35 Burst results for "Napster"

"napster" Discussed on a16z

a16z

03:46 min | 2 months ago

"napster" Discussed on a16z

"So there are people on the Internet. The British system and then the third one is just the fact that and I do argue that maybe around the edges there are others, but they were the first company to succeed at our business model is just whatever our users are doing on our platform. And I tell the story in the book that just skull is the newspapers were not dumb no matter what anyone says. They were kicking the tires. They knew that this was a threat to their classified ads business. But one of the guys says to Jeff, my C suite is not going to sign off on buying you because you don't own anything. You don't own trucks, you don't, I'm factories. And that's common throughout the digital era, but also they couldn't wrap their minds around the fact that like you're not even taking possession of the goods. All you're doing is letting people interact, right? And so again, where would social media be some of the most powerful, valuable companies in the world? Don't own anything. Why they're so valuable because that turns out that's a very profitable deal with the inventory and everything else. It's funny, you still see that on Twitter, people are like, you know, how could Uber be more valuable than, I don't know what hurts or something. They don't own things and it's like, well, it's actually a feature, not a bug from P and L perspective. That's interesting. So I guess some other issue wants a napster. That was wine a little bit more. I mean, I knew this public story, but that's another one where I discovered what that was about while doing it, because we all think napster is about piracy. It's about disruption of a media industry that can't get with the times quick enough and dug their heels in stubbornly. But no. And I got this by interviewing some of the napster guys, where they're making their case, and then when you do the research, you see their quotes from 1998, 99. They're screaming this from the rooftops. The story of napster is today we live in a world for media of unlimited selection and instant gratification. If I tell you about a TV show movie, book whatever, we just did that with our phones. You expect to be able to pull it up in 5 seconds and at least sample it or probably consume it, right? That's what they had. And had they been able to convince any one of that in 1999, it would be a completely different media landscape. And the only problem that they had is don't pick a fight with an industry that has literal mob ties going back to it. It's very founding days. That's the interesting thing is it's sort of a react. To me, it's a three X play, right?.

napster Jeff Twitter
"napster" Discussed on The Swearwolves

The Swearwolves

03:47 min | 10 months ago

"napster" Discussed on The Swearwolves

"Dawn buffering or you just get the sound and you can see the video fucking so yeah first world problems. I know but it was definitely a different time. I was telling my son crazy like yeah. Now you can stream stuff on your tv and no problems throw something. That's on your phone onto your tv. Like what yeah. I was telling my son about We're talking to him about that downloading music from napster share bear. Or whatever fucking site you do. Do you remember like you start downloading something. It's like all right and a few days. I'm going to have the new album. And then you get you finally listen to it and it fucking wasn't it was like pirate bullshit. They put the wrong title. So i was like downloading some fucking. I don't know bullshit song. Yeah but you would. You'd set it to download and you'd go to work or go to sleep and then you wake up in the morning you got one song and then you have a q. I'd have cue that. I just keep reading and there will change depending on your internet speeds to be like i got four hours we now. It's his five hours. What's exactly ten years as soon as the bell album. Nineteen ninety nine. Yeah funky lars here. The metallica kills me. Just spend the money man. Okay i tell you that story to tell you this story. we're watching. We're reviewing blair witch project. A story the second story but it totally all that stuff. Because i was fascinated with the blair witch project before it even came up. This was the first. I'm going to go on record. I don't know if this is true or not. But put me on record as saying this. This is the first movie to viral. Using the i would say yes i would agree with. That would agree with that. You're gonna go on record. Yeah yeah at least the first to execute it really really well..

napster
"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I double A sued Napster in December. 1999 at the service had only gone live in June of 1990. Nine's of the R I. Double A did not waste time about this. And like many legal processes, this one took a long time to reconcile. And it was tricky because the DMC a did establish that service providers are not responsible for how their customers use their service, as long as the service itself is, in fact, legal and peer to peer distribution is a perfectly legal process. The problem wasn't with the method necessarily. But the content that users were up loading and sharing it XLII Eagle to use peer to peer networks to distribute files. That's their purpose. It's not legal to use peer to peer to distribute files without the authorization of the owner of the intellectual property. Use an analogy. It's perfectly legal to use the road system to transport stuff from one city to another. We do it all the time. That's what the road system is for. But it is illegal to smuggle contraband. However, if someone were caught smuggling the law wouldn't go after the federal Highway Administration in the United States. Because it's not the F H. W s fault that someone was transporting illegal goods using the highways that the agency actually oversees. The same concept was meant to apply to online providers. But there was a caveat. Providers had to be willing and able to take action against people who are using the services illegally. If a copyright holder such as a music label were to contact a service like Napster, that service was supposed to help clamp down on illegal behaviors, and in return, the service would receive the protection of safe harbor. So part of the lawsuit was alleging that Napster was willfully turning a blind eye. To illegal behavior on the service. Now, for the record, Napster did try to comply with us, but they were only able to demonstrate that there their ability to prevent illegal file sharing. Was 99.4% effective, and the prosecution argued that that wasn't good enough and had to be 100% effective, which led some people to say this isn't actually an attack on Napster. This is an attack on peer to peer file sharing. As a strategy in the first place on DeSoto. It led to pretty ugly fight. The lawsuit also led to Napster, shutting down its existing service in 2001. The lawsuit kept on going at that point the following year, A judge and an appeals court both found that Napster was liable for numerous copyright copyright violations in separate lawsuits with artists like Dr Dre and Metallica. Napster would settle out of court. Paying handsomely to do so and Napster would go bankrupt. They would eventually re emerge in a very different format as an online music store. It was not really the same entity as the original company that, like I said that company has gone bankrupt. Another company came in and bought up all the assets. And in fact, there's actually been a couple of different music related services called Napster since the original shut down and Napster wasnt the only entity the R I double A and music artists went after, as I mentioned earlier, individuals who used these services were also targeted on Daz. My colleague Ben Bowlen might say, Here's where it gets crazy. Because industry went thermonuclear against people, and not only did it hurt a lot of people, it didn't actually achieve the goal that the industry had set out to do, which was essentially to scare off pirates so that they wouldn't copy and share music files as it turned out. The actions didn't curtail that behavior at all. So To go into all the different lawsuits would take a few episodes all by itself. So I'm just gonna hit a few highlights, or you might want to call them low lights. Now I'm pulling a lot of this information from a white paper that was published in 2008 by the Electronic Frontier Foundation titled R. I. Double a versus the people five years later. In April 2003 the R. I double a suit for college students. The students would ultimately settle out of court. Not necessarily because they felt they had done something wrong or illegal, But because Going into the court system would be very expensive, much more expensive. Even if they won the fight, they might end up having to spend way more money in legal fees. Then, if they settled out of court, and then at least one of those cases, the amount of the settlement was exactly the same as the amount the student happened to have in his bank account, and it effectively wiped out his college fund. The reaction against the are edible. A was mostly negative, with many people saying that this was an overstep that it was Being far too cruel and its pursuit of pirates and the payments the penalties people were facing were far greater than what was justified. On September 8th 2003 the R I. Double A would sue 261 Americans, alleging that those people were illegally sharing music on peer to peer networks and as many have written in the year since it was a particularly aggressive and confrontational and ultimately stupid move. After all, the industry was attacking music fans. The very consumers that supported the industry were the ones that they are I w we're going after So in hindsight, it seems pretty clear that this move would alienate a lot of people. Even those who had never illegally downloaded a song and industry that sews its own customers is not likely to see a sales jump..

Napster United States Highway Administration Dr Dre Ben Bowlen
Making Art in the Modern Day

Innovation Hub

07:02 min | 1 year ago

Making Art in the Modern Day

"In 1993 the group. The Breeders released this song Cannonball, and it started to climb the charts. The lead singer Kim deal was by that a pretty important person, alternative rock, not somebody who seems like they would later be featured in a book called The death of the artist. She's a big indie rock icon and has been for a good 30 years. Maybe more. William to Russell. It's is the author of the Death of the Artist in which he argues The arts world, which has always been hard to break into, and is always hard to squeeze a middle class living out of It's crumbling. As Kim deal has seen, you know she grew up in Dayton, and she lives back in Dayton. She's doing okay, she said to me, but again, fame does not equal wealth and she said to me, you know, I'm a coal miner, I'ma steal man. I'm just another person whose industry is gone. Obsolete. The perplexing part about that door is wit says, is that while Cole is not used in the same widespread way that it once was in America, we still listen to music quite a bit. And it's still produces a ton of money. But not much of that money goes into artist pockets. Instead, lots of it goes to the tech companies that bring you the music. These companies are too powerful. They can dictate terms, especially to independent artists and even tow labels and publishers because there's so much bigger and so much more powerful, and we need to do something about that power. We need to reduce that power. Then there is the notion that we can all record her own songs with tools on our Apple computer and People we can break through the noise. But sister Jesuits That's mostly a pipe dream, one that has gotten way too much traction like this is a profoundly irresponsible message to be disseminated, and it's been disseminated with all the marketing power of Silicon Valley. Still, he acknowledges that Tech has in some ways widened the playing field. It's increased access, even if that's no really consolation to those who Ping to turn art. Into a living. My argument is not that the Internet has been terrible for the arts. In every respect. I think it's been terrible for working artists financially. It's done a lot of good things, and one of the things that's done is that it has democratized creation, and I think it's great for a lot of people. I mean, I'm a big fan of amateur creativity and people making their music and people writing their books. But there's a big difference between that and serious. I'm gonna just say it's serious, talented, dedicated artists who make the stuff that the rest of us actually want to read and listen to. I mean, that's the issue, right is like, Think about it. First of all, think about how much time you spend in an average day consuming art, meaning every kind of art music and narrative television and books and everything. Probably several hours. And then think about how much of that art is created by amateurs who just put their stuff out there. Probably none. But in any case, maybe at best, very little. So God bless all the millions of people who want to do this and put their songs online. This is not the way to have a culture. And it's also not the way to have an arts economy. Are there break spots You mentioned television and ah, I for all people over the last 68 months, we're doing a lot more television watching. Not that we weren't doing plenty before. Are there places for screenwriters or things that that have bossom DH because of technology because of streaming services like Netflix, and I'II bet Amazon in the TV business and on and on Yeah, There's no question that television has blossomed, You know, not just in terms of the numbers of shows, but aesthetically artistically, right? I mean around 2000. We got the Sopranos, and there was a 1999 the same years Napster and then all these terrific shows on HBO and Showtime and L. Amazon and Netflix and Lulu. And it's great. I mean, TV is the one art that's that's confident. That's blossoming. As you said, Why is this happening? It's not because we can get TV on streaming versus our television sets. It's because we pay for it. We pay a lot for it. I mean, if you add up the money that goes to television in your cable bill, Amazon Prime Netflix, HBO Max ESPN, plus all the money that each of us is paying every month. That's flowing through the system, and that's why television is flourishing. That's why movie stars and movie directors and screenwriters have migrated from movies to television because that's where the artistic Opportunities are if somebody does the television what Napster and now Spotify have done to music that's going to disappear. Overnight. Okay, People are not going to you know, Nicole Kidman is not going to do a TV series for 10 bucks. And maybe that's when people will realize what's been happening across the arts. I wonder what you see ahead. I mean, obviously. You know, when you talked about this notion of sea and like the death of the artist that was even before, as we talked about like that arts in many ways, kind of shut down for several months. What is the way forward? I don't know that there's a good answer. But let me let me say this in the last few decades already something we now call the food movement has arisen where people have realised, you know, we're eating a lot of processed food, reading a lot of fast food. It's bad for us is bad for animals. It's bad for the planet. It's bad for the people who make the food for us. We need to consume in a more responsible way. So people have started to pay more for food, and we've Started to restructure the food system a little bit around the edges, then, more recently, the same thing with clothing. People call it fast fashion like like fast food, and we're trying to be more conscious consumers of you know, cheap clothing that's made in places like Vietnam and Bangladesh. I think we need the same kind of movement for art. Because now we have what I call fast Art. Because this stuff has to be produced fast if you're going to make enough To make a living. At the very least, you have to make a lot and it's produced cheaply and it's consumed in haste. Music, text, visual images moving images, everything. So Yeah, I do think that we need to become more conscious consumers and pay what we can but also like with food and fashion. Larger structural changes also need to be made and the more conscious we are as consumers and the more we are aware of. The need for these changes and demand them from our public officials. And again, That's especially going to mean taking on big attack, which we now have so many reasons to do this, I think has the potential to maybe turn things around.

Netflix Kim Deal Amazon Napster Dayton Nicole Kidman Silicon Valley William Cole HBO America Russell Spotify L. Amazon Showtime
"napster" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"napster" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of Health and human Services at taxpayer expense. 2 53, and we go to traffic and weather together. The super retailers of New England all wheel drive traffic on the threes. Here's David said, Ronnie. Thanks, Let's go back up north first, and I'm going to start on the upper end of 1 28 South bound still jammed up from before we won in Peabody Toe Walnut Street in Lynnfield that earlier crash there that is cleared. But bad news Further south You're a total standstill from 1 29 down to a crash, blocking the two left lanes before the cloverleaf upper and 1 28 North bound heavy starting Washington Street in woman right up to route 28 reading, and then you'll hit more delay Sailing away on Salem Toe Walnut Street in Lynnfield. For 90 five's looking Good Route 3 93 95 Clear shot to and from the Napster State line, Route one cell phone. You locked up nearly a mile and a half past a work crew it to Chelsea Curve Center Lane is closed. Getting by Cotter Street, Right lane closed after that oneself on your heavy pine street down to the jug handle coming from made in Hampshire. Looking better now, 93 cell found Not all that bad. Just lose about a mile and a half down pass through 3 93 and conquered on 95 cell phone, You'll ride the brakes about three miles worth getting to the Hampton tolls. The West the pike both ways we're in good shape our past to 90 in Auburn for 95 cell phone, heavy 62 2 to 93 to 90 not looking bad, both directions, David said. Roni W. Busiest traffic on the threes, traffic on the threes brought to you by Commonwealth Motors. And Here's the four day forecast with AccuWeather's Matt Ben's through this afternoon. Mostly sunny skies with a gusty breeze comfortable with the high tempter of 2 79 degrees, and for tonight, mainly clear skies that allows temp tres.

Lynnfield David Chelsea Curve Center Lane Peabody Toe AccuWeather Commonwealth Motors Napster Matt Ben New England Hampshire Salem Ronnie Auburn
"napster" Discussed on The Tech Humanist Show

The Tech Humanist Show

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"napster" Discussed on The Tech Humanist Show

"Are still making an effort to throw emotion and show that you care and I think that's a really important piece that often gets missed when empathy becomes a buzzword especially in the tech community and in the business community especially in business where you have all of the. Embassy the empathy index in all of these, you know it's just used as. To actually just mean we kind of care about our employees or not a, we have a great age, our department, but in terms of a favorite definition I liked thinking. Is actually from a Buddhist some Buddhist writing I can't remember exactly where it came from. That sympathy is feeling for someone and empathy is dealing with someone a simple you know. Further to say, even just making the effort to feel with someone acknowledging that you might not literally know what it's like to experience what they're experiencing I think that's kind of like an active form of empathy. Yeah. That's a really great distillation phrase because I think that's what a lot of it comes down to is you can work around the nuance and the abstraction and I love new wants Napster Action I'll work neons direction all day. But when you're actually trying to deliver something that's applicable for people that people can actually take and understand in in real useful ways. It requires that level of intellectual rigor and I. Find This to a lot of my work centers around meaning and meaning is a similar similarly like concept that people talk about in very abstract terms and so a lot of the work I've done over the last few. Decades is to develop clear construct that people can apply and how they can break down what we're really talking about when we talk about meaning and specifically meaningful experiences. So did you was that part of in any way what drew you to the topic that it lacked that intellectual rigor amy mentioned going to the one book and being disappointed and kind of feeling like now I need to create this..

