20 Episode results for "Nanna"

Want your voice heard on Should This Exist?

Should This Exist?

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Want your voice heard on Should This Exist?

"Hi. My name is Bailey, and I'm producer on should this exist. I'm twenty nine years old. And if I had a choice, I would live to be eighty five. Up until the end, I would be healthy and active with a clear mind and memory, but I worry, whether it's possible to have both I'm thinking of my great grandmother nanna who died two years ago at the age of ninety four the last few years of her life were tough. She broke bones lost most of her friends to age in disease and talked often about being ready to die. I would love to have nana's longevity, but I don't want the finish line of my life to be sad and painful, our next episode dives into these topics death aging and the human quest to live longer than ever before. And we want to hear from you. If you could take a pill that lets you live to be a hundred and fifty would you take it? What would you do with that extra time record a voice memo answering, this prompt, an Email it to should this exist at wait. What dot com by June tenth? You may be featured on the next episode of should this exists.

nanna Bailey nana producer twenty nine years two years
2 Bears 1 Cave w/ Tom Segura & Bert Kreischer Intro

2 Bears 1 Cave with Tom Segura & Bert Kreischer

01:11 min | 1 year ago

2 Bears 1 Cave w/ Tom Segura & Bert Kreischer Intro

"Hey guys, this is Tom Sahera. And there's quite sure, and we have a new podcast coming called to bears one cave. You can download you can subscribe, you can rate and review, it, we encourage and appreciate all of it will also be available on YouTube. If you wanna watch the show on the year mom's house, podcasts YouTube channel. What's the new pod has going to be about? Well, it's just too good. Friends, Bert ni-. And we're having fun. You know, we're sitting around shooting, the shit budget nonsense going to be mean to me. I don't know probably there's going to be food and drinks because I know you like that, and you can tell your ridiculous stories you want to wrestle, the nanna condo. And I want. Yeah. It'll be all kinds of fun, stuff like that. So make sure you download you subscribe, you rate, you review it, and we will be here at least twice a month for you. Can't wait new episodes or coming soon.

YouTube nanna condo Bert ni Tom Sahera
The Nebulous Nana  written by Jess Judd

Story Time

13:54 min | 1 year ago

The Nebulous Nana written by Jess Judd

"Guys, we have a very special story fleet today. It was written for a couple of Allison's. We have a very sick family member. The stories cold the navy Lassana, and it was written by me. Jess jet. Andre it's time to leave Leyla code as she stumped down the hall to her brother's Andre looked up from his during as she burst through the door. Mom's been calling you for ten minutes, we need to go visit manner in the hospital KO k-, I'm coming under said looking down at his during he'd have to finish it when they go home. He grabbed a comic to read at the hospital and followed his to step back down the whole an out the front door. They climbed into the car and hit it out towards the hospital to visit the children's nanna. How many times we visited now Leyla asked him other as they wove their way through the Los Angeles traffic, I think I've lost count sit on dre. We've been so many times, but the doctors are trying their best aunt they lay the aust-. The mom noted. Of course, they are lighter. The job is to help people who seek and do whatever they can to help them. Get will and make them comfortable, but will not get betta Osler my mind just full of questions this morning. I Elena they will do what they can. But they're never any guarantees when people get sick Layla and Andreessen gazing out of the window as their costly took them closer and closer to nanna lay though is thinking about all the fund troops. They liked to go on. And Andre thought about how nice it was when they just snuggled up on the catch. I watched movies together when they finally arrived at the hospital. Mom Papa and the old climbed out and. Walked up and through the front does most mornings when they arrived to visit nanna the doctors, and nurses will all rushing around. There were lots of things bay ping. And everyone seemed very busy the smoothing. However, things were a little different whilst there was still lots of beeping happening. And some people seemed to be very busy. They also pass small groups of doctors, and nurses who will huddled together talking. They were talking very fast and seemed to be very excited about something. Linda and Andre notice the strange behavior, but didn't think any more about it until they reach the floor of the hospital within Anna was this seemed to be even more people standing around tool king. And by the time, I need nana's room that were very curious about what was going on. Just as they were about to walk through the door of nana's room. A very flustered looking doctor came bustling out and rent straight into the mom. Oh, I'm sorry. Please do excuse me. The doctor said as she closed the door behind when she looked up her eyes widened. Oh, it's you before you go in. I think I. I need to speak with the doctor strutted Andrea and looked the door very confused. What's wrong? They must did something happen is narrow k the duct small briefly. But then her expression became worried again. Well, she began we spike with nanna last night about trying a new type of treatment, we told her that it was only just after the experimental phase. And we went sorta it would do anything to help. We didn't think it would have any negative side effects nanna asked to try the new treatment. So we got his set up straight away. Things seem to be going fine last night. But. This morning when we went to check on her. She the doctor trial. She want cried Layla and Andre the same time. She she disappeared said the doctor in a voice that sounded like even she didn't believe what she was saying everyone to mounts open and is wide in disbelief. What do you mean she disappeared? She got up and left, mama. The doctor shook her head. No. I mean, she literally disappeared one minute. She was there and the next it was like I was looking at thousands of tiny specks of lot all hovering over the bid. I blinked. And then there was nothing. I just can't explain it. Layla and Andre looked at the doctor trying to understand what she was saying. The mum thanked the doctor and asked to please see the room the doctor opened the door and let the family file into the room. Softly closing the door after them. Layla Andre and they mum stood down at the bid Winona had been lying. The last time. They had come to visit him. I don't understand Louis bid. How can she just be gone? Andre asked demaim says on the side of the bid impacted the bed damn as if she was just double checking that nanna wasn't hiding somewhere under the covers. I don't know. I'm sure the doctors will do what they can to try and find too though, I don't know with. I would even start looking the mom said she side, a heavy sigh and took lows hand. Why don't we go home? We can't really do anything here. And I'm sure the Dutch was will call us if they find too. Layla and mom walked out of the room. But Andre lingered for a minute. Looking at the bid. He pulled up. The covers fluffed up the pillar. And then placed his comic on top of the bid just in case, you get bored. Nanna it whispered before following his family out of the room as he closed the door. He almost thought he felt breath of wind brushing past his doc, Brown hair. It continued down the hall without looking back. But if he had he might have seen the pages of his comic rippling in what appeared to be a breeze the began an ended entirely within those little room. The ride home was a quiet one. They had all nine that at some point in time that would have to say goodbye to nanna. But this was just also sudden and unexplained when they arrive time mom wanted into the kitchen to stop preparing lunch. Andre windy his room. I went back to his during while Layla Setina lounge watching TV suddenly the cartoon she was watching was cut off. And the local news reporter appeared on the screen. We apologize to the interruption in your regularly scheduled program. Never in my news, costing Korea. Did I think I would ever report on something this incredible early this morning? There was a band code up in which full thieves locked down the local Bank and held the tellers and customers hostage. They demanded that the Bank manager open the vote and give them all of the money inside. However, I witness accounts from inside the Bank, tell of some kind of supernatural fullest that appeared within the foyer of the Bank. We cry. To ever voter Suzy Mabel, and who is on the sane, Susie. Layla watched as the TV flicked to an image of lots of police and other people standing around outside the Bank. The report was speaking with the person it looks like he was probably the Bank manager. Yes. That's right. Tom. I have here with me Bill Jenkins who is the manager at this branch of the Bank of America. Mr. Jenkins, could you please tell us what you soul. Mr. Jenkins looked at the camera. What faced and shaking oil are could barely believe my eyes one minute. The thieves was standing there looking Maine and in suddenly they would distracted by something on the ceiling. It looks like sounds of tiny stars would descending through the ceiling to hold over our heads. Leyla who had been absent mindedly fiddling with him mom's fine and not really paying attention suddenly setup straight instead at the TV tiny stars. She thought mom, you might wanna come see this. She. Code through to the kitchen. Mom came in wiping, her hands on the towel. Did you say thousands of tiny stas, Mr. Jenkins the reporter? Yes. I know. It sounds ridiculous. But they would just hundreds and thousands of tiny pinpricks of lot hovering in the air, though, a pink and purple and blue and silver, and almost any other Kelly could think of this Eve's would distracted by the stars and stood there looking up at the ceiling. Then suddenly the stars started moving around. They all just sort of rushed around running into one another, and then they began to bunch to give a almost like a swarm of bees they look like Mr. Jenkins looked around hopelessly as if he still couldn't believe what he saw. I mean, they almost looked like there was swarming as as as a person. It was incredible Mr. Jenkin started to laugh. Uncontrollably. And to mix had to leave him away to the ambulance to calm him. Damn well, Tom you heard it right here. And it's not only Mr. Jenkins testimony. I believe we have just gained access to the security footage and to various different shots of the occurrence from people so phones inside the Bank. Mr jenkins. It seems was not wrong. The TV cut to the security footage from inside the foyer of the Bank. They're above the heads of those inside appeared a cloud of tiny speaks of lot. They seem to come together to form the shape of a person a woman, in fact, mum Layla begin doesn't that look like Andrei getting and quickly mom code? Andrea came in and mom pulled him down onto the couch. What she said quietly in response to his questioning glance. They watched as the vaguely familiar looking swarm of lot distracted disarmed and detained the would be thieves. Then the police came racing in and then lost sight of the lines. The TV switched to footage from someone's phone. They saw the police handcuffing them in and leading them from the Bank, then just before the video ended. They watched in amazement as the swarm of lights lazily floated past the camera when. Mking at them until finally the lot slowly flick it out and disappeared. The TV switched back to the news cost in the studio who started something about keeping them updated. As more information came in. And then the cartoons were back as if nothing had if a happened was that they trailed off. It looked a lot like mom began. It was nanna Andre shouted and they all set the staring at each other for a very long time. The next few days, they will more and more sightings of what the newspapers. When now cooling the nebula, a new superhero who is fighting bag is and stopping crimes from happening all over Los Angeles. Even though they miss thin, Anna, the family would sit around the TV every evening and watch as the nebula foiled robberies saved people from FIS and got cats down out of toll trees, it was hard to believe that the nanna was now a superhero, or at least they thought it was nanna. They hadn't actually seen her since the last time in the hospital, and although the nebula Luke's locker they couldn't decision. One night a week after nanna had disappeared. The family went outside laying in the grass looking with the stars. Which one do you think is her Leyla asked under loft? We could never guess that he greened they lay their winning out the different shapes. They thought they could see the stars. When suddenly they did see nanna hovering in the air above them. Now, they owe cried jumping up the grass nanna small them his stolid foam hovering just above the grass. Have you come home later awes-? None. I didn't say anything. She just shook it hid ECONET, Kenny. Andre said you've been given a gift and now you need to help other people. None of turn to him and noted she floated closer to them and as much as being made of tiny stars Ken kissed each one of them on the forehead. We love you nanna. They all said, she smiled at them looked up woods, and then all of the tiny stars began to shoot up into the sky. They watched and just before the stars disappeared from sight, they formed a giant love hot in the not sky. It's okay. Then will always be watching over us mom said as she hoped each of entirely they wanted to the house and just before they went through the door. They hit a noise behind them. A comic book was slowly floating down from the sky it landed at Andres fate. He picked it up there on the front cover with the words. Just in case, you get bored. Well, I really hope you liked that story. It was definitely very special infamy too. Brought. Thanks, guys. We'll see you next time.

