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Should You Master Mind?

The Daily Boost

04:00 min | 1 d ago

Should You Master Mind?

"Before we get started I have to ask the question. I dwell on every single Monday, I've done it since how long since two thousand six thirty eight million downloads go, it's a lot. Have you done your homework? Serious. I stood emails every single week. Scott a bit. Listen new for years, and I finally sat down. I look at my goals. The roles that I play my life where my focus is what I really WanNa do. What I like, what I! What I'd like change. I look at I looked at that fine. And all of a sudden suddenly I found that was well. It was working and that's why a question because when you take the time to evaluate at least for a few minutes where you are. Then you can go or you to go until then it's kind of difficult remember. The perfect planner helps you do that, so just go to motivation. WE'VE DOT COM. If you haven't, it's in the resource section. Get the perfectly planner and watch the video. It's a cool video and it tells you exactly how to get the mindset. To really transform your life at about ten minutes a week with one single piece of paper. AUSE stuff. So. Let's talk masterminding. In nineteen thirty eight. The Pauline Hill had a book. Thinking grow rich, you might read that. It's like an a tenth edition. Now it's crazy. I think I read it five or six times maybe more. Change lives it at time when the depression was going on right, Kinda Creepy Beckham. And a lot of modern personal development self-help personal improve whatever you call it. A lot of it really began then because people were down at the dump, said he'd get lifted out of the dump. So thinking grow rich comes out. And, he popularized a concept called. The mastermind now it's interesting. If you track the word mastermind, you'll find that. It really was very rarely used up to that point. But after that point, damn, it just took off. Must have an impact on the world, isn't it? By the way mastermind is not a character in an Austin powers movie. In case you're wondering on masterminds, be Dr Evil Right. Napoleon Hell. And I believe this to be true said it was the True Path to success for anybody who wants it. Now if you listen. I define success. It's kind of a generic term. Right suggest what is what's accessible anything it could be success in you know having a Nice family, and we how many good job or a nice house or just being happy I don't care how you wanted to how you define success. That's up to you. So what about this mastermind, thing, why is it so powerful? Well Napoleon. Hill was the first to see this. He said a mastermind news the coordination of knowledge and effort. In a spirit of harmony with two or more people. For the attainment of a definite purpose. I like the spirit of harmony I like the two or more people and I like the. Attainment of a definite versus. South, collaboration isn't. Collaboration going on these days. It's different than a mastermind. Why is it different? Because when two mines come together. They create a third mine. It's invisible. It's an intangible force. It's a third mine. That's different than just getting your job at hey, how you doing that project doing this doing that? Okay fine chicken chicken chicken chicken off done. Now, it's different. It's that definite purpose. I do this a lot with folks on the phone. People that I messed around with. We'll talk to you about something. That's mastermind this not brainstorming. Tapping power that third mine. It gets even better. This is exciting, but mastermind process. If you don't have a mastermind should find one. Ed You can do with your colleagues it with family if you wanted to easier sometimes when you don't know folks. Ran Certainly could work. With persistence and intelligence. And use. Of discrimination in the selection of who you mastermind with.

Pauline Hill Napoleon Hell Scott Austin
"napoleon" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

07:38 min | Last week

"napoleon" Discussed on Citation Needed

"That egg on our face again. Again. And again. Russia at this point. Has a peace treaty with France, but they're struggling financially. The system of trade that Napoleon institutes basically forbids countries to trade with Britain. Russia disregards this order in trades with them, and there are some other territory disputes, but the real reason for the invasion is for one big tough guy to show the other big tough guy who's. So on. twenty-fourth, Eighteen, twelve, two hundred and eight years ago. Today Napoleon starts his invasion. Okay, all right. Does anyone else just think we should have to say history out loud a few times a year? As we all. Get getting. Square to recite it. Start to finish every year yeah. All wrap voting. A. Now, there's lots of different numbers for the size of the French forces. It varies between half a million to six hundred, thousand of seen even seven, hundred and fifty thousand. A this grand army is it's called. It was stocked up to last about thirty days with provisions, and as I mentioned before. That's really not much of a problem. When Napoleon conducted this kind of military activity in central Europe is, horses could live off the land. He's in for just a slight surprise in Russia though. You don't when we think of Russian president picture a fat Guy No. Such a dumb move going to Russia right away like that. Everybody knows you start with Australia there. There's another. And then you move over to Africa South America. Risk. The bridge. Army, the size is also an ecological disaster. I mean you have a military force of the population? This is a modern day Atlanta marching across the land. The lack of clean water pretty much immediately creates a dysentery epidemic. In fact, it wasn't the only illness that would wreak havoc on the French forces. They had to contend with typhus, influenza and Diptheria Oh and the elements and the lack of supplies, but we'll get there. Yeah, no to be clear. The guys who like died from Diptheria right up front the lucky ones. and. See so when I read your essay the first time I thought you, said elephants, instead of elements and I got like. Rose. Do Hannibal next week for you. I was I was pretty jazzed. Only time we've read an elephant. We killed it on this show. Right I don't think. We murdered at send. You know what that's what they did. To to have elephants anymore that guy from Brooklyn Brooklyn. Can't talk about it even though it's right in the room. And The rose army. The Russian armies led by Michael Andreas Barclay to totally now in the things I've read. They've shortened his name down to Barklay. So that's home and refer to him. He's in charge of one hundred, thousand, one, hundred thirty thousand Russian soldiers, so he's outnumbered about four to five to one and it at at a certain point, he's replaced by the czar, but really he's the reason that Napoleon fails that overconfidence and under planning and the fact Napoleon is French, but. One of the reason because he knew how to minimize disadvantages and maximizes advantages and the biggest advantage had was that. Russia is not terribly hospitable. Well I right, but like French rudeness didn't slow down the Nazis. Not Terribly hospitable. That is the nicest way to say shit whole country. I think. So the grand army. Starts this expedition in summer, so they're packed for hot weather, but they weren't prepared for how ungodly hot it was going to get. The heat on the trail was oppressive. They never give an exact temperature, but they use words like stifling an intense. The troops also weren't ready for the temperature swing between night and day the temperature drop like a rock when the sun went down in the army wasn't prepared for that the also not happy. Again. You know when that Sun goes down. Just a Russian. The temperature swings I guess were really dramatic. Like yeah, yeah, so it's really it's a dramatic swing. They also weren't expecting the thunderstorms that soaked the road and turned in a muck. Because a half, a million people walked over, so it might at this point actually saved us some trouble. If you just narrowed this down to what they were expecting owner. Who's just like what if it rains shut up? What Shoe Shara Pierre I saw? The thing was seven sunny. Smiley faces on. The. What do I wear? APP and it doesn't say anyth- coming like a long sleeved T. Forecast not even accurate. Now I'm going to bring one. I don't WANNA pack two Layers? Layers? Room for a second pair of shoes anyway, so here's a quote from historian Richard Ryan. Quote the thunderstorms of the twenty fourth turned into other downpours, turning the tracks some dire claim, there were no roads in Lithuania into bottomless Myers wagons sunk up to their hubs. Horses drop from exhaustion. Men lost their boots as soon as it was autumn. All the wagons became obstacles that forced men around them and stop supply wagons and artillery columns, then came the sun, which would bake deep ruts into canyons of concrete, were horses would break their legs and wagons, their wheels and quote go. You're making wars sound like a huge bummer. Alright well I guess while we pause for a moment of remembrance for all the lost boots that somehow made it into the. Little Apropos of nothing. His Eye Napoleon, Bonaparte. Emperor false and soon to be conqueror of A. Company telling them. Lucid Goose Yeah. Yeah yeah about that. Who Are you? I'm you I'm Napoleon like you, but without the accent from the. Is Ozzy future okay. Tell me. ME. What gloves await me after my. Inevitable and swift defeat of. You're right, so that's why I'm here. You Might WanNA rethink. A few things. Really like what okay so you know, we're French and we basically invented food. We like took over Spain, and the topics were just terrific. We mixing it up. To take cluster little. Z. Ham in Spain is worth it just for them. Yeah, yeah, so have you. Have you ever said these words? Hey, there's a great new Russian place that just opened up. No no I have not. Not Necessarily Jira. Well! You're saying you're. You're planning to feed your army on Russian land scraps. You might want to look at.

Napoleon Army Russia grand army Spain France rose army Brooklyn Britain Africa president dysentery Diptheria Europe Michael Andreas Barclay Square Richard Ryan Lithuania
"napoleon" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

07:38 min | Last week

"napoleon" Discussed on Citation Needed

"That egg on our face again. Again. And again. Russia at this point. Has a peace treaty with France, but they're struggling financially. The system of trade that Napoleon institutes basically forbids countries to trade with Britain. Russia disregards this order in trades with them, and there are some other territory disputes, but the real reason for the invasion is for one big tough guy to show the other big tough guy who's. So on. twenty-fourth, Eighteen, twelve, two hundred and eight years ago. Today Napoleon starts his invasion. Okay, all right. Does anyone else just think we should have to say history out loud a few times a year? As we all. Get getting. Square to recite it. Start to finish every year yeah. All wrap voting. A. Now, there's lots of different numbers for the size of the French forces. It varies between half a million to six hundred, thousand of seen even seven, hundred and fifty thousand. A this grand army is it's called. It was stocked up to last about thirty days with provisions, and as I mentioned before. That's really not much of a problem. When Napoleon conducted this kind of military activity in central Europe is, horses could live off the land. He's in for just a slight surprise in Russia though. You don't when we think of Russian president picture a fat Guy No. Such a dumb move going to Russia right away like that. Everybody knows you start with Australia there. There's another. And then you move over to Africa South America. Risk. The bridge. Army, the size is also an ecological disaster. I mean you have a military force of the population? This is a modern day Atlanta marching across the land. The lack of clean water pretty much immediately creates a dysentery epidemic. In fact, it wasn't the only illness that would wreak havoc on the French forces. They had to contend with typhus, influenza and Diptheria Oh and the elements and the lack of supplies, but we'll get there. Yeah, no to be clear. The guys who like died from Diptheria right up front the lucky ones. and. See so when I read your essay the first time I thought you, said elephants, instead of elements and I got like. Rose. Do Hannibal next week for you. I was I was pretty jazzed. Only time we've read an elephant. We killed it on this show. Right I don't think. We murdered at send. You know what that's what they did. To to have elephants anymore that guy from Brooklyn Brooklyn. Can't talk about it even though it's right in the room. And The rose army. The Russian armies led by Michael Andreas Barclay to totally now in the things I've read. They've shortened his name down to Barklay. So that's home and refer to him. He's in charge of one hundred, thousand, one, hundred thirty thousand Russian soldiers, so he's outnumbered about four to five to one and it at at a certain point, he's replaced by the czar, but really he's the reason that Napoleon fails that overconfidence and under planning and the fact Napoleon is French, but. One of the reason because he knew how to minimize disadvantages and maximizes advantages and the biggest advantage had was that. Russia is not terribly hospitable. Well I right, but like French rudeness didn't slow down the Nazis. Not Terribly hospitable. That is the nicest way to say shit whole country. I think. So the grand army. Starts this expedition in summer, so they're packed for hot weather, but they weren't prepared for how ungodly hot it was going to get. The heat on the trail was oppressive. They never give an exact temperature, but they use words like stifling an intense. The troops also weren't ready for the temperature swing between night and day the temperature drop like a rock when the sun went down in the army wasn't prepared for that the also not happy. Again. You know when that Sun goes down. Just a Russian. The temperature swings I guess were really dramatic. Like yeah, yeah, so it's really it's a dramatic swing. They also weren't expecting the thunderstorms that soaked the road and turned in a muck. Because a half, a million people walked over, so it might at this point actually saved us some trouble. If you just narrowed this down to what they were expecting owner. Who's just like what if it rains shut up? What Shoe Shara Pierre I saw? The thing was seven sunny. Smiley faces on. The. What do I wear? APP and it doesn't say anyth- coming like a long sleeved T. Forecast not even accurate. Now I'm going to bring one. I don't WANNA pack two Layers? Layers? Room for a second pair of shoes anyway, so here's a quote from historian Richard Ryan. Quote the thunderstorms of the twenty fourth turned into other downpours, turning the tracks some dire claim, there were no roads in Lithuania into bottomless Myers wagons sunk up to their hubs. Horses drop from exhaustion. Men lost their boots as soon as it was autumn. All the wagons became obstacles that forced men around them and stop supply wagons and artillery columns, then came the sun, which would bake deep ruts into canyons of concrete, were horses would break their legs and wagons, their wheels and quote go. You're making wars sound like a huge bummer. Alright well I guess while we pause for a moment of remembrance for all the lost boots that somehow made it into the. Little Apropos of nothing. His Eye Napoleon, Bonaparte. Emperor false and soon to be conqueror of A. Company telling them. Lucid Goose Yeah. Yeah yeah about that. Who Are you? I'm you I'm Napoleon like you, but without the accent from the. Is Ozzy future okay. Tell me. ME. What gloves await me after my. Inevitable and swift defeat of. You're right, so that's why I'm here. You Might WanNA rethink. A few things. Really like what okay so you know, we're French and we basically invented food. We like took over Spain, and the topics were just terrific. We mixing it up. To take cluster little. Z. Ham in Spain is worth it just for them. Yeah, yeah, so have you. Have you ever said these words? Hey, there's a great new Russian place that just opened up. No no I have not. Not Necessarily Jira. Well! You're saying you're. You're planning to feed your army on Russian land scraps. You might want to look at.