Napster
"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Legal and peer to peer distribution is a perfectly legal process. The problem wasn't with the method necessarily. But the content that users were uploading and sharing. It's it's legal to use peer to peer networks to distribute files. That's their purpose. It's not legal to use appeared appeared to distribute files without the authorization of the owner of the intellectual property. He is an analogy. It's perfectly legal to use the road system to transport stuff from one city to another. We do it all the time. That's whatthe road system is for but it is illegal to smuggle contraband. However, if someone were cut smuggling the law wouldn't go after the Federal Highway Administration in the United States because it's not the F H W ays fault that someone was transporting illegal goods using the highways that the agency actually overseas. The same concept was meant to apply to online providers. But there was a caveat. The providers had to be willing and able to take action against people who are using the services illegally. If a copyright holder such as a music label were to contact a service like Napster, that service was supposed to help clampdown on illegal behaviors and in return The service would receive the protection of safe harbor. So part of the lawsuit was alleging that Napster was willfully turning a blind eye to illegal behavior on the service. Now, for the record, Napster did try to comply with us. But they were only able to demonstrate that their their ability to prevent illegal file sharing was 99.4% effective. And the prosecution argued that that wasn't good enough and had to be 100% effective, which led some people to say this isn't actually an attack on Napster. This is an attack on peer to peer file sharing. As a strategy in the first place, and so it led to pretty ugly fight. The lawsuit also led to Napster, shutting down its existing service in 2000 won. The lawsuit kept on going at that point the following year, A judge and an appeals court both found that Napster was liable for numerous copyright copyright violations in separate lawsuits with artists like Dr Dre and Metallica. Napster would settle out of court. Paying handsomely to do so and Napster would go bankrupt. They would eventually re emerge in a very different format as an online music store. It was not really the same entity as the original company that, like I said that company had gone bankrupt. Another company came in and bought up all the assets. And in fact, there's actually been a couple of different music related services called Napster since the original shutdown, and Napster wasn't the only entity. The W and music artists went after, as I mentioned earlier, individuals who used these services were also targeted on Daz, My colleague Ben Bolan might say, Here's where it gets crazy. Because industry went thermonuclear against people, and not only did it hurt a lot of people, it didn't actually achieve the goal that the industry had set out to do, which was essentially to scare off pirates so that they wouldn't copy and share music files as it turned out. The actions didn't curtail that behaviour at all. So To go into all the different lawsuits would take a few episodes all by itself, So I'm just going to hit a few highlights, or you might want to call them low lights. Now I'm pulling a lot of this information from a white paper that was published in 2008 by the Electronic Frontier Foundation titled versus the People five Years later. In April 2003 the sued for college students, the students would ultimately settle out of court. Not necessarily because they felt they had done something wrong or illegal, But because Going into the court system would be very expensive, much more expensive. Even if they won the fight, they might end up having to spend way more money in legal fees. And if they settled out of court, and then at least one of those cases, the amount of the settlement was exactly the same as the amount the student happened to have in his bank account, and it effectively wiped out his college fund. The reaction against the idea was mostly negative, with many people saying that this was an overstep that it was Being far too cruel in its pursuit of pirates and the payments the penalties people were facing were far greater than what was justified. On September 8th 2003 would sue 261 Americans alleging that those people were illegally sharing music on peer to peer networks. And as many have written in the year since it was a particularly aggressive and confrontational and ultimately stupid move. After all, the industry was attacking music fans. The very consumers that supported the industry were the ones that were going after. So in hindsight, and things pretty clear this move would alienate a lot of people. Even those who had never illegally downloaded a song and industry that sews its own customers is not likely to see a sales jump. As a result, that's not how you build customer loyalty. And not only was aggressive and ineffective. It was a faulty process. The ride was collecting I P addresses by joining the same file sharing services that pirates were using, and then searching for people who are uploading music that was in the represented record labels. Directories in the R I double A, but an I P address doesn't automatically tell you the physical address of a device to get that information the I'd actually had to go after Internet service providers or ISPs. So the ISPs have an incentive to withhold that personal information of their customers because the handing over customer data is a great way to lose your customers. Confidence. The R. I double a leverage the rules of the DMC, a toe force, the hands of the Internet service providers of the ISP's didn't comply. They wouldn't be protected under the rules of the DMZ. Not first tried to subpoena customer's names and addresses from the ESPYs just with allegations of copyright infringement. So in other words, this wasn't as the result of a lawsuit or even They didn't even present evidence to support their claims. They said. We suspect the person using this I P address is committing piracy. We want their name and address so they weren't coming forward with any Stronger request then that that tactic ultimately failed as various public interest groups and the challenge that practice in court and the court agreed, saying, No, You need Maura than Justin allegation to get hold of the information. There was a period though, when the court was still deciding this where the practice was effectively legal, or at least it wasn't illegal, And in that period, the issued 1500 subpoenas to various ISPs. Now, some of those 261 people that the IRA a suit in September 2003 were probably fairly active in copyright infringement. They may very well have been the appropriate people to go after, at least from the perspective of thes. People were actively committing this infringing behavior. But there was someone that list Who won a lot of sympathy from the public like Briana Laura. She was 12 years old. And the R I. Double A came after her like she was some sort of evil super genius. She was living in a public housing development in New York City. And her mom. Was a single mother raising this kid and they were targeted by this initial blast of lawsuits and our only real option was to sell the case out of court because there's no way she could afford going to court and defending herself. That settlement would include a $2000 fine and the requirement that she apologize publicly. So here's the thing turns out having a massive multi $1,000,000,000 conglomerate of companies come after and forced a young, poor girl to apologize publicly, isn't the best PR movement in the world. It seemed pretty clear that Lo Hara wasn't some sort of existential threat to the R I double A and this was a real abuse of the legal system. And then there were all the people who were targeted, who clearly had nothing to do with illegal downloads. Sara Ward was one of those people she was accused of using Kazaa to download hard core rap music. But this grandmother probably didn't do that. Seeing as how the only computer she owned was a Mac computer, and Cazale was on Ly compatible with Windows machines. She wasn't apparently running a virtual Windows machine on her computer, so chances are she was not the right person. The Devil did eventually withdraw the lawsuit, but did not apologize for making that mistake And it wasn't the only mistake. The list of people that was sued by the way, also included a family in Georgia that not only didn't have an Internet connection, they didn't have a computer at all. There was no way for them to commit the crime that the accused them up. There are even people on that list who are actually deceased. So clearly, the R I double a was using a very wide, very inaccurate net to try and catch a few big fish as a message to pirates everywhere. And the 261 lawsuits were just the beginning. Over the course of several years, Nearly 30,000 Americans were targeted by the delay in an effort to create an environment that would discourage illegal file sharing. So what did that accomplish? Well, mostly, they made the ride like a vicious on carrying group of greedy corporate jerks who were willing to financially ruined the lives of people who are already vulnerable in an effort to secure their own bottom line, so it didn't win them. A whole lot of good will and piracy continued unabated. And there's no big shock there. We've seen time and time again. The more extreme punishments do.

Napster Federal Highway Administration United States Dr Dre New York City Ben Bolan Briana Laura Mac Lo Hara DMC ESPYs Georgia Sara Ward Maura
"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:42 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Pretty ugly fight the lawsuit also led to Nassar shutting down its existing service in two thousand one the lawsuit kept on going at that point the following year a judge and an appeals court both found that Napster was liable for numerous copyright copyright violations in separate lawsuits with artists like doctor dray and Metallica Napster would settle out of court paying handsomely to do so and Napster would bankrupt they would eventually reemerge in a very different format as an online music store it was not really the same entity as the original company that like I said that company gone bankrupt another company came in and bought up all the assets and in fact there's actually been a couple of different music related services called Napster since the original shut down and Napster wasn't the only entity the R. I. double A. and music artists went after as I mentioned earlier individuals who use the services were also targeted and as my colleague Ben Bowlin might say here's where it gets crazy because the industry went thermonuclear against people and not only did it hurt a lot of people it didn't actually achieve the goal that the industry have set out to do which was essentially to scare off pirates so that they wouldn't copy and share music files as it turned out the actions didn't curtail that behavior at all so to go into all the different lawsuits would take a few episodes all by itself so I'm just gonna hit a few highlights or you might want to call them low lights now I'm pulling a lot of this information from a white paper that was published in two thousand eight by the Electronic Frontier Foundation titled R. I. double eight verses the people five years later in April two thousand three the R. I. double eight sued for college students the students would ultimately settle out of court not necessarily because they felt they had done something wrong or illegal but because going into the court system would be very expensive much more expensive even if they won the fight they might end up having to spend way more money and legal fees then if they settled out of court and in at least one of those cases the amount of the settlement was exactly the same as the amount the student happen to have in his bank account and effectively wiped out his college fund the reaction against the R. I. double A. was mostly negative with many people saying that this was an overstep that it was being far too cruel in its pursuit of pirates and be the Hey miss the the penalties people were facing were far greater than what was justified on September eighth two thousand three the R. I. double A. would suit two hundred sixty one Americans alleging that those people were illegally sharing music on peer to peer networks and as many have written in the year since it was a particularly aggressive and confrontational and ultimately stupid move after all the industry was attacking music fans the very consumers that supported the industry were the ones that the R. I. W. we're going after so in hindsight it seems pretty clear this move would alienate a lot of people even those who have never illegally downloaded a song and industry that suse its own customers is not likely to see a sales job as a result that's not how you build customer loyalty and not only was it aggressive and ineffective it was a faulty process the R. I. double A. was collecting IP addresses by joining the same file sharing services that pirates were using and then searching for people who are uploading music that was in the represented a record labels directories in the R. I. double A. but and I. P. address doesn't automatically tell you the physical address of a device to get that information the R. I. double A. actually had to go after internet service providers or ISPs so the ISPs have an incentive to withhold that personal information of their customers because the handing over customer data is a great way to to lose your customers confidence the R. I. double a leverage the rules of the DMCA to force the hands of the internet service providers if the ISPs didn't comply they wouldn't be protected under the rules of the DMCA not first the R. I. double A. tried to subpoena ISP customers names and addresses from the I. S. P.'s just with allegations of copyright infringement so in other words this wasn't as a result of a lawsuit or even they didn't even present evidence to support their claims they said we suspect the person using this I. P. address is committing piracy we want their name and address so they weren't coming forward with any stronger the requested that that tactic ultimately failed as various public interest groups and the EFF challenge that practice in court and the court agreed saying no you need more than just an allegation to get a hold of that information there was a period though when the court was still deciding this where the practice was effectively legal or at least it wasn't illegal and in that period the R. I. double A. issued fifteen hundred subpoenas to various ISPs now some of those two hundred sixty one people that the IRA a sued in September two thousand three we're probably fairly active in copyright infringement they may very well have been the appropriate people to go after at least from the perspective of these people were actively committing this infringing behavior but there were some on that list who won a lot of sympathy from the public like Brianna Lohara she was twelve years old and the R. I. double A. came after her like she was some sort of evil super genius she was living in a public housing development in New York City and her mom was a single mother raising this kid and they were targeted by this initial blast of lawsuits and her only real option was to sell the case out of court because there's no way she could afford going to court and defending herself that settlement would include a two thousand dollar fine and the requirement that she apologize publicly so here's the thing turns out having a massive multi billion dollar come right of companies come after and forced a young the poor girl to apologize publicly isn't the best PR movement in the world it seemed pretty clear that Laharl wasn't some sort of existential threat to the R. I. double lay and this was a real abuse of the legal system and then there were all the people who were targeted who clearly had nothing to do with the legal downloads Sarah ward was one of those people she was accused of using kazaa to download hard core rap music but this grandmother probably didn't do that seeing as how the only computer shield was a mac computer and because all was only compatible with windows machines she wasn't apparently running a virtual windows machine on her computer so chances are she was not the right person the R. I. double A. did eventually withdraw the lawsuit but did not apologize for making that mistake and it wasn't the only mistake the list of people that was sued by the R. I. double eight also included a family in Georgia they not only didn't have an internet connection they didn't have a computer at all there was no way for them to commit the crime that R. I. double A. accuse them up there even people on that list who are actually deceased so clearly the R. I. double A. with using a very wide very inaccurate net to try and catch a few big fish as a message to pirates everywhere in the two hundred sixty one lawsuits were just the beginning over the course of several years nearly thirty thousand Americans were targeted by the R. I. double A. in an effort to create an environment that would discourage illegal file sharing so what did that accomplish well mostly they made the R. I. double a look like a vicious on caring group of greedy corporate jerks who were willing to financially ruin the lives of people who are already vulnerable in an effort to secure their own bottom line so it didn't win them a whole lot of good will and piracy continued unabated and there's no big shock there we've seen time and time again the more extreme punishments do not discourage crime but for some reason we keep trying that approach anyway well the industries were able to shut down services you know they were able to to target the actual services not necessarily the users other services would pop up and some were operating in foreign countries which made it more difficult for the R. I. double A. to go after them because they were outside the jurisdiction of the United States legal system it would lead to the industry lobbying for new legislation in the U. S. to force ISPs to block access to those services that were outside the U. S. but I've covered some of those efforts in previous episodes of tech stuff and as I mentioned before the R. I. double A. wasn't help by claiming piracy has a demonstrable calculable affect on diminished sales because it's impossible to equate every download as a lost sale it's quite possible that the person who illegally downloaded a file would have never purchased an album or song otherwise it's just as possible that after they downloaded it they would go out and buy the song legally there are people who did that too they might just download it to listen to it to determine whether or not they want to go buy the album so it works both ways was no way to say eight eight any single pirated instance would lead to a loss in revenue so the justification the R. I. double A. was using when it was deciding what damages it should be receiving from people was completely unjustifiable is based on faulty logic you can't say you owe me X. dollars because you cost me extra dollars when you can't be sure that's the case so it was a huge issue ultimately the music labels that fund the R. I. double A. began to withdraw their funding and this was for a lot of different reasons but one of them was that the country was entering a recession and that coupled with the already established trend of lower record sales was trying to put the squeeze on record label company budgets and there was the possibility that the R. I. double A. would just dissolve completely due to lack of funding so the industry organizations stop pursuing lawsuits not because it suddenly had a change of heart and said you know what we've been real jerks about this instead they stopped it because they ran out of cash to keep doing it they did maintain more lawsuits against the services but they start going after people let me be clear I don't think that does good I don't think it's a good thing to share copyrighted material without authorization I do think that artists should be compensated for their work that if you want to access something that's behind a pay wall you should either pay for that access or you just do without you you don't work your way around it you don't trying to get to the content without paying for it otherwise if you do that then you have removed the monetary incentive to create something and there are creative types who want to create no matter what you know but most of them also want to make a living they have to pay bills have to be able to eat so they need to.