nanna Andre Layla Andre Layla Bank Andre Bill Jenkins Leyla grass nanna Mom Papa Los Angeles Andrea reporter Layla Setina Tom Anna Jess jet Allison Bank of America aust nana
280: Why Storytelling Will Increase Your Sales

The Goal Digger Podcast

47:01 min | 1 year ago

280: Why Storytelling Will Increase Your Sales

"You're listening to the gold digger podcast episode number two hundred eighty alley. He nick is c._e._o. And the founder of nanna inco it started with an appreciation for aguado molin culture and exploring the country with her mother learning about the beautiful hand woven textiles and the people who create them now these fabrics the weavers and the culture culture are the foundation of her business and she's created this line of limited edition handbags and accessories that her fans myself included cannot wait to kerchiefs in her business. It serves an even greater purpose in the countries that inspired the business to begin with. I wanted to ask allie about the start of your business. How it's evolved how she stays true to her. Why in the mission to provide reliable and sustainable income opportunities for the artisans to help create her amazing using products but i also want to dive into some of the behind the scenes like how running a limited edition product business really looks because it's something that alley and nine encode ouzo well. This episode is rich and clear with actionable advice for purpose driven businesses in the ins and outs of growing a company that has a limited edition product motto. I have been a fan of nafta and co in a customer for years and years and years and so without further ado you here is my friend allie he nick. You're listening to the gold digger podcast where we firmly believe that work doesn't have to feel like work doc self-made millionaire marketing guru jennifer katcher. We'll help you redefine. What success looks like it's time to hear from the experts listen in on honest conversations and learn the best tips and tricks that helped others pave their own way and craft their dream career. If you're ready to a dig in do the work and tackle your biggest goals. You're in the right place. Here's your host educator photographer and mac and cheese levered janika ter- <music> hey bookworm. You are going to love this because audible is supporting the gold digger podcast start listening with a thirty day trial in your first audiobook a plus to audible originals for free when you go to audible dot com slash gold digger or just text golddigger to five hundred five hundred thanks to bark box for supporting gold digger bark box is a subscription service that delivers a selection of treats toys for your dog right to your doorstep each month to get twenty five dollars off your first subscription box and detri- the style plan by bark box completely risk free had to bark box dot com slash gold digger her alley. It is time for you to finally be on the podcast. Welcome to the gold digger podcast. Thank you so much which i'm so excited. I'm so excited so last night. As i was preparing for interview i was literally going through the archives of like old hard drives chiefs to find when we first partnered which was years in years yeah years ago so it's kind of amazing now that we get to sit and have this conversation on air because i have truly been a longtime fan of your work in your business into today. We get to share that with all the community who i'm sure many you have already heard of you so welcome to the show thank you or this is just amazing dream. Come true for me so i'm happy to be here well. Let's do this so i. I know so much about you. Before we air. I was like how did you keep your children alive. You can tell them more about why context matters kind of give us just a little glimpse into your story. Where did it all star in. What do you do today so a little bit about me. I didn't get married until i was about thirty. He won while i was thirty. One and i had been in corporate america for a long time which i found to be in my experiences pretty hostile. It was like nick male dominated work environment when i got married. I felt like it was kind of like this fresh start like i was going to move from utah to you california where my husband you know my fiance lived in. We're gonna start our life there. It just felt like i could do whatever i want it it. Just it felt like an opportunity -tunities to say. What do i wanna do now and we knew we wanted to have kids so we actually being i was thirty one and he was already already eddie. I liked him about <unk>. He was thirty seven. I think and so we're ready. We're ready to get started. We loved each other but we actually didn't know we. We're gonna have infertility issues shoe so it took us about three years to get pregnant and when we finally did it was with triplets that are now three three years old and but in the meantime i kinda like i needed something to do like i needed something with meaning. I needed to take something. I needed to get my mind off off of lake. If anybody who struggled as infertility knows how like how hard it is on you physically mentally emotionally financially early. I loved travel. I've travelled to over sixty countries. You know throughout my life at that point and i was really just wanting to connect with family again. So i'm half guatemalan. I had gone back to guatemala with my husband a few times and what i had realized and i mean i love my family. I love where i'm from. I love my heritage and when i would go to these places when i travel. I'd see that like there. Were these beautiful textiles. I had a a somewhat of a good knowledge of how they are made by by han- on back strap looms embroidered whatever they were beautiful full and so like telling of the people that made them where they were from and i would buy these textiles whatever it was like a runner or a blanket or or you know in guatemala would be like a repeal which is mine woman's shirt and you take them home and you just kinda don't really know what to do them. They're like so beautiful but like you don't know how to incorporate great into your life and i thought that i could take something that was so beautiful that memento from whatever country visiting for me it was guatemala and i could turn it into something that was a little bit more useful than people would find more value in you know in the united states so i started my company. Anco that is a socially conscious brand. It's slow fashion company that focuses on textiles working with indigenous people all over the world but mostly mostly guatemala morocco ghana and soon to be mexico or working on opening up mexico but basically i wanted to pay homage to the artisans these indigenous artisans and give him an opportunity to to showcase their culture their art the beauty in in handmade and what they do and i wanted to basically frame that with a high quality product so i'm talking about like turning into a bag with beautiful leather really good hardware and i created a brand around it that basically just brought it. All together like brought the artisans in the culture and the authenticity in creating a product that was like true to where it comes from and kinda used my family background to do that because it's what i knew so. It was so yeah does that. Do you think that explains it. Yeah i mean it's like so much in one thing and would so amazing is if you guys saw on instagram even just in the last few months and i had this beautiful beautiful baby carrier in so many people you won't told me to try the ring slaying and i was like i don't know what that even means but she by anyways you've done some amazing collaborations and stuff but everyone is obsessed with these textiles myself included -cluded like i was like alcohol. Can i use this for because they need one into the is so i'm not going to throw you under the bus but i want to share a little bit about your heart heart because i can speak to it in a new way before call. I was like l. Your website look so good and you're like actually. We're like redoing the whole thing thing and i'm like why it's beautiful. There's so much information that i want people to get before they like browse products and to me that speaks so much to your heart because as business owners were always looking at like profit profit profit and <unk> beautiful you we need that to run these companies but and at the same point to the mission behind what you do is so much at the forefront of your thought process that it comes before the product addict so talk to me a little bit about how you created this business that is so multifaceted. There's so many different levels levels of involvement in it like walk me through that because it sounds really complicated to me. It's complicated to me too so i always say the i. R. goal is to connect the consumer or the customer to the artisan to the maker of the product. So when you you know i want not to be able to look at our products and initially it just has to catch your eye. You have to love something about the way it looks and then i want. I want that you know the price point. It's about three to five hundred dollars handbag for our best selling items and it can be a sticking point from people for some people so i want you to think gets beautiful of course but then i also want you to know the meaning behind it and its purpose and then fill lake. I feel good about this like i you know i feel good about where my the money is going and so for you to to have a product and to feel connected there so many steps in manufacturing and we manufacture ourselves and so i know all those steps ups and it's really like from purchasing the threat to dying the threat to getting it to the weavers to getting it to you know it turns into fabric and then you know we figured it's transported to our headquarters antigua and then it's turned into bags you know that doesn't even speak to the custom leather that we do to the person that's assembling assembling the bag the leather craftsman everybody has a story and so when you think of it that way the journey of the bag to get to you there's a lot to be said. Had you know who's who's the woman dying the fabric who's the woman that's that learned how to weave the fabric on a back strap loom kneeling on the ground that was taught by her mother and her mother was taught by her mother. There's so much heritage and story to be told like says so i like to think of ourselves as visual storytellers storytellers because your audience usually doesn't give you that much time so visually how do you tell all that in just a few seconds of somebody new getting on your website site and saying oh my gosh this means so much it means so much and like a have to have an i can relate to that. We also want that we want. We want you to feel like you can relate to the stories. We're telling and it's my belief that like i've traveled so much and what i found and i loved it. If if felt like its own you know like school. The school like to travel. I learned so much about myself and i learned that like as humans and as women we're we're so different of course we all have our own you know thumbprint and we're all different but we have so much in