Napoleon Army Russia grand army Spain France rose army Brooklyn Britain Africa president dysentery Diptheria Europe Michael Andreas Barclay Square Richard Ryan Lithuania
11 Trivia Questions on Movie Mashups

Trivia With Budds

05:53 min | 2 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on Movie Mashups

"MAITLAND's Number Today's number two one. car episode backstreets What crash is former about was movie US far mashups. president lost more gruesome in I the question will flood was give number you also two. clues the The first number. first and about Two movies the to word Promised in win early of that the Michael Nobel share drafts Land a Jackson's word offer in to Peace the Maitland middle. beat Prize it. home. This Is For is very everyone number They similar one to a the before number original two? and ending after of McDowell style The first puzzle screenplay word of that you Michael might find beetlejuice Jackson's on Number. wheel Three being of beat destroyed fortune whole it. 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Gioachino Rossini 3: Overtures

Classics for Kids

05:36 min | 5 months ago

Gioachino Rossini 3: Overtures

"Hello welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Win. Overture comes from the French word for opening vow to. That's what they called the piece of music that opened ballets and operas in Seventeenth Century France. After French overtures became popular all over Europe non-french composers started pending the name overture onto larger pieces of music those overtures or sweets as we now call them consisted of alternating fast and slow sections but they always started off with an overture in the French style. A slow introduction followed by lively second section today the kind of overture we know best is the dramatic overture a piece of music. That gets you ready for a stage. Work that follows sometimes. Those overtures consists of a bunch of hit tunes. That work like the overture to Jacques Oven. Box Operetta the Grand Duchess of Charleston. Dramatic go all the way back to the days when trumpets announced that some royal entertainment was about to start. That's the opening to one of the earliest opera ever written or fail by Claudio Monteverdi. Good overtures really. Get you in the mood for what's coming up for instance you can tell from the very first note that something serious is going to happen in. Mozart's Don Giovanni overtures set the stage for plays to Egg Mont by Gooda is obviously a tragedy as you can hear from the overture that Beethoven wrote for it but when you hear the overture Felix Mendelssohn composed for Shakespeare. Play a midsummer night's dream. You know it's a comedy. Actually Mendelssohn didn't originally right. His overture for production of the play. His midsummer night's dream is yet another kind of overture. A concert overture as the name says it's meant to be performed on a concert and doesn't have to have anything to do with anything. Theatrical lots of times when composers were asked to provide music for a special occasion. They'd write a concert overture. So that people who were sitting for a long time at some ceremony didn't have to sit through a long piece too when you're honest. Brahms composed music for the ceremony at which he got an honorary university degree. He made all the students happy by putting their favourite drinking songs into his academic festival. Overture lots of concert. Overtures were intended for patriotic purposes. Like the one Tchaikovsky wrote for the dedication of a church in Moscow. Tchaikovsky used that occasion to celebrate Russia's defeat of Napoleon in eighteen twelve tchaykovsky certainly knew how to put a rousing end to an overture and of course Soda Gioacchino Rossini. With one he wrote for his Opera William. Tell one of the things where Seaney put into his William Tell. Overture was a musical thunderstorm

Overture Felix Mendelssohn Seventeenth Century France Naomi Win Claudio Monteverdi Tchaikovsky Europe Egg Mont By Gooda Jacques Oven Brahms Moscow Russia Charleston Seaney Mozart Napoleon Beethoven
How ToStay RelevantIn aChaoticWorld

Book Marketing Mentors

09:02 min | 5 months ago

How ToStay RelevantIn aChaoticWorld

"Scott what N- absolute pleasure. It is to welcome you to the show and thank you for being this week's guest ex but at Mental Susan. Thank you so much. It's always a pleasure working with you over the last. Gosh I don't even know how long seven arrangements or even longer than that but it's been a pleasure working with you. You have been such a phenomenal guide disclosed to be on today and talking to your guests so looking forward to share in a little bit about background and what I do. What my books about in how we can help your guest listeners? Excellent Scott ought to the relevance gap. Talk to us about that. What exactly is the relevant scab? The relevance gap is kind of a definition ignition for relevance gap. Is the distance from kind of weird. You are in a relationship to the speed of the world changing around you and you look the last decade in how fast everything has completely changed. I mean currently right now we have four generations in the workforce course right you have everything from technical skills to work site identity you got workplace anxiety you've got technology anxiety people really just kind of like what do I do. Where do I start in woods troubling? What's difficult is I think? A lot of people freeze up. They've not embraced changed changed. We tend to resist change by our nature in the more you resist the more relevant and there's always somebody behind you. It's smarter younger more. Importantly certainly just willing to do things that you're unwilling to do serve. Everybody has adjustments to make. But the one thing I've learned along the way in the talks that I've given I and beating around the country is that you're dealing with four different generations everybody has a contribution to make. Everybody has a gift as a skill in I and so people are embracing change raising the limitations and they're beginning to realize wait. A minute can catch up pretty quick. Just because there's no new modalities allies in new systems. New Technologies new ways of doing things I'm needed and I think that's important because sometimes people feel that. Maybe I'm too old. They didn't matter as we need everybody in the game right now. And so. That's really what relevance gap is. All about it's just about any people pass that feeling feeling of overwhelm so that they can catch up in that they can make their contribution and be a part of the whole as we move forward. So that's what the book is about in helping people make those adjustments that so exciting. What do you feel that Nonfiction authors need to do to stay relevant in this false changing world idol. I think about that. I mean not just in writing the Book Me Being Author Being An entrepreneur in the marketplace. In what I've found is that we have a lot to compete with me. When you just look at is for example social media there are so many platforms arse for social media right now in order for you to promote and get out there you really have to get allowed Mrs Allowed Universe? I mean so many voices out there vying competing for the same readers or for your product or whatever that you do and I think a lot of times we kinda shy away way. We don't want to be too loud and too noisy. But that's what's different about the market. Today what's different is you gotta be noisy. You GotTa be loud. You gotta be out in it gotta be letting people love who you are what you're about how you can help them. Why they should Wanna read your books why they WanNa talk to you about your products really the benefits you can bring in so again you got to do some things you've never done before? I mean just case in point look at say for example Youtube okay. Most people might not be comfortable trouble with doing video but video the future when you look at generations e everything they do video driven and so you have to now make that adjustment and learn how to get video recordings and hustlers hangs in provide quality content that somebody could not go and get information everything from doing a podcast for example or either so many different modalities of putting information out there. But what I find is they will doesn't take all that back. The matter is is yeah it takes all that you have to learn to do all of this and they can be a little overwhelming. I think you got narrowed down to three or four maybe five five different platforms or niches. Really work real and then to put yourself in those modes experience them master them get you miss not going to be easy at first right the definition of easy as something. You can do basically everything you've ever done or at one point in time you didn't didn't know how to do. It was uncomfortable yet. Learn how to do it once you had to do it. It was easy to the definition of easiest you can do all of these things can be learned. I I mean all of these things can experience be mastered. I didn't know anything about Youtube. Not really by any means at this point in time youtube expert but took a course youtube for Bassett's assets with sunny Lesnar busy and it was a great course. taught me a lot in happened around the same time it was at a NSA event. They'll the Georgia which was called the video intensive Jr.. Why were we all their cause? Video is so important and so you kind of feel like remember being at that function within. SAP and everybody kind of realized why they're sitting there. How far behind? We actually are because five ten years ago. The number one income producer Sir for public eaters was speaking today. Subscription based models and online courses in so said the models have changed and so the models moved the models change but remained a successful which is our content. Those things naturally change right. I mean they adapt and grow at the things that produce excess are. The thing is those. Don't really ever change your ability and your willingness get out in the market deliver. Do you think you'd never done before. Choirs Skills Nassar. Something you've never done the That's what I think. Dr Successful People Successful people a base their success or measure their success based on what they've done the measure themselves against their potential. Next real things. You've never done before if you embrace it. You're going to master it in a GIG. Good at it in. So those are the things that decisions I think entrepreneurs speakers authors. We gotta make a decision to adapt and change in embrace. The market is is moving forward so that get some suggestions. I would give a few things that you said but just stood out. Full may festival the definition of easy. Something that you can do I I think not so simple and so easy. But you're absolutely right when you do something and you've done it many times you think. Oh this is easy but you forget the other people have not done what you've done to get way you are so it really isn't easy for them. And then I think everything that you've said leads to the whole idea of the power of you mindset to to his more about that because I know that that's an aspect of your bulk so took us more about mindset mindset is just absolutely critical the growth of your business. Your name is a very powerful thing. As big student of Napoleon Hill. The author is greatest allies. Also your greatest greatest enemy that is so powerful that whether a thought as empowering thought or disempowering thought is bound to come true. It's bound to be come. A reality in the what happens is that we are not active. Participants in the forming of our thoughts are believes our core values in our core principles. That's why would you wanna be able to do is to really be able to capture that in really creating some core values core principles that are empowering verses uses core values and principles that are disempower. You WanNa take an active role in that and so that all comes down to a lot of different things. It's where you spend your time. You sociation is that you make the people you spend time around the books that you read the audience that you listen to you. All of those types of things are formulating the power your mindset in your your mind once. You've set your mind in motion you haven't powering thoughts. You have empowering beliefs you can change those things. That's where things get into him into my is really talking to you. How do you go about formulating in designing core values and design core principles? That are gonNA move you in the direction of your dreams and the goals and you know where he wants to be in life in how you go about doing that process

Youtube Scott Mental Susan New Technologies Georgia Producer SAP Napoleon Hill Lesnar Bassett
How Winston Churchill defeated Nazism despite his 'black dog'

Between The Lines

11:38 min | 9 months ago

How Winston Churchill defeated Nazism despite his 'black dog'

"Now today on the show visual defend our island whatever they got maybe we should fight on the beaches on the landing grounds the field and in the street fighting the hill will never surrender churchill the subject of countless plies movies drama series documentaries and biographies indeed believe it or not there have been a thousand Churchill Biographies One thousand the first biography was written in nineteen ninety five and the author of the latest one is our guest today now according to the prominent British columnist and historian Tom and heffer regular guest on this program this most recent Churchill biographies the best single volume imaginable of a man whose life would seem take impossible to get into a single volume the book is called Churchill Walking with destiny and the author is Andrew Roberts who's written other water declined books including a biography on Napoleon and the storm of war a new history of the Second World War Andrew Welcome to ABC Radio Thank you Tony took great on us now as I mentioned they've already been a thousand Churchill books published what's different about yours when I was very fortunate that there's been an enormous amount of sources that have come out over the last five years since I've been writing this book the Queen allows me to be the first Churchill biographer to use of his diaries and came due to sex mets church every Tuesday at the second mobile church who trusted him the great secret civil war and luckily rate down everything churchill say within forty one new sense of papers have been deposed to church college archives in the Cambridge University and other people like the servies investor time I even mice gate rations diaries basic become available giving those same in fact now on top of the dates and accounts of the war cabinet but I discovered six years ago allows me to have some they pretty much every page book it's never appeared in nature to focus okay well let's start with Churchill's upbringing can you tell us about Winston's parents briefly well he's talking to the upper cloth he was a charismatic successful Victorian politician he became chance of Exchan- so you never saw any of genius in Churchill and green to netted frankly they all the Stanford right to any sound full of contempt and to stay and his son Winston continue to love him and Martin and when his father died when Winston was twenty he raises who's focusing in Winston sorry randolph someone's name and he basically didn't allow it to to scream up whereas his mother also route took nations over to she was a great American future in society maybe something offense with the Prince of Wales Austrian about Saddam heels Okay and you went to school did he do you have did you have much luck at school I mean what sort of student was he he was a monster the student and he made himself out to be it's very rare for politicians to try and make themselves out to be thicker than they genuinely All I it should be in fact that being the dumbs 'cause he portrayed himself broke free my life he in fact was in the top third of all the classes ooh okay well let's turn to Churchill politics because he wasn't always a conservative he crossed the parliamentary floor in Nantes in four over the threat four government opposed to free trade in non white at thirty three he was the youngest cabinet member in forty years and then of course he was pretty significant figuring the British military from an early age this is of Relevance to Australians Andrew What do you wrote about his filings glibly in Nineteen fifteen well of course he was responsible for the idea of the of attacking the Straits of the dodgers novels and it was a brilliant idea to come off name one of the great strategic tunes of the of history of all Pfaff but as we all know say silently on the eighteenth of March nineteen fifteen Liane go six ships foods straits and then of course largely town to Him we double down and and landed all the way through fifteen and of course over the next eight months few one hundred forty seven thousand casualties suffered in the in the West Inside Straight so this was a drastic and terrible decision but one boots the real problem came in implementation well yeah okay now we went into politics to elect liberals rejoined the conservatives in the mid nineteen twenties what did he do that because the conservatives came back to the idea of free trade they it'd been the policy that let's say that's the party he joined the Nipples does the Conservatives dumps feature each and David intense you're often attributed with the quite quite I if a man is not a suspect I by the time he's twenty he has no heart if he's not a conservative by the time he's forty he has no brain churchill really say that I am and unfortunately there are lots of great lines like that but he didn't say he might have if you're going to keep going for example make the safest shape about about lady astor drinking coffee around any number of things keeping lucky men like Groucho Marx no power say funny things people with cheating too even if you didn't say those funny things it was talking about Winston Churchill with Andrew Roberts now Andrew your account numerous occasions when Churchill cheated death in your fi. He survived a school stabbing Cuban Bullets Boer Artillery German shells on the western front a near drowning replaying crushes three car accidents and a house fire Croaky and I'm actually very serious mainly at the age of eleven nomadic agent doctors administered brandy to the inevitable and which she wanted to be so you will send you make the point the church will develop the art of seeing virtually everything through the prism of history yeah it was the fact that he wasn't himself from historic congruent several extremely good he's a genius he was widely seen as Virginia wasn't he won the Nobel Prize for literature and actually he's unhappy about that because the price for peace that he was going to win communicants history who actually has been disappointed when he got the Nobel Prize which shop now we talk about a lot of people think of Churchill he's attitude towards the Nazis and Hitler and of course the British policy of appeasement toward Nazi Germany people forget this but in the late thirties it was actually popular with the British people tell us more about how Churchill riled against the spirit of the Times in the lightning thirties well he was only a final team is it's like jeeze you grew up with Jesus father did like the whole day with them they appreciated the service they it says humanity he was honest from quite an early age and saying he had an early warning system came during the Nazis that a lot of the other people in many wrench AC- rights didn't have also were so we mentioned earlier in being an historian he he sold the threat let's go to the European balance of power that we opposed and EDUC- seen fanaticism place in his life in a way that the other primary tonight people standing Naples we will never change and didn't say he was the first major predisposition of the decade the only major politician to not only warn against Hitler Nazis but also talk with an idea about what do I e rearming especially in the air the by the way you know you obviously know John Howard our second longest serving prime minister did you know that he's middle name is Winston it was named by his parents in mid Naughty thirty nine? When as we've discussed Winston Churchill was anything but the flavor of the month he was seen as yesterday's man rod that shows John's parents and Great must be full size. This is searching tremendously impressive actually I didn't know that's in Ann Arbor got I think yeah well during the war Churchill husband and relations with the United States which meant that America applied an important role in helping Britain defeat awesome but what about the altar pace conference towards the end of World War Two was not Churchill's finest hour why well because they back large number of famine of Yugoslavs to to get to Marshal Tito too because he he basically killed them and a hand backlog Germans and ethnic Germans who an ethnic Russians as well actually Cossacks to stone promptly murdered them as well so as far as the share sort of real politique day was concerned they had to believe result in general had to believe starlings were vulne- that he was going to get to respect the integrity and independence another eastern European countries but unfortunately Adelson those deals went shot which net new Mexico's yeah false assurances by S- talented the free elections would be held in eastern Europe but I mean you bit hot on Churchill because many historians would decide that the dying FDI he essentially stitched Churchill up I didn't believe that case I've been I've found myself we H mccown superbowl cabinet Churchill held on return from Yalta in which very much that he thought he could business was done in the deeper deep stalling the only alternative to trust on of course he was for that much thin walls and it's very other fueled fairness of course because in a million Russian soldiers variant at the time he was also at Folsom Missouri in March Ninety six When you made the Great Iron Kerr in speech the first major Western politician to warn against started was doing in eastern Europe

Winston Churchill Nobel Prize Bullets Boer Artillery Virginia Germany Naples John Howard Prime Minister Hitler Croaky Marshal Tito Yalta Europe Ann Arbor Yugoslavs Adelson Britain America United States
Trump: Let 'Napoleon Bonaparte' rescue the Kurds