Nassar Napster
Why Circular Conversational Design is Best with Alison Greenberg, CEO at aflow

Inside VOICE

07:09 min | 2 years ago

Why Circular Conversational Design is Best with Alison Greenberg, CEO at aflow

"Was reading online. That you have a pretty impressive background you went to Yell. And you studied anthropology you played in the Symphony Orchestra there. And then you did some work in the arts for Awhile and now you work in voice technology and there's been a lot of people that have come from the creative space so I'd love for you to talk about briefly your journey into how and why you got into voice technology years ago. Yeah absolutely well. One of my favorite things about this industry is how cross-disciplinary it is. There's really not one background of people who under boys and I don't think many different in that respect but I will say that really from the time I could talk. Language wasn't just the way I express myself it's Mike Currency and so music is something that I was always drawn to. I played music in high school and College. I still to this day. I studied anthropology because of how central language was to it as a social science. I didn't study English or history. I studied a social science because I loved looking at language as a tool and as a currency especially in ultra contacts and in the voice industry but actually with my company of flow we started with chat bots. Language is very much currency of conversational user. Interfaces or curious as we call them and so you know voice and chat go hand in hand they are. Interbay says that requires specificity precision and entertaining use of language but the design principles across voice and chat. Can you really different? And so- entering Voice Technology. You know it's kind of a misnomer. I didn't enter voice technology. I entered chat and that was because when we started flow. Mico Gandara South Miller was actually the driving force behind beginning not company and he was noticing automation taking he was noticing the role of AI in businesses in communications and he started to build the baht of an NBA all star name Russell Westbrook at the time of Oklahoma City Thunder and that was our first bought and then we started to build from there realizing that we scale communications we could even skill personas and brand identities into these conversational experience and so while we believed that automation and I were powering communication. We also believe that is really immature. I don't know if you hear this often but do people ever talk to you about kind of how I is lacking yes. That's definitely something that comes up and I know especially when it came out a couple years ago and consumers used it. There was kind of frustration and so I feel like there's now this like element of education and awareness of like. No it's growing and and we're working on it and getting people to understand that totally. Yeah I mean in technology. You hear a lot about the hype cycle rate. So we might be in that trough of disillusionment which is a piece of language. I just love it's kind of various the trump disillusionment makes sense. Alexa is a teenager. You know came out. In two thousand four chat bots really the dawn of chat bots was in the mid twenty tonnes. We are looking at technologies. That are not just immature in some time. They're immature in the sense of the amount of work that has to go into making them seem less so this industry needs our help. Our words and our design for it to actually work. It's not intelligent yet right so if a is a teenager you know. Teenagers can crash your car. Teenagers can make a lot of mistakes and do a lot of damage especially on the part of brands but teenagers can also change the world so just look at Greta. Van Ver look at the kinds of young people who are driving social change today. That's the approach that we take to chat and voice it'll flow and match. Why we built the concept of conversational design is because we believe that we have to work together with these systems and with the power moderation and conversation design is actually the most important part of Charlton boys today. If these systems are designed well technology to incredible but it's not going to work welter these her. Yeah which brings me to. You made a comment in another interview. You did how you talked about. Hamas boys conversations are linear and what you do out of flow as you really work on creating a circular conversational design. Can you describe the different? So people understand it and why it's important to what you do at a flow hersher. Yeah so out of what we developed. Circular Conversation Design as our attempts to fix these broken visual and verbal designs. Keeps the industry has kind of had to back dialogue into the tools that we have to build it. And so I think really voice and charter just like any industry were almost only as good as our tools and so what we do to kind of choose actualized or conversation design. We talk about a traffic circle. Have you ever been a England or actually you live in New Jersey? I was GonNa say we definitely have traffic circles in New Jersey? So yes perfect. Yes so we'll have talking to people who've been to New Jersey because you're intimately familiar with the roundabout traffic circle. You know you have to get on a certain point and then you make turtles people who aren't from UK or New Jersey. These very confusing carry. I've learned But the cool thing about around about or traffic circle as you can get on off any talk and so if you miss your exit you just keep going in the circle. You have another opportunity to make that exit once you exit you can drive through the backup but you always have an opportunity to get back on. And that's how human conversations work the tools of the trade up until now have kind of destroyed the potential conversations. I in my opinion because we've mainly used the decision tree right. So that's linear design thinking conversations as linear. But that's not how we speak. You know I could talk to you right now about projects for doing it a flow. We can pivot to women and boys. I could ask you what it's like to live in New Jersey. That's how communication works. There's so many circles within circles. There's so many overlaps in and crossed actions and so we had a great experience actually Boy Summit last summer we were really lucky to be part of Amazon's conversation design workshop. One got to take some great echo. Show fives and They disqualified anyone who designed using a decision tree. And so that kind of shows you the way that the industry has been. I know a lot of designer still used decision trees. And it's because it's how away to understand the computer logic but we don't conversational napster and we think of them as a set of nodes that are all linked to one another wherever and whenever possible in a circular fashion and just like that traffics. Are you have to be able to get on and get off at any point? In time we should be able to return to the part of the flow to the extent that the platform we build allows us to do so we should be able to return to order the flow midway through at via

Voice Technology New Jersey Mike Currency Symphony Orchestra Alexa Interbay Hamas Russell Westbrook Van Ver NBA Gandara South Miller Oklahoma City Amazon UK Charlton England
Record labels rush to IPO amid music streaming boom

Techmeme Ride Home

02:42 min | 2 years ago

Record labels rush to IPO amid music streaming boom

"Last year was the year of the Unicorn. Ipo parade this year. Not so much where mostly just waiting to see what AIRBNB is going to do but there is going to be a bunch of new. Ipo's coming soon from a very specific space. A lot of the record labels are planning to go public warner music. Group filed to go public two weeks ago. Universal Music Group is planning to IPO in the coming years. It said in Vivendi earnings report last week. And there's all sorts of investment and acquisition and merger chatter across the whole industry. Why well suddenly thanks to music streaming? The music industry is feeling flush and bullish. It's not that record. Labels are making as much money as they did in the golden olden days before napster. It's just that the bleeding has stopped and the industry has turned around. The labels have seen double digit revenue growth for each of the last few years basically revenue is growing. The charts are all moving in the right direction. Finally things are going up not down. So people are rushing to cash in and the record companies also seemed to have gotten with the Times quoting axios. The record companies have transformed themselves into music entertainment companies that provide services to all artists at any stage of their career and regardless of whether they are signed to that label says Mitch Glazer Chairman and CEO of the recording industry of America in a phone interview with axios quote that kind of diversification expands. Revenue options creates more opportunity in the industry and creates more competition says Glazer Glazer notes that the record labels today provide everything from social media strategy to merchandising for artists not just distribution deals. Miller notes that in the digital era and not every artist will rely on a label for distribution quote labels are much more willing and in fact must meet the artists where they are and quote paid. Subscriptions are now eighty percent of streaming music revenue which is up from just twenty five percent only five years ago so people are finally paying for. Music again. No wonder the industry is feeling its oats. Still there could be a natural sealing to all of this people don't seem to be willing to pay anything more than about ten dollars a month for music. Subscriptions and unlike in the video space you cannot entice people with exclusive content because of people are paying for music they want all the music not just a subsection of it so once everyone signs up for streaming this all hit a brick wall quote. I think that's why these companies want to go public now. I think there's some growth limits to this model says Miller end quote

IPO Glazer Glazer Axios Universal Music Group Mitch Glazer Miller Vivendi Chairman And Ceo Napster America
"napster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nineties fashion I can't remember if it was from a friend or if I found it online but I think a friend was listening to this woman's work and she had also introduced me to Napster so I like downloaded this womans work I was really moved by it I kept like listening to it over and over again because it was so beautiful and strange to me like I guess it made me feel uncomfortable for some reason I think her voice was just so intense in this is so interesting like I was really captivated by how strange it sounded to me and it's funny to think there was some so strange but it is strange I mean it's really mysterious music you know it was very emotional very sentimental like really sweet and it was complex her music holds like the emotional complexity of life running up that hill which is like one of her biggest hit was pretty powerful for me yeah like six great ride my bicycle just kind of penned into it you know to me that I didn't really know what it was about or whatever but rather than just caught the it was moved as far as like patterns and the roles in the drum you know I mean it was it kind of reminded me of of a steady marks plus me ride my bike schools going up and down hills like I use it as motivation to get school lunch at in about time they brought since then the this kind of struck a chord like the music is a poster invoke emotion in the most of it is music brought out of me was that of Jordan as his love you know me makes you feel good and that's what is this post because had the big hit single running up that hill the hounds of love and what inspired that song thanks very much about them and the power and the restoration of misunderstanding asics a man could become a woman and a woman a man within their relationship.

Napster Jordan
Decentralization Philosophy Part 1  From Buddha to the Conquistadors

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

09:34 min | 2 years ago

Decentralization Philosophy Part 1 From Buddha to the Conquistadors

"I've been trying to figure out how to talk about this topic for a while because cryptocurrency is this really kind of strange flat structure. That has all of these little hierarchical structures built on top of it and you can take that analogy and you can really really zoom in on it or you can really really zoom out on it as kind of still true really regardless of how you're looking at it and I think a lot of this has to do with just the nature and sort of the oddness oddness of crypto currency and a Bitcoin as a community right as a movement and as technology that also is attached to people getting rich. Sometimes today I WanNa talk about a topic that I've been calling catalysts and CEOS and take a look at what the crypto currency space looks like. Today what it looked like in the past. Ask Talk about some of the different attributes that got us to where we are today. So Toshi said an interesting precedent. They led with their ideas and to a lesser extent their code and the early sparked a was association that contribution catalyzed first Bitcoin and then the crypto currency movement at large those who believed in that vision given an opportunity to get rich in some cases crazy rich rich and that combination of factors lead. I all coins coins than ICO's SAFT'S STO's and I don't think even talked about on the show before and who knows what will come next because clearly the path of innovation that's occurring here is not over at all but it also created what feels like a strange legacy that we're going to explore today as simply put are charismatic leaders who emerge from that flat structure that is the bitcoin protocol more or less dangerous more or less problematic more or less notable than the mark Zuckerberg's the Elon Musk's Jeff bezos. Goes and Steve. Jobs who really lead their movements. There's not that much of a difference between Associate Akimoto and a Jeff bezos except for the way that they fundamentally went about not inciting the change that now has kind of swept the world in one case kind of the e commerce site of and the other case this digital currency cryptocurrency or blockchain bitcoin movement. Or whatever you WANNA call it. Today's conversation is about decentralized catalysts and centralize CEO's the first thing I thought of when you said SA- Toshi contrasted to Jeff bezos. US was the difference. Between a certain personality type blended with introversion versus extroversion an extroverted rated person who is very smart and capable and intelligent and can see the future almost but wants credit and wants to be the face of an organization and is is comfortable in that role. You end up with someone. Like Jeff bezos. WHO's out there? And he's totally comfortable with that even though he retracts heat sometimes but but she didn't want the credit souto she wants to be behind the scenes and gets everything they needed from just being the mastermind. Mind who's kind of silent and letting other people be the face and I think that's really interesting. If you study personality types. Maybe even like the Myers Briggs. Souto Souto she is like your classic. I N T J personality type. They're like the mastermind architect but they don't need the credit and they don't need to be the face. Jeff Bezos as US would be like an E. N. T. J. who's like the CEO and the leader and wants to be the public face. I think that's a really interesting point. But I think that there's another factor here. Maybe okay which is that. Was it a choice. For Satoshi to take the type of catalyst like behind the scenes never revealed role or was that a factor of the not just the disruptive potential but what was being disruptive of course it was a choice. I mean Saito. She clearly thought through the implications of what they were doing carefully but if they really wanted credit they would have justified some way to take the credit and to be public about it. I think you always have a choice. I think another pretty good way to differentiate so Toshi from Jeff bezos is one of them make several hundred million a year contracting with the CIA Eh and the other one was never heard from one someone spoke to the CIA. I don't know who's point that supports but I think the big different factors that there was a legal path for Jeff Bezos to do what he did and even if he was an introvert. It still a good choice for him to do it. If it winds up that he has all the resources and success. I don't think we see that in practice very often where you have a founder. Who Comes in catalyze is a thing and then leaves before it actually becomes successful and their contribution bution isn't largely replaced by what comes after? I don't think it's so cut and dried that. What Jeff Bezos was doing or wanted to do with there was a legal path for him him? I mean he was doing something that nobody had ever done before. What was that avoiding state sales tax? This is another good point. Jeff bezos has been really interested in Star Trek. He wants to create a star trek future and some of the things he's been doing are totally unprecedented. And so it's not as though you can really say. Oh they're definitely legal because there's never been a legal precedent to establish that they are legal. You could say oh well Ijaz doing things that are a gray area or questionable. But he's he's not asking for permission and that's an admirable quality so you're talking about different levels of challenge and so with Jeff Bezos thing and with examples like like Uber. And other things like that. You are talking about companies that are doing very disruptive things but the question is who are they disrupting and in both of those situations the person or the entity. That's it's being disrupted their state governments and so if you're like a national company and you have presence in many many states that actually gives you the ability to play a bit of a game there. The thing that Uber did is kind of the reverse of what happened with napster. Napster was a decentralized network for file sharing then hit a bunch of national and even global organizations that suited everywhere but it was ultimately fighting these national or global organizations whereas Uber. They weren't fighting any global or national organizations they were fighting lots and lots and lots of little regional monopolies and it's to a lesser extent. Sure about Amazon to every state where they weren't collecting sales tax. Well that was an individual a fight so it's not like they had a problem with the United States. They had a problem with each individual state. Look at what's happened with projects in the lead up to the invention of Bitcoin and all of those centralized charlize alternatives. They were competing with the federal government for fundamentally monopolized right in the right to issue currency and control sort of the dynamics of the money that we all use news. And that's a place where it seems like you couldn't have done this as a CEO because people tried that and they basically all wound up getting arrested or getting all their assets season in many cases giving customers assets assets seized two so as we can see. There are definitely reasons why people do decentralized and centralized organizations whether it's from personal reasons just because they don't want the credit in some cases or in some cases because having the credit is dangerous and on the other hand the advantages of taking on that leadership role. Well the thing about a flat structure is that it's a flat unstructured. So even if you're on top of it still major basically at the same level as everybody else but organizations you know. Companies these are hierarchies for the most part and so if you have that role at the top of that structure well. It's a lot higher than you'd be if you were at the top of a flat structure. All of this comes back to one of my favorite books. It's really short and highly recommended. Did starfish and the spider by Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman. I read it actually before I became interested in Bitcoin and it was really kind of formation book for me. We've talked about on the show before but it's been like five five years so I figured it wasn't a bad topic to bring up again. The subtitle of the book is the unstoppable power of leaderless organizations. And if you're a fan of decentralized technologies but I've never read it I cannot recommended amended highly enough quoting from the book. A spider is a creature with eight legs coming out of its central body. It has this tiny head and usually eight is. If you chop off the spider's headed headed dies and that's exactly what happens with centralized organization a centralized organization has a clear leader. WHO's in charge? And there's a specific place where decisions are made if you get rid of the leader. You paralyzed realized the organization now. This contrasts with a decentralized organization. which is a fundamentally different animal? It's actually a starfish. At first glance at starfish looked similar to a spider appearance but the starfish is decentralized. starfish doesn't have ahead. The major organs are actually replicated through each and every arm and in reality. starfish is a neural network work. Basically a network of cells instead of having a head like a spider the starfish functions as decentralized network and you can even in nature see situations where a starfish fish has been wounded and for example in arm or even several arms have come off what tends to happen is that actually both pieces will then grow into a complete starfish and it's another another method that they can reproduce. You might say that that's inefficient from a biological perspective to duplicate or pent-up locate editor. How you even and say that word but to make five copies of all of your major orders and neural tissue? GAFFER's them this great advantage of being able to regenerate just from from a small piece it means that while starfish might not have perhaps some of the advantages that a spider does it also isn't vulnerable in the same way. That spider is to damage to you. Know very small parts of it because again it's just not centralized we're GonNa talk about this concept in a different way a little bit later. But what other comparisons do you like besides this kind of starfish in spider for decentralized and centralized organizations and kind of broader question that I wanna come to his how many companies do we actually think or how many any projects do we actually think like rough. ballpark percentage in crypto actually are starfish versus. How many might be using a network that is a starfish but in reality the are themselves