common we all experienced joy and pain and suffering and happiness genus unlike the miracle of birth but also like the struggles of you know you go through with your children and your husband and financial issues so that's really the connection i want to people to feel is like that. These are humans. We're all humans and and we have that in common and i like to say things like more humans less machines because these aren't machines that are making our products is actually it's like there's so many faces that are crafting your bag and i want you to know them and i don't want you to like buy it and you know onto the next thing i want you to like love it and experience something when you open your package so so so that's what i mean is like. How do you get all that in like one hero shot that will you let us know back to you on that. The funniest at an event in santa monica in one of the girls showed up and she had one year bags and i was like oh my gosh. Is this an code. She's like yes. I've had it for years and i was laying. Today's world where everything is disposable in- everything is onto the next thing it it was honestly one of the most refreshing to hear so. I just want you to know that mission is being carried out by the women that you're reaching because i believe that ah you've built a brand where it is so clear who your girl is in what they care about which i think is really hard to do thank you. They complement one thing. I'm kind of curious about an and i feel like a lot of listeners. Here are probably wondering is nowadays. It's very common to see brands brands that gives backer. They're tied to emission and i think it's amazing. I think our generation desires change in that. We are understanding and learning learning that we need to be the change makers and i know that for a lot of people it can be really hard to figure out like what is that tie like. How do do i make a difference with my business like. Do you have any advice on that because your business is so intertwined with that idea but for somebody that's just starting to like scratch surface was on that idea. What would you say that. It's so true. Being a socially conscious grand is it seems like it's become this really trendy trendy thing and i and i'm okay with that. I like it. Use it for sure. I think that i like to make it really clear that we are a for profit it company who were not nonprofit but for me what is important to me so instead of giving tips. I'm just gonna tell you what's important. What's important to me is that everyone in this process of my product is treated fairly so it took me a while to figure out how i was going to. I guess what kind of company i was going to be. I think that a lot of entrepreneurs a lot of had down a path. We think we know what our the goal is and other things come up along the way that kind of like they change our path and it's it can be for the better so when i would be open in to keep your options open of like what you're okay with and what's important to you because you'll learn a lot along the way and it might change so for me. It was the i had to know that every hand that touch my product was being treated fairly and although we're not a fair trade certified brand and we have had several meetings with them because we wanted to you know become that and be considered for that so we know all of the standards and so one of the things we realize is that we already were a fair trade brown without the certification we were taking the amount of funds we were taking responsibly and giving back to you are not only like our employees but the communities we work in with the weavers and with where our bags are made antigua giving back to the hospitals battles to the schools to you know scholarship funds that we put together we do it responsibly and so i say that responsibly meaning. It's not a one and done done those before like i've done service projects in uganda where like we go and build a library and we're we're trying to do all these things and it's awesome in. It's a wonderful thing to do a great experience but what change makers want is consistency and something that's duplicate -able so what we wanted to do you is. We wanted to make sure if we offered a scholarship that we could get them all the way through school. It wasn't just a semester and if we were we're gonna offer some sort of like healthcare plan it was going to you know be a consistent one that they can rely on and that it wasn't like i'm going to start on this as you know plan to get my health back but i can't finish it or whatever so i think what you should consider is how to finish your projects because because leaving open ended ones or ones where the people themselves can't continue without you there like that meaning lake not that i have to be there all the time. That's what i mean is that i personally don't have to be there to run the program that i can find a local person that can continue it and run the system and make sure that it's working without out me physically there. So of course you know you're creating monetary income that can support it but like the physically don't have to be there. I think that's what communities really really need. Another thing we're doing is with the weavers we have weavers are more like freelance for us. Our employees in guatemala let are mainly like leather crossman and accessories seamstresses. Mike pompeo's makers that type of thing that are actually on their payroll that we have like we like to offer for those programs to lake education. We rebuild people's homes that got destroyed during the volcano access to dr onsite that type of thing but but for our weavers that are more like freelance employees or contractors. We're helping them build their own businesses so for example the way it works works in guatemala specifically is that an morocco is that you'll find your head weaver and then they have their network of weavers and then it becomes almost like community thing becomes community business really they're so remote and so hard to get to and don't know how to a lot him didn't know how to like even calculate the cost of what they're doing and so i feel like it's my responsibility to not. I would never want to take advantage of them for a lot of reasons like i want to continue doing business with them. I want them their lives to be better because of my brand. I want them to better their communities. Provide better lives for their children so we'll take the time to educate them on how to calculate their time to make their process faster so for example apple. I'll tell you quit story. I was meeting with a group of weavers and you know in the middle of nowhere in guatemala like you know eight hours away from where my headquarters are often to roads and and then a bit of hike walk into their house and i was there to receive a small order ahead placed i and these women that lumina backstroke they can only loom as white as their their heads and i asked for something that was like eighteen inches or something like that and i can't remember how long and i was going through them and i had my measuring tape and i was kind of looking at them and i'm like okay well. I have a question so this one. Is you know you know thirty six inches long in this one is thirty two on this thirty four and there's so many discrepancies and i said can you tell me any what's going on and she goes oh yeah. It's just that like i am shorter than her and she's telling me and i might kinda like i don't know what you're saying and she goes. Oh oh well like my arms. Length is how calculated a euro-zone. Her arm is longer than shorter. That's why and she goes my thumbprints. How we calculate wait. An inch pinky to thumb is six inches and so i'm kinda like i can't believe i didn't even ask if you have a measuring you know like so part of it is like let me give you embroidery hoops. Let me let me at least print the pattern for you when we do embroidery so that there's not so many discrepancies when i received received patterns back and let me i've tried to give them more of a the idea of a process and the materials they need to grow grow their businesses so even doing that. I mean they've been able to produce more and make more money because i'm enabling them to to do that and so things like that are things that you could do. It's actually a really small thing like i've provided materials for them to grow their business like that's something that you can really so. You should tell your customers like they're growing their business because i'm healthy. No i've able to ask the right questions. It's a super simple thing so i think look for opportunities on how you can like to your own horn basically and it works in so many ways because it really it grows your own business. It grows their business if feels really good good and you can tell your customers about it and it's the truth. There's so many good things to it back to this conversation in just a moment. I i just think bark box for supporting this episode visit bark box dot com slash gold digger for a free extra month of bark box when you subscribe to a six or twelve month month plan i mean your dog is going to be thrilled. Bark box is a subscription service that delivers treats and toys four your dog right to your door every single month. They pop pick the best. All natural treats and innovative toys to match dogs unique needs including allergies and heavy chewers. Each monthly box is themed. Listen to these themes. They're amazing. There's jurassic park shakespeare in the dog park sniffs from the abyss and more i mean i get just as excited as chloe and tucker our dog's bark box arise because it is so fun to see them sniffing through all of their new toys treats and we have to make sure that conley doesn't intercept them. Don't worry dog moms and dads. All the trees are made in the u._s._a. Or candidat without corn soy or wheat so your babies are getting top quality snacks ax if you're pop has discerning tastes and turns his nose up to anything in the box bark box will send you something else for free. No questions asked each boxes over over forty dollars worth of toys and treats but subscription started only twenty two dollars with free shipping in the continental u._s. For an extra month of arbox when you subscribe to a six or twelve month plan visit bark box dot com slash gold digger. That's a free extra month of arbox when you subscribe to a six or twelve month month plan by going to bark box dot com slash gold digger since we're talking about stories today with our guest. It seemed so fitting that audible abol help make this show possible start listening with a thirty day trial in your first audiobook plus to audible originals for free when you go to audible dot com slash rush gold digger or text golddigger to five hundred five hundred now audible is where so many inspiring voices in compelling stories open listeners up to new experiences and and ways of thinking dig into an autobiography and learn from inspiring minds press play on a new work of fiction and transport yourself into a different world audible is more more than audio books to you as a member. You'll get free daily access to the new york