two things that but that it will rise rose that's not even the right the idea the one the first who the killer who's just like jerry i say this from the bottom of my heart jerry you're a jew his justly all right yeah but the other almost didn't he goes you know jerry's a clown and there are a lot of grey clowns emmett kelly that's about i will not give up the other baru hui was rose the is when the martin ones and j jim stewart was on the day is and he goes a jimmy i spoke to the family you're doing fine hosts one there was one where he was on it was his last appearance he was his last carson appearance because johnny was retiring on and then he may johnny lab zohar johnny got into a coughing fit careful john every time you cough lentils at home highfiving the life little good will and i love one and it's a real shit have you seen that one where they built him a club filled with just celebrities the martin there's a dean martin rose who was might have been the d martin show where they wanted to recreate alive rickles show i have that 'cause i signed up for the guide them the other demar the i never saw coming i had no idea there were so many but there was one that came it might have been the d martin show but they set up a club they mean on a sound stage and had people like pat boone in the audience all the celebrities kartal malta bar like he was probably nineteen seventy the early 70s mid70s yeah and and rickles just went up and did his club in insulted ever yeah it was great and as you sweating mid70s when the american flag had wide lapels warren ugly i go it's an interesting question though about because i had this moment where you know being a comic as long as we have you know you and i are old guys already yeah and and by the way just two i am fully aware before anybody jumps down my throat about don rickles and whatever i know i'm i'm i'm done i'm in i'm with this is not what is contemporary this is my view of it pete townsend was talking about the john entwistle used a bitch about wrap that he didn't get it yeah and he said it's not our job to get it it's our job to get out of the way and and i am aware of that yeah i get it i get it yeah well no i mean i you know i can it's becomes difficult with depending on what the transgression is here to stay supportive you'll have to be supporters somebody you can condemn somebody and you can you think somebody's awful but still say that second record though that sure you know and then you somebody said a really smart the genome our solar arguello should young new comic really really funny really funny and really martin somebody was bashing some on woke person new than apologize for it and she said you know you have to let people make their mistakes and grow in public he kinda led have to you have to let people grow catches white dot terrorise them into some sort of cultural siberia yeah the you know the my last special the one before this one um i had the whole thing at the end of boat the our word uh and how it's now relegated wizards see word and i tried to do on those bits ya ya and i wouldn't in i did i mean the bit was a boat the strictly the nomenclature of equating that word with the n word in this year oh it was actually addressing the that that whole thing it wasn't about like i don't use it that way no because then i did use it uh you know i know is that i would never do this and then i did i cheated all over the place and i you know i i said it and i said the n word in the sewer day and i say them now relish at home time mutter myself but whatever i would i would nothing happened but i wouldn't have done i wouldn't do it today i got i did a bit about it about defending you know the use of it in you know in a sense of like in a ended this style gic way um y yo how you know what i mean i grew up with that yeah right but then i guy the guy that igf someone i think it was an email the just said we you know i'm the parent and in and that was a you know i like i had a couple of swipes but in eventually i got a handle on it i i did it and then i met john mcginley lose of very on the forefront of of of all those issues and it becomes real via an and it's not about first amendment that's about though these people have feelings and their young their lives and you're okay i guess that's the thing hey how attached are you two that really need it have you read them of using that word it's not he's no one's censoring anybody yeah it's like you're hurting people's feelings and it's already hard for them yeah exactly brilliant yes i guess they have a rough enough time any and you can and that is truly you can say that will riggles talking about fragile new have enough to have enough they have enough trouble i my my feelings about that are like you say whatever you want the shoulder the uganda water take the take the burn yeah tell uber then handle it what the what's this new were the new season standard against evil what's it did you finish it's all done joey finished it premiers november first on ifc house a different uh it takes the story it takes us roy for the premise of the story is the whole idea of the shows was quite simple i love horror movies are my football so i just thought what if i did a horror movie but put a character in the middle of it that didn't belong here and it was basically what if my dad was an harm of has he wouldn't give it doesn't know just know does he does no he doesn't give fuck right and and we used to make that joke if you remember the indicating kong he's on the building in the planes are flying area my brothers and i used to joke did of our dad was in one of those planes that he would fly out of formation check the scoring the baseball game comeback shoot a little bit more go back and i just thought it would be interesting if like what if instead of buffy the vampire slayer it was just an old irish guy that didn't give a shit and and that was the the premise and i didn't i my mother is still alive but his wife who would have been my mother dies before the show starts and because i needed them to have a giant vulnerability or is just hassle oca them what john mcginley did with that was created this amazingly nuanced character is a good actor huh israel has been around for a long time ago he's not fuck in a row it doesn't seem age much either doesn't know he's he's good lives at the gym i mean is this arms are and i say this knowing he's listening to it his arms are terrifying um uh no easing these in crazy like an old irish boxer from like a poster for the he's like hundreds who was in the issue williams was like five over visas and wall street is a platoon he was in any given sunday but he's built like an old irish bar and how he's all upper body and but he created the he gave this character so much more than than i had give it it on the page and and i have to also give jet at foreign ego amazing kudos for the way she balances him the ballast that she and as such a strong actress the because john is done so much of this work that for the second season i had to right up to him so i developed a whole arc of a story line where there is a time travel element where he's going to try to go back and save his wife's life oh wow and as as always happens makes things much worse oh good and that's the arc this as the art the season and what's the name of the record that see the digital this is what did them i call it a record 'cause i don't know what else to call it how it looks it in a my doubt because my downloads sounds vaguely filthy ah mister funny men and this is what the kids on her the account how many you've done how many record seventy special uh i have the worst i proudly have the worst album titles fun houses fine yeah but it's an they keep up album and his version is albums much better uh let me put my thoughts in you i know what's wrong which was okay this is mr funding in screwed what i mean the bigger problem is really the art work generally yes like looking at what you can almost any comedy record in you know somebody who's like move was i think and yeah homeless every comedy record bullets every comedian gets to be a rockstar for that that one day we you get to look figure your album cover via i did all right like you know in retrospect i don't have any stupid once i ask you know the last don't try to be funny on your color exactly don't try to be funny on your cover that's it that's it iin the war here quad split headshot via the worst people from boston we both novaya the what were their different panels viking different hats and i can't say it on the air but i'll tell you what were probably sure have on those i remember seeing it becomes clear i like how there were different has i know they can play different jobs it would be a fireman and a chef who was a doubt i will good well it's good talk in the arabian sea all dana cooled the great dana gould so lizzy goodman who i'm going to be talking to next in just a second um she was very good friends remarks pits the lay mark spitz they david years ago and mark spitz was a a great writer in his own right of music writer and wrote a greg memoir and he was on the show and because he passed not too long ago that you can still listen to episode in