Jeff Bezos Sa- Toshi CEO United States Souto Souto Cryptocurrency Mark Zuckerberg Napster Steve ICO CIA Myers Briggs Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman Amazon Satoshi Saito Ijaz Founder
Woman Caught On Camera Walking Naked Through Miami International Airport

Woody and Company

02:57 min | 2 years ago

Woman Caught On Camera Walking Naked Through Miami International Airport

"Did you see footage of this woman walking through the airport stripping her clothes off didn't see the footage is still a saw a still photograph of it moments ago due to actually witness just see it I actually saw the video it was pixelated so I you know the woman is actually from what I could tell you know like an average looking woman nothing really stands out about her I mean she looked fit she's just if you she's casually removing her clothes and she's walking through Miami International Airport and when I say casually she didn't break stride she's walking you I think it picks up about where she's got on a broad panties and she's continuing to walk then the camera then is kind of a a back angle of her kind of walking away she reaches her hand back behind us Napster brawl it just takes it all doesn't even break stride just continues walking and then she just pulls are just pull some office she's walking steps out of them interest continues to walk it's easy to get bogged down in an airport so I I can understand you know she was in a hurry you want to keep stride you wanna keep your moment forward momentum you can't miss our flight legs moving ahead running back just drive fall forward get more yards moments later the here's the interesting part she's on top of a police car near the exit she jumps off of that into traffic she runs over to a waiting police officer who takes her into custody at that point and then they're saying she was in coherent and delusional at that point when they're speaking to dilute you think I mean I don't know that anybody of sound mind would just be walking through an airport stripping off their clothes when you started talking about that you sadly you go either she's whacked out on drugs and I'm watching it right now yeah and or or she's having some sort of mental break which is also set I thought it was also interesting that they were saying nobody all the people who saw nobody stepped in to help let me ask you this question let me pose this question to you if you were in now Miami International Airport in your walking and you see a woman coming at you who is either naked or is stripping off her clothes the last thing you're probably going to do is run up and say do you need help you're probably going to be standing there stunned because you're not expecting something like I'd be looking around to see if I get in film there's there's there's like punk or something along those lines I think I would probably look you know does she have something in our hands does she have a gun or a knife it and if she didn't then maybe go Hey are you okay can I help you but I would I do that from about thirty feet away so you would be running up trying to put your coat around or or no yeah hello she said can you help me or or yeah and but she's been evaluated now and once again do not Google is on your work computer just a

"napster" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"Is all there is nobody think about it yeah how how would you know yeah if you call to go home in the closed until after March that's crazy so I I have to remember what was the what was before Grokster what was the first be thou what Grokster and what was the first with the weather meant how he got mad that you give them yeah okay so I I got fired from working with above in March or know someone ever was yeah it was it was March or April of two thousand one right and shortly after that Napster had just become popular so I was trying to find different clips of your surgeon Howard Stern clubs whatever and there is one thing where some guy called up and he asked Howard to make a voicemail message for the hard like I don't want to do that the there is a time to go there he got very three two one and he's like Hey it's Howard Stern the guy who called is a big fat idiot and he's a loser and I don't know why you want to talk to him but if you want to leave a message go ahead and do that right so I took that and then I called the bubbles voicemail allegedly no I did hi amber again do I knew the code Leo and I change his outgoing office voicemail to that voice mail and then I started working and across town in another radio stations on I was competing and I was able to book all my gas by just taking their voicemail guess pitches give the stupid in Miller's own voice mail password yeah I couldn't change the outgoing message that and they didn't know was on there for months months because who calls our own phone right in all right so so you'd call above his office phone at work and it would go hi this is Howard Stern who is still interested radio at the time we got a call the big fat idiot and was just red and then people would call people the misery many have changed that's.

Napster Howard Stern Leo Miller
First cargo-carrying robot now available for consumers

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

First cargo-carrying robot now available for consumers

"It's call Gaeta and it looks like a large round red cooler on two oversized wheels it can transport groceries or just walk with you says co founder Jeffrey sh Napster reaching for the keys to the car and go out for a walk with Jesus the points as co founder Greg Lynn is to be both functional and fun we decided to focus on helping people be pedestrian and outdoors rather than giving them another thing to ride on at just over three thousand dollars it's not for everyone but analysts JP Gallagher says this is robot future they're not going to look like what we have imagined in the movies meaning it doesn't look like a human or animal instead an object or even just a voice in a device like a lex up for Sears I'm Julie Walker

Gaeta Greg Lynn Jp Gallagher Sears Julie Walker Co Founder Jeffrey Sh Three Thousand Dollars
"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:26 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"On a legal behaviors and in return the service would receive the protection of the safe harbor so part of the lawsuit was alleging that Napster was willfully turning a blind eye to illegal behavior on the service now for the record Napster did try to comply with us but they were only able to demonstrate that their their ability to prevent illegal file sharing was ninety nine point four percent effective and the prosecution argued that that wasn't good enough it had to be a hundred percent effective which led some people to say this isn't actually an attack on Napster this is an attack on peer to peer file sharing as a strategy in the first place and so it led to pretty ugly fight the lawsuit also led to Napster shutting down its existing service in two thousand one of the lawsuit kept on going at that point the following year a judge and an appeals court both found that Napster was liable for numerous copyright copyright violations in separate lawsuits with artists like doctor dray and Metallica Napster would settle out of court paying handsomely to do so and Napster would bankrupt they would eventually reemerge in a very different format as an online music store it was not really the same entity as the original company that like I said that company gone bankrupt another company came in and bought up all the assets and in fact there's actually been a couple of different music related services called Napster since the original shut down an answer wasn't the only entity the R. I. double a and music artists when after as I mentioned earlier individuals who use the services were also targeted and as my colleague bend bowline might say here's where it gets crazy because the industry went thermo nuclear against people and not only did it hurt a lot of people it didn't actually achieve the goal that the industry had set out to do which was essentially to scare off pirates so that they wouldn't copy and share music files as it turned out the actions didn't curtail that behavior at all so to go into all the different lawsuits would take a few episodes all by itself so I'm just gonna hit a few highlights or you might want to call them low lights now I'm pulling a lot of this information from a white paper that was published in two thousand eight by the Electronic Frontier Foundation titled R. I. double eight verses the people five years later in April two thousand three the R. I. double eight sued for college students the students would ultimately settle out of court not necessarily because they felt they had done something wrong or illegal but because going into the court system would be very expensive much more expensive even if they won the fight they might end up having to spend way more money and legal fees then if they settled out of court and in at least one of those cases the amount of the settlement was exactly the same as the amount the student happen to have in his bank account and effectively wiped out his college fund the reaction against the R. I. double a was mostly negative with many people saying that this was an overstep that it was being far too cruel in its pursuit of pirates and the the payments the the penalties people are facing we're far greater than what was justified on September eighth two thousand three the R. I. double A. would sue two hundred sixty one Americans alleging that those people were illegally sharing music on peer to peer networks and as many have written in the year since it was a particularly aggressive and confrontational and ultimately stupid move after all the industry was attacking music fans the very consumers that supported the industry were the ones that the R. I. double a we're going after so in hindsight it seems pretty clear this move would alienate a lot of people even those who had never illegally downloaded a song and industry that use its own customers is not likely to see a sales job as a result that's not how you build customer loyalty and not only was it aggressive and ineffective it was a faulty process the R. I. double A. was collecting IP addresses by joining the same file sharing services that pirates were using and then searching for people who are uploading music that was in the represent a record labels directories in the R. I. double A. but an I. P. address doesn't automatically tell you the physical address of a device to get that information the R. A. double A. actually had to go after internet service providers or ISPs so the ISPs have an incentive to withhold that personal information of their customers because the handing over customer data is a great way to to lose your customer's confidence the R. I. double a leverage the rules of the DMCA to force the hands of the internet service providers if the I. S. P.'s didn't comply they wouldn't be protected under the rules of the DMCA not first the R. I. double a tried to subpoena I SP customers names and and addresses from the I. S. P.'s just with allegations of copyright infringement so in other words this wasn't as a result of a lawsuit or even they didn't even present evidence to support their claims they said we suspect the person using this I. P. address is committing piracy we want their name and address so they weren't coming forward with any stronger now requested that that tactic ultimately failed as various public interest groups and the EFF challenge that practice in court and the court agreed saying no you need more than just an allegation to get a hold of that information there was a period though when the court was still deciding this where the practice was effectively legal or at least it wasn't illegal then in that period the R. I. double A. issued fifteen hundred subpoenas to various ISPs now some of those two hundred sixty one people that the IRA a suit in September two thousand three we're probably fairly active in copyright infringement they may very well have been the appropriate people to go after at least from the perspective of these people were actively committing this infringing behavior but there were some on that list who won a lot of sympathy from the public like Brianna Lohara she was twelve years old and the R. I. double lake came after her like she was some sort of evil super genius she was living in a public housing development in New York City and her mom was a single mother raising this kid and they were targeted by this initial blast of lawsuits and her only real option was to sell the case out of court because there's no way she could afford going to court and defending herself that settlement will include a two thousand dollar fine and the requirement that she apologize publicly so here's the thing turns out having a massive multi billion dollar kind of companies come after and forced a young the poor girl to apologize publicly isn't the best PR movement in the world it seemed pretty clear that Laharl wasn't some sort of existential threat to the R. I. double a and this was a real abuse of the legal system and then there were all the people who were targeted who clearly had nothing to do with the legal downloads sterile ward was one of those people she was accused of using because all to download hard core rap music but this grandmother probably didn't do that seeing as how the only computer shield was a mac computer and because all was only compatible with windows machines she wasn't apparently running virtual windows machine on her computer so chances are she was not the right person the R. I. double a did eventually withdraw the lawsuit but did not apologize for making that mistake and it wasn't the only mistake the list of people that was sued by the R. I. double eight also included a family in Georgia that not only didn't have an internet connection they didn't have a computer at all there was no way for them to commit the crime that are a double a accused them up there even people on that list who actually does so clearly the R. I. double a was using a very wide very inaccurate net to try and catch a few big fish as a message to pirates everywhere in the two hundred sixty one lawsuits were just the beginning over the course of several years nearly thirty thousand Americans were targeted by the R. I. double a in an effort to create an environment that would discourage illegal file sharing so what does that accomplish well mostly they made the R. I. double a look like a vicious on caring group of greedy corporate jerks who were willing to financially ruin the lives of people who are already vulnerable in an effort to secure their own bottom line so it didn't win them a whole lot of good will and piracy continued unabated and there's no big shock there we've seen time and time again the more extreme punishment do not discourage crime but for some reason we keep trying that approach anyway well the industries were able to shut down service says you know they were able to to target the actual services not necessarily the users other services would pop up and some were operating in foreign countries which made it more difficult for the R. I. double a to go after them because they were outside the jurisdiction of the United States legal system it would lead to the industry lobbying for new legislation in the U. S. to force I. S. P.'s to block access to those services that were outside the U. S. but I've covered some of those efforts in previous episodes of tech stuff and as I mentioned before the R. I. double a wasn't held by claiming piracy has a demonstrable calculable affect on diminished sales because it's impossible to equate every download as a lost sale it's quite possible that the person who illegally downloaded a file would have never purchased an album or song otherwise it's just as possible that after they downloaded it they would go out and buy the song legally there are people who did that too they might just download it to listen to it to determine whether or not they want to go buy the album so it works both ways was no way to say eight eight any single pirated instance would lead to a loss in revenue so the justification the R. I. double a was using when it was deciding what damages it should be receiving from people was completely unjustifiable is based on faulty logic you can't say you owe me X. dollars because you cost me X. dollars when you can't be sure that's the case so it was a huge issue ultimately the music labels that fund the R. I. double A. began to withdraw their funding and this was for a lot of different reasons but one of them was that the country was entering a recession and that coupled with the already established trend of lower record sales was trying to put the squeeze on record label company budgets and there was the possibility that the R. I. double a would just dissolve completely due to lack of funding so the industry organisations stopped pursuing lawsuits not because it only had a change of heart and said you know what we've been real jerks about this instead they stopped it because they ran out of cash to keep doing it they did maintain more lawsuits against the services but they start going after people now let me be clear I don't think that does good I don't think it's a good thing to share copyrighted material without authorization I do think that artists should be compensated for their work that if you want to access something that's behind a paywall you should either pay for that access or you just do without you you don't work your way around it you don't trying to get to the content without paying for it otherwise if you do that then you have removed the monetary incentive to create something and there are creative types who want to create no matter what you know but most of them also want to make a living they have to pay bills have to be able to eat.

Napster two thousand dollar hundred percent billion dollar four percent twelve years five years
"napster" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"napster" Discussed on The Big 98

"Operator of the vehicle such I sense. show. all right well I don't quite understand this but there's a bizarre social media craze. that sees women using glue to lift their top lips higher to create a folder power. no I had my do you do a little research here ninety tell me about this yes people are doing on that tictoc they're taking like super glue putting it right above there let and then there was that little spot has the you know the little in between and a little in between part yeah and then they live their lives and it kind of like. necklaces gathered together so big to look fuller. good faithful so in the middle of your live you've got this little tunnel we'll call the tunnel then if you go to both sides of the tunnel together it makes you look look cool and I pulled the lead but that means of a good I. it's like things like lifting it up now. the skin sticks together older yeah I mean there's a look at that really know how it hurts. we are on tictoc because all the kids are doing it. I know you get my dishes every on tech talk probably not I mean it's fun and I like browsing around on that oppose anything okay my daughter always talking about tick tock me you don't even have a phone I don't know where she sees that but what does she see. good question because at her school she's not in a class with a bunch of kids correct I don't know she just knows thanks. I'll find out maybe you saw it on Napster friends from them there wasn't around then around then okay I don't know all find out I saw a pop I said that okay they have a solution to the chicken sandwich shortage and that's a bring your own bread so if you take your own bread up with two buns indigo LA magic is ours does give you chicken tenders you buy on the part of the writing and how much you make shows how much they're.