times wall street journal and the washington post delivered right to your audible app audible able members choose three titles every month one audiobook plus to audible originals that you can't hear anywhere else just go to a you d. I b ellie l. E. dot com slash gold digger or text gold digger to five hundred five hundred and browser unmatched selection of audio content. We spent a month in hawaii focused that time on my family and myself and i listened to the book where the crawdads thing by delia owens my mom just run it and she said it was so good and it was such it's an amazing time for me. I would go on walks colleen. We walked by the ocean and i would just listen while she napped in her stroller and i love that i can just listen and open my mind. Meanwhile i'm rocking her to sleep or taking on a walk. I mean it was just it was a good time now you you can start listening with a thirty day trial in your first audiobook plus to audible originals for free when you go to audible dot com slash gold seeker or text g._o. L. d. i g. g. The era art to five hundred five hundred so one thing i was smiling is when you're talking about discrepancies you have used that to your advantage interesting way doing limited edition pieces so walk me through how that came about and how that's kind of fueled your business because that's a huge part of what you do in also just a really fine way to shop where things are one of a kind truly yeah <hes> so. We have three different collections. When i first started i started with all one of a kind and these vintage fabrics that it i was purchasing and repurposing into handbags and it was it's a tricky model like it is fantastic caustic in the you. Can we have this really amazing. Buy sell trade market. Keeps the value of your products up. We have this fantastic group on on facebook. Now called the v._i._p. Group and it has about thirteen thousand members. These are like are diehard. Nanna love. I mean it's our recall numbers. We have all these made upwards because of it the they love because they've found the value and so much in these one of a kind fine pieces that has been ruled over into like they've grown with the brand so have the one of a kind collection. That's made from vintage pieces. Every single one is truly one of a kind. I i would say steph lake if you like it by it because you'll never see them again. I mean that when it's gone it's gone at the time. I wasn't really sure how it could recreate eight stuff like that. I didn't have my network of weavers but what i also what i learned along the way is that weaving. It's a bit of a dying art all over the world and i also learned it's this loss language so things that you see in the weavings aren't just like it's not just a diamond. It's actually a symbol of creation. It's it's not just you know <hes>. It's not just a arrow. It's a direction you know what i mean. It's like north south east west that type of thing so as i was learning wing i was realizing there's an opportunity to preserve heritage which is so important to me so one of a kind after one of a kind i i started on artisan collection which is made on a foot limb so i talk about preserving culture and heritage and i talk about that because it's important to me not that i started these other lines that gave opportunities to weavers to continue what they're doing and it's something they love so losing their traditions of weaving and things have been passed on not in school not online but literally by their mother and their the grandmother and their great grandmother. That's really important to them. Traditions are really important and so. I realized i needed to do something to get my customer to care about that because i needed to give them that work. It couldn't just be the vintage fines. Which of course we all love. It had to be something something new something that moved the local economy so i started my artists in collection which fabric woven by the yard on a foot loom and we everything we do is actually limited edition to be honest so are one of a kind every single one is one of a kind so it's like limited but we also have our artisan collection. Ah we do one every single month and we only do. We do a small amount of yards from lake three hundred yards to seven hundred yards. It just depends on what we think. I think the popularity is going to be of the fabric but and then our third collection is it's called heritage in society and it's kind of i call it our bohemian couture line because i mean really all of our because every single detail is made by hand and touched by a human and there's so much work that has gone into who it but that one really that one focuses on women that loom on a back strap so the woman is traditionally kneeling down. She's like hoisted herself to a polar kaotry with the thread and that's how she retains the tension on the thread to actually design a pattern turn into a piece of fabric and that's how traditional national mayan shirts are made so that's actually how the one of the kind pieces actually started you know five or ten years before i brought it to market on our website so oh that line is called heritage society because it's their heritage and it's changing in its for our society but also like the societies they have there too and that went focuses on symbols and so much meaning so i've just done a ton of research on the different symbolism that i've found in maya traditional mayan weavings and a lot of it is not written down like it's hard to find so a lot of it. I've had to just do so many interviews with our master rivers asking. I'm like i love your your blouse like tell me what that means because the symbols mean because the shirts they're wearing the repeals dictate. They tell a story they literally early. Tell me so if we put it in context of the united states if everyone in utah war shirts that had mountains on it but i love greens of course i do my mountains and grain and my friend is in utah. She doesn't mean red but she loves mountains. You know we're we're all different but you know we're from utah and if you know in california l. -fornia everybody wears shirts with waves and so you know everybody's different so some waves are bigger and smaller in different colors but i know you guys are from utah so they're literally like you. We know symbols of where you're from your heritage. There's the usually do sunbeam's rays of sun around their neck line. That is a symbol of a higher power and i mean there's so much so i thought i had to preserve that storytelling that language and so once a month we drop a really really special bag and they're numbered. They're usually heritage inciting number one and we'll give it some sort of you know the name. We'll give a description but those are probably probably the most exclusive most precious because it is giving a lot of work to a lot of people it's preserving a tradition addition and it's preserving a lost language so that was probably my favorite collection but it's all limited edition and it's crazy because it's so much work. It's so much work for my team here in the u._s. For me because you have to dig deep every time to tell tell the story intel it well so that people cannot just look at it. It'd be like oh. That's great for you but they can relate to personally. They can find a connection. It's not meant to be something that like you know. That's cool for you. It's we want you to feel connected to it. I want you to feel like it has meaning to me and it had meaning to this woman that made it. That's so cool like i feel connected. Did you know that like having the limited edition and almost gives people a reason to purchase because it's like this once it's gone. It's gone and if you'll like not many any companies nowadays do anything like that so there's zero sense of urgency and when people are making purchasing decisions. I don't know if you're like me. I i was laughing as you were speaking like eight tabs open of things. I was looking at maybe buying maybe not. I'm gonna compare all these things but it's like you cannot compare compare these two anything else so it kind of encourages consumers to make a decision it does. It's true it's it's funny because as you know my message really is keep this neck forever like don't this is not throwaway fashion like treasure. It and a lot of people do they. They just some people are like oh. I only use my special occasions like no use it all the time like i promise you it's gonna. It's gonna last like where repair it works that way but yeah it also creates some fomer lake people you know businesses we go in ebbs and flows where you know. There's more foam or less foam in it depends on the design but they really fill aac. We kinda didn't know what to do because we couldn't keep up on our website like it doesn't look look good to a product on your website and i've been told that you know by different people that are mentors by different p._r. Firms they're like what's the point of doing this advertising advertising if like there's on your website like they need something to go to because we only draw on fridays is what we traditionally do is every friday. There's a new release. You know it's it's the new artisan or it's the new heritage society a redraw batch of one of a kind. I started that way because it literally is just so hard to make these things. It is truly slow fashion. It takes so long to make that i can't just have tons of product on there all the time as my following grew the demand grow. Oh so i mean it was kind of late. I was just trying to keep up with the demand and i couldn't and so every friday i would just i just made it okay every friday. I'm not gonna have like twenty bags a day. I'm going to drop on fridays so it looks nice and healthy and we'll see when it goes and it will just go into seconds. I mean seconds aunts and i was like oh. It felt good again like what i supposed to do with the rest of the week like there's nothing to sell l. and so because it was just me and i think people should know this to who are starting their own business. I started with six thousand dollars that my husband jerry night decided sided we could we could lose not look back on it would be fine. I started with six thousand dollars and started like i built my own website myself on squarespace space. I design my own logo. Do have a little bit of graphic design background but i didn't have a camera setup and so i use an iphone to take photos i scanned old old photos of my parents when they guatemala to give it kind of like this vintage vibe used on my website and i mean i was doing it all myself i was i was shipping amazon customer service from my garage. I was getting on my husband's motorcycles in the morning and backing them out of the garage gets set up my shipping table so i had room to actually like take photos of bags and stuff like that but yeah like i would receive product to my garage and photograph every single one which is another. You're kind of crazy thing with one of our products. Literally are taking thousands of photos. You know now and it's gone on you know like it's like that photo so so we have now we have. It's this continuous process of lake. The