the in the free feed if you'd like it was a great episode very personal very engaged and we missile marqui we miss him you know i think i'm a good cook when i make food at home but there's nothing worse than not having the right amount of an ingredient or leaving out a step or not cooking something for long enough i hate all those things but with hellofresh the recipes are simple and he get them on step by step instruction cards with pictures it helps with making things that i never thought i'd be able to cook on my own or that i would cook on my own in general you can scheduled deliveries when it works best for you and i'm really busy with my shooting schedule right now so that's a huge plus and if i need to pause my account for weeks of the time i can hellofresh offers a wide variety of shift curated recipes a change weekly including the classic plan the veggie plan and the family plan plus they offer kid tested recipes selections like a pena port noodle bowl with bell pepper and carrots over rice verma celli or the easy pz ravioli gratin on with spinach time and parmesan breadcrumbs look i like to cook so i'd be cooking at my house no matter what but hellofresh makes a convenient and simple and the quality is top notch so it's a no brainer for thirty bucks off your first week of hellofresh visit hellofresh dot com and enter the promo code wtf that's how of fresh dot com promo code wtf so lizzy goodman the writer is my guest and i met her when i met her with mark once but she put me in her book can we talked about it when she was writing then she sent me the galley and i didn't quite get to it then she sent me the real book and honestly i just skimmed it looked at my part but i have very little recollection i talk to her about this but whatever was happening in rock and roll from two thousand one to two thousand eleven i gotta tell you i think i miss most of it i don't know what i was doing i don't know where i was i mean the last time i knew i was really blocked in to root to rock and roll happening in real time was probably in the late eighties and then side some i just some i went away i don't know where i went but i wasn't i wasn't locked in i'll mocked back in but this the two thousand one to two thousand eleven i was just a struggling comic trying to figure it out i do i get sober like i guess was right after i got silver that might add something to do with it but i just wasn't keyed in to the new york music scene i was just keyed into the comedy scene there was some crossover we we hammered out lizzy and i hammered out and i talk a newer the book is called meet me in the bathroom rebirth rock and roll in new york city 2000 a one to two thousand eleven which apparently are my lost years but that's not true i did i did radio did air america away way i got divorced a guy they'll get married got married and divorced in those years that would have something to do with it so i was listening to music but it was like twelve to fifteen songs that i put on a fucking mix after my wife left me that letter of that a lot of those twelve to fifteen sok unita heartbreak mix i got one how how long you've in la i have a real problem here really i just i've been here for three days where he frazzled you not a dry did you drive i know you drive here i'm from new mexico i know how to write weaker of your friends with i keep i always forget that i wanted to go i'm going you i i think that's a great idea it's great there had to how long did you stay in new mexico till like 14 seconds after i graduated from high school which highschool albuquerque academy i don't i didn't tell me all this now probably not i don't know you went to the academy here how do you i'm two thirty seven twenty five i don't know i just had a birthday and i have been i realize that i've been telling people my old age for at least the last couple of weeks because i forgot the elderly seven i was born in 1980 what was your old age thirty six turns out are you've and you have a goto no no no i just i have this joke with my friend rob sheffield that might ages is 26 forever i have not really evolved pass that i may i'm moving i think i might move i have to me become hear a lot more now what's happened and so i'm thinking don't use drop that i will vote will that but at one of my biggest or i've been thinking about where i to live show alana's neon it seems to be happening fedronic yeah in what way but i will tell you but just my biggest concern is that i'm gonna miss winter and one of my friends his out mean half my friends that i hear one of my friends his lobbying been lobbying me for an ally move for a long time was just suggested to me recently and i never thought of this like you go to new mexico for winter go have winter new mexico's eventually just go have a mild winter well i mean it's cold it's not new york coal i live in upstate new yorkright now oh my god where high falls new york it's what are you doing up there i was finishing a book this book yeah that embassies different one who one of the one of avoiding talking about on your wedding efficient probably hate it which is fine this not hate is not the word disagree with no italian a disagreement thing i missed it of course i miss this if the it's called earth and rock and roll in new york city two thousand one or two thousand eleven i know none of the bans in the really would you like some help well that's why we're going to do but not down yeah yeah so yeah i like the idea spending the casual winter's in new mexico where he here in the higher or some parka whitesnow nodded loom area the luminary of i've in kerala's is awesome when you get your health through in the lights now no known does the candles anymore you can't go said i know they are good they one hundred percent you it's the real thing all right some people still do the rules of very traditional place kerala's new mexico we what we think about living here i'm not admitting that i'm thinking about overweight now i don't lie echo part will people i i don't like them i don't wanna be near them like i don't wherever the williamsburg of la is i don't want any williamsburg valet thank god is not because here it's like bloctobloc you know williamsburg maybe i don't know it's different i mean i want to live by the beach but every night if that he can't live vitamese because yield you know fall off well why show business quarter year because of the book a real yeah marks like oh that didn't even occur to me what an awful idea i have i have to tell you were important which can into serbia but do you know some people like it so is known and i i know it's people love it and i understand that not being yeah i'm very sure there's no i know you and i'm totally teasing you i this book is about a period where you could actually get most of the people to play themselves as their younger selves and it'd be pretty quiet pretty close he added in various no it's going to be there like documentary and and narrative at like fictional adaptation series ideas around that's great i'm excited about it i mean i want to do more of that stuff anyway and always have or have in the last few years and so it's like fund to think about how to make the i mean people i've just felt really gratified by the kinds of ideas that have been a you know because as skeptical that the whole hollywood here at it so far than the people that i think we're going to be working with are awesome well we're did you how'd you start out where'd you end up you went to the academy graduate you got brothers and sisters yeah i gotta younger brother take that's a good name yeah he's get he lives in nigeria really he's a foreign service officer he's a diplomat o good for him the state department and cut them loose yes no um now not yet that's good maybe maybe nigeria this sort of like what i stand ninety he got there he just got there and it's funny we're talking about luminaries he's going to have lumina or something he's having he's getting married in december in england here on dan and he's going to have all this new mexican stuff we've been talking a lot about the new bringing the new mexico to the new mexico christmas vibe to london thoughts nice yeah so what would you go to college after you can ran away to fill it i mean i wanted to be on the rules like right away it was all about new york as obsessed with new york and with the idea of lake eastern urban magic get the eu's when he grow up in a smart household in new mexico you i i want to go to where really happens i like all this cowboy cowboy intellectual shit i that's exactly how i felt i mean it is disturbing to be talking to you about this there there's basically no one who gets out of new mexico so those of us who do all have the same kind of like course spirit about that if you go back they go back oh hi tonnes tons yeah i mean you're going back now i've been thinking about it yeah it's drawing i think about it to the way on wife yeah my heejoo like i don't i like i i don't i'm done with new york i'm almost down with la whereas from argun go this is how i feel you say i'm too young to feel it this is literally the conversation i've been having while i'm here i'm like i will always feel like i live