Napster
Fired Up!

The Sustainable Futures Report

06:03 min | 2 years ago

Fired Up!

"But increasingly read comment while ago posted about the sustainable futures report. The correspondent was concerned that i was trying into politics. The truth is everything is political while we can all do something toward solving the climate crisis. It is only governments and politicians who can make the changes of the magnitude that will make a difference. We are talking about system change after all. I know that many of you listening thing to the sustainable futures report are not in the u._k. I think that even you would have noticed that you k- politics are in some turmoil at the moment in fact this has been going on for three years but it's finally approaching day new mall. I say finally but everything may well have changed by the time you hear this anyway. They situation is the new prime minister has sought and received the authority of the queen to prorogue or suspend parliament of course she couldn't refuse but that's another story. The point at issue is that this would allow the prime minister to govern without parliament and allow how him to complete brexit the u._k.'s departure from the e._u. As he chooses i happen to believe that leaving the ear would be a disaster. Komo concerned if this prime minister can sideline parliament than any prime minister can do it on any issue. That's the reason i spent tuesday in london with your for europe and the yorker remain voice clap. I hope you saw us and hurt us on the evening news on bbc you see i tv and channel. Brexit is a sideshow by comparison with the climate crisis while breaks. It dominates u._k. Politics antics little of significance will be done on climate change all on many other issues that we've been neglecting over the last three years worrying agreeing also is the fact that many permanent brexit tears pacifica's climate deniers if i'm being political in opposing them and so be it in the climate crisis news this week the amazon fires why they're not the only fires why they he may not be as bad as you think a why they may be much more serious in ways you don't expect the future of the consumer society professor ian boyd retiring chief scientific advisor defa has set out his thoughts which looked very much like system change to me and the flying prince. I'll all common offsets making his travel common neutral the fun as in the amazon have been making big news news over the last couple of weeks that destroying the rainforest sante threatening an area which produces twenty percent of the world's oxygen on the amazon amazon rainforest is the lungs of the earth. Isn't it well. Yes no i strongly recommend that you listen to more or less a statistics sticks programme on bbc radio four which is available online and has carried out a detailed analysis of the situation they spoke to daniel net stunt of the earth innovation institute who explained that the fire houses have been identified by satellites are not burning rainforest generally the rainforest doesn't burn because it's so damp and humid what can happen is that low level fis can burn the leaf litter on the forest i flow and this can scorch the trunks of the trees and callum off these files are not visible from space and their effects are only evident once the trees have died off which may take a euro reversed point then is that the fires may be more extensive than we know at present. The fires that we can see from space are carrying on land which is being cleared. It's common practice for farmers to burn off weeds. Where land has been recently cleared. The trees are left to dry out and then abundant. One of the major consequences of these files is smoke soot in the atmosphere leading millions of people to seek treatment for respiratory diseases smoke from the falls code sao paulo which is mulling one thousand miles away from the amazon to be plunged into an apocalyptic darkness in the nineteenth of august the new president of brazil k. A. bowl sonata has taken a very hard line on the amazon weakening the brazilian environment ministry and turning a blind eye to illegal logging and deforestation he the amazon as a resource to be exploited by minus farmers and loggers as reported recently when the brazilian satellite satellite monitoring agency revealed significant increases in the rate of deforestation. The president denied that it was true on the director of the agency was dismissed. Does the amazon produce twenty percent of the world oxygen. It depends how you calculate but according to daniel napster it consumes a lot as as well and the net effect is more or less neutral. He sees the most important function of the forest as cooling effect as every every drop of water transpired by the trees evaporates. It cools the atmosphere you the effect of this across the whole forest is enough to have an effect on the climate of the whole world. Let's not forget the consequences of the fires and the deforestation policies for the indigenous peoples of the amazon amazon basin. They see the homes that food sources their way of life destroyed tribes that have been wolf generations a coming together against a common enemy enemy. Surely the global community should take that pont in our own interest as well as this president bolsonaro initially initially suggested the ngos had deliberately set the forest on fire in order to embarrass the government rejected the twenty two million dollars that politicians titians attending the reason g seven summit in biarritz pledged to help fight the fis. Can the world afford to stand by and let this destruction attraction continue. It's claimed that attention to the amazon leads the world over the fact that there are far more fis in africa but it's not the same thing writing in courts africa kolin bill senior lecturer in ecology university of york says fire is an essential part of the savannah savannah. The first to know is that the impact of a wildfire depends more on wet and what it is burning than how big it is or indeed how many fines there are the vast majority of the african fires currently earning seemed to be in grasslands and exactly the places we expect to see fires of this time of these files are usually by cattle famous as part of their traditional management of the savannahs where the animals graze some files are started to to stimulate new growth of nutritious cross for their animals others are used to control the numbers of parasitic takes own manage the growth of thorny we scrub without fuzz many savannahs and the animals they support wouldn't exist and lighting them as a key management activity in many any of the iconic protected areas of africa for instance. The sarah getty in tanzania is known worldwide for safari animals and all inspiring hiring builder beasts migration and i'll work shows that around half of its grasslands each year most foss both in the amazon was an ad in africa therefore deliberately started by humans as part of land-management b._b._c. news reports wildfires ravaging parts of the anti with areas of siberia alaska greenland and canada engulfed in flames and smoke satellite images

Amazon Prime Minister Brexit President Trump Daniel Africa London BBC Biarritz Europe Sao Paulo Savannah Savannah Komo Siberia Alaska Greenland Tanzania Sarah Getty Earth Innovation Institute Bolsonaro
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 2 years ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
Remembering CD-Rs

Talking Tech

04:29 min | 3 years ago

Remembering CD-Rs

"Hiring is challenging but there's one place you can go. We're hiring is simple and smart. That place is ziprecruiter where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates. Let's try it for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash tech talk ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire kids remember C._D.'s CDs because I stopped by my local C._B._S.. Store the other day and was pretty shocked to see big row of C._D.. Artists in jewel cases cases happily stocked on the shelves. It's been a long time since I opened a blank CD. How about you so on today's talking tech? Let's remember yesterday's yesterday's technology with fondness. I'm Jefferson Graham for those of you who don't recall well once upon a time. We've been mixed tapes on cassettes. You know those tapes tapes with their round holes Liane Sony Walkman units which if you don't recall tended to be bright and yellow the Walkman is forty years old this year although you'd probably have have a hard time finding any of them in stock anymore what was cool about them was that for the first time we could hear music on our terms sure I could take a crappy sounding in cassette of an album and listen to it in the car or at home but the Walkman let me take the music and my mix tapes anywhere but I digress at the turn turn of this century Napster showed us how to turn any song into an M._p.. Three file and create playlists on our computer. This was twenty years after the CDs came out convinced us to buy our old vinyl records all over again the music industry began to fall apart due to napster and the ease of making our own C._D.'s. He's on recordable media you could rip a C._D.. On your computer and converted to M._P._3. Files and then put them onto a recordable Aim Sort of recordable media that C._V._S. selling today at around twenty dollars a spindle we spent hours on this taking the C._D.'s into the trays of our computers using burning software to handle the transaction and waiting a good ten to fifteen minutes for the process to bleed itself oftentimes the disc would fail and we'd have to do it it all over again now. Of course we can do it with just a few clicks on spotify or youtube music in have a living breathing playlist that can be accessed by simply asking Alexa Lisa or the Google Assistant to play it and we could also listen to other people's playlists on those same subscription music services. It's great now the C._d.. D._V._D. C._D.. Home era was killed by apple went around twenty ten to disk drives stopped appearing on computers other computer manufacturers followed quickly and then came streaming so I must admit I don't Miss Physical media in disc form or even on vinyl. They were too finicky. The ease of streaming and calling up something thing with your fingers is just too great in. I never ever get disc error messages anymore. How long has it been since you've burned to CD? I'd love to hear from Look for me on twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham. You've been listening to talking tech. Please subscribe to the show. Wherever you listen to online podcasts I will be back tomorrow with another quick it from the world world of tech hiring used to be hard it was and still is one of the biggest challenges businesses face before it meant dealing with endless stacks of resumes ace flipping through them and hoping the perfect candidate would jump out at you and the manual review process wasn't any easier but in today's high tech world hiring can be easy and you only have to go to one place to get it done ziprecruiter dot com slash tech talk with their powerful matching technology ziprecruiter scans thousands of resumes to find the most qualified defied contenders for your job and actively invites them to apply. Ziprecruiter is so effective that eighty percents of employers who post on the site get a qualified candidate within the first this day and right now talking tech listeners can try Ziprecruiter for free at this exclusive web address ziprecruiter dot com slash talk. That's ZIPRECRUITER DOT COM com slash T. E. C. H. T. A. L. K. ziprecruiter dot com slash tech talk ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire.

Ziprecruiter C._D. Napster Jefferson Graham Sony Spotify Apple Google Alexa Lisa T. E. C. H. T. A. L. K. Fifteen Minutes Twenty Dollars Twenty Years Forty Years
"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:12 min | 3 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"On a legal behaviors and in return the service would receive the protection of the safe harbor so part of the lawsuit was alleging that Napster was willfully turning a blind eye to illegal behavior on the service now for the record Napster did try to comply with us but they were only able to demonstrate that their their ability to prevent illegal file sharing was ninety nine point four percent effective and the prosecution argued that that wasn't good enough it had to be a hundred percent effective which led some people to say this isn't actually an attack on Napster this is an attack on peer to peer file sharing as a strategy in the first place and so it led to pretty ugly fight the lawsuit also led to Napster shutting down its existing service in two thousand one of the lawsuit kept on going at that point the following year a judge and an appeals court both found that Napster was liable for numerous copyright copyright violations in separate lawsuits with artists like doctor dray and Metallica Napster would settle out of court paying handsomely to do so and Napster would bankrupt they would eventually reemerge in a very different format as an online music store it was not really the same entity as the original company that like I said that company gone bankrupt another company came in and bought up all the assets and in fact there's actually been a couple of different music related services called Napster since the original shut down an answer wasn't the only entity the R. I. double a and music artists when after as I mentioned earlier individuals who use the services were also targeted and as my colleague bend bowline might say here's where it gets crazy because the industry went thermo nuclear against people and not only did it hurt a lot of people it didn't actually achieve the goal that the industry had set out to do which was essentially to scare off pirates so that they wouldn't copy and share music files as it turned out the actions didn't curtail that behavior at all so to go into all the different lawsuits would take a few episodes all by itself so I'm just gonna hit a few highlights or you might want to call them low light now I'm pulling a lot of this information from a white paper that was published in two thousand eight by the Electronic Frontier Foundation titled R. I. double eight verses the people five years later in April two thousand three the R. I. double eight sued for college students the students would ultimately settle out of court not necessarily because they felt they had done something wrong or illegal but because going into the court system would be very expensive much more expensive even if they won the fight they might end up having to spend way more money and legal fees then if they settled out of court and then at least one of those cases the amount of the settlement was exactly the same as the amount the student happen to have in his bank account and effectively wiped out his college fund the reaction against the R. I. double a was mostly negative with many people saying that this was an overstep that it was being far too cruel in its pursuit of pirates and the the payments the the penalties people are facing we're far greater than what was justified on September eighth two thousand three the R. I. double A. would sue two hundred sixty one Americans alleging that those people were illegally sharing music on peer to peer networks and as many have written in the year since it was a particularly aggressive and confrontational and ultimately stupid move after all the industry was attacking music fans the very consumers that supported the industry were the ones that the R. I. doubling we're going after so in hindsight it seems pretty clear this move would alienate a lot of people even those who had never illegally downloaded song and industry that use its own customers is not likely to see a sales job as a result that's not how you build customer loyalty and not only was it aggressive and ineffective it was a faulty process the R. I. double A. was collecting IP addresses by joining the same file sharing services that pirates were using and then searching for people who are uploading music that was in the represent a record labels directories in the R. I. double A. but an I. P. address doesn't automatically tell you the physical address of a device to get that information the R. A. double A. actually had to go after internet service providers or ISPs so the ISPs have an incentive to withhold that personal information of their customers because the handing over customer data is a great way to to lose your customer's confidence the R. I. double a leverage the rules of the DMCA to force the hands of the internet service providers if the I. S. P.'s didn't comply they wouldn't be protected under the rules of the DMCA not first the R. I. double a tried to subpoena I SP customers names and and addresses from the I. S. P.'s just with allegations of copyright infringement so in other words this wasn't as a result of a lawsuit or even they didn't even present evidence to support their claims they said we suspect the person using this I. P. address is committing piracy we want their name and address so they weren't coming forward with any stronger now that request in that that tactic ultimately failed as various public interest groups and the EFF challenge that practice in court and the court agreed saying no you need more than just an allegation to get a hold of that information there was a period though when the court was still deciding that's where the practice was effectively legal or at least it wasn't illegal then in that period the R. I. EE issued fifteen hundred subpoenas to various ISPs now some of those two hundred sixty one people that the IRA a suit in September two thousand three we're probably fairly active in copyright infringement they may very well have been the appropriate people to go after at least from the perspective of these people were actively committing this infringing behavior but there were some on that list who won a lot of sympathy from the public like Brianna Lohara she was twelve years old then the R. I. double lake came after her like she was some sort of evil super genius she was living in a public housing development in New York City and her mom was a single mother raising this kid and they were targeted by this initial blast of lawsuits and her only real option was to sell the case out of court because there's no way she could afford going to court and defending herself that settlement will include a two thousand dollar fine and the requirement that she apologize publicly so here's the thing turns out having a massive multi billion dollar conglomerate of companies come after and forced a young the poor girl to apologize publicly isn't the best PR movement in the world it seemed pretty clear that Laharl wasn't some sort of existential threat to the R. I. double a and this was a real abuse of the legal system and then there were all the people who were targeted who clearly had nothing to do with the legal downloads sterile ward was one of those people she was accused of using kazaa to download hard core rap music but this grandmother probably didn't do that seeing as how the only computer shield was a mac computer and because all was only compatible with windows machines she wasn't apparently running virtual windows machine on her computer so chances are she was not the right person the R. I. double a did eventually withdraw the lawsuit but did not apologize for making that mistake and it wasn't the only mistake the list of people that was sued by the R. I. double eight also included a family in Georgia that not only didn't have an internet connection they didn't have a computer at all there was no way for them to commit the crime that are I double A. accuse them up there were even people on that list who actually does so clearly the R. I. double lady was using a very wide very inaccurate net to try and catch a few big fish as a message to pirates everywhere in the two hundred sixty one lawsuits were just the beginning over the course of several years nearly thirty thousand Americans were targeted by the R. I. double a in an effort to create an environment that would discourage illegal file sharing so what does that accomplish well mostly they made the R. I. double a look like a vicious on caring group of greedy corporate jerks were willing to financially ruin the lives of people who are already vulnerable in an effort to secure their own bottom line so it didn't win them a whole lot of good will and piracy continued unabated and there's no big shock there we've seen time and time again the more extreme punishment do not discourage crime but for some reason we keep trying that approach anyway well the industries were able to shut down service as you know they were able to to target the actual services and not necessarily the users other services would pop up and some were operating in foreign countries which made it more difficult for the R. I. double a to go after them because they were outside the jurisdiction of the United States legal system it would lead to the industry lobbying for new legislation in the U. S. to force ISPs to block access to those services that were outside the U. S. but I've covered some of those efforts in previous episodes of tech stuff and as I mentioned before the R. I. double a wasn't held by claiming piracy has a demonstrable calculable affect on diminished sales because it's impossible to equate every download as a lost sale it's quite possible that the person who illegally downloaded a file would have never purchased an album or song otherwise it's just as possible that after they downloaded it they would go out and buy the song legally there are people who did that too they might just download it to listen to it to determine whether or not they want to go buy the album so it worked both ways was no way to say eight eight any single pirated instance would lead to a loss in revenue so the justification the R. I. EE was using when it was deciding what damages it should be receiving from people was completely unjustifiable is based on faulty logic you can't say you owe me X. dollars because you cost me X. dollars when you can't be sure that's the case so it was a huge issue ultimately the music labels that fund the R. I. double A. began to withdraw their funding and this was for a lot of different reasons but one of them was that the country was entering a recession and that coupled with the already established trend of lower record sales was trying to put the squeeze on record label company budgets and there was the possibility that the R. I. double a would just dissolve completely due to lack of funding so the industry organisations stop pursuing lawsuits not because it only had a change of heart and said you know what we've been real jerks about this instead they stopped it because they ran out of cash to keep doing it they did maintain more lawsuits against the services but they stopped going after people now let me be clear I don't think that does good I don't think it's a good thing to share copyrighted material without authorization I do think that artists should be compensated for their work then if you want to access something that's behind a paywall you should either pay for that access or you just do without you you don't work your way around it you don't trying to get to the content without paying for it otherwise if you do that.

