18 Burst results for "Naomi Klein"

"naomi klein" Discussed on Blazing Trails

Blazing Trails

02:29 min | 11 months ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Blazing Trails

"I think that. I've been an environmentalist for many many decades. But what made me kind of leap from my seat and decide to move to dc and start what has come to be known as fired row. Fridays was reading. Naomi klein's book on fire the burning issue of green new deal. Because what she did was. She explained the science in a way that really that really got to me and that. An because people are environmentalists and climate activists and they never mentioned fossil fuels. Fossil fuels are at the center of the climate crisis. Yes there are other things methane from animals and various But the main culprit is fossil fuels and what naomi showed me is the science. Scientists are saying that we absolutely must not allow warming to go above one point five degrees celsius above what it was before we began to burn fossil fuels before the industrial revolution. That is very specific. One point five degrees celsius and we have to do that by cutting our fossil fuel emissions in half by twenty thirty. That's so clear and so specific and even in their new report that came out very recently the global climate scientists. Say the same thing we have now. Nine years left and We have to cut our fossil fuel emissions in half so you know in the in the wake of ida and all the destruction in the fires in the flooding and so forth the talking heads on television. During that week i noticed. Nobody mentioned fossil fuels in mentioned. This is a catastrophe. It's it's colbrad. We have to move towards green energy and everything but people don't talk about fossil fuels so i decided that i have a platform on a movie star. I have a hit tv series behind me grace. And frankie that are flying went to washington and i engaged in civil disobedience that would put me in a position where i was risking getting arrested..

Naomi klein naomi frankie washington
"naomi klein" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

"So you've got fantasy football that's basically now for me. You're also just shot a movie gonna shoot this other show. You're working with lita haiti. And you also have a new new ish. Podcast metaphysical milkshake. How did that come about so a long time ago. While i was doing the office. Some friends of mine and i started a digital media company called soul pancake in some of you may know some of the videos. We'd have very successful youtube channel. We did shows like kid president and up my last days and a lot of viral video hits you. I did a music video. Do music video. Yeah we that was really fun. Radio pajamas wonderful. Yes i did a little show on that called metaphysical milkshake. 'cause i love deep philosophical conversations. I just love to kind of dig into the the biggest possible big ideas. That's something i've always loved to do. Ever since i was a preteen so along with my friend dr raza azlan who is a fantastic Historian writer commentator. We started this podcast. Metaphysical milkshake which is exploring life's big questions With some of the biggest authors and thinkers and movers and shakers out had malcolm glad well on the show and a naomi klein so many great thinkers and the topics are all over the place. You know it's it can be this week we're interviewing. I'm so excited this guy. Avi loeb whose astrophysicists from harvard. Who has this new book extraterrestrial. it's all about The search for alien life. It's great great book and so sometimes it's science. Sometimes philosophy sometimes spirituality. Were unafraid to talk about. You know god and life and death and the soul and so that's been really fun. We've been doing this for cast media and there's you know there's about twenty episodes out they come out about every week or so. You can subscribe wherever you get your fine podcasts. You're talking a great thinkers. I haven't been on yet. Oh god how did we let that happen. I mean great thinker now of our day. I don't know. I think that we think about some life's big questions that might be involved with topics like golf and fantasy football. You know i. I don't know i'm even. I know i'm setting myself up here even beginning this subject to tell you that for me. Golf does bring me to a place of spirituality and there's not a not a joke. I know i'm opening myself up but i know it's not a joke for me. I believe it's the it's the equivalent of i don't specifically meditate. I will at times. Try to take moments of quiet. But for me on the golf course. It is the only time where everything else falls away from me. Which i feel like is a form of meditating and for me. It is strictly about accomplishing this. One task and finding focus on that one thing allows everything else to go away any other anxieties. Or were or family stresses or anything else goes away and it's simply me attempting to accomplish one goal which is to get the ball in the hole. Is that weird. Does that count. No i relate to that completely now. I do have a meditation practice but as you know i play a lot of tennis. We used to play tennis right. And you are a pretty damn good tennis and used to kick my butt sometimes not all the time. Well most of the time. But i've gotten a lot better since. That was like twelve years ago but i feel the same way about tennis because i think there's something beautiful about sport because it forces you to be in the moment so when i'm on the tennis court the only thing that exists that green yellow ball and where is it and how am i going to address it. All of my natural. I'm a very anxious person. My anxiety lifts away. And i'm simply in my body breathing moving and witnessing this ball and it's exhilarating and all of a sudden you're done playing tennis an hour and a half two hours later. And you're like you just feel so refreshed and uplifted because looking at your phone and haven't been pondering things and obsessing over things and you've just been in the moment and been outside it's a. It's glorious yes i relate yes you see. Here's what we did. We just talked about a life's big question. Just like this irreverently with fun in relatable way and that's what we try and do metaphysical milkshake well. That doesn't seem so hard. Yeah i could be a guest then. Yeah i think if this is easy as that well there you have it. Do you have a favorite big question to ponder or one that you're currently pondering. Well i think all of the life's big questions that are the most meaningful to me are. We are living in really difficult times and with climate change with political divisions with racism with fears of international divisions and Saber rattling going on economic insecurity. It's a really difficult time to be alive. And i have you have kids. And i have a teenage son and for so many young people. Mental health epidemic is really extreme anxiety depression suicidal idealization. It's a very difficult time so any time that you have a question about like what what is my life's purpose like why are we here. And what can we do on two levels. One make the world a better place but also to give our lives kind of a deep satisfying rich wellness and wholeness so those two things go hand in hand i believe like we feel more rich and fulfilled and more well. The more we're giving to others and the more we give to others the more rich and whole and fulfilled. We've we feel so. I think that's what young people need to think about. There's so many Young folk just have given up. You know it's just like why. Should i care. It's all the world's going to hell and everything's falling apart anyway but you know we can make a difference. We need to make a difference. And in making a difference you will find your fulfillment and eventually your enlightenment. Excellent on a on a recent episode of the podcast. You mentioned that you were raised by aliens yet. Not wolves well first.

tennis dr raza azlan Avi loeb golf football naomi klein haiti malcolm youtube harvard anxiety depression
"naomi klein" Discussed on It Could Happen Here