you know we received product tweet photograph it we put it into inventory gets list on the website and then it's it's shipped it. One funny story is that i i was kinda like okay. They're saying. I just need something for people to look at. I don't have anything that's relevant because it's also doubt until friday. Let's just put a photo of a puppy on the website so on each different cook shoe but just to be funny you know like we'll put a cute cute photo of a pepsi and it'll say like upsets where sold out comeback on friday just so they have something to do on the website kind of thing and then the woman had helping me. Do the product page was like. I don't know how to do this without putting an actual price on it. Otherwise can't be up there whatever i know and so i was like okay so she goes i put it up and they sold out and i said what do you mean. They sold out and she goes. The photos of the puppies sold out. There were like three hundred dollar. She put three hundred the price of the bag on. She's like people are buying. They think it's like a mystery bag or something and they bought them so so it's kinda like people were just and sometimes we still do that like if people know what the fabric looks like but we don't have the bag i'm like just put photo of the swatch and lets us removal by it if it does. It'll say that's me. Being lazy sometimes like ended the day on friday. It's because it is limited. Limited people know like i just wanna get in before it's gone because it's like were moving onto the next artisan fabric so and really like we have like like i said a really healthy buy sell trade market and so people know that it's almost an investment like it's a safe. It's a safe purchase because we do have return policy but like oftentimes people are just reselling it for more than what they bought it for so they become really these collectors items when i'm thinking through your business model and like you have a lot of work because with the way that you run everything like you said like you can do an entire shoe with these. He's bags and then like they're gone now. You need to like keep replenishing and rejuvenating. How is it looked as you scale your business because is when we collaborated years and years and years ago. I'm pretty sure i had like ten thousand followers and i don't even remember what you had but like as you said is i <hes> probably those in obviously i've grown what has been the biggest challenge what has been the biggest gift yeah so definitely definitely the biggest challenge has been scaling and we kinda talked about that already. I love one of a kind but scaling to have artisans that make new new fabrics that was really years and years of like pounding the pavement and the barrier to entry to doing what i'm doing is the really high i literally you can't just get online and say you know weavers that do this technique like list so i can contact them and call them and just have adamson me samples. I literally have spent you know weeks and months and years of my life just going to guatemala and going into the most remote villages to find weavers that do a certain technique and that that want to work that wanted are willing to put into the work that it takes to grow their own businesses businesses and so i think that has been one of the hardest parts to scaling on that side on the creative side is growing my network of weavers because they are so so for example even in guatemala where the national language is spanish. I would go to these villages and i'd be you know i give him a heads up and say <hes> you know i wanna meet with all your waivers and let's gather together up here at this you know so and so's house and everybody cam and so i'm just kind of getting to know them because they learned that you need to ask questions in you get to know them. You need to know what their situations are and i'm doing that. I'm doing my thang am just getting blank stares. There's only like a couple of people that are like really nodding at me and i can tell her understanding what i'm saying so the finally mom was with me and my mom's also my business partner. She goes way too sick it. We need to ask them how many speak spanish and so we ask. There was like twenty five women. Only two of them spoke spanish. There's about. I think there's over twenty. I five dialects in guatemala so they all you know catch you cal- kitschy. I mean there's so so these are the hard things about working with indigenous people is that it's a they don't have the technology. The education part of what i feel is what i wanna do is provide them with those opportunities for growth in education haitian in if they want it and if that's that's probably the hardest thing growing scaling and doing it with authenticity in staying true to the brown the best thing has been getting to know them getting snow the stories getting to know what their life situation relation was. When i first met them versus it almost makes me want to cry and i even thought about this like i'm not gonna cry cry when i talked to janet all the weavers the women but knowing where they've come from and where they are now and going to their homes and seeing being you know them welcomed me with open arms and to say. Did you see the bowl outside of my house. That's he's new. Did you see this extra room that we've been able to build for my sister like that's now do you know did you see it's like that's what really keeps me going and i like to tell people when they get into this this kind of business to know what your why is because it's so hard it's so hard when you're putting so much heart in and something goes wrong or like. There's an upset customer that wants to let everyone online on every platform know. What's you know why they're mad. You have to know your y and remember because it's really easy to give up when it gets hard but when you know you're y and for me it's like these women and men that their lives are changing and and i'm seeing their children grow up. It's like that is my way and my wife has evolved a little bit since i've been able to grow mike community here in the u._s._a. U._s._a. with our we have this private page on facebook for. I think i mentioned earlier our v._i._p. Our v._i._p. Groups our customers that like want to know no more want. More exclusive offers want to connect. We have one event a year. Everything's e commerce. We don't do wholesale. You can only purchase ninna products directly from us or i guess you know you go to buy sell trade and buy it from other people individuals but we started doing this is another thing i would suggest for brands brands that are only online have a warehouse sale or do something an event a pop shop where you can meet your customers face to face shake their hands. John's hug them. Whatever get to know them because you can have your avatar in you should have your avatar but once you have that experience of seeing and knowing your customers ars it like changes everything it changed everything for me like to see them love. The product was huge. So now we actually late with this group. We like to say it's not just about the bags it's about. It's a community because we've organized these like mccown these chills across the country but also we have been canada germany in all over the world and it's a place where women you know they come together and we have similar values like compassionate. They're giving their funny. They care about the process of how their products are made. The different values that we we actually got together on a live. I got together with with them and said let's come up with values for this group for this because we're on here chatting all the time it's also a place where they can pop to me directly and i can give give them feedback on stuff. That's happening. It's not so much like can you tell me about my order but more like inspiration for color ways and different programs were offering bring in guatemala or morocco or whatever like it's kinda like higher levels stuff that i like to talk about on there with them but i've gotten to know my customers in like a whole other way and they're organizing themselves in different states and cities and getting together her and they're they're meeting each other in real life where they've met online to find that they have common values and really like filthiest friendships and bonds with each other and it's been. I've just loved reading stories about lake. You know i've been going through this thing and like my my nanna sisters. Manana community has really kept me going and that's something that i never would have lake. My brain would have never gone there so now. We have like a community community in the u._s. That's not just about bads. It's about like a friendship and kind of like values and values that we have in common and now we've raised so much money together with this community to make a difference in different programs like domestically here in the u._s._a. And abroad in guatemala like it's just become so much more so those are the two best things like the people here the u._s._a. My customers and the men and women work with out of the country in guatemala and all all over the world so good. Oh my gosh okay. So where can everybody find you and connect with you. What are the places six search for online you can go to w._w._w. Donna and co dot com and a lot of people say nina but it's none a- and that's okay. I don't mind none of actually means. It's a spanish word for like darling her baby girl but you can also find us on instagram and on facebook with the same handle nanna inco and we'd love to have you like i'd love to have you take a look around and tell me what you think amazing. Thank you so much. We're coming out and show. I know i value my bags. They are like my little babies and had that one for like steak seven years now beautiful new and and then i'm so excited to us so thank you for adding so much joy in meaning to my world as well. I loved being on here. Thank you for this isn't such joy i loved our conversation today and getting to hear some of the behind the scenes of the beautiful products that nana and co puts out now i love alleys heart in her desire to really make a difference not just in the lives of our customers but in the lives of every single person who encounters the story behind nanna in co trustee. You're going to see my name. Cope popping up now that your eyes are attuned to the beauty of what she creates eight in. I just want to say thank you. Thank you for hitting play on another episode of the gold digger podcast. Thank you for letting these amazing women have have their voices be heard all throughout the world and thank you to people like ali who are out there using their businesses to change lives until next time gold diggers. Keep keep on digging your biggest goals and thank you for tuning in to another episode of the gold digger podcast. Thanks for listening to the gold digger podcast. I dive into the show notes for this episode and all past episodes at w._w._w. Dot gold digger podcasts dot com. If you love the show tare it with a friend the more the merrier thanks for tuning in. We'll see you next time. You gold digger you.