Morning Edition

05:38 min | 9 months ago

Trump: Let 'Napoleon Bonaparte' rescue the Kurds

"How does the United States stop a Turkish invasion of Syria for which the US had previously cleared the way president trump is imposed sanctions against Turkey he is warning turkeys leader president everyone not to go too far in a region where the U. S. withdrew yesterday vice president Mike pence said he is being sent on a mission with the national security adviser the president has directed me and Robert o'brien to to lead lead a a delegation delegation to to Turkey Turkey in in the the immediate immediate future future but but to to begin begin discussions discussions and and negotiations negotiations to to bring bring the the bloodshed bloodshed to to an an end end but but a a few few hours hours before before that that the the president president was was on on Twitter Twitter and and seem seem to to dismiss dismiss the the conflict conflict he he said said it it was was quote quote seven seven thousand thousand miles miles away away and and as as for for the the Kurds Kurds US US allies allies in in Syria Syria who are now in trouble the president said he did not care if they got help from quote Russia China or Napoleon Bonaparte democratic senator Chris van Hollen is on the line now senator good morning good morning good to be with you do you support the vice president's effort to negotiate some better arrangement well I support any effort to stop the Turkish incursion and slaughter of our Syrian Kurdish allies that but the reality is that what the president has done so far is first green light the Turkish operation to begin with and now the sanctions that he announced yesterday are really pathetic the the steel sanctions represents the represents about four tenths of one percent of all of Turkey's exports the president still has a standing invitation to present air to want to visit the United States a lot more is necessary to get the Turks to stop and to protect ourselves from the resurgence of ISIS which is what's gonna happen secretary Mattis and others have predicted that and this is one of my ISIS fighters who seem to be getting loose is this is all happening they talk about wanting to do more as I understand it you and a Republican senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina I have been working together to come up with some kind of congressionally passed sanctions is that going to work and are enough Republicans going to be with you want it yes we are will be introducing that very shortly there's also bipartisan legislation in the house of representatives and I think it will have a very strong bipartisan support guy you've heard strong negative reactions across the political spectrum and our proposed sanctions will be very biting and they will stay in a fact Intel Turkey ends its aggression against the Syrian Kurds and withdraws its forces in proxies from the areas that it's taken although I'm just trying to think this through and I don't want to sound cynical center but of course it takes a while to legislate it would take weeks it might take months meanwhile Turkey is conducting its operation could they not kill everyone they want to kill to put it brutally and then they say okay fine will withdraw now what time is of the essence and the the best thing that could happen would be for president trump to impose devastating sanctions after all he's tweeted several times that he wants to he can quote devastate the Turkish economy and has it within his power to do a lot more than he's done he's constantly flip flopping on this issue but Congress when it wants to it can move very quickly we could enact sanctions in the house and Senate very quickly send it to the president's desk so it's essential that we do it look my view Steve is that we got to do everything we can to end the slaughter against the Syrian Kurds to stop the resurgence of isis this is a a desperate moment and we do everything we can do this though does point to a larger conflict has been going on for a long time Turkey has certain interests in the region they don't always match up with US interests in the region Turkey is a NATO ally really valuable NATO ally but just sees the world differently than perhaps some of the other NATO allies do does it make sense and is it going to continue to make sense for Turkey to remain in NATO and aligned with the United States what you're asking a very fundamental question in Turkey is really testing NATO and its relationship with NATO in addition to their efforts to slaughter our allies the Syrian Kurds they've taken delivery of a Russian has four hundred and it Vance the defense system against our strong objections is fact that Congress is now said that Turkey will no longer be able to take the F. thirty five advanced fighter yeah because by having the Russian air defence system they will put NATO pilots at risk and put NATO security risk so Turkey has been drifting the other way and I think it's time for an important debate with respect to what their role in NATO is going to be but for now we just got a deal with the immediate situation that we've got which means just press the Turks not to go too far in Syria or to get out of Syria what is the bottom line demand well the bottom line is to get out of Syria they have no reason to be with in in Syria what they're doing is really allowing ISIS to you know come back you know Turkey from the very beginning has not been with us in the fight against ISIS they allowed a lot of ISIS fighters to to come through Turkey many years ago where's the Syrian Kurds have been with us as partners in this effort in Holland need to get out senator Chris and holiday Maryland thanks so much

United States Syria President Trump One Percent
Celebrate Mexico's True National Holiday with Mole

Gastropod

02:02 min | 10 months ago

Celebrate Mexico's True National Holiday with Mole

"Most of your listeners have never heard reference to September sixteenth because in the US at least at Cinco de Mayo the fifth of May made that Inspires Tequila fueld partying but and this is never normally the case. This is an example of where Americans are kind of getting it wrong about about another culture right. Cinco de Maya celebrates a military victory over Napoleon's French army in eighteen sixty two and it is yes celebrated in Mexico but it celebrated with a military parade. It's not a huge deal. September sixteenth on the other hand. That's the real national holiday Mexican Independence Day and with the National Holiday Holiday comes holiday food traditional dish to how during September sixteen is the Chilean because of the colors of the reds and the Greens and the whites and it's in that season is when you have the best Liz Jewison Nagata is a dish of chilies stuffed with meat dried fruits and nuts. It's topped with a creamy white walnut sauce and sprinkled with pomegranates grandma and herbs. It's very delicious and it's green red and white like the flag but it's not the only delicious thing your typical Independence Day party Mexicans uh-huh we'll make lots of and to heaters those little snack foods like bananas and Tamales and those will likely include something that is perhaps the true national dish of Mexico Moulay. It's always around Melissa dish. That's there to celebrate lie in celebrity death. It is one of those dishes that are that. It's just always going to be there. This episode is all about that party. Essential Moulay and this podcast is gastropod the Butkus that looks at food it through the Lens of Science and history. I'm Nichole twilly and I'm Cynthia Graber and right now. I am dreaming about the molay eight basically every day. I was in Oaxaca in the south of Mexico but for those of you not familiar with molay. It's an indigenous dish or is it okay but it's a sauce well that part is not clearcut either but at least it's Mexican Mexican yes and also know this sounds like a guest robot episode to me and it

Mexico Melissa Dish Liz Jewison Nagata Cinco De Maya Mexico Moulay United States Oaxaca Napoleon Greens Nichole Twilly Butkus Cynthia Graber
An Introduction to the Industrial Revolution

Hijacking History

05:18 min | 10 months ago

An Introduction to the Industrial Revolution

"We're going to look at the consequences of this revolution first and then you'll see how important it is to understand first of all. Here's a definition of the industrial revolution. It's the use of steam engines to produce power instead of the ways going back thousands of years wind water and muscle and the second definition of the industrial revolution is it's the rapid social change that flows from that introductory machine in other words. The steam engine is quite literal definition of the industrial revolution but what were the consequences consequences of using the steam engine instead of wind water and muscle rapid social change was the answer the industrial revolution's chief product product was a world in constant change mainly in the areas of transportation and communications think about it this way at the beginning of the nineteenth century that is the eighteen hundreds the army of Napoleon did not move faster really then the armies of Julius Caesar Two thousand years earlier so in terms of transportation you couldn't get from Point A. Point B. Any faster Mr in one thousand nine hundred then you could in say five hundred. BC however by the end of the eighteen hundreds it was possible to go around the world in eighty days which was of course the title of Jules Verne's famous novel and you could send Semaphore. I four messages in a flash from one continent to another so that gives you a sense of the rapid changes in technology to just use one example news in eighteen hundred was very slow and very selective. It was only available to the rich in order to buy a newspaper. You had to have enough money to buy a newspaper which was certainly not cheap and news production production was quite slow and in fact the the whole concept of news did not exist until the industrial revolution brought it into existence in order to have news. You have to have change in society but if people were living in eighteen hundred you're pretty much the way they lived in say five hundred they would not be expecting to read much in a newspaper. Even if they could afford one they couldn't afford one but they didn't even have the concept of news. News requires a society that changes and the society never really changed changed not for the common people that's why when we study history we tend to study kings and generals and statesmen and what they do because at the level of the common people there's not much historical change to talk about so there was no concept of news news but by the eighteen thirty s and eighteen forties thanks to the industrial revolution which started in England news production began to increase and also thanks to the Industrial Revolution Printing presses were produced which were so advanced that they could produce a newspaper for only a penny and for example in eighteen thirty two. You have the first Penny newspaper The New York Sun in the United States of America now that was going to revolutionize politics because for the first time relatively poor people could afford to buy a newspaper for only a penny and once they could read the news once they purchase it. They could read it and once they could read it. They knew what was going on and then it became a factor in politics. newspaper editors would have to pay attention to the opinions of the poor whereas before the poor never had an opinion because they could not know what was going on and in the nineteenth century in Europe and America newspaper Editors Editors Editors were the political kingmakers who could select candidates and mobilize people to support them so the industrial revolution created the technology that gave people a reason to look for news and the means to look for the news because of the relatively cheap cost of the printing press and the ability to turn out a newspaper for just a penny any so this is one way in which the industrial revolution was going to revolutionize society in the next podcast. We're going to be looking at the first country to experience an industrial revolution.

America Jules Verne Julius Caesar Napoleon Europe BC England United States The New York Two Thousand Years Eighty Days
"napoleon" Discussed on The Dirty Bits

The Dirty Bits

12:39 min | 1 year ago

"napoleon" Discussed on The Dirty Bits

"For him. Really good savings good for Stalin. Is Bill do campaigns. All the deaths of ten pounds L. Yeah Station. A lot of military campaigns have resulted in mass devastation. For a lot of people throughout the world is hues are pretty good too roussel figure whether or not it's like a horrible dictator. Oh yeah there's this one. Great Quote From The Wall Street Journal by Max Hastings and he says that Napoleon is controversial controversial because he thought of as either an enlightened despot who laid the foundations of modern Europe. Or instead a megalomaniac who rob greater misery than any man. Before the coming of Hitler pretty bad so you have these two and you know and he still studied today in military school in a strategy which I think is hilarious because his strategy was Surround myself with other people that have seen opportunity and have used it for their advancement. That was all he did. He was surrounded himself by good people. It's Business WanNa one so so I told you all about to tell you. This sexting is not a new thing back in the day you just had to use pen and paper to draw your little eggplant and peach emojis and pray to God that the mail carrier your didn't intercept anything because I'm sure was way more reliable back. Oh Oh it was. You'll find out how unreliable and actually was. Naturally you being away from your sick other is tough so the newlyweds wrote these incredibly Raunchy letters to each other like there is nothing on foreign. That could have prepared. Take these letters to hear a little excerpt sure. They just want to paint the picture though. I am more flushed reading these than I am watching the most absurd porn that you could imagine all right let me start out. December seventeen ninety five Napoleon. How can I rest anymore when I yield the feeling that master's my in most itself when I cough from your lips and from your heart a scorching flame? Yes one night has taught me how far you're portrait falls short of yourself. You start at midday in three hours. I shall see you again till then a thousand kisses meal dose. Am Y but give me none back for fourth. Set My blood on fire. That's not that Raj. I'm going to get there okay. Seventeen ninety six Napoleon a kiss on your heart and one much lower down much lower how happy I would be if I could assist you. You're addressing the little firm white abreast the adorable face the hair tied up in a scarf. Allah Creel and then someone like the race. Your stuff would say I'm GonNa be home in a few days. Don't take a shower shower. Because he was obsessed with like you don't have it. Sounds like you liked it. A little bit liked it a lot. He was obsessed like ripe. Yeah there's there's there's this one commercial from like decades ago and I think it was European I watched A. I've had exposure to a lot of television. So I'm not sure where this aired food because I have a hard time imagining would have aired in Puritan United States labor. But there isn't a Polian and he's in his tent on campaign and and he takes a piece of cheese and puts it over his nose and goes Josephine. I remember like I didn't get it at the time. Of course I but Through my research here again for this episode I stumbled across that commercial. Remember this Oh with again boost. The commercials was selling cheese. That's a weird commercial. I I thought it was a trip and a half. I was reading sticks at your by but I don't think it would have by that. She I I let girls and cheese after watching Ching that I'd wanted neither of them. He had a pet name for her downstairs. Mix Up the Baron Day Koeppen. Nobody knows why the hell he called her genitalia. That no clue and she did something something in bed called zigzags which is another mystery. As far as what the Hell Batman all these little code stuff that they had just like how people do now they have a little pet names so they have little acumen with at one time. It's super cute. But there's trouble in paradise. Napoleon's ladders also revealed that his wife didn't answer him quite as quickly as he would've liked so they'd have these gnarly arguments via snail mail until Napoleon. Here's Josephine had started hooking up with young men of the sexy variety we and so. He writes the super angry letter to her about her affair which the British intercept and then widely published embarrassed most British thing ever. It is Wilson same thing. People love publishing naughty letters in Britain. So it's hilarious military tactic. This was before Harriet. Ah this predated her. So Napoleon has this letter published with all of these intimate details about his personal life. What's going on with him and his wife and his marriage uh not stoked but he goes fine and he proceeded to have no less than twenty one affairs while he's on this campaign? Yeah Retaliation Plus Zero Frisk. I kind of assumed US already. You seem already that he's not going to be faithful to anybody. Comes with the territory. I'm not saying it's right. I'm saying the expectation you don't expect us is to be faithful. Maybe maybe maybe not like. Well that's what I wonder is. I'm not even Hitler but is there any royal person who has ever have been faithful. Is there any leader. That's ever been faithful. Is that just think Hitler was either. Yeah because we assume that just comes with the territory. Celebrity ruler ruler. Pick a lot of these guys to have one track minds. There's just so much shit like I can't imagine. Being any of these dictators sounds exhausted. You know there's pushes somebody constantly that need your attention it's like renting a business you're on you're on the clock time but it's a nation state which they run like businesses. Yeah that's the that's the mentality again. I'm not saying that's right but the mentality of these people is. It's their business so used to doing this. Mostly just to get back in her though. Yeah Yeah I think this is kind of retaliation fares before this. I think it was kind of like. She awoken that passion in him. He got obsessive over her. She was like chill l. out right and then he did it out of retaliation just because of the way that he approached sex before her that change after. Do you think it was mechanical. It was do you think I think with her was not mechanical. Would I think with the retaliation had a motivation. So that sex was going to be more. I don't even think intimates the right word but I'm not a forceful is not the word I'm looking for either. But I think he would have very aggressive sex because it's angry to speculating. That's total speculation. Relation he could have been from what I gathered. He was actually really good like as far as taking care of his mistresses go. He made sure when he was done dating somebody they yeah they were set up. Kids were taken care of. He legitimized a lot of his bastards to it really was he actually. That was something he was really passionate about with slake the father's role the man's role the husband's role in the home kind of a thing as misogynistic and backwards as he was for you know now with the knowledge that we have he was he he really did. Make sure that everybody was taken care of the time who's right he was he was. That was a stand up thing at the time to do to make sure your mistresses were paid. They were taking care of kids. Were taken care of when they were done dating. He made sure they got married to somebody. Reputable who could take care of them. Good people so in that regard standup guy so he is having all these affairs that resulted in several children. Like I said But the most interesting out of these he's tens of affairs was by far his relationship with Paulina for a now. Pauline husband actually brought her along on this campaign. The which you weren't allowed to do so. She was disguised in uniform and she was undetected amongst all these guys for fifty four days which is impressive. That is now Napoleon's in Egypt so they roll up and go to Alexandria where he's hanging out and the police finds out that there's an officer's wife in tow. So he reacts by going like. Hey Pauline stay here in Egypt with me while your husband goes back to France on this mission. I'm sending him on date so how Goes on this mission. He gets back. Haven Pauline get divorced like immediately and Pauline earned the nickname cleopatra from the scandal. The episodes and now a word from our sponsors back to the show so Josephine. Napoleon eventually meet up but their marriage marriage was short-lived. Unfortunately as Emperor Napoleon had to be concerned about producing an heir to the Throne Josephine for whatever reason introducing her. She couldn't get pregnant she was infertile. She had a botched abortion when she was younger. She was under a lot of stress with this. Who knows but she? She couldn't and get pregnant in Napoleon's careers best interest the couple decided to divorce so he could remarry and provide a shoe. Sounds like Napoleon tied to move they were org however both really broken up about it and they cried during the doors. Proceedings and Josephine was very dutiful about the whole thing. Like she's recorded. You're saying with the permission of my dear an August husband. I declare that no longer preserving any hope of having children to satisfy the political need for an Air Erin France I proudly offer him the greatest proof of love and devotion ever given to a husband on this earth and pulling himself was devoted to her for the rest of her life and he allowed her to keep her very much beloved living quarters that Chateau and she continued to have have a nice life for the most part when he found out she died some years later when he was in exile and he was remarried and all that he locked himself in his bedroom for two days and wouldn't come out and when he died years and years and years later supposedly the very last thing he said was her name. He said just being I I think he really loved her Rosebud. Joseph e need drops the snow an appalling ended up remarrying marie-antoinette's great niece the nineteen year old Austrian. Marie Louise and she wasn't too pleased with the arrangement. Considering during her great aunt had her head lopped off in France and Napoleon had been leading big ass military campaigns against her country for years and years. So Marie Louise said and I quote just just to see the man would be the worst form of torture so not stoked on Napoleon. But she doesn't really have a choice so she now she gets her that all she was. Yeah difference it does matter like sorry. Well sorry not sorry there. It wasn't all that bad though. Fortunately for her. That's a rarity as far as arranged Rome heritage's go most of the time. They're not very pleasant but after their wedding. Napoleon seemed to grow on her a little bit. She wrote a letter to her father saying you know he loves me very much. I respond to his love sincerely really. There's something very fetching very eager about him. That is impossible to resist weird athletics on your dad throwing that out there now maybe. I don't think it's that graphic graphic loves me very much. I respond to his love sincerely so I really do like I. There is something very fetching and very eager about him that it's impossible to resist Seattle bike gutter because the chef probably most people. Oh I think times like right with that really totally mean letters were very passionate really took their time. It's not like yeah all this was gonna be something that you had to send out. They were going to get it in six weeks. It's like you're actually absolutely put a lot of ha ha. I would imagine it would be something more. Because of the way it wasn't a quick text message it would be something like that is amused me. Far greater than any parlance that has ever been uttered to this time flowery flowery language through unfortunately for Napoleon and likely fortunate for the rest of Europe. Things started falling apart around this time that he did remarry which was like eighteen. O Seven eighteen tennis Portugal Spain called Britain. Like Hey I know you guys are sick of this shit as we are right..