It Could Happen Here

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on It Could Happen Here

"Right now who's probably no story more important than the tale of paradise california. When the campfire blazed through eighteen thousand homes created a flood of climate refugees chico. the nearest city gained twenty thousand residents almost overnight for a city of just one hundred thousand that many significant strain and the people of chico responded beautifully with a flood of charity and mutual aid people donated tents sleeping bags. Volunteers cooked hot food. Low kids organized team sports for the kids who just lost their town. Many in chico opened their homes to strangers who just lost. There's mark stemming a geography professor at california state university described it this way to intercept reporter. Naomi klein a su- nami. Fire and terror rolled down the hill from paradise but that soon nami was buffeted by a blanket of love and comfort unfortunately the reaction of chico was by and large a feat of charity not of mutual aid. This is a problem because charity is something. You give to less fortunate. People and when news coverage of the disaster faded suited sympathy and willingness to help the victims of the campfire six months after the campfire destroyed paradise california more than a thousand families were still without eating secondary housing before the fire hit there was already a massive housing shortage in northern california rates of homelessness had been on the rise for years now. The campfire inspired the city of chico to create a climate plan which included more affordable housing in order to make the community more resistant to displacement caused by climate disruption. But this is not what happened from the intercept quote then. The corona virus pandemic hit throwing many more people in butte county as elsewhere into various states of economic and social distress. Stemming told me local activists were geared up to hold a big rally calling for a green new decade. He said we had banners and sunflowers. And we're ready to rock. Then lockdown happened and the science just sat in his yard for months brown recalled that once the pandemic was declared. There wasn't much room for conversation about planning for the future when we were dealing with these immediate crises in late august and early september twenty twenty. Another wildfire struck the region incinerating towns and displacing. Get more people in the county. The city opened up some hotel rooms to older people who were particularly vulnerable to cope in nineteen but there were not nearly enough rooms for everyone who needed shelter through this two and a half year period shock after shock. Housing costs and chico have continued to soar i. It was in response to the uptick in demand from paradise evacuees and people working on post-disaster reconstruction which saw a spike and rinse made chico. Among the hottest housing markets in the country today the boom continues but now it is in response to a pandemic fueled influx of bay area professionals and retirees looking to telecommute or chill out in a more affordable low key community according to the california association of realtors the price of a single family house in butte county increased by a staggering sixteen point one percent last year with chico at the center of the frenzy a headline at a local abc affiliate summed up the market's current trajectory up so real estate and chico became much more valuable very quickly which killed any motive to create more affordable housing every low income apartment building one less set of luxury condos for bay area transplants. After all now twenty twenty most of the middle and upper middle class paradise refugees had either bought or built new homes but those had been renters or living in mobile homes. Got nothing in two thousand nineteen. Npr talked to dominicus prog. Who moved paradise because she'd been priced out of the bay area in the six months since the campfire she and her family had been forced to move to six different camps. They were interviewed outside of a camper on a fairground in yuba city. There were not being hosted there by the city nor had been placed there by the state. The spread family paid seven hundred fifty dollars a month for the privilege of camping out many. Who were displaced by. The campfire simply never recovered. Chico county's homeless population surged by sixteen percent after the fire and it has not gone back down in the years. Since twenty three percent of chico's homeless refugees from the paradise fire and when these people became permanent fixtures of the town getting in the way of a profitable real estate boom the warm welcome in charity that had greeted them. In two thousand eighteen evaporated in two thousand and twenty. The chico city council elected asleep of right wing candidates primarily on a platform of using the cops to brutalize and break up homeless encampments for the good of local businesses citizens for a safe chico. Put two hundred and fifty thousand dollars into a sweeping ad campaign that painted these people as vagrants and transients. Despite the fact that most had resided in the county for years in many cases chico police confiscated and threw away donated clothing tents and sleeping bags that had been given to paradise refugees just a few years earlier during her reporting for the intercept naomi. Klein talk to alexander hall a twenty-three-year-old campfire survivor who subsequently lost his new home. In police sweeps of encampments. He told her we're homeless. Were not a disease. You can't just get rid of us and then expect us to be gone. That's not the way it works where people were trying to survive. Were like anybody else. Everybody is one paycheck away and the reality of the situation is that thanks to climate change. We are all considerably less than one paycheck away from calamity. wildfires and other natural disasters aren't the only thing that's growing more common unless stable world means less stable economy. We're already seeing inflation on the rise and everyone listening remembers how calamitous the first weeks of the pandemic were for tens of millions of people. A bad economy makes members of a community less resilient in means they have less to donate to their neighbors in the wake of a disaster. It also means their community their city. Your town or state will have fewer resources to put into things like protecting infrastructure from natural disasters paying emergency workers and providing affordable housing to prepare for the inevitable. The story of chico has told us what happens when affluent liberal enclaves find themselves forced into this position they cut funding to everything but cops and use those cops to do violence to marginalized communities from the intercept quote the combination of factors that has created this crisis and chico is far from unique to northern california after decades of defunding social programs coupled with wild over funding police a great many communities across the country find themselves stretched too thin to absorb a major shock particularly when it comes to housing in mental health supports and without these other tools every challenge quickly turns into a matter of public safety. Check this out. Did you know merle norman. Cosmetics launch ninety years ago in santa monica california. It's a cool story. Merle believed women had great potential to influence the beauty market. So in nineteen thirty-one she began offering franchise opportunities today ninety years later. There are thousands of merle norman studios across north america. She literally put small business owners on the map and even more impressive. Ninety percent are owned by women from acne to anti-aging there's skin care and makeup for every age if you're into smart probiotic technology skin Helps keep skin from looking dull or uneven if you've been plagued by mask me this year like so many of us the acne defense spot treatment works like magic. And here's a quick way to save fifteen percent on your first purchase. Go to the site and sign up for merle's mailing list. It only takes five seconds. They won't blow up your inbox like some other brands. And you'll end up discovering your new favourite products. Just go to merle. Norman dot com slash offers. That's m. e. r. l..

chico butte county california Naomi klein Chico county california state university northern california chico city council california association of real chico police alexander hall yuba city Npr abc
"naomi klein" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"Sure that black people exist in it. Well i don't know what my country recent. The future is You know. I write books. Send about into the world. People use them some of them further through windows. Fix the mistakes and some of them. You know bind some phrases. That are useful for organizing. I try to be humble about what what what what what writer can do But in right now. I am really focused on on giving young people Really young people because the climate movements getting younger and younger Some tools to build. That better future. I have a huge amount of faith in gen z and how radical this generation is and how intersectional they are and and they don't wanna have to choose between caring about people and caring about animals and caring about the earth to carry about each other. They wanna go deep they want. They want holistic change because they they know they're growing up amidst systemic failure multiple fronts and so What i'm trying to do is is kinda. Give some ammo to that intersectional. Climate movement that unlike i think our generation of climate activists is led by young people of color or black people of color. I think they are not repeating our mistakes. So far They are correcting mistakes of of of the white climate. Move miss Say i'm not including you revs but like the the big green groups And so i'm i'm just trying to support that generation right now as much as i can but as much let me At lift them out and and and just just Just just show my gratitude for their courage and for the fact. They're fighting with such tenacity. And and the good kind radicalism guess. Today's only klein. Journalists arthur in gloria steinem endowed chair at rutgers university and i am review your host of the coolest. Show.

earth Today rutgers university arthur gen gloria steinem
"naomi klein" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"So yeah so. I just want us to cop to that. Like i think it's not only the big green groups that put up those barriers in a way. Like i think i. I grew up in the neil era and i did my own version of silos and then realize wait a minute All of these issues intersect. This is a glimpse of the whole the future where we're headed or we have heavy weather. Intersecting with weakened neglected infrastructure that has been systematically underfunded for half a century and white supremacy overlaying the whole thing which blames the victims and abandons them and creates this hierarchy of humanity in the middle of a disaster. That's what we saw right in new orleans or one way of looking at it but your question around. What are they thinking when they when they when they do their version of nece which is like serse we saved the world. Then we worry about poverty and racism and more because if we don't save the world then added that will matter. I mean i've literally heard that argument. Yeah i've seen the argument. And when i wrote this changes everything you know. Folks took me aside and they're like. Why are you making our job harder by talking about capitalism in reparations and colonialism like you're weighing us population so in answer to your question what i what i discovered for one look. I think there's many answers one of those just about power and feeling threatened right like the these are groups that are lead overwhelmingly by white people and if frontline movements are leading than it means that those folks are not leading means that they're having to learn to follow and people hold onto power people hold onto control so i think that there's like a personal answer there but then i also think that there was genuinely a perception and this is what i was told when i was when i wrote this changes. Everything was that climate was popular winnable and these other issues were unpopular right And i think you see the same thing in these arguments within the democratic party around like are we going to appeal to suburban voters. Or you know. And it's it's it's you can't pry apart what obviously you can't make that argument in less you. Yourself are discounting the huge numbers of black and brown people who are engaged with these issues. And you somehow don't see them as part of a winning coalition or in fact the key to winning coalition so mean. I think that that was the argument that was made to me was like christ changes popular at can appeal across partisan divides Everyone has grandkids. This is kind of like a very broad tent and if you talk about all those issues you mentioned it white supremacy palestine. God forbid you know you're going to narrow right. So they positioned they petitioned climate. Has this big tent that everybody can get into but as you say. Everyone doesn't get him for it. Because if you are fighting for your own survival and this movement so called is not talking about it. Then you're not gonna join that movement because it's not your movement right so know that's that's what do you think it is. No no of all just did a lot there. Thank you for that. That was that was that was a that was a mouthful. And i hope he will really meditate on what you said. I guess this respond to what you said by my response would be then. How can you expect a world to transition from fossil fuels to clean energy when you can't transition from white supremacy and so that goes back to this also that if it's unpopular than how can we expect quote unquote run into movement to truly be an anti racist movement. If if they feel this weighs them down in other words if they really feel like this becomes too heavy or awkward or uncomfortable Or unwinnable really touch me when you said that that oak i mean the the literally the opposite is true. You know you think if something you know a a standing rock you know which which was absolutely game changing in terms of building public support for for stopping fossil fuel infrastructure entirely indigenous leads And rooted in place and grounded in core environmental justice principles and the quality of the fights right the way people fight when they are fighting for their water when they're fighting for their future when they're fighting for their land is different than the way we fight when we're fighting around an abstract issue that doesn't that yes we're concerned about but doesn't impact us tomorrow right And and and and the quality of the fight you know what i mean by the quality of the fight is like i mean my god. The courage right in at standing rock It's not the same. And i i don't want to this. You know having a big march. I think big marches matter. But that's different than living on the land for months and and fight and standing up to water cannons and attack. dogs That that that's a different kind of fight. And i think the lesson of that is that when I think there's so many lessons from standing rock but but when people are fighting for for their lives they're they're willing to take bigger risks. They're willing to fight hell of a lot harder And movements that are the movements that went throughout history right. And so this idea that is somehow more strategic to have this broad tent. That is gonna agree on this sort of baseline mushy demand of climate action. Whatever that means right not even specifying what we mean by climate action which is climate action. You know a movement like that isn't gonna have that quality of fight isn't going to have that that nazi city right we're up against very powerful forces right and that's that's the. That's the flip side of this that we always have to remember where we're up against the richest companies on planet earth with the ability to have their own private armies. So if we are not willing to fight like hell we are gonna lose. No and i think that's. That's that's very real. I think when i think about So many of those who really lummus gave their lives during the standing rock I think about our sisters and brothers throughout the world like but the service who have given their lives for this movement. I i sometimes wonder if the the the the quote from into movie is getting in the way because of that because actually we know that the fossil fuels business plan means a death sentence for these communities but on the other side we also know that the the movement in other words from typically from black and brown and indigenous and people of color if they if they want me they destined to the fossil fuel industry. I almost feel like sometimes the department to move his referee inbetween. I feel like sometimes they get in between to kind of placate almost like they haven't escape route. They have a place where they can go where you know we can. Do you know we can always dip from this fight. And so it feel like sometimes. They marginalized those who illustrated dying. And i think. And i think that's a that's that we have to deal with our movement or sir absolutely mean i get into some of this. This changes everything. I mean in all all big. Green groups aren't alike as you know there are some big green.