guatemala guatemala facebook utah morocco nanna inco united states antigua nanna nick male california america allie marketing guru founder santa monica Mike pompeo uganda jennifer katcher mexico
Ask Amy - My Kid is Scared of Bugs

What Fresh Hell: Laughing in the Face of Motherhood

04:02 min | 1 year ago

Ask Amy - My Kid is Scared of Bugs

"Welcome to ask me from what fresh hell laughing in the face of motherhood solving solving your parenting dilemmas one question at a time this week's question comes from Cara who asks my daughter is terrified of bugs like screaming when and she sees a fly in the car and refusing to step off the driveway in fear of ants kind of afraid. How do you convince a kid. The bugs are okay and not all bugs can hurt them. PS. She does get a bad reaction to mosquito bites Cara. I had this to I have to of kids out of three are like get up and run run away from the picnic table saying Oh my God if over like flies I don't get it. It's something that to some extent you probably I will be happy to live with but you can push back against it a little bit <hes> a cognitive behavioral therapist would probably address this by giving the kids some habituation meaning just letting them get used to existing with bugs peacefully and there's a couple all of ways. I think you can do this. You can read books like Charlotte's. Web is a great one. I mean you should be reading Charlotte's web anyway to your kid right but that's a great one. That's about the spider and sort of humanizing the spider <hes> their science books about ants the things that ants do in their burrows rose are fascinating. Maybe there's a museum nearby where you can go see that stuff happening. Movies like a bug's life. I mean these things are silly in the movies like a Bug's Bug's life aren't scientific at all but they do sort of humanize the bug and make it seem harmless and like its living its own life and of course the greatest fear is being stepped on on the bug is way more afraid of you little girl than you are of it. Another thing I was thinking of is <hes> the website. The kids should see this which again you should be looking at this anyway. They collect really cool videos from all around the Internet that are cool for kids to look at but they're not designed for kids heads <hes> and they have one. I just looked today. They have a really cool video on the synchronous firefly's of Nanna Camilla just really cool videos of bugs and other things things doing cool stuff. If you need to habituate like I said you could maybe start by looking at kitty cat videos and volcano videos and other things on the kids should see this and then say hey. Let's look at this cool video show them the bugs have full lives and are fascinating and interesting and bothering humans is is very very low on their totem pole we even had when my kids were younger <hes> microscope just a you know a childhood. Scientists is fun kind of microscope and when we would have a deadbug outside we would bring it inside and look at it under a microscope I mean I don't know if bugs either but I have no problem picking up deadbug so that was a chance for me to model bravery for my kids. We put it under the microscope and the most mundane housefly under a microscope is fascinating and beautiful. It was another way to sort of in that case remiss defy the bug I guess and make it an object of fascination instead of repulsion portion. All these are different ways. You can get your kid to sort of demystify what a buggies or like I said remiss defy what bug is and how fascinating they are and and identify with all the different things they have going on and how interesting they are. All those things might do a little bit to make your kid less afraid. Send US your parenting questions Margaret Awry. I answer yours next. You can ask our facebook page at what fresh hell cast or send us an email info at what fresh podcast dot com. Thanks for listening food.

Cara Charlotte facebook Nanna Camilla Margaret
Best of TIAH #3  Rebroadcast  #112: What if a murderer appeared at your bedroom door?

This is Actually Happening

58:11 min | 1 year ago

Best of TIAH #3 Rebroadcast #112: What if a murderer appeared at your bedroom door?