Emperor Napoleon Hitler Europe Josephine US Stalin Bill Max Hastings The Wall Street Journal Britain rob Pauline Marie Louise Baron Day Koeppen Seattle Paulina Creel Polian Harriet France
"napoleon" Discussed on The Dirty Bits

The Dirty Bits

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"napoleon" Discussed on The Dirty Bits

"PODCASTS shoutouts as well as coming attractions ooh exciting. So today we're talking about Napoleon Bonaparte apart who's hugely obscure. Nobody has ever heard of funny enough. I know very little about Polian. Never interested me so all I know is that he wasn't actually really that short and that he was dictator for a while in France. That's about it. Those are both true things. He wasn't that Short. He was average height. Yeah he was like five seven at the time that was like your average guy. Now that's a little bit shorter. I think five ten is average version so Napoleon Bonaparte Bonaparte. You was actually an Italian guy. Who got his start in the French military and worked his way up through the ranks during the French revolution until they ceased power as emperor of the entire country music? He was then after that he took over a good chunk of the rest of Europe until it collapsed in eighteen. Fifteen a lot of people already know he was pretty big important controversial a military guy. A lot of people already know he had a reputation for being into some weird sexual. She has no no. You didn't okay. Well you may also not know is he may have been the original Fedora wearing self-proclaimed nice guy with a massive chip on his shoulder. Those guys kind of the VIBE. I was getting getting reading a shit. What kind of a deal? I don't know a lot of disdain towards women. We'll find out more now like we were talking about. He's actually an Italian talion guy. He was born on a little island in the Mediterranean called Corsica and he was a big time nationalist who wanted an independent Corsica from France. Funny enough off. He was so into Corsica before he decided to take over the European continent he actually penned. A history of the island is a romance novel before he decided that writer. Life was not for him now. His family was minor nobility which meant their financial situation wasn't too shabby and therefore Napoleon had more opportunities than many people that were born on the island. So they were. The kings of Corsica is doing. They were doing pretty well. Fish while upon video total big fish small pond kind of a thing. Napoleon was supposedly a sweetheart until he turned two years. There's old which is when his mom brought the hammer down. He was really hyper so she exercise some firm discipline while lavishing affection and attention on his brother. Why would they do this so great? He wasn't Napoleon. Apparently okay. That's all it took. This may have been the start of his famous Napoleon complex because he responded by becoming more more aggressive and more approval seeking he even once said the future. Destiny of the child is always the work of the mother. Math at that ain't the truth on what is so. He's nine years old and he goes to school. In France eventually goes to military school on a scholarship after that now being from the island Corsica he only spoke. Doc Corsican and Italian and didn't start learning French until he was ten and despite becoming fluent language he had a really heavy accent and he couldn't spell. Oh Shit so the other kids would just bully him relentlessly and this only contributed to his dushi tendencies. So moral of the story. Don't bully the arrogant weird kid kid because next thing you know he'll start conquering her up. In the we have an emperor again he was also a great student. One Guy who did his examination said Napoleon and I quote has always always been distinguished for his application mathematics. He's fairly well acquainted with history and geography. The boy would make an excellent sailor so he goes to military Harry School and to his credit he finishes two years worth of work in one year because his finances were dramatically decreased. When his dad passed away Napoleon was in the military? A great time for ambitious kind of people. French Revolution was happening in full force opportunities for advancement those damn birds scooters. They're fucking everywhere. ooh Bit to ride one of those speakers. Conquer Europe things are kind of in the gutter. Napoleon becomes a war hero and general eventually cleans up these big ass wins against Russia Austria and the Holy Roman Empire until he becomes emperor France in his control over just about everything else also on the continent to huges profited from the chaos. Right he is. He's an opportunist really what I found really interesting about his rise to power is he didn't study his predecessors assessors he straight up just said just give me lucky generals because that means they're seeing an opportunity and they're going for it about two one on my team lucky generals which is agree point to bring up if you ever have the experience required for a job but not a degree ask for the dirty bits Polian got to set the scene and I got a paint a picture here of the sky because you know the whole point of the show we gotta Fedora Wary of her and his attitudes towards women and sex from what they gathered. Go Way back to his inferior already complexes from childhood he also may have had one foot in the closet. There's nothing definitively proven but Napoleon did say say that. Whenever he saw a good looking dude he would feel something? This is a quote I in the loins and then in another place I will leave on named talking about is is but that was what I was asked zooming. He had also been known for chastising. A classmate for being gained school while at the same time. Being on really good terms is with the gay deputy who ruled France while he was gone. So you combine now with how awkward misogynistic he seemed you might start to think. Maybe he was trying to keep his sexuality under under APPs or is this more English propaganda Austrian propaganda. This is more like directly from the source like quotes observations of those next next to him. That's why it's like security. Maybe statistics alone suggests the vast majority of people are on a sliding scale as far as gender preference goes so I'm assuming he was probably by whatever his sexuality was he was misogynistic and awkward. Never Either Germain Day style once asked. It's no Polian who he considered the best kind of woman. You responded she who has the most children because women were machines for making babies. WHOA quite the quote? Donald Trump tweet. Yeah and also pissed them off in regards to how involved women were during the French Revolution in his mind. Women didn't belong in the streets protesting getting getting shit done. They belonged in as he said the seclusion of the home while he was not a shy man he also believed that men always the final say when it came to marital rates. So I'm assuming he wasn't friends with Olympic Day Gouzer Mary Shelley probably not and as far as him. Being Awkward Goes Nineteenth Century French rider stall once wrote when a lady was announced he would request her without looking up from his work table to go and wait for him in bed later with a candle stick in his hand he would show her out of the bedroom and then promptly go back to his table to continue reading correcting and signing those unless decrees the essential part of the rendezvous had not lasted three minutes to dismiss these gallant visitors after a mere three minutes of his time to go on signing decrees and often without so much as in buckling his sword struck these ladies as an outrageous procedure mechanical right. It seems. He's very mechanical. Like he was just kind of like getting get out. You know it was route like to clean out his nose. Totally blow the ultimate bureaucrat. I feel like that is that the ultimate bureaucrat is the ultimate bureaucrat. Just like getting bogged down under the paperwork. I feel like he would have had them. Sign a release in an NDA before you sleep. What's Napoleon you gotta go down to the HR and get four five dash see one? He likes to know they did a bunch of paperwork. I did you fill out form. Cute ash one. Five nine eight Jess triplicate. Oh how did you save the pink copy for your records scares me filing system. So Napoleon lost his virginity when he was eat teen at the famed Palais royal a former royal palace. That sounds like it was turned into the Moulin Rouge Allen Nicole Kidman Crazy parties debauchery Galore and he was so fucking awkward. He went up to one of the prostitutes and was like damn. It's cold out tonight. I am so cold. Are you cold. No now that's good. So where'd you get your address. How'd you come to find yourself in Paris? How did you lose your virginity? See I was GonNa say normal questions will awkward up until that last one. That's Oughta beaten you prostitute right. You know it's like going. It's the same thing as like going up to your cashier and starting to chat them up. It's like I'm here for business. Let's go along so she's like doing this or not. Basically like she gets tired of beating around the Bush so they have sex and the next morning he writes about it in his journal. Like you mentioned. It was very mechanical. And he basically said had the sex not great gonNA keep trying like it was the science experimental way weird and supposedly. He didn't have a whole lot of luck in that arena until he met the woman who would become his wife Josephine Day Baron and they began their famous passionate and by all standards extremely unhealthy relationship shortly thereafter. The excited to hear about this. It's this is good stuff when these to get married Napoleon's twenty-six and she's a thirty two year old widow with a couple of kids that it seems like an odd pair. What was he like Emperor of fresh? Yeah he's like he's up there in the ranks this point. He's he's big big potatoes now. Josephine's husband had been executed excuted during the French Revolution. And she was savvy enough to get out of prison the hopeless some friends and in front of Napoleon because she was great at utilizing her connections. That's how how she made her way throughout life was just who she knew and making friends and getting her. She was very calculated very meticulous with everything. Good pair go calculating she was. I don't know that she was so mechanical but they they are kind of pot is we'll see over so biographer Andrea Steward. wrote in the rose of Martinique sneak a life of Napoleon's Josephine that she changed her appearance incessantly. Giving her lover's the illusion of infinite variety. She also understood the importance of the settings of her romantic encounters. She paid meticulous attention to the design of her bedrooms evident. The Rue sheltering and in later palaces multiplied supplied the images of their love and created the illusion of an orgy sexy so the couple finally meet and she introduces herself. Like hi I'm marie-josephe Rose Tauscher Deloitte. Rg but I just go by rose. It's such a pleasure to finally meet. You have heard so much about you and Polian goes. Your name is rose. Does I hate it. I'm calling you Josephine. From that moment on she went by Josephine. She's like okay. Feed it is just just a few days after their wedding. Quick skips parts of their. So they get married you get married and just a few days. After her wedding Napoleon Ryan leaves on a campaign. Now are awkward little scam. Napoleon had finally had his sexual awakening the much more experienced unlikely. Excellent Lover Lover Josephine. She probably was. She had a past as being a mistress. Yeah she knew she was doing bed. She's really good at it. Symposiums finally enjoying being sex. Good for him. I'm happy.

Napoleon Napoleon Bonaparte Bonaparte Polian Corsica France Josephine Day Baron Europe Napoleon Ryan Gouzer Mary Shelley Donald Trump Harry School Doc Corsican Mediterranean Paris Rose Tauscher Deloitte Nicole Kidman
2 Things to Do Today to Grow as a Leader

Digital Leadership with Brandon Cox

04:55 min | 1 year ago

2 Things to Do Today to Grow as a Leader

"Changed the game for you and your organization, and the people that you lead over the long haul case. So here they are rapid fire. One after another the first one is today. You can expand your knowledge today. You can expand your knowledge the bottom line is I've never seen a leader excel to greatness or lead an organization to greatness or make a significant impact on the world who was completely self absorbed every leader, I know that's ever been affective was a learner. And a listener they read things they listen to things they took things in. And so a lot of times I come across some. One is how can I make my life better? And I'll say something like well, have you checked out this book, I'm not really a reader, and so often I just want to sort of level this truth become a reader become a reader. I wasn't always a reader. You. Don't think you're a reader, but you gotta give it a shot because without reading you're missing out on so much knowledge. But even if we're not talking about sitting down and flipping open a book and reading page after page, there are other ways to to learn to take in that you can take advantage of today. The the big point is Houston to be feeding your mind with something that's not up there yet. And so you can expand your knowledge by listening to podcasts. K expand your knowledge by subscribing to YouTube channels expand your knowledge by taking an online course expand your knowledge by exposing yourself to information that you haven't had before. And I wanna especially say, what is in rich my life, deeply and expand. Did my own capacity for leadership is to always look for sources of knowledge that are written and created by people who sort of our head of me in my particular field of interest and passion. So if I want to know how to lead a church better. I need to read books by other pastures who have led churches and are now sharing knowledge, I need to read that I wanna read people who have done really well in business people who've done really well in their lives. I wanna read people that challenge my mind in terms of how I think about people and relationships so here lately, I've been reading a books by dean Grozny, OSI, Napoleon hill Bernabei Brown. John Maxwell, Robert Schuler read books by people that I don't necessarily agree with all the way. And it's funny. How when I mentioned an author's name some listeners go he reads him. I can't believe he does that. But the fact is you need to be willing to read things written by people that are just. Outside of your comfort zone that they don't necessarily line up perfectly with your exact perspective because then you get the small world view. So you can expand your knowledge today. In fact, I wanna give you a tip for that. I think you should go to YouTube and find the shows and the channels that are produced by people that you tend to learn from just a little while ago. I was listening to a YouTube show by Ed my let you can go look him up. He's phenomenal. He's a tremendous motivator and leader business guy, and Ed was sharing things that inspired me that made me think about life in ways I hadn't thought about before. So I just watches YouTube videos. They're compelling easy to watch their entertaining, very educational. So expand your knowledge if you don't expand your knowledge, you're done if you stopped listening and stop reading and stopped. Feeding your mind you're at the limit your the limits of you want to. Spain your capacity you've got expand your knowledge K. Here's a second thing challenge. Your beliefs challenge, your belief, so expand expand your knowledge and challenge your beliefs. And I'm not talking about changing what you believe about. God. I'm not talking about changing what you believe theologically. I'm talking more about those limiting beliefs that hold us back. So those of us who struggle with the scarcity mindset, or we struggle with fear, or we share it with ourselves a lot of self defeating thoughts. We we believe in repeat and rehearse lies. And limitations about ourselves. I'll never be good at that. I'll never be able to do that. I'll never be as cool as that guy. I'll never be as as great of a leaders him or her those are the kinds of beliefs that shape, our actions that we need to challenge gay because out of our beliefs we act out of our actions come the habits that shape our lives and our destinies K so challenge. Believes ask yourself. What am I believing? That is limiting me and holding me back. Sometimes my limiting beliefs are the lid on my leadership, and I need to punch through those and knock them down with some big truth in order to go on further. So challenge your

Youtube Robert Schuler ED OSI Spain Napoleon Hill Bernabei Brown Houston Dean Grozny John Maxwell
Notre Dame, Notre Dame Cathedral And Paris discussed on 790 KABC Programming