new orleans tomorrow one way half a century big march one neil so many lessons months palestine God earth christ
"naomi klein" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"Next day respect information education read nick around dot now. The world is not hit by all right. Well i am so excited for this interview. Because i have my dear sister. I only climb and she is an amazing award. Winning journalist cowardice in author Of the new york times in international bestseller's No logo decide doctrine. This changes everything. No is not enough and on fire. She is which have been translated into thirty languages. And for me. I love because they are also audible books which have been just enjoying listening to them as well so my sister how are you. I'm i am good. I'm really glad to see you and talk to you and visit with you. Know i mean yeah nice. Good him you got to get into. And i know from our world. You are a well-known professor writer. A i guess a climate celebrity in some aspects. Because of this to work you do But for folks who might not know you please audience who is my only clients. I'm sure well yeah as you said. I write books. That's the main thing. I do A written about a bunch of them. now And i've been writing about climate change for the past. Fifteen years i came to my earlier. Work was around economic justice. Human rights racial justice My first book was called no logo and it was about the rise of corporate power and how that was impacting workers Artists leading to precarity In all kinds of precariousness in in all in all kinds of ways and And then i started. And i think this is sort of. Maybe where we first connected. I started writing about the imposition of brutal economic policies. Through shocks through through war era. I started writing about the invasion of iraq. And i and i developed this framework called disaster capitalism. Where the shock doctrine to cry a process of using large scale shocks to push through privatization deregulation brutal economic austerity. that hurts the poor. Most of all And that brought me to new orleans In the aftermath of hurricane katrina and so. I never saw myself as like an environmental writer or climate change person but katrina kind of pulled me in taught me a bunch of lessons really fast about the intersection of climate. Change capitalism's White supremacy as it did so many people who who saw that that disaster unfold in in such profoundly unjust ways no actually. I didn't know that angle. I mean i knew that angle. Because you're right for those listening. I i actually am a member of veterans for peace and i am also number of iraq. Veterans against the war was a former officer in the air force. Who spoke out against the iraq west where i met my dear sister and that life and then as i went from the war to nor warming we have we. I saw her work in regards to my home state of louisiana and saw definitely with her work in regards to shock doctrine. In regards to new orleans in the in in your viewpoint was incubating choose. The climate crisis was inconvenient. Truth white supremacy of both. I think it was bowls and underlying both the victim. The most inconvenient truth of all for elites was that you couldn't addressed the climate crisis without simultaneously upending the whole system. And so i think this stage of the climate movement that was kind of embodied by that film by the inconvenient truth was climate movement still in in its own state of denial right. Because it was like. Here's this huge crisis. But first here's a look. Here's a pie chart. And if you change your light bulbs here and you introduced fuel-efficiency there will just get this thing done in this really technocratic way you're barely notice it as our body. Roy says you know how with class environmentalism the question. how do we change without changing And so i think that the inconvenient truth that even the inconvenient truth wasn't willing to confront back in that came out in two thousand six thousand seven was actually knows. It's not going to be technocratic solutions. It's going to be going to the deep deep roots of that intersection between capitalism white supremacy. What cedric robinson. called racial capitalism that created the climate crisis and and all of the other crises. That are intersecting with this. No i i agree. And i think about it. And we looked back your your. Your work was prophetic In many ways What we in a new moment as you know. And then your work you have laid out the path to break down disaster capitalism and it's designed to immobilize and exploit so as many are still celebrating a new regime in the biden harris administration. Can you breakdown how. The doctrine played out in your expensive multiple crises. The pandemic sold on the poor black communities and the environment and how would the sack doctrine playing right now especially for the most marginalized sure lots of ways just to like just to be clear about what we mean by the shock doctrine. So this is the shock. Doctor refers to a strategy a theory of power. Which i argue has been very much in play over the last half century. Where we've seen the rise of this really am gloves off form of capitalism that is sometimes called neoliberalism afraid which is identified with ronald reagan and margaret thatcher in the uk and this was just Just the capitalism without the sort of bones thrown to working people right That.

Roy ronald reagan margaret thatcher thirty languages new orleans uk cedric robinson first book louisiana Of the new york times last half century katrina Fifteen years No logo decide doctrine both first iraq two thousand six thousand iraq west seven
"naomi klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That is Jane Fonda getting arrested in Washington D. C Just before her 82nd birthday, She moved to the U. S. Capitol to lead weekly climate change demonstrations. She called them fire drill Fridays. She show up every week with a red coat and a megaphone to lead thousands of people in civil disobedience. She's been arrested four times spent a night in jail. And Jane explains why she's doing all this in a new book called What Can I Do? My Path from Climate Despair, Toe Action. You're about to hear us talk about her life, and we tossed in some pretty wild archival clips, too, including one of then President Richard Nixon talking about Jane as she was protesting, but we started first with Jane Fonda's most recent arrest. I was curious if she ever imagined she spent a night in jail in her eighties. Well, I never imagined I'd live this long. If I mean, I guess if I never imagined I'd live this long, I would've figured out go to jail. Women get much Feist year and braver when they're older. I mean, you write about being the kind of person who walked the walk, he cut back on red meat. You got an electric car. But then something changed and convinced you to ramp up your own climate activism. What was that? A year ago, I was in big served with friends, which, by the way, Big Sur is burning, help us holds on fire. And I read a book by Naomi Klein. She's a Canadian, certainly is, Yeah. All of her books have a huge impact on me in my life. But her last book is called on Fire. Ah burning case for every new deal. That's what I needed to get me off my Duff and into action. I knew that I needed to do more. I started reading the science and realizing that the window of opportunity you know it's closing that window. We have to work really fast gratitude Enberg, inspired made by her putting her body on the Line. Our house is still on fire. Your inaction is fueling the flames by the hour. And so that made me realize that what I wanted to do is put my body on the line. I'm a celebrity. I'll raise a lot of attention that way. When did that start? Take me back to the roots of your activism. What's your earliest memory of being so moved by an issue that you had to do something about it? Um, 1970, the indigenous people in North America who were protesting a lot of things, including their salmon writes that were being damaged by dams. Being put in and their cultural heritage and land being taken away. So that was my first arrest was with Native Americans up in two comma Washington.