in new york that i don't need to live there anymore and so therefore where do i feel good well that's only corral us exact cheese like me literally only corral starting to feel that it's the only play me for me is not quite corral but i always romanticise prowess but i'm a couple of miles away how you i think would i very close to corral but a all right so dan study what english and classics and your girl at the plan was only good was to be a writer now what a crazy idea what idiot would do that you can't be a writer what was the point of in new york and what just like hang out no the plan was to idea you know i was eighteen i didn't have i had a i had a homing instinct not a plan like i'm gonna come to college because you have to go to college like i'll go as close to new york as they can go and i was really good student and i cared about being gets you now i love school and great china japan but no the plan what it what happened was and this is the right call like i now understand this in a way that i can articulate and didn't at the time that i advocate for it it's like i had to put myself near stuff that would so i could be in a position to have what should happen next revealed to me brian what i mean later that's what new york is yet it's a no to be you know for me and and for others that that's kind of what the books it out here at sense of i don't know why i'm going here i'm just going here because it seems something's telling me to do that and i can't tell you why and i may not even know right away or for years but it's where my next myself is going to emerge on the oddly e know it's because the place it new york holds in the cultural unconscious yes for years since the 70s yeah specially if you're groovy artistic you know literary it it's like it it's grooms large yeah it means something to mean something it's an idea and hand but there but still to this day there's nothing like it i mean you you know you can i can't live anywhere unlike well but do you did you find always at like i was just in new york and for the first time in my life i went over to jazz at lincoln center as fiftythreeyearold and it's have always been there and i was there for for fifteen years on and off and i did nothing like oh yeah hey like all this stuff veiled me like people you go the museum of modern art i did once twice here but i am now like i feel like i'm ready to do that stuff in its fortunate because now i understand new york pretty fucking while i can get around and ought to do what other so if i go in for three days on my show again see let's do it but that's okay that is exactly why my i feel like my current relationship with new york is among the best that i've had which is like when you leave you are able to to be a kind of the it's almost like the first fifteen years are investing in understanding the place enough that you can become a named formed tourist when you go there so now i do that too like i go in from upstate you know every week or so every ten days and i do three days of city staff all my friends i gutted restaurants i do all these things that i had no energy to do because those so relentlessly overstimulated by the time i laughed at that i was like i can't even like i just want to hide and so now there's this the slate has been cleared and it's like new york it's fun again but that i don't ever feel when i was nineteen and started coming to the city from philly all the time i felt like mm i needed it too like kind of worked on me in order to help me figure out how to become myself and now i know how to be myself how did you go there were year ranked ninety eight i moved to philadelphia and i was in school my dad is a new yorker semi dagger opens in status in town via and my grandparents unawares there for a while a who's going to get that apartment come on you tell me about the survivors adel got your grandparents of art okay it's on has pink walls the who is getting that next ruth good men lives there she she's you know she's she's it's her place man here i mean no one's it's a rental it still like i know rentcontrolled renzo deeply rent controlled rental yeah your eyes are like glinting the cia is the new yorker area edge rooms juve everyday that have what's the kitchen like hallander yeah it's the last of the rent control listen everything you're thinking is true it's your fantasy come true it's like the per it's an it's walker they've this would be good always is when you've when i was there you like the idea of control was i i'd rent stabilize but that doesn't mean something i and stabilise to that that's like they're like it's not as brutal so really when you move to new york in earnest this is when this book starts yeah i mean i started coming to the exactly like i started coming to the city from philly to see show i love the story is it's in the introduction to the book it's basically like i i moved to new york the first summer that idea college says after freshman year i i moved to the city i lived in my grandparents apartment i worked at murray yeah and i got a job in a restaurant you worked at sesame street i had an internship at sesame productions or whatever that it was the production company that pretty sesame street that will you write in turn shed you're gone for showbusiness i was not go i was like this is the justification for me being here that's the one the ethics as all i i didn't pick it it was like available and we really i was like i need to go hang out in new york city trash camera oscar with no no they never let me near it wasn't a coup it was like i don't even remember what i did i wasn't near actual sesame street it was the production cut it was it you know is a midtown office building that was set not no would you how could you work for sesame street nakos he were seriously streets production company produces a lot of shows sesame street the crown jewel i was a lowly turn we love the you're acting like this is my choice yet one day they rolled in and they were like do you want to go to the sesame street sat and i was like nath no that's not out having no anxieties me i was i was i you didn't meet ernie organiser continued i wanted to meet rock voice mark i tend not grow her no grown all right grover and the guy with nights in serious who you're like all right yeah he taught me how to ride the subway right are you there you're working says mystery not going to not doing all of the things that i know i've disappointed you deeply and just i got a job in a restaurant 'cause i needed to make money because i wasn't in school and i had to lake support you know i had free rant that i had to lake right pete or whatever you run by close i guess whatever i cared about at that time records and so i got this job at this i got this job training to work at this restaurant crossstrait from grand central station said they were opening any day now and they are hiring up staff i got this job and we end of course it took much longer for them to open and they had anticipated citybased they had hired this staff of kids board hot city kids who went there every day for like four hours and got paid this lowly amount of money and did things like practiced waiting tables and learned the wine list and stuff like that and my coworker was nickel anc who was the guitar since strokes and he was in this band like hit with his friends called the strokes of now the portal opened and you're well no i mean no it was years that was nineteen that was the summer of ninety nine and it was i mean it was a couple of years before like albert the other guitarist had not joined the band yet they weren't they it was my friend nix like ban nick i was nick was like halfheartedly in college and they were just city kids and i was i mean the portal that opened that summer was not rock and roll it was new york like oh nicholas cool in in that he grew up in the city and understood how to sort of like wander wale and how to get into bars and how did you set just it was sort is it was what like i had been learning i it with training wheels in philadelphia that as a new mexico kid like how do you how do you orient yourself in urban life and let these places kind of lake you know wash over you and expose you two things you're supposed to be exposed to how to get the rhythm down and that like nick and i would just hang out after after pretending to wait tables and you know lake wander round office parks and smoke weed in office park teller fina behind off sparked pillars and sort of like just wander around midtown it wasn't and then sometimes i would go downtown to lake st mark's and sneak into bars and do stuff like that beazley it was like that was what was pal 99 summer here that must that summer was those were my marriage was falling apart that was the other big thing that is happening for every avatars you knew marc maertens mary and who's out more a yeah and then he got thrown out of that house in the other find to subway weighed down us instead it was way chiller than what you are dealing with try and dukan redo one man shows that was that are that is i was the best theater oh my god the west bath yeah that became significant for me later really yeah because all the artists where had their