"Hello listeners a few weeks ago conducted a poll on her instagram page. APP actually happening asking fans of the show to vote on their favorite episodes of the last two years. Starting today today I will be rebroadcasting. The top three one each week over the holiday break until we've resumed with new episodes on January fourteenth. Today's episode originally released in April two thousand eighteen number three appeared your bedroom door Welcome to corporations the presentation of the Audio podcast. This is actually happening Episode One twelve. What if a murderer beard The holidays season visitors and holiday travel and deliveries. Your doorbell is going to get a workout. But maybe your doorbell should also be on the lookout upgrade your doorbell to keep an eye on home no matter where the holidays take you ring helps you stay connected to your home from anywhere. If there's a delivery or surprise visitor you'll get an alert and be able to see here and speak to them all from your phone and if you're on the go this season across town across the country you can check in at any time but you don't need to be across the country you could be across the room like I was recently next to the fire and deep and a good book did I WanNa get up an answer. The door no and I didn't need to a quick check of my phone and I knew it wasn't someone at the door. Just a delivery. Maybe my next Good Book Rings Holiday Offers Won't last long so don't wait. Go go to ring dot com slash. Welcome with ring. You're always home even for the holidays. Get Yours at ring dot com slash. Welcome that's rang dot com slash. Welcome additional personal. Terms may apply I I was born. My Mom was eighteen and my dad was twenty and they didn't stay together very long so I grew up mostly with my grandparents. My Grandma Ma who I call my Nanna and I remember feeling very confused at times because I loved my mom and Manana so much and I never knew where wanted to be that some of my earliest memories is the shuffling between the two places and the fact that I really he wanted to just be with both of them but I was kind of caught between the two she. I guess you could could say wasn't ready to be a mom and she had told me several times that she'd never really wanted kids but I was an accident a happy accident but that it was just never something she thought would happen in her life and then there I was. I lived with my Nanna kind of fulltime between five to is seventeen and my mom and my Nanna lived fairly close by but it was hard as they grew up because I was kind of rebellious child and my Nanna AH is a little bit more conservative. Thinking and my mom wasn't my mom was younger and my mom was not here for anyone's wants bullshit. She would tell everyone like it is when I was born. She dropped out of high school so she always felt embarrassed about that and she he kind of moved up the corporate ladder without having any education as she started to do really good in her career she would be gone all day and she would sometimes have to miss important things to work and she worked with a lot of men so she said that she had to have this really dominate. I'm an and tough exterior to be able to handle her job and all the man that I knew that she worked with said that if they put it they said if you wanted to to pick a fight with her you have to pack a lunch. Because you're GONNA be there all day. She's not going to give into you but at the same time. She was very very caring and loving. She had a really really soft side that to see her at work and then to see the person that I knew who would literally carry blankets in her car. Hard to give to homeless people on the street or carry things to try to help people or give people the shoes off her feet. There's just so many aspects of her personality as we all. Have you know so for me as her daughter. I kind of made it a habit of ditching and dating people from other high schools. I am going to hang out with them in the daytime instead of school because my mom was really strict. And she didn't want me to have boyfriends. I think because she got pregnant so young. She didn't want that to happen to me right. After I graduated high school I was almost eighteen or already eighteen. My Nanna ended up moving to Louisiana to be with family over there and she only stayed for a few months because she couldn't stand to be away from her grandkids so she was only there for a few months and then moved back but because she moved it kind of forced me to live with my mom fulltime so that was the first time since I was a really young child that I actually had all of my stuff at my mom's house but moving into my mom's was a challenge because my other grandma lived there and my aunt and my mom's brother who was in and out of a mental hospital so I had my own room they are but when he was there he lived in that room so it was kind of hard for me to think of it as mine and when I would be at my mom's house I would usually sleep in her room so once. My uncle stopped living there. I still pretty much slept in my mom's room every night. I think it fostered a really cute relationship between us because I was eighteen years old and she was thirty seven at the time. I thought she was old but now now that I'm thirty. I realize how young she was. We would talk like late in late night in bed because she worked so long she would come home. That was my time with her. Were we talked. I had like telling her about school and telling her about boys in red around the time I was going to be a year that I moved in with my mom I was in school fulltime. My plan was to be a special education teacher. She would tell her friends like my daughter is so patient and loving being and she wants to work with children insurance. Be a teacher so I really got a kick out of that but she thought that was so cool. I had her drop. Let me off at school at College. And she was very loving she would hug me. She would kiss me on the lips. It reminded me of being a young kid when you're being dropped off elementary school school and you're kind of like don't do that mom I think that's something a lot of my friends didn't have so. I am really glad that shoes like that. But it was a little embarrassing We were just kind of in a routine now with almost a year. Since they live there I was comfortable trouble. I had a great social life. I was in school fulltime. I had boyfriends. I went to church. It was everything was good. It was June of two thousand six. I had just. I just had my last day of that quarter of school. I went to my cousins graduation. I ended up coming home at around eight PM and my mom was home. I got a call from my friend. WHO said I'm going to move? I'm moving out of state tomorrow. Can you come visit me so we can say bye and it was actually a guy that I had dated and my mom never liked people that I dated but she really liked this guy for some reason so she told me like. Oh Oh you should go say bye to him but sad. He's moving and while I was there it was getting late. We were just talking and then it was like ten eleven seven PM. My mom was texting me. She always gave me a curfew of midnight but I think because she liked him and she knew that it was like this last minute thing she said okay. You can come home at one or one thirty. I ended up hanging out with him. We it was really sweet and innocent. I was Kinda dancing in front of my car. And in the reason that memory kind of chokes me up is because now I look at it and I'm like this person was literally seeing to me like for the last time before my life changed the last part of my personality. That was like really carefree I came home. It was about one or one thirty now. Must have been one thirty by this time and my mom was on her yoga mat and she kind of Said Hey. She asked me how he was doing where he's going why he's moving and am the Messenger was like the big thing and my space at the time. So of course I went to my computer and check that and we didn't really talk much more after that. She mentioned about how she didn't have work the next day so she was fine to stay up and wait for me and she was glad I'm home safe so she could relax. She got into her bed But she was reading Sushi. We didn't have the lights off yet yet. And since it was my last day of school a few days or the day before. I also didn't have to go to bed early so I was just kind of up and playing with my new ipod that was right. When ipods came out time is passing it was like maybe one forty five almost two in the morning and my mom fell asleep with the book on her chest? I ended up hearing a noise in my room which was connected to my mom's uh-huh but we had wood floors. That were pretty creaky so I heard a noise and I stopped and I looked but the door was kinda close so I couldn't see what was happening in that room but just kinda looked and waited and nothing else happened and because it was so late I figured. Oh it's probably my cat or something and I just went back to looking at the computer screen downloading music. I went to the bathroom and in the bathroom I had taken. At least. He's ten minutes. I was washing my face taking my contacts brushing my teeth. I remember vividly deciding in my mind not to take off my clothes. Oh so I was sleeping with my tight little skinny jeans my white shirt because the next day had to take my cousin to school really early and I was so lazy that I figured if I sleep when I closed that will save. Save me like five minutes. I ended up sitting on the bed and looking at my phone. The person I had just seen was texting me and and I took my ipad off the charger with my new music. And I was GONNA lay down and listen to it and right when I laid down is when I heard noise again. Uh this time I could tell that someone was definitely walking. My aunt and my grandma lived there at at the time. My grandma was Kinda disabled so I I pretty much knew. It wasn't her because she couldn't walk that fast in this was like a fast walk walk. That could here on the wood floors. I could hear the footsteps so I looked and I waited because I knew someone was going to come to the door when the door opened it opened really slowly in creaky and I saw this person that I don't know she was tall and and dark-haired and just not like anyone in my family. She held the knife over her head for for some reason it could be the way she was standing. It could be because she had the knife although we didn't really know exactly what that was yet I just kinda started thinking all these thoughts right away like I knew do that. She was there to do something I knew she was going to hurt me. She held the knife over her head for. I would say maybe five five to ten seconds but in my head it felt like forever. I was just kind of shocked frozen. I wasn't able to do anything I didn't have the ability to think my way. Like what should I do. I just stood there. I mean I was laying down. I laid there with my hands like clenched and I started hard to say no without really doing much except just being frozen in fear so who in the room with at this particular it was just my mom sleeping next to me and me but my aunt and my grandma also in the house just in a different location in the house she ran at me and she jumped on my bed on her knees which is like a feeling. I'll never forget because it happens more more often than you think someone getting on your bed that way. It's still happens now. And it always reminds me of that and so she jumped on my bed or my mom's bed with her knees and I just had my hands over my chest and clenched and she stabbed me on the left side of my chest like on the very side. Where are your breast ends right by armpit so she stabbed me there twice and I didn't? It didn't feel like a knife. I didn't know what I was feeling. It just felt like maybe being punched. My mom heard like she felt bad move. She heard me making noise so she got up and and she had fallen asleep with her glasses on so I looked over at her and she sprung up from the bed and her glasses. Were Kinda in a falling off but you could tell like when someone wakes up and they're trying to Kinda open their eyes several times to like see what's happening in to make sense of this and so when my mom stood up the person the women ran around the bed to my mom's side and started stabbing her moms classes fell off. She fell down. I saw this happening but in my head I thought I needed to get out of the room. Because she moved off of me into my mom. I was able to leave the room but I was looking back as I was leaving. And I saw her stabbing her over and over. I saw the way. My mom was laying She didn't have her arms up when I saw her trying to protect checked herself. I don't think she had the time to realize what was happening but again like this all happened so quick that I just ran out and I ran down the hall. I was thinking. Did I just get stabbed. What happened to me? I don't feel anything yet. I don't know But I just ran out and my my aunt was on the couch and I told her. Get out someone's in the House and I ran out and there was a neighbor outside and this was I don't even know what time to thirty or three. This person