790 KABC Programming

09:38 min | 1 year ago

Notre Dame, Notre Dame Cathedral And Paris discussed on 790 KABC Programming

"Begin with the big news out of France. The burning of the Notre Dame cathedral. Their lead. The outer structure was indeed saved according to French fire services Sky News says flames broke out at the twelfth century building on Monday evening, quickly devastating this fire and roof and sending plumes of smoke into the sky. One fire was serious firefighter was seriously injured local media say police were treating the blaze as an accident. French president Emmanuel Macron's and he was so sad tonight to see this part of us all burn declared, a national emergency speaking from the scene in Paris express, sympathy with Catholics around the world following the terrible tragedy. But added that the worst had been avoided, and then he vowed to launch an international fundraising campaign, for instance, minister originally warned that the four hundred firefighters scrambled to the scene would not be enough to save the cathedral. But a junior minister from the department later said they were more optimistic that the cathedral itself could be spared. A French firefighter official confirmed that Notre Dame structure and two towers had indeed been saved from total destruction Prime Minister Theresa may said her thoughts with the people of France tonight. And with the emergency services are fighting the terrible blades, the video of it was just. Astonishing and shocking the area where the spire once was was still burning with sparks falling from the cathedral vaulted ceiling as of Monday night, people outside were singing hymns and gasping as they watch much of the much of the cathedral burned to the ground. The Paris mayor and had although urged the public to respect the security perimeter around the cathedral while firefighters tackled. The terrible blaze added that the areas close to the scene were evacuated. Rich Lowry over at national review has a good review about what exactly Notre dominant means. Does Notre Dame stands for so many qualities that we now lack patients and staying power the cultivation of beauty a deep religious faith, the cultural confidence and ambition to build a timeless monument of our civilization that the collapse of inspire is almost too much to bear the great novelist. Victor Hugo who did so much provide interest in the cathedral when it was in disrepair in the nineteen th century wrote. How quote every surface every stone of this. Venerable pile is a page of the history, not only of the country, but of science and art work of generations completed across three centuries in triumph over considerable arc. Conceptual and logistical challenges at arose at the original site of a pagan temple thousands of tons of stone has to be transported from outside Paris, one ox-cart or barge at a time. So cheated soaring height and hold up at ceiling and walls relied on the architectural innovations of the rib vaults and the flying buttress France, built eighty cathedrals in five hundred large churches across this period says rich lower there's only one at Notre Dame of Paris gothic jewel who's towers prior. To the advent of the Eiffel tower the tallest structure in the city. It is or one hates to think was torn by what are culturally significant artifacts in their own, right. The statutory meant to illustrate the story of the bible and to all worshippers couldn't read the stained glass windows, that took ingenuity to embed in stone, walls and are themselves are tick Marvel's the Oregon with more than eight thousand pipes the bells with their names, including the largest masterpiece. Emmanuel dating back to the fifteenth century and recast in sixteen eighty one not to mention the religious relics. That means so much to the Catholic faithful it has been the of countless processions in services to petition and thank God on behalf of the French nation. It is where less is. Marriages and funerals occurred or Napoleon crowned himself emperor or Charles de Gaulle attended a mass to celebrate the liberation of Paris in nineteen forty four riflefire echoing outside it's revived the rampages of iconoclastic huge knots in the sixteenth century the depredation of radicals during the French revolution into the eighteenth century. They transformed it into a friend to the cult of reason used it. As a warehouse in wanted to melt down the bells and incidental damage during two world wars in the twentieth century all the while at accumulated layers in history. And meaning it's great advocate Hugo author of the famous Hunchback of Notre Dame wrote of how the greatest productions of architecture are not so much work of individuals as a community. I rather the offspring of a nation's labor than the outcome of individual genius that a positive a whole people the heaped up treasurer of centuries, the residual left by successive evaporation of human society in a word a species of formations each wave of time leaves it's coating of Luhya alluvial each race deposits layers on the monuments, each individual contribute to stone to it. And that of course is exactly right is amazing at tweeted something out that I thought frankly was. Was really uncontroversial. I tweeted out that Notre Dom was a was a totem to western civilization and of western civilization, and people that very upset with this particularly a lot of folks on the left were very upset with this. I tweeted out if we wish to uphold the beauty and profundity of the Notre Dame cathedral means reefa millions ourselves with the philosophy and religious principles that built it means reefa. Millions ref- Amelia rising ourselves with the precepts of Catholicism with western history with what Catholicism was without contributed to the west. And all this stuff seems deeply important to me this became very controversial lot of folks on the left were very upset with me for suggesting this. They said why can't we just appreciate it just as a piece of art? You can appreciate it. However you want, but if you want to know why so many people in the west were deeply affected by the burning of Notre Dom. It wasn't just because it was icon. Ick is because Notre Dame holds deeper meaning because it is a totem of a chain of history that culminates in the modern west. They can see the sort of sort of anodyne version of mourning for the cathedral from Ilhan, mar she tweeted out art and architecture have unique ability to help us connect across our differences and bring people together and important ways. Thinking of the people of Paris in praying for every first responder trying to save this wonder. Again, it's fine to look at Notre Dame is just art and architecture, but it has deeper resonance than that. And that was the point that I was making is that the residents of Notre nam is about the faith that inspired. Notre and listen, this is coming from a Jew this coming for an orthodox Jew house. So important to remember then note for Dom is again a historical monument to the chain of history of which we are apart and Ronin entire book about this. My book the right side of history talks about this chain of history Judeo Christian history of the west and how Judaism and Christianity combined with Greek reason in play in intention created the world in which we live. I want to read a section from the talking about the period during which Notre Dame was built Notre Dame. Of course was built during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Took a couple of centuries to complete which in and of itself. Is an amazing testament to the human mind ends of the power of the eternal to inspire the human mind. Because after all why plant the tree if you're not going to get to sit in its shade. Why build a building if you know that you're not gonna get completed because our task is not to complete the building. Our task is to join in the building of that structure in the first place. Here's what I talk about in my book with regard to this period in western history. From the fall of Rome through the twelfth century. Christianity would spread from its base in the Italian peninsula in the British Isles, France, Germany, and eventually the Nordic countries as well. Well, understand had posited. A great divide between the city of God. In the city of van. The Catholic church was quite active in the city of man, the church receive tithes from Christians the Continente over had its own ecclesiastical courts by the tenth century, the church was the single largest landowner in western Europe kings found their legitimacy through the conduit of the church and battles with the church to expand their own power. Holy Roman Emperor. Henry the fourth walk barefoot in the snow earn back the approval of pope, Gregory the seventh and within seconds of England eleven thirty three to eleven eighty nine had himself flogged in order to win back. The. Approval of his Christian population. After accidents ordering the death of archbishop Thomas Becket popular history maintains that this period represents the dark ages, but that's simply inaccurate progress. Continued as Christianity spread the monastic system centralized learning in monasteries where priests nuns devoted themselves with Sediq pursuit of divine understanding in educational terms this devotion revolved around scripture. The Benedictine monks. For example, lived under the rules created by Saint Benedictine for eighty two five forty seven a set of orders regarding the hierarchy of monasteries the behavior by which to abide and the requirements of work the arts thrived in the monastic system manuscripts were preserved by monks devoted to writing new copies and beautifying them in the monastic system. The liberal arts taught by the Greeks and the Romans as championed by Cicero and Seneca among others survived albeit in Spiritualized form gusted himself, despite his distaste for paganism suggested that the liberal arts education could be hijacked for service to God. I'll Guston likened such cultural appropriation to the Jews taking gold during the biblical exodus. These liberal arts were categorized by the philosopher both into the famous Quadra, verion music, arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy and trivia, grammar rhetoric and logic. Meanwhile, the middle ages saw technological revolution. In agriculture, the rise of commerce institution of new forms of art ranging from polyphonic music to gothic architecture. Notre Dame would be a perfect example of gothic architecture. It also saw new developments in the art of war with technology developments that would allow the west to defeat its enemies in the course of coming centuries while many history historians tout the power of Islamic civilization during this time period and Islam civilization did thrive on the Arabian peninsula, particularly when his Llamas civilization came up against western civilization. At the battle of tours Islamic forces were soundly defeated by the eighth century. Christian leaders were crusading against enslavement, except notably for the enslavement of Muslim war. Captives monasteries were engaging in proto capitalism as well. Furthermore, the Catholic church was responsible for learning and teaching virtually all literacy sprang from honest, Aries still the modern world could not have been created. Under these circumstances. But I write my book faith provided individual moral purpose faith provided collective moral purpose, but while individual capacity was bolstered by the doctrinal belief in free will and the value of work reason had been made secondary to faith. Well, collective capacity was bolstered by the presence of a strong social fabric. The all encompassing. Power of the Catholic church and the rule of monarchs that that individual choice. It was heavily circumscribed even education had been radically reoriented toward the church ultra knowledge lay in the bible. The liberal arts were only useful so far as they bolstered the biblical story for science and democracy. Take hold in the west reason would have to be elevated once more

Notre Dame Notre Dame Cathedral Paris France Notre Dom Catholic Church Victor Hugo Notre Nam Sky News Rich Lowry Eiffel Tower Emmanuel Macron National Review Prime Minister Official Napoleon Theresa
"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Napoleon's troops in Syria in Haiti once again, his soldiers are dying by the thousands, this time of typhus dysentery and diphtheria estimates put the French at well over a hundred thousand who died of disease, and yet we have a growing anti vaccination movement today. Fucking history turns out it's important to know some shit about why do we have vaccinations antibac- Sers? So we don't die of shit like diptheria you fucking emotionally thinking idiot. God, dammit, okay. On September seven to eighteen twelve the French emperor overseas. The bloodiest battle of the Russian campaign at the battle of Borodino not far from Moscow. The village aboard. Zito was the best place for the Russian army to make their stand. They weren't going to lose. Moscow without a fight. When the smoke cleared the losses on both sides were immense Russian lost around forty thousand troops while the French loss in estimated thirty to forty five thousand thirty hundred thousand most historians put the official number at around seventy thousand dead in just one battle by September fourteenth. Napoleon watched the Russians burn three quarters of their own city of Moscow to make sure the French didn't have enough food or supplies that they needed to stick around. Bottom part was forced to retreat around twenty one to twenty three thousand soldiers think about how many he had brought despite the French empire's, heavy losses. He quickly. Recruited more men now fought Germany is not done lose a couple hundred thousand dudes, but whatever Malecki Biden several battles were fought between French forces in an allied army that would grow to over three hundred sixty thousand men not to be outdone by the battle aboard Dino the battle of left's vague Lipsey in Germany, also known as the battle of nations would go on to be the bloodiest battle in European history until World War One nearly six hundred thousand. Soldiers are involved. Well, over half a million men fighting ends up with between eighty and one hundred twenty seven thousand total casualties over two thousand artillery weapons fired over two hundred thousand rounds of ammunition. Napoleon's forces had thirty eight thousand men killed or wounded and another fifteen thousand were captured this loss really put a dent in Napoleon's invincible, God king, self-described spiritual successor to Charlemagne persona might soon the fight. He would make its way back to France and Napoleon I reign as emperor would come to. And you can't propaganda your way out of getting your ass kicked in your own country. Right. A March thirty eighteen fourteen the allied armies pushing a poll in all the way back to Paris within a week. And I six and the pulling has forced to abdicate his throne. He is exiled to Elba. This part of the story makes no fucking sense to me on any level. He's exiled to Elba in island in the Mediterranean. Just six miles off the coast of Tuscany south of France. Right. Remarkably napoleon. Able to negotiate his own terms his own surrender terms, he himself chooses Elba. And he's supposed to be paid two million francs annually and be given a guard of four hundred men what a great way to get kicked out of your country. Like, I would love to lose like that. But that's the best way to lose ever. Dan. We're kicking you out Idaho. All right son of a bitch. We're we're tired of it. Tired of shit. So charity for this. I can't wait to see you weep. We're going to send you to Hawaii where we're going to force you to make do with about two million dollars a year and just to have a staff of a few hundred so take that enjoy time on the beach with all.

Napoleon Moscow Elba France Russian army typhus Elba in island Germany Haiti Zito Paris Borodino Syria official Charlemagne Idaho Malecki Biden Hawaii Mediterranean
"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Sneak onto the battlefield at night and recover used cannonballs. Right. The bigger the canon, though, the more extra money to get France would eventually abandon the siege. Head back to Egypt. This would be Napoleon's first major land defeat. I mean, obviously, the British kicked his ass say hands up having to leave many of his sick and wounded on them behind an Oscar and legend has on the way back to Joffe. He may have also decided to poison other sick and wounded soldiers right there. These guys are kind of fucking slowing us down. Let's say let's poisoning. We can't history not clear on whether Bonaparte had his troops poison secretly. Or if the volunteer to drink the poison, I hardly doubt that or even if there was poisoned because history is tricky bastard when you deal with propagandists and then Napoleon returns to Egypt as if he had won the battles. Right. He knew he knew how to spin shit. He spoke of only victory in the Middle East. You know, many French citizens. They bought his words when you travel back to France, many French were enthralled by the young general. He brought his cool antiquities treasures. You know, it was like his mythical trip to this land of pyramids and the junction God's later. Bonaparte wouldn't meet his would admit gives me his defeat and author was a big disappointment and an important loss. He later say if I had not been defeated knocker, I would have conquered all of the east during his time around the plague at least according to legend, and again, it's hard to tell what's lead. And what's not in the story, but supposedly Napoleon showed some serious fearlessness to his troops. Or I guess ignorance at a medical hospital in Syria, he declared that the cause of the play was fear, and that the cure was courage. He demonstrated his courage by picking up a dead soldier from the floor a soldier who was covered in busted open play boils. And he carried him to a more suitable rest in place. You know, it's not about fine. Dude. He did know how to inspire. He also clearly did not know dick about the plague or who had never done that when Napoleon returned to Egypt. He learned that France was in political chaos. The French revolution was about to hand him the keys to the castle. Now in Baltimore. Part knew it problem was he couldn't get his army home without his guy day of ships fucking chips. So he just snuck away by himself. He didn't tell us army or even replacement officer. He was going to be leaving and heading back to Europe didn't even tell his mistress. A letter in just hop boat back to France. And if you're wondering what happened to the French army left behind they would eventually be brought back to France by the British army after defeat in eighteen o one. Back in France is by ditching his army in Egypt Napoleon. He's received as a hero. He's a legend super famous has plays. And paintings commissioned about his victories. It doesn't really talk about his losses. You know? He skips over leaving a troops. That whole part of the story. Focuses on the sports that are highlights is folks on a dunk, not not turnovers operation, God king almost complete after sneaky returned to Paris to polling helps plan a bloodless military coup to replace the existing French directed directory now in charge. It will go down as the coup of eighteen bream Meer or Bri Bryner, excuse me. By by mayor being a month in a French counter system extending from October twenty two to November twentieth. A fringe calendar system the Napoleon would soon replace actually with the one we use. Now bought apart was immensely popular. He also had his popular brothers Lucian and Joseph help him take over France bought parts plan was to get the directory to quit to both houses of the French legislature. The council of the ancients council the five hundred to make a new constitution declaring him in charge..