Napster two thousand dollar hundred percent billion dollar four percent twelve years five years
Bruce Allen, President of the Washington Redskins, Talks Training Camp

Larry O'Connor

08:53 min | 3 years ago

Bruce Allen, President of the Washington Redskins, Talks Training Camp

"Get you're saying welcome to football season it's the third week of July for crying out loud the Napster for games out in playing very well it's it's hard to shift your gears but it's red skins well I'm sure here so I guess you know the great thing about training camp is you lose sight of everything because you're with the players from six AM to eleven PM yeah and we are we're inundating them with football football football understandable and then not not running with the bulls or anything like that no we had a talk did you have a conversation with Mister Norman about you know I wasn't a fan of you dancing you know with the debt limit stars yet but I have you dance with the women that dance with the book yeah I think it probably a good choice hi this is your fourth year now in Richmond for our six year is six I'm so sorry for under and and what it turned out it was today I we're on break right now but the fans will be coming back relationship still strong with the city here it's it's strong with the city with you know Richmond is really one of the big NFL markets there in the top ten in television ratings while for every Monday night game the Super Bowl the draft so there's a lot of foot NFL fans here and obviously this is rights can country can you know the time pretty well could you at the governor just won't come on my show I don't I'm not sure why he's been in the news a lot lately could you could you give me a hook up there we've we've heard from the office and we're expecting him to come to practice either Friday maybe this weekend so give me a heads up on that I'll swing by for fat all right let I got to talk about the Redskins in the season ahead of us who's your starting quarterback Jeez I was wondering if you'd asked me that question that hasn't been determined yet the Philly is anybody's job yeah that would Jay's been doing as you saw in the first practice is each player's a cold case and Wayne are all getting equal amount of wraps and they're working with the first in the second and the third groups and we're not going to worry about that for a while now I know why shouldn't loves a quarterback controversy as much as independent counsels yeah right now we're going to let him continue to work and continue to grow and and of course it was talking about do what's happening with your left guard right now the the offensive line seems a little a little different without without are at the heart of the team without Trent there what's what's happening there you have news on that old out no news on it he's not here we love them but he's not here and is everybody talking I mean either you having conversations at least to work through this yeah it's really Trent tranice explained his position to me and we'll see what happens but right now we have to focus on the guys were here well if it listed as we had a great time last season obviously it was an incredible start you superseded everybody's expectations of the B. first half of the year and then these injuries com and it does ask question in that it's got to kill you obviously when you see these injuries in these guys are a part of your family and and you get to know them so much what is it about the red skins it seems is it is it the turf is it the the the program that you've got for strength and conditioning I mean I've seen your facilities there their top of the line you know Larry we we brought in some independent people to try and analyze the different injuries and after spending about eight weeks of our time and their time they came back with the you know there's no correlation is just the fleet demand yeah you know if it was just pulled muscles are growing sin and things soft tissue type of things then it would be the training regimen but we broke some bones we separated some shoulders we pulled some calf muscles we pulled we did it we did a mall you got everything that we share it was hopefully goes in the cycle and and it and it all happened the cowboys I don't wish injuries on any but I do but not us our receipt with Bruce Allen president of the red skins here on day one of training camp that between now that Lester yeah the jets here and they they were thugs right they were day beaten up on our players and our fans what team comes in at the end of this season will be the bangles because that's the first preseason game it didn't work out with the bangles okay so we're we're not gonna have any team come to Richmond we're just we're gonna work is our our own units and then get ready to play the Bengals ran by the way you this goes through what August fourteenth I want to say off the top of my head I believe a right right in there if you guys want to come down here for a beautiful long weekend or just take a couple of days off Richmond is incredibly hospitable and it's a really cool atmosphere don't cost anything to come in the gate no it caught the cost nothing I I do know someone bought a beer a Budweiser very early this morning that that was that I just bought that for the picture I can actually drink the beer I'm workin Bros an hour but it's not it's not get me in trouble or allies I have more questions if you'd like me to ask the group if we're trying to get each other in trouble well no we appreciate the business thank you for let's let's talk about what your expectations are for this season I know on the first day of training camp everybody thinks that we got a chance at the Superbowl instructing the parity in the NFL is incredible but the if you read the press accounts you guys don't have a chance to make it past the first week it all and that's a good thing that's motivating right yeah it's it's it's our players understand that expectations with you don't national outlets is in great for us the the cowboys in the eagles on the eagles have been a very good team that won the Superbowl couple years ago but we can make our own history and that's that is the message here and if you see the shirts that the players are wearing they say everything matters and so we're gonna try and get the details down here in Richmond and trying to get ready for opening gaming and win again when I was talking to the fans here during the the first half of the day for the first practice they were all raving about the draft and do something about this draft in particular that has given so much hope and excitement to the fans odd that talk about your draft talk about the strategy that you have there and who you really look I mean obviously you want all of them to to start eventually but who are you really looking after this season from at twelve each day is very important for the young players and and any new player that comes in to to the red skins or any team because I got to learn the new terminology the new systems and learn their new teammates and what they can count on from their teammates so the young players it's very important for him they're working really hard and we are excited about a week we see great things for them here's where those so you you want to make it a starting quarterback right now is pretty much up for grabs a everybody yes several out of that out of the next ten minutes there goes that that career option starting running back kind of the same situation right even Adrian Peterson obviously coming back but he's not necessarily in you know every down kind of running back right we use a group runny back system for a number of years eight Adrian obviously looks beautiful and is the best body out here him in Vernon Davis it's a tie between who the best body is in any way once again you're not station but Chris Thompson's been such a valuable asset for us on third down and out of the backfield but getting various guys back yeah watching the compile competition for them I was injured right around this time like third day of training camp last one of the first preseason game against overstressed hatred and that and and awful awful but having various guys back and he's he's healthy hundred resign and he's he's healthy knock on wood please not cancel that service thank all right so no conversation with you is complete we're gonna have plenty conversations I understand we're gonna we're gonna you're gonna be a regular here on the program over the course of the year so what's going on with the stadium the stage where we gonna be where we gonna be we do not have that announcement yet you'll you'll get to hear when we do expect to make an announcement about a new stadium new home for the Redskins sometime this year I would say within a year of that if that is the time table we're looking at our deadline for making the decision is really twenty twenty two because our lease and in Maryland and sin and twenty twenty six and so yeah but they don't build around here like they do in Vegas like that they they made the that stadium for the raiders was built in like three months out there I it's going to take a longer to building here well there's history in this city for when they're motivated they can do anything they want to do when I interviewed the president and he said he'd like to come to a red skins game what was the reaction in the front office there an aspirin when you were when you were here and that we look at that residence we have we have pictures of red skin park of the presidents of come over the years and it's it's it's it's part of the greatness of this franchise legacy is we're in the nation's capital and we think that's remains as a present wants to go to a game the president redskin says you'd love to have him at the game so I got to be the mediator I got to work this out I get get everybody in the same room and a negotiated down your your on board for this yeah but I thought you had the secretary of state coming to the game no no I left him down and when is that our Bruce down as a present right you want the president to come to the game alright we got a lot of Redskins fans here want that T. R. Bruce thank you and I know you're busy have a good time with with training camp here thanks

Bulls Football Three Months Eight Weeks Ten Minutes Six Year
Dark Web vs. Deep Web

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

06:39 min | 3 years ago

Dark Web vs. Deep Web

"Into that let's get into the dark web because the dark web is shocking will tell you about that in just a moment but first there's the World Wide Web that's what all of issues you know W. W. W. you're on the worldwide web then there's the deep web and the dark web is not the deep web the deep web is any part of the internet that is it discover a bull by search engine I think that's the best way to say it yeah so for example you're on your banking site and you log in if you've navigated to a specific location on line that particular place online that is your account is not served up in Google results you go to your health care provider and you want to see the results of your last lab test that's not going to show up on on a Google search or whatever surgeons you're using so that is the deep web so we got the worldwide web the deep web I hope I I hope I'm doing you know your yeah you're you're you're putting it in the picture together perfectly then you've got the dark who had been this is I mean these are the blackest of waters folks the dark net the dark web this this is the peer to peer network whereas with this is this is where you find the kind of market places that ply their trade in illicit wearers these are basically hidden crime bazaars they can only be accessed through special software that obscures one's true location on line it's real this is not how good it if the I would say Katie I'll get your take on this I would say the dark web's much much larger than the W. W. W. dot web well you know that there there's a picture that goes around it's like the tip of the iceberg as the W. W. W. realm and then it that giant piece that you can't see above water and that's the rest of the internet it's the dark web so the dark web if you're on the dark web if you're using a crypto currency to do business that's what you do it's not you know it's not the dollars and cents it's a crypto currency and because there's so much money to be made on the dark web both legitimate and illegitimate are using these crypto currencies the one you've heard of probably is bit coin bit coin what did you say one bit coin is worth now ninety five hundred Bucks so crypto currencies these are decentralized virtual currencies that run on peer to peer computer networks big coin the largest the most traded so the crypto currency is digital it's a digital for money there's no central bank there's no central repository the money flows in and out of the system through the use of users computers it went you know as I think about it remember Napster Napster's going back but this is Napster was unique because you could trade MP three songs and videos here it only lasted a few years late nineties early two thousands that's exactly how crypto currency works your currency transactions are verified using super high powered computer equipment and it's all done on the dark web now this is the shocking part is Katie and I've gone there didn't purchase anything we just looked around and it was one of the creepiest experiences that I've ever been a part of I mean we're right here in the studio name a place on the internet where you can purchase a hit man for crying out loud yeah this was not a joke now and and and HK forty sevens and heroin I mean you name it you can buy it there it's a whole the hit man thing was again you're thinking come on this is it this is a joke no it was this was for real it was for this is that the types of drugs that are easily found and purchased on the dark web all the purchaser needs is a cryptocurrency use the big corn you get an address to ship your drug of choice and of course you need the computer smart phone and once you find what you want you literally click and by and proceed to check out just like you're on Amazon it's just it it's wild the way that this it and it's so easy to access it's so easy once you I mean once you I mean you can look at a you tube video how to access the dark web and I'll take you through it so you've got you've got the drugs and you've got the sax and you've got they they hit man and what's what's amazing is with the drugs you can have these drugs discreetly shipped directly to your home the U. S. P. S. literally they're using the postal service for this yep you can get all the stuff guaranteed delivery within twenty four hours this is how Fenton all comes in and out of the country major driver of the current opioid crisis in America it's all happening via the dark web where they'll legal firearms come from yeah I'm sure the FBI you know they they're not dummies they're getting involved but again this is such a dark and creepy part of our our world four one five eight zero eight fifty six hundred I'd love to hear from you about this four one five eight zero eight fifty six hundred but police agencies you know there trying to get involved because well is it and and and the other thing that Steve Steve you must which was making with us earlier tax attorney not all crypto currency users are criminals I have to make that clear but there is a lot of crypto currency involved in various crimes and that's was just absolutely shocking so it's a part of our world that is gaining in popularity and it's a part of a world that stinks I mean it's just putrid

Twenty Four Hours One Bit
"napster" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

Spark from CBC Radio

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Spark from CBC Radio

"A way to make music accessible to those who were getting older music illegally through ninety services like napster and lime wire these days of course far fewer people actually by albums with millions of us subscribing to streaming services like spotify or apple zone music service or even just listening to music on you to which is why i tunes is going apple recently announced it was getting into the tv and movie business needs to make room for its tv plus service which will compete with netflix between that and the fact that apple already cells tv content movies and distributes podcast under a separate up there just wasn't much room for i tunes the death of i tunes doesn't mean however that apple is giving up on the ipod indeed it recently announced a new generation of ipod touch devices and well that may have used it as a cheap alternative to and i phone how many people still actually using ai pilots listen to music a me i love my ipod classic listen to music on my phone bark senior producer michelle breathing keeping it old school with a dedicated ipod do you still using i thought tell us why twitter and facebook we are spark cbc or reaches the cbc dot c h slash bark still ahead on spark there plenty of beauty bloggers out there people making videos offering tips on skincare how to achieve makeup affects but as far as i know there's only one who's also teaching threatened modeling a password security when we think of beauty we think of things like face masks and the sort of thing but there's a much longer history introductory of beauty being released with things like the military for example one of the very first foundation but actually created by may blames for the us military as a way to actually quite literally conceal themselves on the field inside the ops second beauty you to channel ad in are short attention span media overload culture advertisers will do a lot of the capture of viewers eyeball but when outdoor gear company the northeastern wicked pedia images and adds some argued it crossed the line that's coming up with mark continues i'm nora young there's a spark from you're pals at cbc radio when you think of self care what comes to mind healthy eating day at the spa beauty rituals till about cyber security skills i'm gonna promise matt brown thing patrice a i also wanna talk about cameras anna microphone monitoring you could get a sticker to cover your mike you could also get stickers the cover you're cameras you could also use something called the little snatch which monitors your phone in their camera to tell you if it's been turned on on this is the wrong thing kind of be also skincare because it gives you the glow nobody knows how you did it you're amazing it really i on a stage that's a clip from addy what connects you to series upset and beauty in which she pairs beauty tutorials with lessons on cyber security 'em today i'm going to be looking at these clinic chubby sticks which is like maybe horrible name 'em i also wanna talk about blocking.