Jane Fonda Naomi Klein President Richard Nixon Washington North America
"naomi klein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Our mountain treasures. Its Nita Marvin University Book Club Today we're reading from Naomi Klein's brilliant This Cane is everything this from the introduction A voice came over the intercom with the passengers of Flight Flight 3935 scheduled to depart Washington D. C for Charleston, South Carolina, finally collect their carry on luggage and get off the plane. I went down the stairs and gathered on the hot tarmac, and they saw something unusual. The wheels of the US Airways jet had sunk into the black pavement as if it was wet cement. The wheels were lodged so deep, in fact, that the truck that came to tow the plane away couldn't pry it loose. Airline and hope that without the added weight of the Plains, 35 passengers the aircraft would be light enough to pull it wasn't someone posted a picture. Why is my flight cancelled? Is D C. It's so damn hot that our planes sank four inches into the pavement. Eventually, a larger, more powerful vehicle was brought in to tow the plane, and this time it worked. The plane finally took off three hours behind schedule. Spokesperson for the airline blamed the incident on very unusual temperatures. Temperatures in the summer attempt, 2012 were indeed unusually hot as they were the year before and the year before. It's no mystery. Why this has been happening. The profligate burning of fossil fuels the only Very thing that US Airways was bound and determined to do despite the inconvenience presented by melting tarmac. The irony of the fact that the burning of fossil fuels is so radically changing our climate that it's getting in the way of our capacity to burn fossil fuels did not stop the passengers of Flight 39 35 from re embarking and continuing their journeys. Nor was climate change mentioned in any of the major news coverage of the incident. I'm in no position to judge these passengers. All of us who live high consumer lifestyles, wherever we happen to reside are metaphorically passengers on flight 39 35. Faced with a crisis that threatens our survival as a species. Our entire culture is continuing to do the very thing that caused the crisis on Lee with an extra dose of elbow grease behind it. Like the airline, bringing in a truck with a more powerful engine to tow. That plane, global economy is upping the ante from conventional sources of fossil fuels, even dirt here and more dangerous versions. Bitterman from the Alberta Tar Sands oil from deep water drilling. He asked him hydraulic fracturing fracking pole from detonated mountains and so on. Meanwhile, each supercharged natural disaster produces new irony laden snapshots of acclimate increasingly inhospitable to the very industry's most responsible for its warming. Like the 2013 historic floods in Calgary that forced the head offices of the oil companies mining the Alberta Tar Sands to go dark and send their employees home while a train carrying flammable petroleum products teetered on the edge of a disintegrating rail bridge. Or the drought hit the Mississippi River one year earlier, wishing water levels so low that barges loaded with coal and oil. We're unable to move for days while they waited for the Army Corps of Engineers to dredge a channel. I had to appropriate funds allocated to rebuild from the previous year's historic flooding along the same waterway. Or the coal fired power plants in other parts of the country that we're temporarily shut down is the waterways that they draw into cooler machinery worry the too hot or too dry or, in some cases, both Living with this kind of cognitive dissonance is part simply part of being alive. In this jarring moment of history in a crisis we have been.

US Airways Alberta Tar Sands Nita Marvin University Book Cl Naomi Klein Army Corps of Engineers Charleston Mississippi River South Carolina Washington Calgary Lee
"naomi klein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Deal by Naomi Klein this is from the epilogue very end of the book and its title the capsule case for green new deal critics of the green new deal have plenty a seer serious arguments for why all this is doomed political parallax paralysis in Washington is real either a lower climate change denying Republicans were swept out of power it was solely plenty a centrist Democrats convinced of their constituents had no appetite for radical change the plans are expensive and getting the budget approved will be her killing R. Kelly and effort a better course of action we here would be to advance climate policies that appeal to many other white like a shift from coal to nuclear power or small tax on carbon the returns the revenues as a dividend to every citizen the main trouble with these incremental approaches is that they simply won't get the job done in order to win support from Republicans soaked in fossil fuel money the price on carbon would be too low to make much of an impact nuclear power is expensive and slow to roll out compared to the renewables and that's not to mention the risks associated with uranium mining and waste storage the truth is we cannot lower emissions as steeply as rapidly as required to serve off to swerve off our perilous trajectory without a sweeping industrial and infrastructure overhaul the good news is that the green new deal isn't nearly as impractical or unrealistic as many critics claim I made the case for why that is throughout the book but what follows are nine more reasons they were green new deal as a fighting chance a chance they will increase every time we go out and make the case one it will be a massive job creator every part of the world that has invested heavily in renewables and if and yet efficiency as found these sectors to be much more powerful job creators and fossil fuels when your state made a commitment to get half its energy from renewables by twenty thirty immediately saw a spike in job creation the accelerated timeline of the U. as green new deal were turned into a jobs machine even without federal support indeed with active sabotage in the White House the green economy is already creating more jobs than oil and gas according to the twenty eighteen U. S. energy employment review jobs in wind solar energy efficiency and other clean energy sectors out numbered fossil fuels by a rate of three to one this is happening because of a combination of state and municipal incentives and the plummeting costs of renewables a green new deal would take the and they would would take the industry supernova while insuring that the jobs have salaries and benefits comparable to those offered in the oil and gas sector there's no shortage of research to support this for instance by twenty nineteen study on the job impacts of a green new deal style program in the state of Colorado found that many more jobs would be created than lost the study published by the department of economics and political economy research institute at the university of Massachusetts Amherst look at what it would take for the state to achieve a fifty percent reduction in emissions by twenty thirty it found the roughly five hundred eighty five non management jobs would be lost but that with an investment of fourteen and a half billion dollars a year in clean energy quote Colorado will generate about a hundred thousand jobs per year in the state there are many more studies was similarly striking findings a plan for forward by the U. S. bluegreen alliance a body that brings together the unions and environmentalists estimated that a forty billion dollar annual investment public transit the high speed rail for six years would produce more than three and a half million jobs during that period and according to the I report from the European transport worker fetter at workers federation comprehensive policies to reduce emissions in the transport sector by eighty percent we create seven million new jobs across the continent all other five million clean energy jobs in Europe would slash electricity emissions by ninety percent number two paying for it will create a fairer economy as the twenty eighteen IPCC report on keeping warming below one and a half degree Celsius made clear if we don't take transformative action to lower emissions the cost would be astronomical the panel's estimate is that by is that the economic damages of allowing temperatures to increase by two degrees Celsius as opposed to one and a half would hit sixty nine trillion dollars globally course rolling out a green new deal would have large classes well in the plan's advocates appointed to a variety of ways this can be financed Alexander because your course has has said that the US version should be financed away any previous emergency spending has been by the U. S. Congress simply authorizing the funds back stop by the treasury the world's currency of last resort according to a new consensus the the think tank closely associated with their policy proposals because quote the green new deal will produce new goods and services to keep pace with that absorb new expenditures there is no more reason to let fear about financing all progress and there is and there was a lot of cold wars for tax cuts and quote the European spring proposal for green new deal meanwhile calls for a global minimum corporate tax rate to capture the tax revenues of the apples and googles of the world currently Dodge with trans national schemes it also calls for reversal of monetary orthodoxy with public investment floating green bonds supported by central banks quote to address the true existential threat that we face today we must reverse the economic policies that brought us to this brink austerity means extension and quote some analysis and some analysts like Christian Parenti emphasize the federal government's can drive the transition with their purchasing powers policies ensure there are all kinds of ways to raise financing including ways that attack untenable levels of wealth concentration and shift the burden to those most responsible for climate pollution and it's not hard to figure out who that is we know thanks to research from the climate accountable ability institute but a whopping seventy one percent of greenhouse gas emissions since eighty eight nineteen eighty eight can be traced to just one hundred corporation on fire Klein coming up on the science revolution what's the truth on corona virus testing and why is trump refused to accept the World Health Organization test that the entire rest of the planet is using the same Lewis is here and how the insurer's conduct is outrageous on the crime virus pandemic water Weisman joins in on how public citizen and seventy organizations are calling on trump to prevent big pharma from profiteering on coronavirus Kevin Kamps are beyond nuclear's also hear about the ongoing Fukushima disaster an easy science find out what happens if you walk just thirty minutes a day tune into the science revolution wherever you find great podcasts there will be a live from my home office in Portland Oregon and Andrew in Roseville Michigan hander what's on your mind that it's anything goes Friday dander okay and are.