studios in there and still do it's still let me extra to yes rate on the west that the west village became later after i finally moved to the city in two thousand two became like my spot because i don't like coolness like i don't like i didn't like i do not want to be on the larry cider off that city will whites places for me when i when i moved there i guess was eighty nine the first time and then i went back in nine the four remember you saying that yeah but but you know and i talk a little bit in the book about the you know what happened then but it really wasn't the only put i was just a little weird historical artifact you put that this from the guys from the generation before radio exxon giuliani for two minutes well i needed that i've might do i thought i was well represented good you were i agree um so this is all just before nine eleven yeah and the you've you found your place on the west side where it's not hip with artists that are well no i mean i went back to philly for like that so what i'm saying is that the that's why it's this is an important about the book the s not bands like i wanted to be a lawyer or something i thought it was gonna be a lawyer i was a school kid but i was pulled towards this sense of magic and misery about new york city that is the idea that we are already just talking about and he hadn't yeah i loved writing but i didn't work from my school newspaper i didn't it wasn't like what what it was was it was like i'm i i i was being drawn to some expression of culture that was related to my generation that i that had not happened yet and i did not know that that's what i was being drawn to you that i during the next few years in the part the four nine eleven were all these bans interpol yesterday as strokes and in you know white stripes and other place like around the world there all the stories that converged in the book all of those people were feeling similar things like assent this basically the same age as i was and feeling a kind of like i wanna make something that i don't entirely know what it is and like the world is not really receptive for this kind of this kind of vibe it's not supposed to be about urban call right now it's not supposed to be about notions of near and what was it supposed to be about in a music industry is supposed to be about dance music erica in you know i i mean in england it definitely was about dance music or was about like postscript popstar th i mean and in my business it was like i mean in the writing what became my business it was like it wasn't that exciting to imagine yourself as a rock journalists because there wasn't a lot of cool rocked the end so that's right it was sort of submerged in jam jammed asked you for a little while they're right i didn't think oh i'm going to be a music journalists i thought there's something about the way it feels to wander around manhattan at four p m on a really hot day in the summer where everyone rich has left the at they're making me feel like i'm getting somewhere and i can't really tell you why and so i went back to college and i studied and an ice kept in touch with neck and a couple of other people that i owe you and he would come and play shows and then i would see in philly and i will go see him and i had friends in philadelphia who are starting to lake want to go to shows so it was like it was a thing to do that had enough in it for years it was a thing to do that had nothing to do with aspiration of any kind and that was really important and it was also like it was like traditional rocking aware coming back it was not necessarily art rock punk rock was sort of finished in a way and and i guess wakeham sort of 'cause like some of the bands in the book i was given like for some reason at that time when i was there in late 90s in then like i left by two thousand two yeah but i was given cds and stuff for iced up for some reason i have the jonathan fireeaters he shot up i do that's awesome yeah they were so amazing i listen to it and i was into it but like what you're with that have been have 90s yes okay so okay so that was that times out yeah yeah they were the yeah they were round is great ho right i have my buddy john daniel was involved with music so i was sort of up to speed on something yeah okay will and 90s wealth that's all right i mean but like like jazz it only o good if you were there i mean that theoretically lay the thing about looking at the book and reading through some of it is that like when i read please kill me that was the those were before me and i was when that was what everybody was going to new york to find was that that's what this is about no i get that with moscow eyes were going to find that for sure and you kind of right about that yes like that's we're all looking for that thing that was like just it was just the the remnants of it and the and the people that were involved with that you'll first wave of whatever made new york cool were just kinda droopy greyhaired dudes walk around in their weather payments that don't fit any more with somebody going like that guy used to be something yeah if that if they are even living there anymore but i i guess i just think that that's the continuum i mean it's not like every winning please kelme weren't weren't polling on i see the continuum of that notion of new york identity as much much 70s as going ponca much further i mean i think much scher further back that than just whole idea it's it's it's i mean this is later but it's fifty yeah and it's jazz it's it's fucking ellis island man it's like come to it's it's in the american identity of new york gonna come here and you're going to reinvent yourself and the culture all potency of that has is almost as old as you know as the city in some way and so but specifically in the world of the arts yes you know what what you know what came out of new york and and what sort of defined it is you had a wealthy people who were willing to kick in to make she had happened yes right yeah and a lot away sure to reject the of a lot of the factors but then i mean you know that for us because this is my taste in i i i think yours too like the punk the 70s punt seen in cb jesus just like i meaning please county was my total bible i'm obsessed with everybody and napa i love that music that's my stuff i came to that late you're now the earth your specialty is more material for the business card wait to the partly to the party on air safety and wrong kinda leadership skills doesn't look good for any of us march mirror merit love martin on but you know i mean obviously there's also the whole greenwich village like i mean dylan for most people dillon is the touchstone for this and it's so the idea that new york is this place that's constantly polling on a previous constantly kind of coopting and borrowing its own past self via to reinvent for a new group of young people essentially the a new for them version of the same thing how are they related to turn all right they can still find the space there if they can still kinda save their which is the question now but like for my for this book for young in the bathroom like i don't see it as a see it as just this sort of the the the chapter in the cannon at that new york cultural story it's just rose right into the bookshelf right there you know after police kelme and after madonna and light up before whatever comes next but it's just it's a stop it's a stop on the larger train i think that and what comes next is going to be a a prominent either chinese or russian trend do you have that i'm good authority seems like it that's the vets me speculating that summer noncash catastrophic start i have is not catastrophic at all as i say that so so when now way what starts to drive when did you meet the the the way great mark spitz i met the late great mark spitz pretty early i i assume he he served as some sort of guide to whatever the fuck happened to you while yeah i think he'd really like you putting it that way well what mark would say is that i thought he tommy everything i know of on so he would want me to say it that way i tell you this bright i've kid from new mexico through philly who's looking for a rock fantasy and that dini and blames outta some yes he's like i can help you out seles ruin your life and i was like great and say it's the glare sorry yeah he talks in his memoir about how i was wearing flipflops for spammy and he's like they're not shoes zia like he was very my new mexico vibe was pretty united wearing makeup i didn't like i was still kind of like fresh scrubbed girl that point and i think mark with space mark dea like you know bad bad asrat girls with lake peroxide blond hair and he was sort of like you are entirely to clean for me basically and i was like okay but you like me no no as a recipe for disaster who's gonna win well that's where it's later and he would say things to me like yes chased me you know and i was like hot can you do the thing amassing unity or what he writing for spin when you met him yes so the way i'm marklevinshow sara louissant who is also a great character in the book and one of my best friends was my roommate in new york when i first moved there so i graduated from college and