napster
Where are musicians making money

The Frame

03:32 min | 3 years ago

Where are musicians making money

"Ninety nine was a peak year for the music industry with sales reaching fourteen point six billion dollars in the US. And then, you know, the story Napster happened I tunes happened and the CD store died twenty years later. The music business is back to, quote one writer it's back like a zombie prime to devour the world on a massive scale because of streaming services, some projection show that music, revenue may soon surpass the benchmark set in the late nineties, here's pitchforks, senior, staff writer, Marc HOGAN, basically, your for years and years as has been widely publicized, the industry was doing really badly. But now has been finally growing again recently, thanks to the expected growth from a streaming. Goldman Sachs says forty one billion dollars annually by twenty thirty. Right. I mean, unless bear in mind that Leeman brothers in nineteen ninety nine also. Had these really rosy upbeat predictions for industry and the industry crashed and then leading others is now gone. So these, these predictions should all be taken with a grain of salt, but people seem to expect the industry to be healthy again. So that's the labels how Spotify doing Spotify. They keep growing. They have more and more users, they're expected to keep growing around the world, the revenues are pretty big, but they generally lose money. So Spotify struggling to turn all of these users into actual profits in your article, you do really great breakdown of where the revenue goes. So break it down for sure. Well, according to deutchebanks report, the earlier this year, for everyone hundred dollars consumer spending on CDs or vinyl of the labels profit is eight dollars for every one hundred dollars spent on down those on, I tunes, that's nine dollars. And for every one hundred dollars spent on streaming the labels profit is. Thirteen dollars. So the share that goes, the labels is actually bigger under your streaming than it was under the old physical formats, is that simply because of logistics cost of production. They don't have to make a thing cutting out the middleman. Yes, exactly, where's the rest of the money, go to well, I think, for musician it varies based on what they're deal is what I found the more people I talked with is just it really depends. And it's it's difficult to come up with a single simple number for what -sition gets now. Let's talk about musicians. How is this boom affecting, you know, the people who are actually, making the music the way, the boom, seems to be musicians is similar to what we're seeing across the economy, really where the upper echelon Hughes doing better and better, and the middle income, and lower income is issues are not doing this. Well, I talked to one you leibel head who said that the middle class for musicians has dried up. That's not really there anymore. What's the average musician making no days? Well, according to one survey, it was around. Around thirty five thousand dollars in two thousand seventeen but only about twenty one thousand three hundred dollars that came from activity related to music. So that's live gigs that streams merge live for the most common source of income. So these are professional musicians, who are not able to make a living doing music. Exactly. Yeah. I mean, that's kind of what we're seeing is getting harder and harder for the vast majority of people who actually make music to make living on the other hand, though. You've had some really interesting conversations with the indie rapper, Jay pick, Maffia what he tell you. Well, he's a very interesting guy all

Spotify Maffia United States Napster Goldman Sachs Marc Hogan Writer Staff Writer Deutchebanks Jay Pick Hughes One Hundred Dollars Twenty One Thousand Three Hund Thirty Five Thousand Dollars Forty One Billion Dollars Six Billion Dollars Thirteen Dollars Eight Dollars Nine Dollars Twenty Years
"napster" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"napster" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kind of people we're going to pay fifteen dollars for a CD. Anyway, Daniel epic certainly wasn't gonna pay fifteen dollars for one CD. Would he found ludicrous was that the only choice the music indoor? Gave you was fifteen dollars for one CD versus zero dollars for all the music in the world. My view is that the music industry has always been excluding the vast majority of its potential, and what do I mean by that? Well that the peak of the recorded music industry two thousand one it was about two hundred million people who were participating in the economy who bought records. So it was a two hundred million people who are listening to music. No. Of course, not that number was in the billions. So what what the music industry did fairly? Well, was price the product at a premium for an audience that was willing to pay for it. But it only captured a very very small portion of the revenues. So what was obvious to me as I s I started using Napster back in the day was just like this is a way better product than going to record store like like there ought to be away where you can give consumers what they want and at the. The same time. Make it work for artists as you got to know the record labels over time. You know years after Napster started, do you think they regretted not having partnered with Napster earlier? I definitely think. So I mean in hindsight, they probably realized that he was the wrong thing. But they thought by shutting down that..

Napster Daniel fifteen dollars zero dollars
"napster" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"napster" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Get ninety percent off your first year to your phone calls. I was talking to you about these boxes that have probably uses program called Cody Cody in and of itself is not a legal, but when put on boxes for illegal purposes. That's when you get into trouble. So these cable boxes promise, you the world for two hundred fifty bucks you'll never ever have to pay cable Bill ever again. And so people that are trying to cut the cord to save money. They're thinking, hey, this isn't bad. And then of course, you're selling it. They say, oh, it's not streaming. Why would you even say that the FCC is now marketers and sellers are going to end up paying a hundred and fifty thousand dollars in fines. Now, if you note that did not include consumers just yet. That's how it all happened with the bootleg music industry injury member Napster, remember Napster when it was out there is that all. Sudden they were the music of their coming down. And they're saying like, you know, if you are distributing the music, it's like this three thousand dollar fine. And then later on they said if you are downloading music, some you'll get hit with those three thousand dollars. Remember Napster terabyte hard drives that remember Napster, Mr. FCC. I do not know Andrew I have never heard of him before my got expired by that. Right. Sure. Still so much music when you think of apple stores. Do you think of what pristine white counters large glass windows, cherry workers, happy shirts? So you probably don't go in there thinking to yourself. I wonder if they have a bug problem. I mean, like a bed bug problem. That's right. The apple store and Fifth Avenue in Manhattan. They have this massive bedbug problems. So if you ever go in there, refresh your device and yourself. Very very quickly, but bedbugs aside apples, also dealing with a new kind of triangle that's formed if you're apple pencils ripe had pros in your key-fobs irks ending up in the same place. Guess what happens? Well, you won't be able to open your car door. What that's right. So if you're at Starbucks charging up your apple Pennsylvania's with your ipad pro in your key-fobs nearby. It's going to cause a signal interference that might temporary zap your key-fobs just stops working. All right. Here's the high tech solution. Or are you ready move.

Napster Bill Cody Cody Mr. FCC apple apple Pennsylvania Starbucks Andrew Manhattan fifty thousand dollars three thousand dollars three thousand dollar ninety percent
DutchChains Odyssey On Its Blockchain and AI Hackathon

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

08:45 min | 3 years ago

DutchChains Odyssey On Its Blockchain and AI Hackathon

"The street has a crypto winter is finally Thorin most importantly, all blockchain projects remember, those that were all built on future promises and lies Leo culture. Well, the future is right here. We're beginning to see the first fruits from those icy hose from Lowe's future promises. So the future is already here. We're not talking about real partnerships real use cases and stories of early adopter businesses leveraging emerging technologies, but this daily tech podcast. It's not about buzzwords or fuelling hype of anything but hearing right from the heart of the tech world and how it's actually transforming multiple industries. So today, we have Rooker van Zuid dam on the show, and he's the founder and CEO of a company called Dutch chain, which is a leading ecosystem development agency for open. Public infrastructure and also odyssey an open innovation program, which provides a unique collaborative infrastructure for governmental corporate, a nonprofit partners to help them. Find breakthrough solutions to complex societal challenges all using blockchain and so many other emerging technologies. Exile installed Freud that Rooker also has more than fifteen years experience funding companies across communications digital media and tech sectors. And was also the co founder and commercial director of pay logic, which is a next generation ticketing and technology company based in Amsterdam. So buckle up and hold on tight. So I can be meal as all the way to the Netherlands. So we can speak with Ruka who's not only going to talk about everything I've just mentioned, but also ought to see hack twenty nine thousand nine which sounds incredibly exciting. So massive warm. Welcome to the show Rutger. Can you tell the listeners about who you are? And what you do. Thank you, Neil. So thanks for having me first of all, and yeah, I'm from from the Netherlands, and I'm the CEO of this chain and reorganized the one of the largest opening ovation programs in Europe called odyssey can can see everything about it on all the orc. And what we focus on is really the how how can all these new types of technologies like blockchain and a I serve our society in the best possible way. And what we found out is that there is a really interesting space to look at and we call it digital public infrastructure, and this is where we have managed to get corporates. Governments startups regulators. Scalable scientific institutes all on board in a in an open ecosystem that is focused on discovering the future by actually building it. And in this innovation program. We have a a highlights, which is the all the hacker Thon, and that one is taking place in in a week time and about fifteen hundred people from all over to will gather to to work with teams and experts on on solutions in the context of twenty complex challenges. So this is in a nutshell what what what we are working on with a with a team of of nine very very driven people from the deadlines. Tacitly so much to unpack this, I suppose we better start we do chain, which like you said you the founder and CEO of mine to stunning off. It's chinese. It's a leading ecosystem development agency for open digital public infrastructure. But can you begin by telling me a little bit more about that? And the kind of problems that you set out to solve a we'll put you on this path. Yeah. What's put me on this bath really is. And that goes way back to when I was a teenager and internet came into my life. So to say, right. The connection with the rest of the world, and all the creativity simply blew everything away in most positive sense of the word, and this was before Napster when there was no MP3. yet. You know, so but still this this new thing was was there. And then, of course, that evolve, and it was shaping our society more and more than a good way. But also in in ways, we we we don't really know how to cope with yet. I think and then off the social media came in mid and late two thousands. I came across a bitcoin and then. For me. Everything else was just kind of boring because all of a sudden, we we have this digital public infrastructure for a global payment network, and it is not owned by anyone, and it is absolutely independent and neutral, and this whole idea, I think we can take much further, and this is also whether it's basically at the core of what we're doing at other see, so that's that's basically how we came to it. Because what I was doing. When when when I came across bitcoin is both doing experiments with it like built all kinds of new chemical apps. Like, I was at a at a bitcoin conference one of the first ones in Europe organized by mode eleven I think it was in two thousand fourteen or so and then I couldn't pay my beers at the bar with bitcoin. And I was like what what is this? All right. So then we'd you Philip this point of sale system for for restaurants in boss where you could easily pay your base with with bitcoin. But we also. It was a time when when when Google gloss came out, and we connected to go glass to to a blockchain dot info wallet and Aucoin baseball, so then you could do hence free payments. So you could you could say okay glass. Make payments, and then scan QR code like RoboCop style, and then you could not wise, and it pays the actual Bill, and we had so much fun doing these things. But also we learned so much about how this. Bitcoin as an infrastructure system works. And it. It gave me the idea that you can actually discover the future by actually building. It's in a very good way. It takes you out of your comfort zone. It's not a fun. And I also have organized a couple of conferences, but it wasn't really satisfying enough for me because it's just talking. Right. So then I merged the two into this innovation program with the hacker Thon, and and turned it into a professional innovation and collaboration infrastructure. I'm so glad you mentioned you'll teenage years then the arrival lived in

Founder And Ceo Blockchain Netherlands Europe Lowe LEO Ruka Napster CEO Neil Co Founder Amsterdam Rooker Freud Google
"napster" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

Invest Like the Best

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Invest Like the Best

"That sort of piqued up in the ninety s that have faced again, this existential threat of their own with the internet of like oh distribution now became briefly free with Napster and with kazaa and all those you know, like virus 'cause I'm morpheus lime wire. Oh, yeah. And then we got your rebuttal to get into things like Spotify where now it's like instead of paying for individual packaged albums. I pay a subscription for streaming for everything. And really what I get out of Spotify curation fascinating history and change, and it highlights the need for I guess new businesses to identify points. Of emergence, scarcity you've written a lot about how the normal distribution is no longer as relevant for people's buying choices. And for businesses that are going to be successful. So talk about the change from a normal distribution to this pointy business versus utility business idea that you've laid out there's something important to realize around friction, which is anytime that we face friction in our lives, which is all the time. We face lots of choices about whether we want to spend our scarce money or are scarce time going after this thing that we want and the more friction. There is the more factors are probably going to go into our decision. And let me give the example that I give is let's say that you are if you live in a small town there are relatively. A few options for musical entertainment and going back to this music thing again because he's used to be in a band. So I know this part my old life you're relatively few options and a band comes to town, and it's twenty dollar cover do go or not, well, you're gonna wait probably way a bunch of factors. You're gonna say, well, it could use that twenty dollars for something else or it could do this other thing. But I might like to go do I like this music? Do I like the people that are going do I like to Spar there'll be many factors that you will way if you live in a big city though and a band comes to town, you probably not notice unless it is exactly the band you care about. So that there's a big difference here between if there's a lot of friction associated with getting this thing, I'm going to consider lots of variables as friction goes away. I will consider far fewer variables down to basically just is this exactly what I want. Yes. Or no. Now, or when with this is this is a really interesting driver of at least in my opinion. I had this sort of idea..

Spotify Napster kazaa Spar twenty dollars twenty dollar
"napster" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"napster" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"That that we're able to do even against sort of a service mesh this bundled in with your your cloud provider, which, you know, gender lock in stuff aside, you know, might be interesting to you. But it's still comes with a bunch of the burden of sort of configuration that that goes along with this idea of a sidecar service mesh so for every application, I need to write these Yemo files or whatever to to configure everything about that application because just from principal. There's no way. That they can know what your application what level of traffic your application is capable of handling. That's something that has to be has to come from configuration to the difference between what we're doing it Neta fi and the sort of the service mesh architecture. I think it's into this idea of services versus protocols. So, you know, you might remember something like Napster, which is a service oriented approach to the idea of transferring files right within Napster you have to run they run the set of services, which you interact with versus something like bittorrent, which is a protocol based approach to that same problem. So Napster could be shut down because it was a centralized or service or as bittorrent anybody who's following the bittorrent protocol can participate in that ecosystem. And you might there's similar analogies for for example, like transferring money like pay pals service, right, but bitcoin and a bunch of these emerging technologies in the financial sector protocols. So. Proteus which is broker operates on the our socket protocol much that TCP router operates on the P protocol. And what this allows you to do is take advantage of the strengths of our socket?.