Naomi Klein
"naomi klein" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Instrumental by now. This is democracy now democracy now DOT ORG the Warren Peace Report. I'm Amy Goodman with one Gonsalez. We'll continue now to look at the two thousand twenty presidential race that is unfolding in the middle of the corona virus pandemic Tuesday night former vice president. Joe Biden score decisive primary victories in four states including the key state of Michigan his rival Senator Bernie Sanders. One in North Dakota and votes are still being counted in Washington State Biden. Still less than half way to the delegates count he would need to secure the Democratic nomination. While campaigning in Michigan ahead of the primary Senator Sanders touted his trade policy credentials. Attacked Biden for Supporting International. Trade deals like Nafta the North American Free Trade Agreement is without to a two person race that the people of Michigan understand that very substantive differences between Joe Biden myself in Michigan where trade agreements have been so devastating loss of over one. Hundred thousand good paying jobs. Joe Biden voted for NAFTA. He voted for PNT. All China the opposition in terms of foreign policy judgment. Joe Biden voted for the war in Iraq of the worst foreign policy blunder. In the modern history we led the opposition against terms of looking to the future. I happen to believe and I believe that healthcare is a human rights more. We continue with the intercepts. Naomi Klein a Professor Records University. And at least you Garza Strategy and partnerships director for the National Domestic Workers Alliance Co founder of black lives matter global network. Now let's begin with you on this issue of trade and take it beyond that. I mean right now. Wearing a time when the Dow has tanked with US oil wars taking place between Saudi Arabia and Russia. People are talking about disaster capitalism. Yeah well this is. We are seeing that. We are seeing this very predictable process that we see in in the midst of every economic which is extreme corporate opportunism of dusting off. Whatever the the wishlist is Whether it's privatizing Social Security Whether it's handouts for the fossils more handouts for the fossil fuel industry And so in the face of this of this of this economic crisis market crisis the crash in the price of oil and of course the health crisis the trump administration is not solving the crisis. What they're doing is what they always do Which is talking to lobbyists and asking them. What do you want? And so we're seeing bailouts for the airline industry bailouts for the cruise industry bailouts for the hotel industry. Trump's own industry. It must be said. So this underlines this issue that we have had threw out this administration which is that we have a sitting president who has not divested from his corporate empire and as he has continued to profit from from his from the presidency. But now we're seeing a bailout for his own sector. He is in a absolutely direct conflict of interest. Now we're seeing with. The Saudi orchestrated a very dramatic drop in the price of oil. This basically makes domestic oil the overwhelming majority of domestic oil production gas production in North America on economic because so much of it is deep. Water drilling Tight oil fracking tar sands oil in Canada. All of this is predicated on higher prices. And so these into this sector was already in crisis. The fracking industry was already dealing with the debt crisis. Because it already. The price of oil was already too low. Now that it's at around thirty dollars a barrel it's completely On economic and so now we're hearing talk of directly bailing out the fossil fuel sector. What I think is worth about all of this is that these are the companies at the heart of the climate crisis. Right and so one of the things that's happening in. This is why we so desperately need the debate to tie it in with what we were talking about earlier is while it is true that a bunch of losing candidates in the Democratic primary have endorsed Joe Biden reality keeps endorsing Bernie Sanders That is true for Medicare for all we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA be hearing from an and you at least guards are more on that because it is the care sector. It is nurses and homecare workers who are on the front lines of this crisis We are seeing the living argument. Why we need everybody to have health insurance. Everybody to have paid sick.

Joe Biden Senator Bernie Sanders Biden Michigan Nafta Trump Amy Goodman North Dakota vice president Naomi Klein China National Domestic Workers Alli Saudi Arabia Iraq North America
"naomi klein" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"For all this changes everything cold I he's right capitalism versus the climate by Naomi Klein Anne Klein provocative book unveils the myths surrounding the climate change debate and explores how the free market is holding us back from important changes congratulations you're going to the fair my man product research had reset you did well done well played I really think it's best to somebody wins at least we you know I mean like I like a bunch of people lose and then somebody wins so that we might have a you know feel good moment at the end of it all right and you did sufficiently stop a number of I thank you really really what you did is you you got retribution for a week thank you I hope you I hope you know that you did I feel retribution seven two seven five seven nine one a two five and eight hundred seven seven one one two two five talk to me about your well first let me tell you I'm fascinated by this this Papa John's story this guy just can't keep his mouth shut canny no he really can't and I don't I'm not gonna lie I really think this guy got railroaded when I hear him talk about what happened and I said at the time too like I there's part of me that feels like this guy really truly got railroaded I disagree ran out of his own company well I see where you would come up with that and I know what you're going to make that argument and I can't I can't say you're wrong I just disagree because he showed poor judgment but I have eaten Papa John's more the last year that I have than the previous ten I will tell you I think they're making a better product Papa John Slattery disagrees any he admitted to lying about something that is hilarious and we'll tell you what is next but first John let's talk about today I gotta say I go in every single week to many weight loss of south him before my way and it's right on Kennedy Boulevard great location and I had hit a spot where it was like two or three pounds a week and I was feeling really really good about that this is technically the fifth week the beginning of my six weeks so I go in for my way in today I step on that scale that breaks down your entire body composition gives you all the details first piece of good news you're very well hydrated look at that my blood pressure is great my health is great but I am down as of this week a nother seven point eight pounds how is it possible which makes that a total loss of twenty seven point eight pounds I could ride around up to a twenty eight but just for this moment I'll say twenty seven point eight pounds and it is all because of my friends of many weight loss of south LL start this this was the end of the fifth week so in five weeks I've lost twenty eight pounds and I feel I really truly feel better than I've ever felt I am lighter I everything about my mind feels clear and you can do the same you can start losing this weight today with a doctor supervised.

Naomi Klein Anne Klein
Understanding Eco-Fascism

Eyes on Conservation Podcast

09:53 min | 2 years ago

Understanding Eco-Fascism

"Eko fascism ever heard of it or thought about it seems paradoxical but is it or is it a part of American history that has been there all along in an article dated August seven twenty nineteen G. Q.. Magazine yes yes G. Q.. Defined Eko Fascism as quote a belief that the only way to deal with climate change is through eugenics and the brutal suppression of migrants and quote. It's a philosophy that has roots in the American environmental movement. Dating back to the eighteen hundreds rate right down to the creation of our national park system. But let's start off with the recent events that inspired me to produce this episode on August Third Twenty nine a shooter in El Paso Texas Killed Twenty people at a Walmart near the border with Mexico. Nineteen minutes before the first nine one one call a hate filled. Anti immigrant manifesto appeared online. That was strangely called an inconvenient truth in the document the author makes his horrific case for ethnic cleansing as a solution to the climate crisis. I ask myself could. The shooter's deadly words and actions have been inspired by the rhetoric that has been spoken tweeted by the forty fifth president of the United States who has verbally attacked communities of color on more than one occasion this time. It's House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah. Cummings he wrote wrote. This Cummings district is disgusting rat and rodent infested mess. If he spent more time in Baltimore maybe he could help clean up this very dangerous and filthy place. No human being would want to live there infested usually reserved for references to rodents and and insects. But we've seen the president invoke infestation to criticize lawmakers before you see a pattern here just two weeks ago president trump to protect four minority congresswoman. Why don't they go back to the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came reminder three of them were born here all of them are or American infested? He says a week before his inauguration January two thousand seventeen congressman. John Lewis should spend more time on fixing in helping his district which is in horrible shape and falling apart not to mention crime infested. Donald Trump has tweeted more than forty three thousand times James. He's insulted thousands of people many different types of people but when he tweets about infestation it's about black and Brown people September number two thousand fourteen at the height of an urgent health. Emergency why are we sending thousands of ill-trained soldiers into IMBOULA. If Ebola infested areas of Africa bring the plague to the. US Obama is so stupid infested. He says there's a revolution going on in California. So many sanctuary areas is one out of this ridiculous crime infested and breeding concept infested. He says the President says about congressman. Cummings district that no human would would wanNA live there. You know who did Mr President I did. From the day I was brought home from the hospital to the day left for college and a lot of people put care about still do their challenges. No doubt but people are proud of their commuted. One sound self-righteous but people get up and go to work there the care for their families there. They love their children. WHO pledge allegiance to the flag? Just like people. Oh who live in districts of Congressman. Who Support You sir? They are Americans too. We'll be right back. After after the El Paso tragedy. I started reading articles that referred to the term Eko fascism. There seemed to be more than one. Example of racially motivated terrorist wrist attacks in the news from Christchurch New Zealand to Pittsburgh Pennsylvania to California but none so directly connected to the climate crisis as the El Paso shooting which made me deeply concerned about the ways in which humans will react when the crisis worsens. Will it bring bring out the best in humanity or the worst. I began to think more deeply about the foundations of America. Correct me if I'm wrong but post colonial. The American history seems to be filled with examples of ECO fascist ideas and axe our very own declaration of independence refers to indigenous indigenous people of this continent as merciless Indian savages. And yet. This is still a document that we celebrate every year with a national holiday and the principles of manifest destiny. An eminent domain made way for a government led genocide children being separated from their parents put in detention centers and even killed by the American government. These practices are also not new from the slave trade to Indian residential schools. American history has already set precedence every single day that we wake up we are living out our lives on stolen land. This is our history. It's history that we shouldn't turn away from no matter how hard it is to look at it. I know this is a dark subject. But it's an important one one if we don't look directly at our shadows cells. How will we ever heal in a recent interview? In The Guardian activist writer. Naomi Klein referred referred to this concept as climate barbarism. because she connected the dots. So well I'm going to read her words here. She states quote white supremacy emerged. Not just because people felt like thinking of ideas that we're going to get a lot of people killed but because it was useful to protect barbaric but highly profitable actions. The age of scientific racism begins alongside the transatlantic slave trade. It is a rationale for that brutality. If we were going to respond to climate change by fortress seeing our borders then of course the theories that would justify that that create. These hierarchies orchids of humanity will come surging back. There have been signs of that for years but it is getting harder to deny because you have killers who are screaming it from the rooftops unquote and then Naomi speaks of the environmental movement quote when you have a movement that is overwhelmingly Wellm Ingley representative of the most privileged sector of society. Then the approach is going to be much more fearful of change because people who you have a lot to lose tend to be more fearful of change whereas people who have a lot to gain will tend to fight harder for it. I have had many many conversations with environmentalists over the years where they seem to believe that. By linking fighting climate change with fighting poverty or fighting racial justice. It's it's GonNa make the fight harder. We have to get out of this quote. Mike crisis is bigger than your crisis. I we save the planet and then we fight poverty and racism them and violence against women unquote. That doesn't work that alienates the people who would fight hardest for change unquote as middle middle class educated white women WHO considers herself an environmentalist for social justice. An ally in the struggle for racial equality and racial equity. I felt compelled up to bring the issues of Echo Fascism and environmental racism to the Isan Conservation. podcast I hope this episode shines light on our shadow selves an offers inspiration on how to move forward will start this episode with a close. The camps protest attended on August Thirty First Twenty nineteen scene in downtown San Francisco. I'm on my way down to the close the camps protest in downtown San Francisco right in front of the ICE building. This protest today is part of the month of momentum that has been a month long a series of events and protests and ways to get involved in the movement to close down the concentration camps that are are at the border of the United States and Mexico so every day when I turn on the news and I hear more stories about the conditions of the camps and the fact that children are in cages. Children are dying people are dying in the camps. I I'm I'm basically as heartbroken and petrified as I am about the climate crisis CICIS I see these both the climate craigslist and our humanitarian crisis. That's happening at the border right now. As one in the same basically the way that we're treating a world is the way that we treat ourselves and other people and eight and so I needed to do something and so I decided to come down and spend my Saturday morning here. At the close the camps is protest down at ice in San Francisco on August thirty first twenty