Napoleon Egypt France French army Bonaparte Middle East British army canon Oscar Joffe Bri Bryner Paris Syria Lucian Europe Baltimore Joseph officer
"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Then we fight thousands of news don't care if they live or die. And now you want us to stop celebrating and take some skin off our Dicks. No, one of the British hit you you're an asshole. On august. I seventeen ninety eight Napoleon is men would end up fighting a more formidable opponent than the costing the stupid words in the Mamelukes. In the Egyptian desert. They would actually end up going head to head with none other than hulk HOGAN ho committee is running wild brother deploying was like those that mean wholesome in. Yeah. And then HOGAN body, slam some knowledge on him. He was like I promised each and every Hoke ammoniac when I went to that great battlefield in the sky. I would bring the Toby you whiff title with me brother an opponent. What does is W w leaf and hope was like negativity and hulkamania two things don't go together. Brother. What you do when ho Khameini destroys who you, and that's not sense. But that was fun. That pumped me up hulkamania. Always gives me the legendary British Admiral Horatio Nelson had been hunting Napoleon. So much better though, if it was a time traveling HOGAN, but this, but this is still pretty good in the summer of seventeen thousand eight but hunt him down there. He didn't want. You know, this is not going to let the French fuck up their trade routes and on August first. He finds the poll in the battle of the Nile would be very one sided fight between the French and the British. It would go down as the most decisive victory up until that point and European naval history. Nelson Pyle drive Napoleon's fleet into fucking oblivion and stranded Bonaparte and his men in Egypt. Each side started off with thirteen ships and the British ended up with a twenty two ships by the end, the French lost nine thousand men and all their ships were either captured or destroyed the British suffered only roughly, you know, two hundred to nine hundred dead on the source. I mean just a blowout victory. The battle also caused a pull in little Malta the British kicked him the fuck out of the islands now controlled the Mediterranean which limited Francis ability to retaliate against UK. The loss of the battle of the Nile was huge loss from Polian. Historians agree that. The Abbott Khirbet was a poor place for him to have the French fleet. Lay anchor for three months friendships had remained exposed in the shallow waters of the poorly-guarded port. The French Admiral in charge fleet knew that wanted to move to deeper and safer waters. But bought part insisted they stay to crush Napoleon Admiral Nelson throughout the gentleman's rules of warfare at sea instead of lining up ships and firing until once I gave up the British Admiral surrounded the anchored ships and pummeled them from all sides Napoleon had has ships can is pointed towards the sea. So when the British trickled around behind him, they're just sitting ducks a few stories of called this massacre Napoleon's Pearl Harbor at one point in the battle, the world's largest ship at the time, the French orient caught fire and literally exploded with a hundred and eighteen cannons. It when I can only assume was a shit ton of gunpowder on board. The ship's explosion was supposedly heard to fifty miles away. Pretty safe to say, none of those soldiers and sailors had ever heard noise that loud before despite this terrible. Lost propagandists Napoleon was able to spend the battle in his favor. Despite losing his ship Bonaparte still had thousands of troops. And he also still had the one hundred sixty seven French scientists and scholars and artists. He'd actually brought to Egypt to study gypsum culture. And said he wasn't going anywhere. He just decided this week the best situation, and he founds the Egyptian scientific institute named himself ice, president the friendship democrat artists. He brought over work tirelessly to sketch paint record. Discover everything they could about the ancient world of Egypt. Bonaparte himself was obsessed with the history of Egypt, and he turned being stranded into a great excuse to explore his creativity. So much to explore like the great pyramid..

Bonaparte Napoleon Horatio Nelson Egypt Nile Mamelukes ho Khameini Toby Egyptian scientific institute Abbott Khirbet Malta president UK Polian Mediterranean Francis three months
"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Now, let's get to Egypt always hungry for advancement glory and fucking with the British Napoleon sets his sights on Egypt's his mission is to block British trade routes to India via the Nile and to raise funds by plundering, the mythical lands and all their treasures the land of the pharaohs Bonaparte was also interested in the mysteries and secrets of Egypt. He saw it as a way to strengthen his legend. Right. His God king destiny. He said Europe is a mole hill. There were never great empires or revolutions except in orienting right in this guy is fast. Thousand of the great, Hugh, ags, ended a great, you know, kicked Asti to pew to the same thing and Geno seventeen nine eight Napoleon on his way to Egypt decides to sack little island nation of Malta give it to France. Most of that stage takes his day pretty small place without much loss of life on either side, he he takes over the capital city of love let I gotta make Malta someday. By the way, tiny island nation, the Mediterranean, beautiful less than half a million people total been inhabited since roughly six thousand BC's so much history. One of the smallest countries in the world. Also, one of the most densely populated less than one hundred twenty five square miles in size smallest island nation, by the way for random trivia, even I know we're getting a little off track for second. The island of na na do the Republic of no ru in the South Pacific, just over eight square miles less than twelve thousand people it's its own country. Morango tribute trivia on top of trivia, this little tiny island has the highest rated rate of obesity in the world ninety seven percent. Of the dudes. They're ninety three percent of the women are medically obese. So if your average sized, and you're frustrated you're not just getting checked out as much as you'd like to on the beach. Get your ass up. Get you has to do, and you could you could be Trump's model back to France after looking Molteni afternoon Napoleon continues to Egypt much like its hero Alexander. The great Bonaparte wanted to follow in his footsteps, right? What better way to do that than to conquer Alexandria? The city named after him with between thirty five thousand thirty eight thousand troops known as the army of the orient and an entire French fleet. Napoleon does just that he rise in Alexandria to find that. It's not actually Egyptians who are running Egypt right now. But Muslim warriors known as the Mameluke the Mamelukes Alexandra was taken with little resistance..

Egypt Napoleon Bonaparte Alexandria France na na Europe Malta Mamelukes Alexandra India Mediterranean Morango Hugh Asti Trump BC Geno South Pacific one hundred twenty five square ninety seven percent
"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Yes. So seventeen Ninety-three Bonaparte now twenty four year old officer in the French army sent to southern France in December to take back from the allied troops. The French port of LAN harbor the allies consisted that time of troops from Britain Spain Naples, Sicily Sardinia, French loyalists, the French army consisted of around thirty two thousand troops the allies had about twenty two thousand soldiers, plus thirty seven British ships, thirty two Spanish ships and a few others. And while young Napoleon was not the highest ranking officer when he arrived historians noted. It was obvious. He was the superior officer in terms of military, mental might some stories go as far as saying the other officers into lawn were completely inept compared to Napoleon. He began to lay out a strategy to retake the fort his superiors were initially skeptical of the plan until another. For more qualified officer came in looked at it. And basically said oh shit. Oh shit. This good this good. We work with this. Oh, give me a rock hard war Boehner right now. And they went with the police method in the enforce allied. Soldiers were killed at least ten of the British navy ships were destroyed while an anchor to save the rest of their fleet the allies retreated the French lost about two thousand soldiers in a number of their own ships. But they won they won the battle. Napoleon himself was wounded in the leg by a bayonet. But but victory again was his his plan worked and a little fame started his bread is him being the the hero of the day in this this battle, and I find it interesting that he he clearly didn't just plan the battle and then sit back and watch the fighting. I mean that doesn't happen. If you get wounded in leg with a bayonet. An unnamed sergeant of the Royal Irish Regiment, fighting on behalf of the British was the person who stabbed him dude was a musket lengths away. And since the polling didn't die that day. I'm guessing that do did sources don't say, but it's pretty easy to infer that game. It can you imagine having that life experience guy running at you in the heat a battle. There's muskets firing by the thousands cannons firing continually from the surrounding land from the ships.

Napoleon officer French army British navy Britain Spain Naples Bonaparte France Royal Irish Regiment Sicily Sardinia Boehner twenty four year
"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"For his kids. He put a lot of ambition and children who was his dream that his his kids will be recognized as nobles in the French system. Many years later when Napoleon was crowning himself. The first emperor of France had seen a millennium. He did say to his brother Joseph Bonaparte, if only our father could see us now. And he said probably some French equivalent of like, yeah, we did a, bro. Fucking shit, bro. I'll Carlo into Polian relationship was rocky the future, emperor, adored and admired his his mother. Oh, mother Latisha Latisha was born in August twenty four seventeen fifty also. And I got yo she was simple frugal in her taste devout and thoughts you help binder children to the life. Of course, IKA as a mother she was without equal. He said he praised her strength and toughness and said all of his success is from her Napoleon also oddly described his mom as not being the most physically attractive woman saying, quote, she had the head of a man on the body a woman. That's great. I'm sure mom loved that. That's exactly what every mother and just relax prove it. Every woman in general wants to hear you can't go wrong with compliment like that. My mother is a wonderful woman has a big immediate head of a man owns the body of the woman. She has a how you say butter face. It is God a place the hairy lumpy head of lumberjack. All's the body of a bikini model. She gave birth to eight children was actually pregnant thirteen times back. When medicine was was basically chanting in washing your hands and slap it on some leeches. Maybe that's how she got that man head or maybe Napoleon meant the mind of a mand. Maybe some kind of chauvinistic compliment back when nobody challenge chauvinism like many families John history, especially before the advent of birth control. The goal of the Bonaparte was the kick out as many kids as humanly possible keeping up with the Joneses used to involve just shoot now babies until your vagina waved. White flag. Teaser was champion birther her child bearing hips just pumped out Joseph in seventeen sixty eight Napoleon in seventeen sixty-nine Lucian in seventeen seventy five Lisa in seventeen seventy seven Louis in seventeen seventy eight Pauline seventeen eighty Caroline seventeen eighty two. And and Bob in seventeen eighty four knows it was Giral in seventeen ninety four. Napoleon's been is I nine years in Corsica do normal things you'd expect a a possible budding psychopath with the God complex to do bullying. His teachers crushing enemies declaring himself the first head of his family. And and and and I think it's safe to say that neighborhood pets may have steered clear this dude, I don't resource to say he was cruel to animals, but it feels like he was a guy who probably kicked dog or twos. A kit. And on the web, you'll find a lot of things talking about how he wasn't terribly fond of cats, which is actually not true his nephew who become Napoleon. The third was afraid of cats and over time this feline fear became attributed to Napoleon the first bucket telephone game. That's what happens never to get the same name Napoleon. Excel does mad mass as a kid who's a mathematical talents that Matha those math skills later. Help military strategizing he was considered domineering. Not a great trait for for a young boy. As a student, but awesome. Awesome trade for somebody with emperor ambitions, some of his if his teachers recommended that he joined the military throughout his early schooling. And that's exactly what would happen. Bonaparte began his military training at the age of eight after reading about Napoleon's earlier. It sounds like he he was practicing bayonet moves at recess while other kids were sticking gum into their desks. Little Napoleon was probably formulating kickball strategies using sons whose art of war of the world is is pretty lucky didn't have bombs and planes or the earth might look very different right now. We'd we'd have he would have just taken all over. We'd have flat Napoleon.

Napoleon Joseph Bonaparte Latisha Latisha France IKA Polian Joneses John Bob Corsica Giral Lucian Lisa Louis Pauline Caroline nine years
"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"napoleon" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"And then his father, a member of a noble Italian family, which I think is interesting I need know that about Napoleon the actually has a talion heritage as opposed to French really when you get down to his father remain on good terms with the French when he took over Corsica and Napoleon would describe his entrance into the world this way. Into Zia, by way of my models of Jonah, almost suffocated whom I v was twelve four time on my Moses bawdy Bozen, I did not die. My mother's nipple was placed in my mouth and is sold opponent, haughtily and flies. My mobile's. New. No. You didn't talk that. I talked it makes you feel happy. If he did he's that I was born in Corsica or as one when Corsica was perishing thirty thousand Frenchmen spewed onto our shores, drowning the throne of liberty and waves of blood the cries of the dying the groans of the oppressed, and tears of despair surrounded my cradle from the hour of my birth. No short on drama, this guy, all Napoleon drama pants on polio's parents Carlo and Latisha considered minor aristocrats. They own multiple homes address like silly hat wearing assholes which was customary at the time. They look like uncomfortable powder dolls the prep time for leaving the house back then must have been in saying multiple clothing layers wigs make up a lot of time spent in the mirror practicing, looking snooty and above everything Napoleon's parents look boozy, but they actually weren't that wealthy with eight kids that Bonaparte families struggled to keep up appearances the struggle helped developed Polian. Ideals about meritocracy. Let the past be open to talent. He would say the pinnacle of his power. I do love that thought America Crecy very hard to actually implement. But theoretically, I think the best way to run a country or run a business, right? Let each employment position be filled by the most talented applicant measure Napoleon actually did that. We'll look at that later. He seemed to go on to create more of a who has kiss my ass the hottest autocracy, but I like to. It's Corsica was an impoverished island nation. Well, before the French took over it's located in the Mediterranean between Italy and France with a population between one hundred and two hundred or one hundred thousand one hundred twenty thousand inhabitants court Corsicans had seen their fair share of invading armies, excuse me over the centuries from Romans and Moore's to Genoese, the core skins had fought many battles. And they'd won a lot of them. But France developed into one of the world's most modern armies and the Koreans were easily brought under the French flag in seventeen sixty nine again the year of Napoleon's birth prior to the French takeover. Corsica had enjoyed a brief fourteen years of independence after seceding from.

Napoleon Corsica Polian Zia France polio Corsicans Mediterranean America Bonaparte Italy Latisha Moore Carlo fourteen years
Super Bowl LIII Will Have Male Cheerleaders For the First Time Ever

WCBS Programming

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Super Bowl LIII Will Have Male Cheerleaders For the First Time Ever

"Later today, the first male cheerleaders and the NFL will be joining the LA Rams at the Super Bowl in Atlanta. We get that story from CBS news. Correspondent Mark strong. Super Bowl week is always the NFL's bid rob moments. This year the league's rooting for something new. Quinten Doronin Napoleon Jennings made history when they became cheerleaders for the Los Angeles. Rams the first men what made you think it's time for the guys to step up the whole world, especially in the world of entertainment and a place of being open. And if you can do the job

La Rams Quinten Doronin Napoleon Jenni NFL Mark Strong CBS Los Angeles Atlanta ROB
Italy's prosecco boom is leading to dramatic soil erosion, scientific report claims

Monocle 24: The Briefing

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Italy's prosecco boom is leading to dramatic soil erosion, scientific report claims

"Bubble trouble. As per second. Boom is blamed for soil erosion, so per second has sort of largely been clips in champagne and popularity it produce about five hundred million bottles per year to this new vineyards cropping up in the region. And the way that these been yours are constructed means that the rain foil causes a lot of soil erosion. So we studied by scientists in Pudeur shows that for everybody would have protected that's produced four point four kilograms of solids lost which is four hundred thousand tonnes each year and British drink his play an unwitting role in the problem. The producers consortium isn't happy and has called the report sensationalist as the. Region has grown grapes since Napoleon's time. But you know, maybe maybe don't have that extra gloss of per second. Lost. You had prosecutor, by the way recently. I think this weekend. Vargas. Raoul's there. Thank you very much for joining us here in the briefing. And finally on today's brokering Finland winters are often extremely cold. But meteorologists say the nation's Lapland region has produced Europe's coldest temperature this winter chilling, minus thirty eight point seven degrees celsius. There's get more on this with our man in Finland better Bortsov better. We both are finished. But I still had to explain how do the people in Lapland cope when it's almost my minus forty degrees. Well, the funny thing is they cope freely. Well, I mean, you just don't go outside for such a long period of time. And if you go you put on this. I'm not quite sure how to translate Bill key holler at Marcus. But the kind of overalls that you

Finland Lapland Boom Prosecutor Pudeur Vargas Raoul Bill Europe Four Hundred Thousand Tonnes Seven Degrees Celsius Four Kilograms Forty Degrees
Trump Offers Temporary Protections for ‘Dreamers’ in Exchange for Wall Funding

Dennis Prager

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Trump Offers Temporary Protections for ‘Dreamers’ in Exchange for Wall Funding

"Eight thousand protesters started their March at the invalid inva- Lada monument in Paris, which is home to Napoleon's tomb to remember the ten people killed in protests related traffic accidents since November seventeenth a federal agent. Set the takeover. Sears pension plans on January thirty first as Sears continues to work through its bankruptcy. A federal agency the pension benefit guarantee corporation of stepping in PBGC is poised to assume responsibility for the Sears pensions that cover over ninety thousand of its employees Sears had entered into a pension protection plan with them at two thousand sixteen. Now that agency estimates that the pension

Sears Napoleon Paris Pbgc
Judge rules against Trump's asylum restrictions

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Judge rules against Trump's asylum restrictions

"Full trial. The group says the measure violates federal law that allows application from people who enter the US at any point. The Justice department says the restriction is necessary to keep the asylum claim process orderly and to deter illegal border crossings, San Francisco, mayor London breed asking outgoing governor Jerry Brown to consider leniency and release her brother from prison. Napoleon breed was sentenced to forty four years on a manslaughter charge stemming from an armed robbery back in the year two thousand the chronicle reports the request sent by letter has raised questions as to whether it constitutes an improper attempt to influence the governor Napoleon Brita served less than half of his sentence. He pushed a woman out of a getaway car while they were on the Golden Gate Bridge after he robbed a diner in San Francisco. That woman