Napster principal
Talking about the DMCA

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

04:56 min | 3 years ago

Talking about the DMCA

"You know, those music videos, you love on YouTube, and the memes you love to laugh at well. Proposed digital copyright laws in Europe and other countries kinda wanna make those a little less common, and they have their roots in a twenty year old copyright law here in the US called the digital millennium copyright act. So it's a big gnarly hairball of a law. Corey doctor was a writer and activist with the electronic frontier foundation. We reached him in his hotel room and Berlin, he and the F F have been talking about and litigating over the unintended consequences of the DMCA for almost twenty years. Now, the law was written at a time when it was newly possible to rip CDs and DVD's and put them online illegally downloading music was getting more popular Napster came out in nineteen ninety nine remember that and this big copyright law. The DMCA was designed to protect companies and artists from having their works, stolen and disseminated. All. Over the internet. But almost from the beginning critic said it was too broad doctor. Oh points to one section that covers the circumvention of tools that are designed to protect copyright the idea. Here was that if you like made a DVD player and he wanted to control whether DVD's bought in another country could play on it. You could make a little like code that check to see whether the DVD was bought in the same place as the DVD player, and if not you could refuse to play the DMCA made it illegal to tamper with things like that little code. But it basically said it was illegal to break any copyright locks in any product. And that's why you weren't allowed to open up your smartphone or your tractor to fix it which we talked about earlier this week. And so here we are twenty years later, and this tactic is now being used to lock third party ink out of ancient printers. It's in voting machines. And it's being used to punish security researchers who audit voting machines because they say if you reveal the defects in the voting machines, it might help. Someone bypass these copyright locks. Now, there is a provision in the law for a review every three years to consider exemptions one of those reviews just happened. It gave you more rights to fix your smartphone and your tractor and back in two thousand fifteen the library of congress did grant a limited exemption to protect researchers who were trying to find out if voting machines or other electric systems had security flaws as long as they were acting in good faith. However, there was a large catch the researchers can break through digital rights management DRM to find out if for example, a voting machine has a security problem. But if they describe the tools, they used to find those flaws they could get a huge fine or even go to jail, which means nobody else can verify the research. The DMCA should have been raised in the most common sense way imaginable, which is to say if you break the R M to infringe copyright. You're breaking the rules. If you're breaking DRM in your non infringing copyright. You're allowed to do. Do it refining. The DMC has been a long process, and it's not just academics. And researchers who want to fix it in two thousand sixteen major music industry organization said another provisions of the copyright law was making it too easy for sites like YouTube to keep hosting copyrighted music. And they wanted reforms to kind of ironic since the music industry pushed hard for the original law. And now for some related links related to copyright issues. Google is of course, a huge target of copyright owners. And yes, has let a lot slip through the cracks over the years, not even cracks canyons, really. But it put out a report yesterday detailing. It's twenty eighteen efforts to fight piracy. Google said it's invested one hundred million dollars in tools to spot infringing content. They actually scan uploads against a database of copyrighted material, which is something the proposed EU copyright law. Wants everyone to do in fact, and then if someone uploads copyrighted content, the original copyright owner gets ad revenue. From it Google said it's paid three billion dollars to copyright owners that way and another one point eight billion to the music industry in the form of revenue in its report. Google also said if you give people a way to pay for legitimate content. They are far less likely to steal it taking note TV. On demand people. Finally, if you're totally bored with smartphone designs, and I know you are because the biggest innovation in the last five years has basically been the notch. Then get yourself to the internet and watch video of Samsung's foldable smartphone, which it showed up yesterday at a developer conference. It falls out to become a seven inch tablet, and then closes up and there's a phone screen on the front. Google said, the Android operating system will support these crazy do hickeys Lenovo and Xiaomi and LG are also working on them willa work. I don't know. Do you want it? I don't know. All I know is it wasn't about politics. And I don't think it had a notch. I'm in

Dmca Google Youtube Corey Doctor Europe United States Berlin Napster Congress Writer EU Samsung Lenovo LG
Talking about the DMCA

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

04:56 min | 3 years ago

Talking about the DMCA

"You know, those music videos, you love on YouTube, and the memes you love to laugh at well. Proposed digital copyright laws in Europe and other countries kinda wanna make those a little less common, and they have their roots in a twenty year old copyright law here in the US called the digital millennium copyright act. So it's a big gnarly hairball of a law. Corey doctor was a writer and activist with the electronic frontier foundation. We reached him in his hotel room and Berlin, he and the F F have been talking about and litigating over the unintended consequences of the DMCA for almost twenty years. Now, the law was written at a time when it was newly possible to rip CDs and DVD's and put them online illegally downloading music was getting more popular Napster came out in nineteen ninety nine remember that and this big copyright law. The DMCA was designed to protect companies and artists from having their works, stolen and disseminated. All. Over the internet. But almost from the beginning critic said it was too broad doctor. Oh points to one section that covers the circumvention of tools that are designed to protect copyright the idea. Here was that if you like made a DVD player and he wanted to control whether DVD's bought in another country could play on it. You could make a little like code that check to see whether the DVD was bought in the same place as the DVD player, and if not you could refuse to play the DMCA made it illegal to tamper with things like that little code. But it basically said it was illegal to break any copyright locks in any product. And that's why you weren't allowed to open up your smartphone or your tractor to fix it which we talked about earlier this week. And so here we are twenty years later, and this tactic is now being used to lock third party ink out of ancient printers. It's in voting machines. And it's being used to punish security researchers who audit voting machines because they say if you reveal the defects in the voting machines, it might help. Someone bypass these copyright locks. Now, there is a provision in the law for a review every three years to consider exemptions one of those reviews just happened. It gave you more rights to fix your smartphone and your tractor and back in two thousand fifteen the library of congress did grant a limited exemption to protect researchers who were trying to find out if voting machines or other electric systems had security flaws as long as they were acting in good faith. However, there was a large catch the researchers can break through digital rights management DRM to find out if for example, a voting machine has a security problem. But if they describe the tools, they used to find those flaws they could get a huge fine or even go to jail, which means nobody else can verify the research. The DMCA should have been raised in the most common sense way imaginable, which is to say if you break the R M to infringe copyright. You're breaking the rules. If you're breaking DRM in your non infringing copyright. You're allowed to do. Do it refining. The DMC has been a long process, and it's not just academics. And researchers who want to fix it in two thousand sixteen major music industry organization said another provisions of the copyright law was making it too easy for sites like YouTube to keep hosting copyrighted music. And they wanted reforms to kind of ironic since the music industry pushed hard for the original law. And now for some related links related to copyright issues. Google is of course, a huge target of copyright owners. And yes, has let a lot slip through the cracks over the years, not even cracks canyons, really. But it put out a report yesterday detailing. It's twenty eighteen efforts to fight piracy. Google said it's invested one hundred million dollars in tools to spot infringing content. They actually scan uploads against a database of copyrighted material, which is something the proposed EU copyright law. Wants everyone to do in fact, and then if someone uploads copyrighted content, the original copyright owner gets ad revenue. From it Google said it's paid three billion dollars to copyright owners that way and another one point eight billion to the music industry in the form of revenue in its report. Google also said if you give people a way to pay for legitimate content. They are far less likely to steal it taking note TV. On demand people. Finally, if you're totally bored with smartphone designs, and I know you are because the biggest innovation in the last five years has basically been the notch. Then get yourself to the internet and watch video of Samsung's foldable smartphone, which it showed up yesterday at a developer conference. It falls out to become a seven inch tablet, and then closes up and there's a phone screen on the front. Google said, the Android operating system will support these crazy do hickeys Lenovo and Xiaomi and LG are also working on them willa work. I don't know. Do you want it? I don't know. All I know is it wasn't about politics. And I don't think it had a notch. I'm in

Dmca Google Youtube Corey Doctor Europe United States Berlin Napster Congress Writer EU Samsung Lenovo LG
A 20-year-old digital copyright law is still being fought about (and copied) today

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:12 min | 3 years ago

A 20-year-old digital copyright law is still being fought about (and copied) today

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by Colgate. University now in its bicentennial year. Colgate university is celebrating a proud tradition of intellectual rigor at it's beautiful campus in central New York. The deadline for early decision this November fifteenth. Learn more at Colgate dot EDU and by G, suite by Google cloud. A suite of cloud based productivity tools that includes g mail doc slides sheets and drive you can make real time updates to the same document without having to keep track of multiple versions. And since all tools are cloud based your whole team can access the same document and work on the same page at the same time make it with G suite by Google cloud. Find out more at G, suite dot com. Twenty year old digital copyright law is still being fought about and copied today from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. You know, those music videos, you love on YouTube, and the memes you love to laugh at well. Proposed digital copyright laws in Europe and other countries kinda wanna make those a little less common, and they have their roots in a twenty year old copyright law here in the US called the digital millennium copyright act. So it's a big gnarly hairball of a law. Corey doctor was a writer and activist with the electronic frontier foundation. We reached him in his hotel room and Berlin, he and the F F have been talking about and litigating over the unintended consequences of the DMCA for almost twenty years. Now, the law was written at a time when it was newly possible to rip CDs and DVD's and put them online illegally downloading music was getting more popular Napster came out in nineteen ninety nine remember that and this big copyright law. The DMCA was designed to protect companies and artists from having their works, stolen and disseminated. All. Over the internet. But almost from the beginning critic said it was too broad doctor. Oh points to one section that covers the circumvention of tools that are designed to protect copyright the idea. Here was that if you like made a DVD player and he wanted to control whether DVD's bought in another country could play on it. You could make a little like code that check to see whether the DVD was bought in the same place as the DVD player, and if not you could refuse to play the DMCA made it illegal to tamper with things like that little code. But it basically said it was illegal to break any copyright locks in any product. And that's why you weren't allowed to open up your smartphone or your tractor to fix it which we talked about earlier this week. And so here we are twenty years later, and this tactic is now being used to lock third party ink out of ancient printers. It's in voting machines. And it's being used to punish security researchers who audit voting machines because they say if you reveal the defects in the voting machines, it might help. Someone bypass these copyright locks. Now, there is a provision in the law for a review every three years to consider exemptions one of those reviews just happened. It gave you more rights to fix your smartphone and your tractor and back in two thousand fifteen the library of congress did grant a limited exemption to protect researchers who were trying to find out if voting machines or other electric systems had security flaws as long as they were acting in good faith. However, there was a large catch the researchers can break through digital rights management DRM to find out if for example, a voting machine has a security problem. But if they describe the tools, they used to find those flaws they could get a huge fine or even go to jail, which means nobody else can verify the research. The DMCA should have been raised in the most common sense way imaginable, which is to say if you break the R M to infringe copyright. You're breaking the rules. If you're breaking DRM in your non infringing copyright. You're allowed to do. Do it refining. The DMC has been a long process, and it's not just academics. And researchers who want to fix it in two thousand sixteen major music industry organization said another provisions of the copyright law was making it too easy for sites like YouTube to keep hosting copyrighted music. And they wanted reforms to kind of ironic since the music industry pushed hard for the original law. And now for some related links related to copyright issues. Google is of course, a huge target of copyright owners. And yes, has let a lot slip through the cracks over the years, not even cracks canyons, really. But it put out a report yesterday detailing. It's twenty eighteen efforts to fight piracy. Google said it's invested one hundred million dollars in tools to spot infringing content. They actually scan uploads against a database of copyrighted material, which is something the proposed EU copyright law. Wants everyone to do in fact, and then if someone uploads copyrighted content, the original copyright owner gets ad revenue. From it Google said it's paid three billion dollars to copyright owners that way and another one point eight billion to the music industry in the form of revenue in its report. Google also said if you give people a way to pay for legitimate content. They are far less likely to steal it taking note TV. On demand people. Finally, if you're totally bored with smartphone designs, and I know you are because the biggest innovation in the last five years has basically been the notch. Then get yourself to the internet and watch video of Samsung's foldable smartphone, which it showed up yesterday at a developer conference. It falls out to become a seven inch tablet, and then closes up and there's a phone screen on the front. Google said, the Android operating system will support these crazy do hickeys Lenovo and Xiaomi and LG are also working on them willa work. I don't know. Do you want it? I don't know. All I know is it wasn't about politics. And I don't think it had a notch. I'm in both of those related links are on our website. Marketplace tech dot org. I'm Ali would. And thanks for listening to marketplace tech Tele friends, so they can listen to. This is a PM.

Google Dmca Youtube Colgate ALI Colgate University New York Congress Corey Doctor United States Europe Napster Berlin EU Samsung
Tesla Chief Accounting Officer Dave Morton resigns after just a month

The Breakfast Club

02:06 min | 4 years ago

Tesla Chief Accounting Officer Dave Morton resigns after just a month

"Jason. I've got breaking news. That's tesla related. So maybe Tesla's chief accounting officer doesn't like the idea of Ilan smoking weed because he just resigned Dave Morton just resigned after one month at the company if your teeth accounting officer goes after one month, don't you feel like that's somebody who walked in and went what did I get myself into? And then bails write a certain kind of show if you will don't forget to this week. The biggest short seller against tesla is suing Yvonne musk over his take the thing private stock manipulation too. So there is that. And then you have kind of a brain drain apples been hiring a lot of the of the car technology and engineer people not just the software people, but the hardware people too. So he's under a lot of stress with the company. He did admit in that podcast that this is what? Keeps him up at night. He said SpaceX is no walk into park. But a car companies really really hard. Okay. Now help me on the trying to go back and walk through the timeframe in my mind. It was this guy. Dave Morton was the announcement that Elon Musk taking the company private that was within this month. So that happened under this guy's watch. Right. Yeah. I happen to I. Yeah. About a month ago? Yeah. The first week of August is when the tweet came out two weeks later, the SEC said, hey, we're interested in what you have there. And then the blog post came out that walked it all back. Okay. So I'm wondering did. Do you think this guy brought that idea in or was this idea unveiled right after he came through the door? Wow. This this kind of its opening a whole new Pandora's box. It it is it goes towards the brain drain friend seems to be happening there, and yeah, you're right. It does not look good. So another optics hit for tesla slash Musk's today. If if the if that financial officers splits after only one month, it's not because he didn't like his corner office. No, no, no. You didn't like what he was walking into. And I don't know they usually pretty well on both sides at that level. When you're the sea level, you're vetting on both sides to make sure it's a fit because you don't want this kind of Pat headache with your shareholders. Because now there's going to be looked like there's two -bility in all the corner offices now and you coming off of a bad optics of, you know, pulling on a blunt

Spotify Youtube Joe Rogan Yvonne Musk Tesla Jason Middleton SEC Dave Morton Margot Neil Degrasse Tyson Starbucks Marijuana Napster California Ilan Cilla Simon Alon
Family demands answers after police shift story in fatal shooting of 20-year-old man

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:14 min | 4 years ago

Family demands answers after police shift story in fatal shooting of 20-year-old man

"A request for an independent investigation into a deadly police shooting in savannah georgia twenty year old ricky boy was killed outside his house the official explanation has changed several times here's marks rosman and then boom ambon he's he's he's shy he's falling to the ground jamila smiley has seen the body camera video of police shooting her son twenty year old ricky boyd right outside the family's front door back in january they don't have to watch much get gunned down police wanted to question boyd about a recent homicide minutes later he was dead interim police chief mark revenue the day of the shooting the suspect he initiated gunfire towards officers napster's return gunfire hours later they said boyd had a gun but never mentioned he fired it state investigators later said it was only a bb gun did you ever see a gun that he held in that video nassir family lawyer william and says this photo shows a bb pistol lying in a neighbor's yard the body is here.

Savannah Georgia Jamila Smiley Ricky Boyd Napster Official William And Twenty Year