President Trump Congressman San Francisco Cummings EKO Naomi Klein Mexico United States El Paso Texas California Walmart Donald Trump American Government Mr President I Baltimore John Lewis Barack Obama El Paso
"naomi klein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

09:29 min | 3 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Less popular school of thought sees Russia under Putin as well we can declining power the book the Russia trap. or or. this is the Thom Hartmann program welcome back to American here with you and in the studio with me which is like super cool is Naomi Klein she has a new book out on fire the burning case for green new deal tonight she and I will be at work you will principally be I'll be kinda am scene I guess the thing tonight at Powell's books in in Beaverton and then from there and that's today's Wednesday tomorrow Thursday you're gonna be in Oakland at the first congregational church Friday you're gonna be in San Matteo Saturday you're gonna be in Chico California I have done these kinds of bookstores in fact I did one just died three months ago for for my book on guns and boy it it just runs a ragged I I wish you the very best on. thanks thanks for joining us it's great to be with you Tom and Naomi Klein dot org by the way if you want to get tickets are you get more interest in information on this you have a list yeah there you go you're traveling less these days so it's so it's fun I haven't been I haven't done a west coast speaking tour in awhile it's nice to be back I'm glad you can act with folks I'm glad yeah you and I've talked to over the years about a variety of things from capitalism to climate and in your book brings a lot of this stuff together you know from weather was no longer our shock doctrine or this changes everything you know so it just brilliant brilliant writing that you do what's what's the principal message of on fire. well I think the most important thing to understand about the moment where at is that we are living a time of three fires we've got the climate fires the the whether it's in the Pacific Northwest every summer these seasons of smoke we're seeing wild fires yeah in the arctic Siberia places where you're not supposed to have wild fires as grace gratitude Burke says our house is on fire and we've known this for a long time but that's not the only kind of fires we are faced with facing we also have that political fires of the of the far right that increasingly our building political power by creating this it in group the protected the in group and that all of these out group others and petting the in group against the out group give me an examiner. here in the United States it's obvious with trump and and the the the specter of the invading army of immigrants but you know he's been prowling around with moody lately and mode he does the same thing with the in group of Hindus the out groups of Muslims we see a similar MO with a lot of these figures and that's a militarization of whole of of borders mass incarceration of these outgroup others it keeps people fighting with each other and it keeps them freed to plunder and boasts an arrow is doing the same thing in Brazil and they there is an outright war on truth on faxed him boss and are just addressed the United Nations and said the Amazon wasn't on fire actually it's just a big misinformation campaign I think there's a connection between the sort of that the rise of the far right and the fact that we are in this moment where climate the climate crisis is no longer a future crisis we're living at work in it I think people understand that we are now in an era where where more and more people are going to be on the move looking for safety looking to share their remaining habitable places on our planet and I think that's why we're seeing ace eight a resurgence of ideologies that just explicitly rank human life these people are better than those people and if that's true well then it's okay to let them drown to let them die to lock them up indefinitely and we're seeing this we're seeing in the Mediterranean here we're seeing your we're seeing it with the Australian government with their off shore and migration detention camps so. there is a third fire as well which is the fire is out of this growing climate justice movement and we just saw it burn pretty brightly on Monday with four million people around the world participating in these use organized crime it strikes but not just young people adults joining different sectors joining like tech workers and so it's kind of a race against time because we have a little bit more than a decade to cut global emissions in half if we are going to preserve you know anything like a a habitable planet so yeah that's I guess the message of my book is that that third fire the fire of our movements has to has to be powerful enough to take on the fires of the far right and I really think it's a green new deal that is our ticket for building that kind of broad movement that broad coalition and and I want to get to that in just a moment but the it here in the United States were actually seen climate refugees on our southern border I mean I was I was. yeah I'd read this stuff but then NBC went down to Guatemala and tracked back into some of these remote parts of Guatemala that a lot of these refugees are coming from and found literally places where people were starving to death because they're in the fifth year of a drought and there's literally no food that eating grass and tree marks and things and and this is the source of many of these people who are on our southern border the Donald Trump is throwing their children's in jail and and and in a passing out billions of dollars to his buddies in the private prison industry even as he cuts hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Central America much of which was going to help farmers who are dealing with drought way and none of this is ever talked about in the context of climate change you know and I think they're very conscious of it though because if you look at what the trump administration has done with its immigration policy one of the first things they they did is take aim at TPS temporary protected status right purse for Haitian patience than for Salvadorans to these are millions of people who are in the United States under a program that provides status temporary status to people who are displaced by an ex some sort of extreme event in their countries the other is a refuge yes refugees but specifically people refugees from and when it lifts the good that the it lists the basis on which you can get temporary protected status can be worn by eight which is true for for for other ways of getting at refugees status but it specifically lists natural disasters and that's very significant because climate refugees you know we're talking about them the climate refugees actually don't exist under international law there is no such thing as a as a climate refugee under international refugee law it's dated because that it because our convention in before climate. from an earthquake well you actually can't. refugees from warns him at you know human you can get refugee status for because of human rights abuses but not because of natural disasters but TPS with an exception EPS like people from there if people from Haiti in the United States got T. P. S. because of the earthquake in Haiti and so they they have really understood that this is a loophole yes it's a loop Amy in the administration that allows people to get status because of natural disasters earthquakes aren't connected to climate change but super storms are and we just saw with the the the Bahamas that people are being refused entry to the United States and trump is calling them drug dealers you know in the aftermath of a cat category five hurricane right so I think they absolutely understand that that that that more and more people are going to be seeking haven because of the climate crisis and this is their climate change adaptation. their plan is is for the for testing of the borders and it's it's getting more and more explicit as much as anybody I know you're a citizen of the world he yeah I'm curious your thoughts on this whole impeachment fall overall here the the the and and and this transcript that you know I we've been talking about the last hour the the whistle blowers how the world views yes how should be viewing this Frank I mean well first of all I think it's a very good thing that finally. hi Nancy Pelosi has decided that enough is enough and at and has begun impeachment proceedings I think you could have it could could be gone before I'm glad it's happening now I'm glad it's and and I do think that it even though we know that the Senate is not going to. impeach him this will hurt him despite their bravado it's going to help our reelection is not I don't think it's gonna help and I think anything that keeps trump from getting a second term is incredibly important his what.

Russia Putin Naomi Klein Thom Hartmann three months
"naomi klein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Thinking beyond trump can temper tantrums or dangerous incrementalism of the supposedly Sirius center because our house is on fire and straws. going to cut it it's time to grab a fire hose. Naomi Klein the renowned author our award winning journalist and activist speaking in a new video from the intercept when we come back Naomi will join us to talk about her new book on fire the burning case for a green new deal stay with us. yeah. one way or another by Blondie this is democracy now.