Napoleon Brita San Francisco Golden Gate Bridge Justice Department United States Jerry Brown London Forty Four Years
Bonus: More with Nice Peter and Epic Lloyd from the Epic Rap Battles

Talking Tech

13:56 min | 1 year ago

Bonus: More with Nice Peter and Epic Lloyd from the Epic Rap Battles

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. It's Jefferson Graham of USA today. Listen to the weekend edition of talking tech. Now, I really sat down with Peter chic off and Lloyd out list. Who are the guys who do the epic rap battles history videos YouTube to get like four billion us fourteen million subscribers series of spinning in NAFTA successful and just about two years ago. They took a break they've had it. And now they're arrested in the comeback with a new video that features Alon must taking on Mark Zuckerberg. I'd like to invite you to listen to more of our conversation. We ran the initial part yesterday. This is more of the extended chat talking about their favorite characters. How they got started and their cake on that seven year old kid who's making twenty two million dollars a year on YouTube, a have a listen to nice, Peter and epic Lloyd from the epic rap battles. To both of you have favorites that you've done over the years. Yeah. Who? I my favorite is an old one from season one. It's no Polian. Dynamite versus Napoleon Bonaparte. It's just it's memories for me. Because I think it's both of us that are strengths sort of Pete as like a more sort of nerdy settled character. Yeah. And I'm like, this giant French guy, and the beat was made by very old friend of ours who sort of very nostalgic of both Peten is this guy named Eddie from Milwaukee. I love his name is Eddy, I've beat so get a guy named Eddie. So that's my favorite. My favorite's the philosophers, we did eastern philosophers versus western philosophers. So it was Nietzsche's Socrates Voltaire versus sunsuits lot suit and Confucius, and we we decided that battle. There's a website that was made by some fans that has a little chat room minute. And I was in there one day just talking to them about suggestions. And we kinda came up with that together. And then we all sat down and tried to write it, and it was. Really hard. It was a, but we got there, and we had squabbling in between philosophers in their style. And they started fighting amongst themselves loss I do. And I liked the way it turned out a lot. So that's my favorite told everybody how you guys get started doing this. This is five years ago. Twenty ten is when we did the first battle. A Pete, and I met in nineteen ninety nine something like that we met in Chicago, we actually met freestyle rapping on a porch at a party amongst improvisers. Loyd was big in the imprompt community. I was nude the umbrella community in Chicago. And then Lloyd actually hired me Lloyd end his partners hired me and to do improv improv. I call it mission improbable, and we have a theater in Santa Monica called west side comedy. And at the time. It was just a touring improv group sorta like whose line is it anyway on the road, and we were expanding and bringing bringing on new towns people and people, and I just sort of clicked right away. And then we tore together for a couple years, and we do like, improv comedy shows like Iowa State community college at noon, and then the next day would be like Michigan state at ten to twenty five hundred people. So is this crazy experience, and we always kind of little songs and wrapped together here and there, and then yeah, it was made our way out to California. And I got my first. You remember the Emek? American emek. Not the I MAC, computer. Correct by maybe. Yes. Okay. So had I got an Email back, and I got a little pro tools inbox. And I was just starting to learn pro tools. Loyd had rap songs. I was working on acoustic songs, but Loyd had written these rap songs, and he had these beats by this guy named Eddie that that Milwaukee. Yeah. And we basically learn how to cord rap songs together. So we were in my apartment in Chicago in the closet. Loyd was in a vocal booth. And I was just like learning as we went. So he brought the music and the wraps. I brought the Emek and we figured it out. And that was also when we started learning how to edit together because mission improbable needed a new trailer. And I remember I got paid with the hard drive, and it was like a seventy two gig seventy two gig. I really needed pay. All edit this video for you guys can keep hard-drive afterwards. And I did. And I think I still have that hard drive. I wonder if anything's on it. So that that's how are. Partnership started. And then you made a video we made a video, but this was pre YouTube. This was all kinds of stuff. And then, you know, we we stayed in touch and stayed friends would move to LA state and Chicago, and then I came out LA to perform his theater and his wife's university LMU. Yeah. And then she owns a she owns it. Yeah. Octagon? Mrs loyola. She was a good activties director. So she put me essentially, and then I was writing sketches and music for different internet companies not doing that. Well, and Louis got an Email of people looking for talent to write and do stuff, and he recommended me. And I dish ind ended up being this YouTube company that I got a job at called maker studios and that ended up being the start of the YouTube revolution. And I was there. So you made it video with maker impulsive. I made all I made I wrote songs for makers while I was brought on as a songwriter. And then I was encouraged to develop series and stuff and experiment on my own and Lloyd came over and had this idea from a stage show where you take two celebrities, and they wrap out all I was like that would make a really good video. Let's do it. And so I used all my resource days at maker. We got a camera person and editor and a green screen, and we made this rap battle between John Lennon and Bill O'Reilly and it did. Okay. Yeah. It did. Okay. Enough to do a second one, which was Darth Vader vs Adolf Hitler. And that one did great. And so that in two thousand eleven it was like, okay. I think this is what we're going to do we've been trying to figure out. I was trying to figure out what it was going to do since nineteen ninety four and all sudden two thousand eleven figured it out. And so there went videos every day you work on videos every day. Correct. Shoot him every day. Everything branched off from there when you have a YouTube show. That's that big for me. You know, there was it was was sort of the flagship show, but it was able to bleed into other things we made a behind the scenes channel Pete had his own channel. He had a Monday show, and he had, you know, different videos. I had a little different series and everything would sort of trickled down from that main battle. So what started out as one battle a month turned into one battle with the BTS video maybe twos. Sometimes another show on my little side channel and p do Monday show, maybe a picture song. And and it rapidly got expanded sort of horizontally, and and this are sort of ascension that word. Yeah. Are essentially kind of happened at the same time that YouTube exploded with popularity as well. So it wasn't like there was a couple of generations of other YouTubers before us that had done a lot of stuff when we could like look at them as a model. It was all sort of very new to us, which I think is why we got so tired. After six years of it. We weren't sick of it. We were just exhausted because it sort of blew up so fast. And then and then there was no there was no model for it. Really? So how do we feel being back? Good. Yeah. Yeah. We have a totally different approach to it live healthier as far as you know, not wasting much time working more efficiently. We're able to hire our own team. So they report directly to us the world's working with people that we work really well with and just trying to be more efficient more effective pace ourselves a little bit. I don't make eight to fifteen videos a month any more. So I just focused on making the battle one battle of on. I think that's what we're looking at. Yeah. When we when we start up in the spring, and I think that's what we're going to. That's our goal is really good to, you know, there was a multitude of different things that we had to learn how to do when when we first became successful in twenty ten and. A lot of them were more complex than just making a video. A lot of them was like, how do you? How do you an iphone? How to Pete knife function sort of managed people, and how do we manage within a system? And how do we like, you know, communicate well and inspire other people that work for us, and that was all kind of new for us in that capacity. So taking a break and stepping away from it. And then coming back with like some fresh eyes has been I feel really excited about it. That's where I'm at. Yeah. The tech stuff is kind of. Crept up in quality to it's it's a little easier work. We're on all Dobie software now, and it's just it's a nice workflow things work efficiently. We know how to use things. Computers are faster you're talking to premier and after. Yeah. And and back in the day, we were Switzerland between final cut and after sometimes for some stuff and sending it here sending it back. Now, we have a pretty nice little tight workflow. We got a bunch of computers, and you know, how to use them when doing battles. Loyd. You have podcast a podcast. I do on Wednesdays at noon called kings of influence, which is really cool. The comedy theater is the place where is the comedy club Dione, and I'll perform there, and you know, teach teach there, and I I hang out with my wife and my dog and the cat, and yeah, stay very busy. And when you're not battling. Yeah. I don't do much. You you raising your daughter the family thing. That's okay. It's nice for me. But even that like, I pretty much just sit with her and talk with her. I try not to leave the house if I don't have to particularly on a day when it's raining, so unusual. We're talking in LA today where it's actually boring. It's like two days a year that. Yeah. And we forget what it's like, it's good. I see I got into gardening to getting into all kinds of domestic hobbies. So I like the ring let me ask you this. Forbes just came out with their annual list of the highest paid YouTube performers people always love reading this thing. Everyone performer is seven years old. Ryan toys review. Right. He's got within everyone channels can bring in twenty two million dollars in two thousand eighteen seven years old seven years old mom's pocketing money, but if it's a safer as college, right? I mean, how many times do you? Do you have to go to college? So tell tell us is being a youtuber in two thousand eighteen really that lucrative. No. I mean, it can be. But I mean, we we make Tim vehicles a year that are that cost quite a bit to make. And they they're not twi- commercials. Not yet anyway until we hook ups and toy commercials. It can be you know, there's there's definitely money there. And we we started making videos just as YouTube was turning on monetization. So we really ridden up and then down during the ad Pakalitha era of YouTube where advertisers were fleeing like crazy. And now, it's kind of stabilizing. It's just like anything. There's you know, there's one or two basketball players who make that much. Right. And then there's a lot of people who play basketball don't. And I think you tubes about the same way. Can you? If you're you were there at the beginning. But just people are listening now and say, hey, I. I put up my videos on YouTube. But I, you know, I I have a theater, and I could do a live show Chemi kid is it too late. No, I think that everybody there. I don't think that that platform has changed so much that the basic tenants of hard work have gone away. If you work hard and do good work, and I think YouTube is is skewing towards a consistency a consistent amount of work that is on a consistent basis. There's definitely a whole equipped. He was saying like a whole blue-collar class of entertainers on YouTube digital entertainers that. Yeah, you're not making twenty two million dollars a year, but you can make a living, and there's every reason to feel encouraged to do that. But the whole like Goldstrike type thing people ask us a lot of times. Like, how do you make a viral video? And that's like asking how to find a grain of sand on the desert. You know, it's it's the there's a million different ways to do it. I think you have to do good work and you have to do it consistently. And I think there's. A lot of people out there who are ready to do that you see a lot of people reading the news and just jumping and during your chase Vons. Right. Stop really how it works. Right. It's like you decide to do like like, I mentioned, you know, I started doing this in in the early nineties. I didn't make any money on it until the late two thousand tens. It's just a matter of of believing in what you wanna do obviously still possible since that young man wasn't even alive when YouTube turned on monetization. So it's still possible. You know, it's a massive massive platform. You know, I think kids kids videos are doing very well. I have a niece of nieces, but I was watching YouTube with my one niece, and she just watched the same toy video nineteen times in the same afternoon, which is probably. I'm Jefferson Graham with USA day listening to talking tech, please subscribe to talking tech on apple podcasts. Please favorite show on Stitcher, which helps more people find the show in his always. Thanks. Everyone listening.

Youtube Loyd Lloyd Chicago Pete Jefferson Graham LA Eddie Milwaukee Napoleon Bonaparte Peten USA Polian Confucius Santa Monica California Peter Mark Zuckerberg Alon Basketball
Why Ambassadors Still Matter

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:38 min | 1 year ago

Why Ambassadors Still Matter

"Listening to the foreign desk. Still with me are John Everard and Chas Freeman jazz to start the second part of the show. I wanted to go back to one of the points at which we came in which was the role of ambassador during moments of great crisis or great tension. You were the United States ambassador to Saudi Arabia at the time of desert shield and Desert Storm how much does your job change at a moment. Like that. When history is being made around you. Well, one becomes a crisis manager, I was conducting relationships with elements of the Saudi establishment and indeed other governments with members of the coalition with Philo envoys to reality of a sort that I never would have had the war not occurred. So you're a manager not only internally of your diplomatic mission, which contains of course, many different agencies and lots of complicated people who have tendency to act unpredictably under stress, but you're also the manager of. Of relationships with the host country government and with the resident diplomatic community, and you are the mayor of your nationalities local community, they look to you for protection for advise, and I all these functions come into play very very sharply. When a crisis occurs Jomo mutt. Thought of the the ambasaador as actor, especially at a moment of crisis or tension. What was your perception of at moments like that what the stakes actually were as they applied to your particular job? Like how badly can one person damage or I guess how much how vastly can one person improve relations between to entire nations depending on where you are the onset can be a really quite a lot. I mean, very often and work in countries where you may be the only member of the sending nation that these guys are gonna come across. So yes, you can shape events. Really quite considerably and the calls you make under stress come effect history. I mean, maybe not the broad thrust of wilt history. The history for that nation, and the we affects its place in the world. Yes that can happen. Just follow that up. John were the can you recall any particular moments from your own service? I guess especially probably as ambassador to North Korea, which it really struck. You about a given situation that I really don't want to get this one wrong. I remember very clearly after north Chris I nuclear test frenetic meetings of the European Union busters with various of them calling for really soft line on North Korea. And some of us manage to persuade the European Union. Just to hold five for forty eight hours. Just to see what the North Korean said how they explained what they had done which turned out. We'll get into the degree to here was a good thing. Because the North Koreans explains. Their action in ways that nobody had expected them to those another one in Europe. Guar. I was there when something like a decade and a half a right wing government collapsed and the left took power. Now, do you relations with Uruguay up probably not going to affect the broad sweep of well developments? But the acquit lots of people around who was saying that we ought to give you guys the chill, these whistle. Put a communist, and we ought to coach them, and I was able to say, no, no, these are actually reasonable respectable people. You you can agree or disagree with the political tenants. But these are not criminals, and they deserve a fair hearing, and we won chose to put a I guess a similar question to you. How often did you find yourself making decisions or filing reports or having conversations that you felt like they were considerable stakes riding on. This was something you needed to get right? That you need to be. Absolutely sure that you're communicating what you had learnt clearly and Thornton deeply, otherwise things might go, terribly terribly wrong. We'll I was fortunate in my career to be. In a fairly central position on several occasions in the opening of relations with China and as investor to Saudi Arabia during the war to liberate Kuwait I had to make decisions and to recommend decisions that really had great consequences, sometimes just preventing Washington for making foolish mistakes, for example, shortly after the invasion of Kuwait by Saddam Hussein and his forces in the United States, suddenly sent me from a relatively low level an instruction to go to the king of Saudi Arabia and asked for bed down of beef, fifty two's in Jeddah. We'll the only place they could have been bedded down was in the hedge terminal I thought this was a dreadful idea one photo when we would be dead in the Islamic world. And I said so and made other arguments and suggestions for how to avoid the need for such a thing. I got a reply ordering me to do it from a higher level at finally several more interruptions, it ended up with a personal. Message from the president in each case. I replied, you know, I wonder if you have seen the arguments against this. Let me reiterate them if you have considered those and rejected them, of course, I will execute the instruction. And I never heard anything in the end except the president when he came out and thanked me for standing my ground in voiding error, the impetus behind this was a desire by the US air force to demonstrate the continuing utility of the fifty two for budgetary reasons. I think an an anecdote like that demonstrates both the value of ambassadors in an and the satisfaction that must come from doing the job. But as we are regrettably nearing the end developed time did want to ask you, both internal I'll start with you, John. What was the one thing you really disliked about the job? The one thing you kind of glad to not have to do again. Once you've lifted being nice to lofty people is not in my nature. You know, be long enough to know that I tend to speak my mind fairly readily. And not being able to do that includes circumstances created the Yuli when I was in Bosnia having to shake the hands and green happily at Serb mass, murderers, I really didn't like doing. So the actually having to be diplomatic part of being a diplomat was the part that grated. Yes. I mean, some of my colleagues disa- just that I was one of business less likely diplomats. What about you? Are there any parts of the job in the foreign service that you really not Cain to go back to? We'll I agree completely with John. But I would add I really disliked being kissed by men with beards and bad breath. And also just finally because I think at monocle generally, we'd like to encourage the idea of ambassadors and of a country to have a a professional foreign service. We think it's a good thing. I I did also want to ask you both for one encouraging example from history as it were. And again, I'll start with you, John. If if if you have this is a great local radio question, this, do you have a favorite ambassador. Listen, but the the actually ambassador and minister to London in the first World War. The man who argued an argue with the Kaiser an almost stopped the war happening where my heroes and chess. What about you know, I would think of our envoy to France who when presented with the Louisiana purchase from Napoleon as opposed to -bility seize the opportunity without instructions to buy it that more than double the size of the United States, right man in the right spot. You can't argue with that is a good day's work. Chas