by that time it was clear that like the city's music scene was happening and i felt i was like dare to it i was inspired by all of i was inspired i was inspired by and have sudden a there was something to write about nato i then was like i wanna be a writer who writes about this but i i taught secondgrade frontiers first 'cause like i can't be a writer thought that's nice i taught at an allboys private school on the upper east side uh glazer's no really has a double life for awhile we were real like fullon teacher major oh yeah misguided men secondgrade whether in how what how did that and why did that and it a two year and it's like your estate teacher and then you either maybe you kind of the carrying on of that would have been to go get a degree in education and like stay in school and would stop you from doing that oh you know i'm are on that cya now now he loved at he he would talk about how wake up in the middle of the night and i would go 'cause i had i talked to my sleep and here go boys get in line and you'd be like jesus who is this girl and is scary she's like yeah so now okay so now you're you're getting you're you're getting involved with the rock senior roommate is what is she says sarah was marks like little protege at spin so i met mark before i graduated from college actually at coachella the one of the first coach as i went out with sarah to see if we could live together we went to this rocked festival together to lake try it on here and on she introduced me to mark who is i mean it's it's in the book their their meeting is pretty awesome like he was he didn't understand instant messenger and because and he's mark air sarah i was like this sort of protec savvy little jewish girl in new jersey who is who liked his writing it's like high and i'm also girl he had like why is this window coming up and they can eventually she wore him down in the house and so she introduced me to him and we had you know a serious series of battles for about a year and a half that then got together and yeah i mean mark was my tour guide through he was writing for span he was a hot shit writer writing cover stories about all these bans and how'd you manage not to get all fucked up i don't know my i honestly i i think it's genetic i i really do i just i don't know may just have the thing i'd die went out and drank every night like everybody else and reich you know there is all kinds of drugs around in yet but i just didn't care that much about it for you but it's not good for me that makes it sound like something i get credit for and it's not like i get credit every not be compelled by that like the like to just a drink in smokes from we'd and just enjoy the music you don't have to go you know you i mean i like you don't have to divert alliance but it's it's it makes it sound like it's a matter of sort of will and it's not it that's why are saying connecticut's like i don't have i'm compulsive in other ways right now i get it i get it that's why i'm saying you're lucky unlucky yeah so that's how okay unlucky so let's talk about you know the the bands that define this thing and the ark of this book because yeah like i just i i think i got my first walkman album like six months ago okay i'm larry liking it so okay i think i got that guy so record i thought that was get those good singer yeah so the strokes you knew that you saw them become what they want us in then and then like the the white trips our guests were coming in from detroit occasional yeah but i didn't the white strips were not like sort of first generation in new york of that were like any who has that were the strokes interpol yay as an lcd soundsystem feel like the whole lcd soundsystem thing like people are like you got your view murphy guy got your mike i don't know what he did so i had to get quite catch up with dfa miyazu jonathan the guy over what is the aga he sent me all this shit yeah i like that the prince worn dance called record yes good first record i love okay maharidge starting went ahead to go find me that record like i said you have one of them around their way it not be you know we have one ring laying around here we were using as a as a as a like a a map for when you eat your time castle your way into this that's you will love james and y'all that's i listen to a no it's great it's great i watch the movie and i i actually narrated a short documentary five lcd thousands of heavier like who the fuck is this no anyway script evaluated out but like i know he something because he mental i too a lot of people like i can see how they met something that people can also see how they kind of like you know kind of like well there's a there's a gap pure that was once occupied by the talking heads yeah that we should climb in do totally the talking heads said that i mean that's what i got no problem that kinds of sending okay i am not jane so you're not to defend now i understand how music work tell me more i understand you tell me my understand that there is now out of new she it yes and that you just keep inventing the old shit i think i mean yeah all right sure i think the thing that all the judge the the period that the book covered with the book is about is not music it's about all the things we i talked at it's about it's about new york it's the central character it's about what it feels like for this group of people at that period of time under to do a thing that is eternal as we just described which is to be young and to feel on scene and to get together with certain friends serendipitous lay that you meet who unlock something in u n two in the shadow of lake at theoretical anonymity make something beautiful that makes you feel alive i mean it's pure that's like that's art that's young people that's new york city that's rock and roll that the but it's important for the book that the context is also from my generation are these people that we're talking about it's happening in in coincidence with all these other major global events like napster we just 2000 and nine eleven which is one hundred percent you know a huge part of this story obviously and it's about and then the reinvention of brooklyn and the commodification of brooklyn and the exporting of that via the internet the newlyborn internet to the world as this sort of notion of how to live like a lifestyle brand to be earth to by going to interview james he said i was trying to dip into that like the brooklyn idea in williamsburg and all this stuff in kenneth ease my way in he goes oh yeah that's all our fault like cool thanks scott and it's that's what so this story is about that but it's about that through the lens of paul banks and carreno and yes you know later jack white or the kingsley on guys or whatever and then off to england and off to the killers in vegas and around the world but that record we should nikola pile of what you did have it'll be about three hours them sti no than i i know i the jonathan firefighter that's a hall in allied it yeah that's a you know you get points for that that's a big crowd point the area the i like one thousand out is great i thought it was pretty good but those bans i mean to answer your questions such as it is it's like there's no like yeah there's nothing new under the sun and this is a retaliating of a generational story there will be i i believe that people make things new i i'm not one of those people that yadav a problem with appropriation i don't have a problem with with the of the evolution of music and he because like if you really look at rockets the people that really make something completely new or generally misunderstood and you may be years later people like i think i get it and somewhere they're like nato the other but there's a core group of fans that are sort of like worthy the only one said get it yet that bullshit any basically the story of the book too i mean if this is mark says this in the book i mean he's one of the greatest characters in it where he's basically like look i was 28 and writing for spain or whatever less was thirty something his thirty already and writing for span and like mark who had an encyclopedia harry say that pete accent encyclopedic thank you very much sandy pratt thing music and film knowledge and all that stuff of was sitting there in new york city loving york city's sort of but just board and that the thing that this that this that there's the sort of beginning of the book that everyone had in common energized boredom energy everyone was bored james murphy was bored he did not know carreno carreno was bored she did not know julian julian was bored gillian didn't know paul paul uh the interpol paul was bored and it was like in their own independent corners of this town at that period of time they all did something about that board and then mark spitz or sara or any of the other sort of non musicians but journalists future bloggers a and our people like all the different sort of um i don't know contestants in this in this like road show here all had in common that sense of what we have here right now is really not enough and we need to like build something cooler and no one else is doing it so we're gonna do it so when spits heard like i mean he says this hilariously