Naomi Klein Sirius us.
"naomi klein" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:49 min | 3 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Hi I'm Amy Goodman. You Count on democracy now to stay focused on the stories that matter most we count on you to support our independent journalism democracy micro now is funded by you not by the oil the gas and the coal companies when we covered the climate crisis not by the weapons manufacturers when we cover war if everyone everyone who tunes into this podcast gave just four dollars we could cover our operating costs for the entire year really that's all it would take please do your part today by visiting us at democracy now dot. Org and thank you so much. This is democracy now. Democracy now dot org the warrant piece report. Naomi Klein is out with her new book. Today it's called on fire the burning case for for a green new deal and she joins us in studio for part two of our conversation. Naomi we ended part one of our conversation by talking about the presidential official candidates playing a clip of Bernie Sanders talking about the green new deal playing a clip of Senator Elizabeth Warren. I WANNA get your overall picture now about this debate within within the Democratic Party how much focus on the climate crisis with the DNC holding a vote the Democratic National Committee Tom Perez the chairman of the DNC prevailing linked. There would not be a debate specifically on the climate crisis because he another say before you know it they'll be debate on every other issue. How do you respond well. I I think it's a fundamental failure to understand the intersectional nature of this crisis right. I mean the climate crisis impacts everything from economic inequality to international relations to war to whether or not we're going to have a fair economic system to femicide Emma side. I mean in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. We have seen a huge spike in domestic violence in murders of women. Basically climate change makes everything worse. I write whatever the stresses your society is under you add climate stresses on top of that and it gets worse so there are ways of talking about climate change indeed we need to be talking about climate change in an intersectional way that shows how we can't pry apart from from all of these other issues in the absence of the DNC that gets this that is going to create a platform for candidates to talk about how these issues are connected. We really have to rely on the candidates themselves who say they support a green new deal to do it in their stump speeches in a non climate theme debates. They can't wait for moderators to ask them about climate change. I mean if you say you support a green new deal which most of the candidates the say they do not Biden. Most of the other leading candidates say that they do. You can't wait for the moderator to ask you specifically weekly about climate change. This is your economic plan. This is related to what what your foreign policy is. This is related to your racial justice platform so this this is really the story of the next economy so the the candidates need to seize the reins and I think some of them are doing a better job than others. I think actually frankly all of them have a lot of work to do to really weave this into the stump speech so you're not waiting for the DNC. Hand you the opportunity to talk about your holistic. Nick Vision so evaluate the candidates positions on the climate crisis where you think they stand okay well. I don't have time to go through each one I think that the idea that that Joe Biden is a safe choice is not true on any level. I don't think he's safe electorally but I also so don't think that he's safe when it comes to climate because he's still within this paradigm of you know we can't spend too much. We can't do too much you know this `incrementalist approach that that actually leads us to this incredibly unsafe place which is a warming world of three to four degrees additional warming so but set by the the side. I don't think it will come as a huge surprise to your listeners and viewers and I'm not Biden Fan. I think the biggest difference that that I would point to has to do with Sanders and Warren as it relates to climate and war and to climate and and International Affairs I you know I think they both have some very very strong climate policies. I think it was very good that Warren adopted so much of of INS lease platform warm sanders is talking about spending a lot more money that is significant but he's also talking about spending a lot more money internationally one of the things that we're hearing from a lot of different candidates Bates including Warren is that the US can lead by example and warned talks about economic patriotism as it relates to the green economy so basically spend a lot of money converting US manufacturing to you know from manufacturing the infrastructure of a fossil also fuel economy to a green economy so solar panels wind turbines and then sell those products to the world right. I don't think that's economic patriotism. I think economic imperialism realism I think the US doesn't lead by example the US has to lead based on historical responsible responsibility the US is the world's largest historical circle emitter it is embedded within the treaties that the US has signed the climate treaties the US has signed that the US owes a debt to the global double south to have the resources to develop their own economies so I don't have to just by made in the US solar panels they need to be able to to develop their own green green manufacturing and they do need resources from the US and other large historical committed to leapfrog over fossil fuels to get that economy at also to prepare for the impacts packs of climate change that are already locked in so I think Sandra's honestly is the only candidate that is really reckoning with that historical responsibilities talking about spending two hundred billion in dollars for climate financing and this is really the first time we've had that that type of approach another big difference that I think is worth really wrestling with has to do with what Sandra's talked about in terms of greening the military it is true that the that the US military is a major procure of good and it would make a big difference if it was procuring goods that were low-carbon but the fact is that war itself is an ecological disaster and most of the wars that the the United States fights are in areas with a whole lot of oil and that is not by coincidence so I think the idea that we battle climate change by painting painting the Military Green frankly a bit of an absurdity. I understand why people think that it is more politically palatable but I think we need to be honest about the fact that you know. We need to get a lot of the money that is currently being spent on arms on these disastrous wars disastrous from on every three level first and foremost humanitarian disasters but also ecological disasters. We need to move that money over to building a peaceful and just and zero carbon economy now make line. I want to thank you for being with us. People should go to part one of the discussion that Long Alison. I have with Naomi Klein on in her new book out today on fire the burning case for green new deal. Naomi Klein is the renown author also author of this changes everything capitalism versus the climate and the shock doctrine and no logo and more she's a correspondent at the intercept and the inaugural Gloria Steinem chair of media culture and feminist studies at Rutgers University to see part one of our discussion. Go to democracy now dot ORG. I'm Amy Goodman. Thanks so much..

us DNC Naomi Klein Amy Goodman Joe Biden Senator Elizabeth Warren Bernie Sanders Democratic Party Hurricane Maria Gloria Steinem Tom Perez Emma Long Alison Rutgers University Nick Vision
"naomi klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:01 min | 3 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Me trapped the interview but we started off by her showing you what else is in her sketchbook this is my third thirty co slash India sketchbook it has drawings from the recent protests in port three core and also of a farmer's March in India last year I've been pronouncing for the record. mobs with the light still wait you were in India what with the farmers protesting about and who we are covering up for and what was your role there the farmers are protesting a climate change and also these on payable dats and I believe it was over a million people from all over India they walked to Delhi and the protest in front of the parliament can I have a look at one of the farmers markets pictures yes look at the US. this is incredible thank you yeah these they have these unionized seek guys and they were very very handsome dapper guys even though they've been walking for god knows how many miles today see them somewhere do you publish them I'm here because your books also meant my patron saints when you do that kind of work do you have a purpose in mind are you I'm just recording this you know without one I I just wanted to to get it down I mean I think I I could say I have all sorts of socially improving purposes but ultimately. I think all artists are motivated by fundamental greed to capture life in a fundamental great to draw and you know if I do something improving that's cherry on top but I just wanted to capture it yeah I have the site may brothers of the garden which is your latest photo yeah and it's a collaboration with tomorrow on his son yes whose really amazing Syrian racer can you tell us what the brothers of the gun is a bank's brothers of the gun is a model ones memoir that starts in the early days of the revolution with him flinging pack tear gas canisters at the cops and takes the reader through. the. decimation of the revolutions hopes and through the occupation by ISIS right when you read this you go insides raca which is was physically impossible for a lot of certainly westerners for most of us in the world but he brings you in there absolutely I mean model and I we started working together in two thousand and fourteen when we only knew each other through Twitter and he had I think the only account that was tweeting in English from inside ISIS occupied Rucka who's learning Arabic and he was helping me with that. and then one day I asked him I said you might want to have any photos on your phone just showing your life in America he said I I don't but I can take some and I said it's not gonna be a dangerous my one he's like not ask my city don't worry about it you know lying of course and he went around risking his life to take these photos that showed I the truth of the ISIS occupation in something he would have been probably beheaded on tape for there was so little space for like a working class Syrian due to publishes thoughts in the U. S. publishing industry that was a shame and so we decided to reside secrete this together and we co wrote it together I drew it but he are directed at I consider illustrations also equally has because whole interesting well you know it's not like I had photos for most of them yeah for most of them. he was explaining what he saw me and then I'm doing sketches and he's telling me I'm wrong and can reference in back and forth and of course you know we're dealing with the book it was in you know all the horrors devices and but there's also this one illustration it really stuck with me which is he's talking to his garden like for a while I guess people do all sorts of things to cope with like living under that kind of stress yeah I wanted to try the the sprockets and even though there is. horrors of the type that I have never experienced in my life people also live and they also fall in love and they planned gardens and they try to you know make make lives for themselves and I've often felt that sometimes the view of America towards our countries in the Arab world is that these are perpetually war torn countries and because of that it almost makes America more comfortable bombing them because they think these countries are just always wore turn these countries are always rubble these countries don't have anything of value so speaking of rubble let's check in on your drawing of my face. I was a coming along it's going. Ali as I've been out here trying this this very complicated microphone in front of you yeah I know I think it's an omni might come out of it so it goes all around but I'm yes sometimes people come to comedy shows and draw often but this soon this is incredible thank you yeah they're often like really hammers I draw there's nothing worse than when someone drives you and it's it's bad you have to like kind of smile I've had this I like people John man I am I my nose I look like it was like an upside down six or something like some sort of misogynistic caricature and I'm like oh thank you that looks that looks great really please. don't post. and so could you describe your drawing style for vBulletin that can see what you're doing right now I mean I don't know I don't know if I have a specific school I I think I'm someone who's incredibly impatient and that's why I draw so fast which turned out to be very good for journalism because I could get things down really fast you know before before the people moved there yeah for a cop found how I was doing yeah I was very influenced by blues the track that French painter who did the can can stuff and by Aubrey Beardsley out by Diego Rivera go yeah Ralph Stedman obviously so one reason work of your is that went viral is this very cool video by Naomi Klein and the intercept Alexandria because you're Cortez is now raising her vision of the green new deal and we see this time lapse footage and it's you illustrating watches saying it's just like your hand holding a paintbrush using ink and water colors and then those drawings come to life before our eyes as she speaking yeah. the bullet train from New York to DC so it starts out with a see sitting in the slick sleek modern super cool you know bullet train looking a little bit older she is a seasoned Sonntag a streak of white all right. very cool white tailored suit and what we want to do with this video is we want to give this a feeling of time travel the wave began.