John Everard United States Ambassador To Sa United States Saudi Arabia North Korea European Union President Trump Chas Freeman Desert Storm Philo Kuwait Jomo Mutt Europe Bosnia Saddam Hussein France Uruguay Monocle
This guy is cruising up the nile in a 19th century steamboat

The Frankie Boyer Show

01:45 min | 1 year ago

This guy is cruising up the nile in a 19th century steamboat

"Frankie Boyer and welcome. It is so nice to have you with us right here on biz talk radio while my guest today is John Paul Sinclair Lewis, and he's the author of the new historical novel, the Tri color and the same time. Seven years of research. And if that were not enough he's getting ready to embark on a trip up the Nile on a nineteenth century side decide side wheel steam cruise boat to conduct more research for the sequel is John Paul. I you crazy or what? I always liked adventure. I always like anything that. I'm getting me out of the house to kill the tedium and boredom of life. Yeah. Okay. So you've written two books about the American west on the buffalo soldiers. The sequel buffalo Gordon fighting on the planes and those were nominated as the best novel of the west by the western writers of America. You've pub published short academic work for the American waterways and underground railroad. Honey. How did this new project? Come about. Because it was never done before. And I wanted to put the readers into my characters head. The center is actually the first. And hopefully, I'll finished with the sequel in about nine months or so and. So this one here who recounts Napoleon Bonaparte and his army on the orients thirty to thirty five thousand men, women and children who invaded and occupied Egypt and the holy land. Seventeen ninety eight in eighteen o one. Now, the book opens with the conquest of Malta in June of seventeen ninety eight and then moved to Egypt and the death March to Cairo the battle of the Annunciation of Admiral by Admiral Nelson on the French Mediterranean fleet at the battle of the Nile, initially victorious and land. But now he was marooned. All of its ships were destroyed by the British so Bonaparte and his troops is thirty five thousand soon confront fanatical resistance insurrection. Gorilla desert warfare. Ancient superstitions slavery. And the birth of Egyptology that's one maybe is why am going down the Nile to see some of those monuments that were recently actually, only two hundred years old recently discovered by French archaeologists and so forth. And I used a lot of nineteenth century French military records journals and so forth to bring to life, but thousands of actors on this incredible time in history from ranker's famous generals to a young Bonaparte who was only twenty seven years old. Obsessed. He was obsessed with power even at that age and wanted to create his legacy. That's correct Napoleon Bonaparte. I don't think wasted a minute of his life. He didn't live very long. I think he was dead by fifty four. But this is a man who kept busy twenty four seven. He would sleep, you know, and map style. A couple of hours year a couple of hours there. But. This man had an agenda already when he was a boy who calling in elementary school in France. And he he sees people followed in. Unbelievable. So your trip down the Nile is happening in October. Did you where did you find the the? Old both that you're going on the steamship. Well, it's a French travel out sent then owns this concern some growing with them. The small group. You don't even does this twice a year. And I had some friends who took that trip. And they waived about an. Maybe I should do this trip. So I do it to get away from the maddening crowd. I don't wanna be unaccountable crews and seeing and seeing in Egypt from the water and taking this little day trips. You appealed to me more than being thousands of on the people on well travel lanes.

Paychex Business Owner IRS
"napoleon" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"napoleon" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Was approached by the Napoleon hill foundation to take the manuscript to a book that was written in nineteen thirties, called outwitting the devil and to refresh it. So she's worked with the Napoleon hill town Dacian now to release a multiple books, including thinking grow rich women and outwitting the devil ladies and gentlemen, family and friends. Donnie further ado is my pleasure. Introduce to you? My friend miss Sharon Lechter. Sharon, Lechter misled her, how are you doing today? I am fantastic. Klay. Thank you so much. Hey, I have a question for you. I think a lot of listeners would like to to to to know off the bat here is with your when you created the rich dad, poor dad series, what was your role with that book? And how did that? Where did the idea for that book come from. Well, at the time, Robert is back. This is back in ninety five rubber Kia. I had gone to see my husband my collector whose intellectual property attorney with an idea for a board game, and it was drawn out on a piece of paper, but he needed somebody to help really make it happen. And so we went to see my husband about getting Cup copyrighted and and and patented, and in that process I'd already been working in the area financial literacy and so my husband and reduced us, but that I would enjoy seeing the potential of the game which I really did. So I met Robert at the Bay. I beta test for the game, and it was drawn out on a piece of butcher block paper and the plane pieces were different caliber bullets. First impression is everything right of the three tables. I, the only person got other at race, but at the same time, I really saw the value of the messaging. Which is consistent with my messaging and understanding the importance of passive income, the importance of building assets, not relying on a job or a paycheck for your financial health..

Sharon Lechter Napoleon hill foundation Robert Dacian Donnie attorney the Bay
Ex-MSU coach charged with lying to police amid Nassar investigation

24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Ex-MSU coach charged with lying to police amid Nassar investigation

"Fifty a, former gymnastics coach at, Michigan State University, has been charged with lying. To police amid the sexual abuse investigation involving Former sports Dr Larry Nassar the charges against Kathy Klay GIS were announced. Today by a special independent. Counsel appointed by the states to investigate that school if convicted could face up to four years in, prison she's denied allegations that former gymnast Larisa Boyce. Told her that Nassar had abused, her twenty, years ago when voice was, sixteen boys had. Been training with the Spartan youth gymnastics team at that time now Boyce has said Klay dissuaded her from taking the issue any further even after another young gymnasts related similar

President Trump Jeff Sessions Michigan West Nile Dr Larry Nassar Wayne County University Of Michigan Donald Trump Michigan Department Of Health Kathy Klay Vicki Thomas Justice Department Reporter Dr Deanna W. W J Dr Deanna Lights Sheriff Napoleon Michigan State University Attorney Oakland County
"napoleon" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"napoleon" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Is now the battle dot cra is bloody minded and one point this is the age of napoleon bonaparte and mozart and everyone on stage all the time commodore smith shallan just napoleon to a one to one duel to settle acro and napoleon's response is striking how does he turn him down what he says that he wouldn't mind having a do with the greatest british general off until that point the he but unfortunately movers data nashville he wasn't gang fights and he said he wasn't going to have a deal against a single english royal navy commodore there is a battle that takes place away from aqua at the time fought by a subordinate to napoleon but eventually napoleon arrives just at the last moment this is the battle of mount table where they face off what would have been the army from damascus and defeated and didn't make a do of the fact that he was near nazareth when he fought this and that the battle of megiddo was right to the south of immeditely right about makita yes you did it crops out in his biography but when you visit the battlefield of of mount table which actually isn't at bound table it's about eight miles away on mount homerun but nonetheless they were close enough from the biblical reference who say powerful but of course he he took it on one can see how he he's his homemade in the undulations of the van of giselle and managed to get he's to be right the way round the back of the turkish army and therefore destroy it the the scenes and details and the apocalypse in the battles in in the levant and in cairo are overwhelming their paintings to this the one that strikes me as most overwhelming when he visits the plague victims because his arm is is afflicted with plague after they have plundered one particular town they catch it in the and he visits plague victims and he carries one soldier suffering from bhubaneshwar plague across the floor and does he get the plague do we know whether he was ever infected yes he was north infected and but it wasn't tremendously at brave thing to have done he did it partly as a propaganda stumps needless to say to show how much he he loves his man but nonetheless it was a it was a life threatening moment even to go inside a play coastal in in jaffa in seventeen ninety nine these were places where they were enormously high death rates and and he did do that we have that not just from the paintings of course biddle say from the from the doctors and the surgeons i witness accounts he returns to cairo breaks off the cj walker when it is not successful says we've achieved what we want we've defeated the army at damascus there's a lot of rationalizing napoleon but remember he's dealing with the directory and with the power the paris papers and this is a revolutionary army in a revolutionary time so you can fall out a ver very quickly if you're identified with a defeat my note says he lost four thousand of his thirteen thousand men when he returned in august of ninety nine at this point he decides to leave the army and go back to paris in secret why did he do it in secret because sidney smith the english commodore had given him the newspapers at the time at akra and he realized that he needed to get back to europe because the fringe had been defeated in italy where he didn't successful and also in germany and france is in danger so you need to return to the sound of the guns are seen as possible right and clever one of his generals describes the who's left behind him with men in cairo describes him as that corsican runt i made a little close here so at this time napoleon wasn't celebrated as we will see when he becomes i counsel and emperor that's where we're headed strikingly he's has the life of cromwell read to him on the voyage home house this is an extremely selfaware human being napoleon bonaparte was that also meant to be a a witty was he and i know he's anticipating but at the same time it's it's almost as if he's outside of himself andrew and celebrating how classically is yes that but also of course partly he is actually trying to learn from history his love of history isn't just an intellectual paula game he.

napoleon bonaparte mozart
"napoleon" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"napoleon" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Yeah well you know i i think i'll do since we're talking about animals and then they've got the pig in the white house i'll do part three and pigs you know to great books right now the people should read are both by orwell and of course one is animal farm and the other is nineteen eightyfour and even if you just read the first fifty or sixty pages of nineteen eightyfour you'll get a good idea of exactly you know what this president has in mind so those are two of the most amazing books ever written i mean they both blew me away i mean animal farm is just unbelievable and nineteen eightyfour these are just amazing works that should be required reading of every human even if i said the magic word absolutely but joe i've got i've got into jackie before i forget that when they call people animals i get to call them deplorables and i don't want to hear any objection i don't wanna hear the high horse getting on your high horse getting all huffy and emotional and moral how dare you i don't want to hear any of that stuff because if you're going act the way you act and if you're going to call people animals and if you're going to give comfort and succor how's that for a good word had the best words are a bunch of suckers given sucker that's s u c c o r that is a best word they're giving support to donald trump they have forfeited four their opportunity and their arguments in opposition to being called deplorable joe go ahead yeah well i just wanna say norm animal farm was great because basically to pigs were ran the farm you had napoleon and you had snowball and eventually you know napoleon took over and and he was a bad pig and the pig was was was snowball napoleon and his gangsters ran snowball off the off the form and the symbolism of it all was the farmer was considered he was like big government and the polian convinced all the other farm animals that you know the farmer was big government and we don't need the government you know we can run things by yourself we you know we can have all the playtime grazing time we want we don't need the you know the the farmer tell us what to do excuse two legs.

orwell president joe napoleon donald trump polian
"napoleon" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"napoleon" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"He knows flattery joining us now former nato supreme allied commander another dean of the fletcher school of law and diplomacy at tufts university retired fourstar navy admiral james debris this is chief international security and diplomacy analyst for nbc news and msnbc admiral street it's always good to see sir if you listen to macaroni speech in congress yesterday if you got past the hand holding in the kissing and all the touchy feely stuff and the wiping of the dandruff off the lapel and the oval office macro was railing against drums entire theory of the case he was railing against the america first policy he was railing against 'isolation as a nationalism and withdrawal he was saying we gotta stay in the iran deal or at least a version of the iran deal you've got to rejoin the paris climate accord's he stood up there before all of congress and basically said what trump's doing here is not the way to go he did and i thought the most important comment that micro made in fact was the word fear essentially he was saying we cannot take counsel of our fears and i thought his his vision in my view is the correct one and since he's french i'll quote napoleon in fact i like quoting napoleon because i'm sure and short people have to stick together but napoleon said a leader is a dealer in hope a leader as a dealer and hope i thought yesterday in our congress we saw leader who is dealing in hope and i think unfortunately our president tends to deal in fear and i'll give you a pragmatic point here as well that mccrie thinks which is they look at this administration as a big complicated difficult machine but i think macron has taken a very french in a sense of very pragmatic approach he quoted.

tufts university analyst congress america trump napoleon president mccrie macron supreme allied commander fletcher school of law nbc feely iran paris
"napoleon" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"napoleon" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"And napoleon fears the the they're going to continue to do that but thinks that because the british all mia a nation of shopkeepers as he famously gold them they would be able to be pushed into making peace if they were cut houses of world trade his defeated the precious but now he's going to take on the russians it takes some time for them to get organized and get across all the way into your into germany but the battles their series the battles now in o7 we begin oh seven with the retaliation of the british to the continental system of percival i have spencer percival becomes prime minister leader of the new government he seems to have a and understanding of napoleon that isn't quite rational he she sees them what is the anti christ yes it it's a psychological disorder frankly am he sees him as the enzi christ and and has done for years rotate pamphlets in which he equated him with some sort of creature from the book of revelations in some frankly no this is uh this is not how normal british politicians behave the oh seven is going to be battles with the russians and series of victories for napoleon through oh seven were rising to his moment when he's in supreme control of the continent at the same time they're all these things going on around him he's a signing his his family to various crowns royals he's running them around is trying to promote them he's he's almost two men he's the corsican who cares for his family like a good putter familias and he's the emperor who is indifferent to the passions of of the european families that he's crashing through so let's crashed through allow an and freed land i did not know both those battles i allow in february freedland in june of eighteen no seven he's magnificent on the field against the russians are they an old fashioned army as well yes there very oldfashioned army but again rather light depressions they're about to learn how to change into an to adapts the the and the two.

napoleon germany o7 spencer percival prime minister
"napoleon" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"napoleon" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Being napoleon bonaparte was that also meant to be a a witty was he and two i know he's anticipating but at the same time it's a it's almost as if he's outside of himself andrew and sell braiding how classical years and yes paul policy that would also of course poetry he is actually trying to learn from history and his love of history isn't just an intellectual um paula game he is actually trying to learn from uh people like um like crumbled about how to do it and and clever little though he wolves um he hated napoleon and despite chemicals for having left egypt actually forget this central point that you have to be if you'll somebody like apparently you have to be the key point way you can help and save your country you can't be thousands of miles away if of trump's is endanger this is the the critical moment now clue after coup after cohen napoleon as anticipating what becomes the broom mercu the primaries the time of year seasons of and fog at this is the french revolution they remade the calendar 10day week eventually they'll returned to the sevenday week napoleon arise in paris october seventeen ninety nine there's cheering everywhere for him immediately falls in with the coup masters what what do they need them polian for they need to ward because he's cooled they need somebody who's actually a popular with the army he can affect camilla tcu because all do they all diplomats and policemen and bankers none of them the popular and so you need somebody who is popular nobody's irs pope he knows the purse austin who defeated d cooks at the back of mount table and also another victory that he won at the care the directory at this point is the governance is so complicated all i can say is that it's fifty here 500 their three hundred here they go back and forth are arguing all the time everything's chaos in addition and there's hyper inflation there's hoarding there's riots uh the pair was ripe is the quote napoleon goes along with these coup making it's called the broom there and they planned for three weeks is it tally ran who identifies napoleon as trustworthy is he the one who i'd who who makes the decision in the comasters he's one of um yes.

napoleon bonaparte egypt trump cohen napoleon camilla tcu mount table andrew paul polian ward irs three weeks sevenday 10day