in the book where he's just like you know when i heard the white straits it took me a minute to figure out that i was being saved because it was my job to write about mark mcgrath every day and like there it was boring it oh yeah loaded orient and that's the story idea like i get it i get it it's like well boredom mikey to classify all those artis as board i understand that but i think that if you in the history of of what happened with punk rock in the sort of like you know kind of strange angry apathetic posturing that happened is that what it comes down to though anybody who surfaces with any consistency may be board but their workers oh right well that oh totally i mean and that's also new york city like everyone in that town has to labour via the i got a want it yeah and you've got to keep pushing two two to sort of break away from the pack of garbage because in any city especially that size you know for every one may be original band there's going to be like twenty guys just tooling through rehash especially in an era where i mean it's hard to in it's hard to overstate this and it is crazy now but i mean it really seems crazy now that like being in a rock band i loved the guys and dumped than fired or talk about this and later the walkman they talk about how like telling your friends that you were in a band was like now i take us that late yeah it was like really didn't elettronica music kills janjaweed could do we have to go through this aid rallies yes on thursday is at sad than you know like you're gonna make us do that you'll biased drinks rate i mean it was like the least possible cool thing to do and and it was like lame and and kind of an opposition on your friends to ask them to conceive lesser so this whole the it's hysterical because relatively quickly people would be dressing across the country and around the world like they had just been thrift in on the lowery side but not when these bans formed but that's interesting because that whole thing you know that thrifty thing has reinvented itself with every generation of people yeah it's like the now like their thrift in 1980's clothing and i'm like no i know i now i'm feeling that to it's weird like his when i was in high school we were thrift in shark skin yeah not a better yeah yeah and then i had ended at kinda the whole for you know that rockabilly kind of boos like whatever the fuck it was going after the suits in any time we speak to someone about this like can we address this with the culture in general that we just nominate certain erez as as as take as as out of the loop of of going to be rediscovered some ambitious ivan around anymore like fortunately for now everything is made so badly can i know that will never happen you'll never never be thrifty 2017 they should is not going to hold up maybe we've inadvertently solve the problem rallying stealing the fascists that were previously thrift it yeah this is not even making shit that will hold up to be so maybe we just need a generation a cycle through that in like twenty years people will actually have to create new stuff because it will literally going at all disintegrate and have to create outfits said will withstand the heat of there i'm sorry i've taken me right out of there i did it i'm sorry for him you're not enclosed outfits with of'short new mexico's supposed to fair relatively well i mean waters going to be a problem but waters going to be a problem but we have the mountains we aquifers dory right on an akko yeah we give a lot of as i understand it no no eight i think we give a lot of water to california so mother fugger's he had one of the california's thirsty mansour okay so like i know owner free burger this one again with a list of names like oh i show you read all your quotes first come on of course yes okay then you looked at the list through an area in and i kinda poked around it like you know the chapter headings ps but a vote like i don't know grizzly bear the national i came much really lay to and i understand why they're good but i i don't know that i go back to the records up much tv on the radio maize i listen to their first and second record i'm like holy shit this is the media their incredible yet the a as the first couple of records i listened to her i had him the hives i had that record i remember liking so what is your problem nothing we're just get vampire weaken don't think i've ever heard him all right we'll interpol i think i got a recent record with like their back in a mike i missed it the first time pretty good we've routines just gotta whoever teens rokaya feeling about pretty good yeah kind of punky right yeah yeah i hope we will come on something and you'll be like you really have to go and do that is that what you're looking for ya well i buy a records i'm i'm mike i mean i mean a renaissance had music appreciation i'll send you a list i need i don't know like i have your book i know yet we'll you do though actually 'cause you can't start gone mouldy reaches yeah amazing did you play who's got the crowd i don't have it all right we'll play who's got the crap by the multi pages is just one song well that song in particular is your gateway drug for them dave across comedian i know him with his worse are you hold steady i like that guy greg gregory great right yeah he's a good talkers if thinker is good the killers i like that okay kingsley on first who records and crime what happened well y but okay that that's another alternate title for this book sure is where's the staying power while they're all still making albums and touring and dura al like literally all of these people yeah so like you okay let's talk about them what happened what did have well it's up first talk about like the whole that you know a nine eleven left in the world in that like in terms of near all over that chapter see that's another place right you would you but compounding the board white whatever that boredom was was that horrendous existential to terror sadness grieving like i think i talked to spits about that a bit did he ah but a lot of this came out of that well it didn't come out of that it riot it was positioned as gross that word is under the circumstances to be heard in a different way and buy more people as a result of it so lake nino none of these important records the first as record the first strokes record the first interpol record early dfa staff none of that had been was written post nine a lead and it was not a response to that ren before but it was about you know it was about all these themes that we are just talking about yet culture considered obsolete like sadness and anxiety and loud guitars as the solution to that as an expression of that is a response to being alive right it was like oh that's old news and then you know the towers came down and new york city is under attack and america is under attack and it makes you kind of return to the the sort of lake core aesthetics of rebellion and that's rock and roll so what are you want to hear you on here jack fucking white playing guitar you wanna hear the urgency of the first strokes record he wanna you want a kind of a manic toughness the that and i think so these bans who it's not like if nine eleven hadn't happened the strokes wouldn't have broken an englanda had already broken in england and kind of ignited this industrywide like doubletake towards new york before nine eleven happened there album was supposed to come out like the week after nine eleven the first one in the states so it was already kicking off but what nine eleven did is a couple of things i thank and this is argued in the book it it it animated it it increase the number of people who were immediately feeling the need for that kind of sound and it also turned the world's attention to new york city culturally in a way that it had not been it had not had the attention of of sort of like global cool hounds in that way in sense i dunno i also like it they were it was also the guy seventy hanshin for perseverance yes i mean ranked sympathy yeah you know you're bruce springsteen how to go to werleigh hurst tracy and got them back call tied to hit it and yeah and i think i mean all these bans talk about touring in the wake of that and being it off doing comedy in the wake of sure i and the but being cast is kind of emissaries for new york and again for this idea of what new york is about that the entire world on some level was either either loving your heating at that point in new ways it was it was interesting time because if you were new yorker and you did live there yeah you're like we're we're gonna fight yes totally and we're thinking about that now and and it and the other thing that it did i think for the purposes if this seen such as it is and tune day from tv on the radio talks about this in the book i think he when he when he said this to me it really kind of it was a turning point behind her standing as he talks about how the szekely he thinks nine eleven put a kind of pause button on the jansher vacation race there has already happening i mean the the sort of post the giuliani into bloomberg cleaning up of everything sure that would eventually result in the new york the slick anodyne near erni