India Delhi Naomi Klein US. Aubrey Beardsley Ali vBulletin Sonntag Cortez John Diego Rivera Ralph Stedman New York DC one day
"naomi klein" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:38 min | 3 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"It would donate three hundred thousand to relief efforts ExxonMobil's two thousand eighteen quarterly profits six billion dollars three hundred thousand dollars is less than seven minutes of their two thousand eighteen prophets author and activist Naomi Klein re tweeted Patel's tweet adding tell Exxon to pay its climate debts starting right now. About Nagarajan response. I absolutely agree with that analysis from sales and from Naomi, I mean, Mozambique did not create this climate crisis. Our people have contributed almost nothing to the climate crisis. But this is the eye of the climate crisis that it affects those who did not do anything to create it. And it affects does the most. So the poorest and the most vulnerable people on the planet are going to be affected the most, and that's what's happening in Mozambique right now, and we really want to pull out those responsible. So this is about the rich countries. Amy way you're sitting at the moment the United States. This is about Europe, and Australia, and Japan and for yours yours. Societies have built up your societies using the fossil fuels. And now, we know this is what it's caused in the atmosphere. So we call out the rich countries, even the UK government has promised some some amount of money, but the UK go home in just a few days ago has approved a new coal mine in their territory soul. This is an absolute affront to you know, we we need to deal with the climate crisis. We need to stop dirty energy dirty and harmful energies everywhere. But this is about historical responsibilities. So that needs to happen in the northern countries. I to stop fossil fuels to stop dirty and harmful energies. And then as you say, we don't want this and our country's either. So our organization Zsa zombie. Untold is it again. Exploited gas in the very north of Mozambique right under Tanzania. And it's ExxonMobil that's involved. It's any from Italy that's involved, and it's an darker, which is another US corporation, and we have been working with a group of allies from all over the world because there is a huge loss for this gasfield in Muslim be. And we are going to fight because we don't want energy in our countries eat up. I'm in seventy percent of the people of Mozambique don't have access to electric, and obviously the situation is going to get much worse after this disaster. Because of how many power lines have been knocked off, and because of how many villages have disappeared. But this is not the way to get energy. We don't have any more space to keep emitting. These these greenhouse gas emissions and to have this horrible dirty energy, which is affecting people on the ground. We pushing for repayment of the climate debt, which means we didn't create the crisis. So those who did give us the finance to be able to actually deal with this on the ground. And you know, we want to we want to fight for people centered renewable energy for our people. That's the future that we want to see. And of course, this disaster has showed us that we need we need to be able to build up the resilience of our people we need to have, sir. Survival strategies for people because the ocean is coming into people's houses. I mean agriculture is going to start failing. We're seeing impacts intensifying all over the world, and how are the poorest and the most vulnerable people who don't have these strategies of survival. How are they actually going to live? So this is what we are fighting for repayment of the climate debt. Stop the dirty and harmful energies. And let's. Let's have an energy transformation towards people centered renewable energy that's what we're fighting for dip day. But I was wondering if you can end by talking about the significance of the climate school strike led by Greta Tinbergen, Sweden, who's just been nominated for a Nobel peace prize. The sixteen year old climate activists millions of young people walked out of schools across the world. And also what's happening in the United States with this new congress. The most diverse congress in US history with Alexandra Castro Cortes, the New York. Congress member pushing for the green new deal what this looks like from your vantage point in Mozambique, and right now in Malaysia where you're at a climate summit the same kind of tree that's historically the biggest greenhouse gas. And where President Trump has pulled the United States out of the UN. Climate summit and the Paris peace accord, well, not the summit they go to push fossil fuels, but the Paris climate accord. Absolutely wonderful question. Actually, we've been meeting with some of the the Malaysian activists to organize the strike in the city of Penang last week on Friday. And I think it's wonderful. What's happening across the world initiated from Greta Tandberg in Sweden who are team from friends of the ads were Witter and allies were winter in in the UN climate negotiations, lots December, I think it's absolutely wonderful. And she's what she's saying about system. Change is very very critical because that is what is going to take that level of transformation is what we need to be able to stop the climate cry. Isos, but also to serve the people who the current system never served those who don't have electrical and those who struggled to have food on the table. I mean, we're talking about a world of increasing inequality. So we as the Muslim because of the international we're really pushing for this transformational agenda, and I was really happy to see Greta actually talking about it. However, I don't think that the school strikers in some of the other countries are actually making those leaks. And and that's where I think we want to also a connection those of us from solid from the southern countries. We would love to talk to you. We would love to talk to the school. Strikers, we would love to talk to those in the parliament to the US who are who are pushing this green new deal to say, this is absolutely wonderful. What you're doing? Let's not forget about equity. Let's not forget about the salt. Let's not forget about historical responsibility. So I think I think the war. Happening is wonderful. We want to make sure that they realized we are also in the boat with them. And there is a respond. They have not used to stopping climate change. But actually doing it an equitable way. So I'm offering myself. I'm available anytime to speak to school strikers to speak with people in the US. Onerous for allies. We've just been talking about this at our climate Justice meetings. We really want to reach out we really need to strengthen the the narrative of equity and of historical responsibility within the within the climate within the green, you do you like that are wonderful opportunities. Remember, I wanna thank you very much as you talk about remembering the south day. But now gar with friends of the earth international climate Justice and energy coordinator, usually based in Maputo, Mozambique. Joining us now from a climate Justice conference in Penang, Malaysia, this is democracy. Now when we come back Lakota historian Nick ESTES on his new book. Our history is the future. Stay with us. Directions by Rio's, featuring nocco,.

United States Mozambique ExxonMobil Penang Naomi Klein Malaysia Sweden UK Exxon congress Europe Paris Amy UN Greta Tinbergen
"naomi klein" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"naomi klein" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"An incentive to do it right there. You don't need to have the government force you to do it. So. How really gets me though, is that she seems to have no sense of proportion. Somebody who was asked how much would it cost to turn our entire electrical grid and into using renewable resources instead of coal oil gas, or whatever, and they calculated it'll be about thirteen trillion dollars. That's a lot more than our current electrical grid is worth right now. It's only worth about a trillion dollars. I was thirteen times as much, but she doesn't want to just replace all actress ity, she replace all transportation, all all residential heating all industrial use of fossil fuels with renewables, and to do that that would do at least four times as much. We've only got a minute here trillion dollars. We've only got a minute here. Right. I gotta come from printing money. It doesn't work backup even farther back. We've only got a minute here. How how insane is this? From this is not pure, socialism and a planners paradise. I don't know what is is. Are there people in the environmental community who actually thinks this woman is sane? Yes. And I come back. I mean, the environmental community is essentially been taken over by socialist. And I come back to Naomi Klein who wrote a few years ago that global warming has.

Naomi Klein trillion dollars thirteen trillion dollars