lives there no one does it's it's saudi billionaire's who have apartments for their homes yet they're summer homes that they like might go to it's me the ranch russian it's all yeah and it is it's well chinese i don't know what an honor i it's it's just feel like you've done it feels like it doesn't have a a cultural identity has architectural and the identity right now is money money has a bleaching a fact eventually on culture i think in right now new york feels to me like burnt out literate like whited out like nine i'm not saying that race i'll have her hands out in the way that it was burnt out was bankrupt brought down in the way back right that that like acid has been porn on it and it's it's blake bleached out like i don't know i mean i keep seeing you know i don't know what causes this but when a create is her your it has deadened yeah by capitalism yet money on and by people that don't that day they don't like it will be interesting to do really explore what is rooting there you know in the sense that you know it is completely antithetical that to what it used to be when it was i think the big difference was there was a time were always money there but the people that worked there could live this and now that central and what's funny and not ha ha funny but of course like the it's all connected to this era because that's way jane saying it's our fault is funny the in an again brooklyn brooklyn because it's all those people the new york became the kind of place where you would invest in that kind of apartment because of all of the culture that that re in live in debt and made it interesting and sort of buzz he and brand rival in that way and now all these people who bought their on some level whether they know it or not as a result of this this latest ingretation of that new york thing i live in a place where none of those people can be but this is also like in a way so boring because it's like no shit that's called the cycle of art madda called lake art versus commerce 101 i mean it's going to just play its that and held out over how they all moved out of the city like the that generation of their artist once they got money they all live here they orly or here or they live in new jersey or connecticut or are you not a lot of them keep sort of like i love this i understand this instinct i feel this instinct they keep places in new york like a little apartment on near the barrier rodal whatever lay in just to kind of be like no no i still guide of me i still have a place wrestle like this so this the the ark of this book front yo two thousand eleven sort of the ends in brooklyn beat becoming the like the the the wealth center of hipsters totally and the but also just that that did it ever have any integrity other than for sure but i also just think it's yes it did i'll answer that but also that the idea that that would have one of the things that's hard to see from now because it's so obvious that that is what took place is how unlikely that seemed that that would at the time if you had been sitting there in two thousand two and and sort of prognosticating that in twenty in ten years or whatever like williamsburg a place you could not get cabs to take you was going to be the default locus of cool for the globe for but it's weird because there was some would have been laughed out of that conversation what's really like i lived in the story i had an apartment in the story from 95 five hill like two thousand and two whenever they might sub wetter was just informed by the new known of the building that he now add the lease uh quick note with note under the door there were people like louis had a place in williamsburg there were people moving into long island city yeah and likes her was sort of happening but that was because you could get space fits dole rahab winning is that it's just like everyone move to williamsburg because it was cheap brand because in this to return to it ten days saying i mean it was like you could get free he indeed siddig met each other because they lived in the same converted loft and they were passing each other's rooms enough and seeing that the same shit basically was on the floor at each other's rooms and it was sort of like i guess we should probably talk you know you've got a same weird stuff in there and like loss and in that's not like it's so easy to be like wow that must have been so cool and it's like it's it's only romantic later at the time it's like i need to live somewhere and and and be able to paint place with that right but that's that's the story of the amine ripe but that context or that that framework of life has repeated itself yes generations generation totally though the yeah the law thathat's another title that we here but the thing about nine eleven that tunisia was saying that's important is that whole justification we're talking about in the money in the bleaching out or however you want a phrase it these are they his theory and i by this now is that that was coming much sooner and nine eleven pause debt because there was a sense i mean people thought no one would travel there anymore no one wanted to get on planes it was like leaving for a second it was like is new york's economy going to die this the is this really like are things you can get cheap they were rally are things are things going to you know plummet here is it gonna be russ 70s new york thing again because no one will tourism will dinro wanna live here and all that stuff is they're going to be because it was it was terrifying and it was like you know every plane that flew overhead it was i mean people there were a couple of years where and so what that created for the purposes of this book is this weird a period of uncertainty that was really a gift to these bans because there was a couple of years and this is my my hay day really of lake going out in seeing shows during that time it was two thousand to two thousand three maybe into two thousand four but fair li where it was like it was just wild everyone was like are we gonna die but hey let's party en route druggie and it got dirty and it wasn't that expensive yet rent wasn't going up really of sort of just like the whole the whole apparatus was trying to figure out how this was going to shake out and it was like kohl let's play the you know you should read boca for answer some of those questions behind the scenes what did you ever read that book securing the city on my god who wrote i like i like i recommend this book to so many people i did you secretly right it no oh could cover ominous yes it's a bow it looks like the beginning of every law and order old school lunch or episode is by christopher dickey who i believe is james dickey's son in the i still see him as a you you shows up on shows on cnn and stuff but it's really about how how new york had to create its own count yes i should read that it is to the injury yes 'cause it was like we had we're our own city and we ourselves yeah because federal government and the cia and the fbi were not talking real yeah there was in the federal government was not really stepping up so these guys know what was going yeah and it was it was with giuliani still who was like we've got to make our own counterterrorism force and we've got to have international alley yet ray kelly yeah food and this guy cohen associated irate ocala read this like and then i'll be like i should have talked to him for the buck this is my life like i wake up still at night is damage extradition don't even choke of add that why never writing another oral history ever again or only organized oh it made me move state to a cabin in the woods by myself because they had an emotional breakdown like it's so hard that organization is really a nightmare well you did it and people like it yeah and you know it seems to be all in their uae dill per is let's check it out they clear talk of what do you want from me i i think it is hilarious eiriksson i let my favorite people around the book art like that one of my favorite pieces written about the book was by my friend dan aasi who hates who does not like any of this music basically he's in the book talking about conner over since he loves turnovers but he basically doesn't he's a music nerd anna anna a rock critic and this it he's just like all his hand suck basically i mean not literally but it's not his stuff but the thing is like i have i like i i'm not a connor overspent but i have him in here handsome my best interviews with people who are mike i will that is why and say like i'm at that's basically i think i i enjoy the fact that this isn't your world i think that's more fun lagging learn the creator of service project to talk to someone like that then someone who's like julian casablanca's this my favorite rock star of all time you're like well you're gonna love this yet boy do i have a book free like the this is writing i take this this part of journalism seriously like it's not my job to write a press release for one of these fans its job to convince those who aren't naturally inclined to take this as interesting that there's something there well here's what i have to say i'm happy you kids had your okay are you gonna try to say that that was not condescending he has had a knock out of it is out of all right it's a joke it was it was it was a sarcastic coffin ha ha ha pa let's shift gears demar serious yet um you know i and then the private police state fire juliana of just personal stuff i mean like i i've and talk to you really since markelle passed away a eulogized him on this show thank you for doing and you know because i like the guy and i literally your text to them like would like a week before it happened here do you talk about what happened can you talk about it or not i can totally i talk about i liked talking that i think people are a little afraid understandably to ask me about him because it's france you romantically involved on and off your best friends he was on the up and up again it seemed yes 100 percent it's really tragic i mean the answer to what happened which is what i guess is like not known i suppose i mean i don't really know i don't know anything other than he died and then i i texted you too to say sorry but then i got no information and then you know you just sit there and go igor would have and what that you it's not he's one of those guys ruettgers bound to happen but he didn't seem like it was going to happen that way well a lot of people you feel like it's bound to happen and then it doesn't i mean mark was had a history obviously of drug use and i think most people assume that he died of an overdose and that's not what happens i mean he didn't he we don't know for sure because there was not an autopsy performed huh so there's no leisure a cause of death that attack i mean cause of death unknown as far as i know you ea yes so this is what you're not afraid to talk about we have no information kind of accept i mean they i guess they just think like i so i was here and you know we shared custody of our dogs for six so mark or seven an hour years together in from my 20s and then we broke up like 10 years ago and but we stayed incredibly close friends and he was my creative partner basically like that mark this book would not exist without mark he is the person on the other end of the line consistently throughout frame iin merrier well like naughty i mean sometimes like sometimes is needed grady stuff but more just all writers need like the the i'll people i guess that create the the sort of like hootie who is on the red phone was on it was like i don't know and this isn't working in what do i do and like help and also i just need to that it's like that was the dark we are really really tight creatively and he would do the same we would talk to each other about writing every day and our dogs and so i was out here and he had been in a period of incredibly badge oppression for a couple of years on i mean probably his whole life it had been really bad and um i was helping him in his his family was helping him you know try to get the right mental health care never quite came together for him and eventually and so eventually after a couple of years lake road than the month before he died he was better than i've ever seen and he may have told you that india he was like like running a little bit yeah he was taking better care lindo visit no no one he hadn't dan i mean i think i know that mark lied to me about drugs or the years he wasn't like here's what happened the night that he died he went to a bar on the night that i think he died he went to a bar because he i mean we don't know exactly when he died he went to of our on february second and he had a couple of drinks drink and a half with a friend and at six thirty something like that and he came home and he walked the dogs with this friend and he was inside his house with the chain on the door and the locks on the door and a bowl of pasta on his on his like coffee table they found him and i couldn't hear i didn't hear from him the next day and i was worried and i didn't hear for him the next morning and we he didn't do that with that i mean he the dog think mark loved dogs er that anything in the world and wouldn't fuck around if their howarth and knew i was all the way out in california i mean he was like mortar arctic about the doksan i am pia and that's how they a his eventually i woke up a bunch of people up in his super went into his apartment and he found him just slumped over on his couch with dinner on the table so like as i have never done heroin but my understanding is you get big bell right and also there was no drug paraphernalia in his house and no drugs oregon went yeah i mean it's an aneurysm or a heart attack or or what any he i mean the dogs were fine they were in that house with him for thirty six hours and they were thirsty and in america pasta here at left that here too viking luggage joni it in like pardon me asshole i'm hungry and like their sausage in that layer she's too short can get up to that just short short leg's well you know it's it's it's nice to know that it it probably wasn't some eur grisly relapse no i mean if fit you know i don't know enough about you tell me can you like have secretly donovan of heroin fight hours before and then go home and make dinner and then die from doing that i mean a dozen quite at up but i you know but it seems to me that he put himself and his body through and you not up to him you know you know and if you don't know what you're like i don't know one is less physical was i mean you could only had one he high made him go and get one with wh what was the informality all systems go but you don't i mean this is what the there's i mean i'm going to be dealing with moves it out over that out of my life by not heart stuff that well i mean right like this is if you have a blake blood clot if you've an an aneurysm is undetectable i mean you can't like you can show people and this we don't have any control over any of this in the illusion is that lake via if you take care of yourself and you get physical zinni's sort of like drink your green juice that there is a sense of of control over warding off death in it's just not like that and like mark abuse the shit out of his body but that's also no guarantee that he was going to die in that way and you can take really gets care of yourself and you can get hit by a but i mean you know or diet something undiagnosed it's just what happens and it's horrible it's horrible but the one thing we do know was quick yeah and he was there with the two people in the world that he loved the most which are those two dogs no good swear to god i i'm sorry for your loss and congratulations on the book and it was nice of you to dedicated to him of guel i my friend imran told a a really potentially off color but actually amazing joke about this on this happened because imran loved mark in knew him very well a lesbian he goes so that's what it took to get together because there was dedicated to my parents and they got for this is the only thing mark could have done and i mean you know you knew him quite well and you guys have a shared sense of real black humor and so do i and mark i mean i can hear and sometimes it's being like the biggest promised that book was there is not enough amee nso i had to be something that will yeah you've got to have the dark your mercy you don't you know so the bottom doesn't fall out was nice talkin united sock india that was fun those good those promotional in some ways don't forget if you're in now way you can join me and brendan for our only l a book event and signing this sunday october twenty nine th at seven pm go to live talks la dot org for the tour page of wto of pod dot com i can't play ktar tired and a little depressed boomer lives uh uh uh

Brendan
"napster" Discussed on Tech Policy Podcast

Tech Policy Podcast

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Tech Policy Podcast

"So you've had this steady decline for about fifteen years about five years or so ago revenues flattened and then just in the last two years in business says especially in two thousand sixteen we saw some real growth in the industry and that's been mainly from uh streaming and in particular paid subscriptions from streaming and what do you see as the reason for that decline is it as simple as to say that the internet came along and that just hit your revenues or is it something more i think it's a number of different things i mean clearly the internet was part of it in the way that people consume music was different um so you had an album world going to a singles world you also had a tremendous amount of piracy fifteen years ago when napster came along and you know the the napster progeny like rockstar and khuzaa uh after that and so you had a lot of things happening it at one time that were you know very disruptive to the industry uh and so you had this very kind of you know pretty rapid decline i mean you don't often see for an industry is mature as as the recording industry to have that kind of decline over essentially a decade uh so uh you know those those reasons i piracy was was the biggest one obviously but the way people consume music uh y you know as part of it as well and you could argue that piracy was kind of the precursor to streaming in many ways i mean from a consumer perspective.

napster fifteen years five years two years