was outside kind packing their camper to get ready to go on vacation and I remember thinking thank God. Someone's out here and so I went up to him and I told him someone's in my house and he looked at me Dan. He pointed to my house and he said you need to go call nine one one and I remember freaking out and I'm like I know I don't have time to explain this to you so I just said look look I can't go back in there. And he kinda closed his door so I ended up running down the street and there. There was no reason I just ended up choosing driveway and running behind this car sitting there. And that's when I realized as I had been stabbed because I started feel blood flowing out of the side where I had been stabbed and so blood was like leaking down my body and it was warm sticky so I put my hand over the wound and I was trying to put pressure on it and I just remember thinking how how much was coming out. And how fast it was happening and I was still trying to breathe breathe. I could hear the air coming out of the stab wound so so it made like this really like kind of sound that surge freak me out and I was like Oh my God. What's happening? I started to feel like I was losing consciousness and I started to hear things like I. I didn't realize realize it but people were coming out of their houses as I was hiding behind the car. I didn't know what was happening. What I know now offend later? was that in. My aunt ran after me. The lady with the knife went and got my grandma but then my aunt realize that this person Jason was still in the House and was worried for her mom. Because like I said my grandma was disabled. Couldn't really get around. So she went back in and at that point ain't it seemed like whoever she encountered that seemed like the biggest threat was who she went for. The woman had stabbed my mom over thirty times and then came out and stabbed my grandma who had woken looking up because of all the commotion and went to the phone to call nine one one as she was on the phone with. The woman came out in stabbed her so my grandma grandma ended up falling in the phone fell and then my aunt apparently had chased me outside to try to see what I what I like. What did I mean what was I saying but when and I ran and hid she went back into the House and realize that this person had the knife so she's then the women started stabbing my aunt? My aunt was able to a to chase her outside. By this point the neighbors had heard everything we were standing outside and they were seeing them but the neighbors said that they didn't know that anyone even had a knife it looked like they were wrestling kind of they were just like tumbling. The woman with a knife actually tried to slip my my aunt's throat but she didn't go deep enough so my aunt was able to get the knife away from her and then my aunt got her outside aside she kinda ran from her and she chased her outside and that's where she was able to get the knife away from her. She stabbed it into the grass and kind of laid over Britt so that she wouldn't be able to get it back soon. As my aunt took the knife the woman just stopped and got up and and walked away the woman who lived a few houses down from us but we didn't know her mm-hmm and she hadn't lived there long. She just moved in with her boyfriend a few months before so when she walked down the street that's where she was going back to her house. 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Apply and cross another thing in your to do list policy genius when it comes to life insurance. It's nice to get it right and so I was behind the car this whole time and I couldn't see any of this happening but I could hear commotion. I was just in the state of losing consciousness where I wasn't really able to understand what was going on but I knew that something what was happening and like I said I couldn't see anything but I was already starting to have all these thoughts like. Maybe this is a nightmare. This can't be real holy Shit. Am I dying right now because I could feel all this blood coming out and I could feel that there was obviously a problem with my lungs because the air was coming out there as I was losing consciousness. I couldn't move anymore like I couldn't stand up and I realized that I was trapped between this car in someone's garage judge I think it was and so I thought to myself if this woman comes after me again. She's going to kill me because I can't move anymore. I was trying to think of how I could get help. Because I hadn't heard any police could hear noises but I didn't hear police and so I was looking like I was is feeling all around me even though I couldn't see trying to find rocks like so even though I wasn't all there I was still trying to find ways to survive. But then is he's just started to feel too weak and I thought okay I'm dying so I guess that's it. I felt like I was sinking into the cement everything Kinda like slowed down and I almost felt like I was under water and it was not a bad bad feeling. It wasn't scary even though we had just happened to me was horrifying at the time but I knew that if I survived survived I was going to have to deal with it. I was pretty religious at this time but it just kind of felt natural to like start talking to God and I remember thinking this is so sad. I'm only eighteen. I never got to be a teacher. I never got married married and I'm GonNa die here and I didn't even I wasn't able to wrap my head around what had happened like I knew something happened but I just it didn't dawn on me. Yeah like this is really sad. I'm dying but I can't even believe how I got to this place. I think part of me knew that dealing with this would be really hard you know and so I was like. Oh I'm so close I could just just like die right here because it felt like falling asleep so it was really kind of a peaceful feeling. I wasn't in pain. What was happening right now? This peaceful feeling. I was ready to surrender to that. I thought this isn't that bad. Like this is what everyone is afraid of is dying right in here. I am in. It doesn't hurt everything's fine and then at this point. Sorry to hear the sirens coming. I was a little upset set. I thought like maybe I should just die like come on and then I heard the sirens coming and I thought like okay. Shit I guess and I'm GonNa have to try to get their attention or they're gonNA leave me because I'm hiding here and nobody knows where I am. I remember Thinking like okay now. They're here but I can still die because maybe they won't get to me fast enough. My Body did everything everything it could to survive. Even though my mind was changing its mind and the way that I held my wound. It was just instincts. It was just the only thing that I could addu shortly after. I heard them what they were doing was taking my mom out on the stretcher. Even though I couldn't see it I heard them saying her name and I heard them yelling her name and saying stay with us. Stay with us so at that point I thought in a little bit in my head like it is my mom dying but then I thought no no. She can't be because if I got away she could get away too so I just kind of put that thought to arrest and I didn't think about that again so is still having this like running conversation with God and I was saying okay. I can't stew anything like I know that they're here but they don't see me yet. So what do I do. If I'm supposed to stand up. You need to to open my eyes. I can't do this and then my eyes opened. I was able to sit up but I knew I was still too weak to do anything and I started. It took kind of use my hands to scoot myself down the driveway. But I knew that was taking up too much energy and that I was going to pass out I just us remember thinking like okay. Tell me what to do and in my head I heard someone clear. Stay okay run okay okay. I just asked this question and this is the answer. I'm getting so I have to do it. And so I got up and Iran. I ended up collapsing in the street. But the cops or the poster was there they saw me and so I guess they had pointed at me with their weapons and said drop your weapon because they didn't know exactly who I was yet and then someone the neighbors who was watching said No. That's Megan that's one of the victims. So then they came up to me. They started to cut my clothes off. I remember I asked them. Am I gonNA die. And they said no and even though I was on good shape I remember thinking or saying will you have to say that. You're not gonNa tell me. I'm dying shortly after they said to me. I know that you don't want to do this. But it's really really important so we're going to take the car around and I want you to look inside and tell me if this is the person that did this to you right away sir. Say No I'm not going to do that. And they said you really have to. So they drove the cop car up and the lights were on and I remember looking at it and it was just so surreal. Because I couldn't believe all these things were happening and then they opened the door and I saw the person inside and she didn't look at me but I could just see her sitting there and and I said yes. That's her so then. They closed the door and they'd drove her away. So what happened with Harry guesses. She went. She walked back to her house. Her boyfriend's mother because she lived with her boyfriend and the boyfriend. Mom I guess at that point that the the woman with the knife said to the boyfriend's mom just kill me now and that she tried to go in the house but the boyfriend's mom stopped her and said you need to wait out here and they put me in the ambulance and they brought my aunt with me too so we were in the ambulance together and so for me and my aunt we ended up going to the place with the better trauma unit and my mom and my grandma both went just to the nearest hospital. Uh when I got into the ambulance I remember That's when I started to feel pain so before that I was kind of numb and feeling like loopy like I was Gonna GonNa pass out and now I was feeling pain when I got there. Get this point. I was in a lot of pain and there was people all around me and nurses and people just like shuffling doing things and doing things to me and I remember looking for someone to make eye contact with. I was like desperately looking around for someone to look at me and like is this real. You know because I was in critical condition. I couldn't be put to sleep when I couldn't have anything. Anything administered to me so they basically put tubes into my stab wounds in into my lungs while it was awake and that hurt really bad and I just remember being hysterical and that it was so bad that like even now trying to remember it. My I bodies feels a little numb because it was just like this pain that I couldn't believe finally. The pain medicine started to work at at this point. They were asking me if there is anyone that I wanted to call the first thing I said was I want to call my mom and they said well your mom at the hospital. She is getting surgery right now. So you can't call her not yet. They let all my family family come. I was trying to tell them what happened. And I just remember seeing people and I remember people looking at me and I remember thinking I must look so bad because everyone looks so so upset and I hadn't seen myself yet but at the time I had like bleached my hair blond so my hair was red from the blood. Even if they weren't crying crying I knew I could tell that they were looking at me like this is really really bad. I kept asking them. Can I call him on. I WanNa talk to my mom. I'M GONNA call my mum's room in my head. I thought while I know this was bad but if my mom is alive than this is just something. We're GONNA look back on one day. She was going to tell me. Everything's Okay and she was just going to be like. Yeah fuck this. We're good people will ask that question like what's the worst thing that ever happened to you and before that I don't know what it would have been in now since it's like my grandpa my Nana's has been to a lived with for so long him coming in the room and I could tell that he was going to say something really sad because it's just like the certainly He kinda sat down on the next to me on the bed and I looked at him and he said I have some bad news. Your mom didn't make it and I remember looking at him and I just started needed to cry and I don't know if I screamed. It feels like I did but everything was still a little painful in my chest and I think I just kinda cried myself to sleep and then when I woke up I said the same thing I was like. Okay I WANNA call my mom now and then they like told me again then. I don't know and what I did after that or how anyone handled me at that point and I don't think like it registered I. I didn't really believe it. Yeah you said that to me. But it doesn't register doesn't make sense. It was just really heartbreaking breaking this whole time. I had thought I'm GonNa talk to her. She was in surgery. But she's GonNa be okay and we're GonNa talk again and then it was like this realization of wall. No she's Day like what does that even mean when you haven't really had to face me lost like that it's like how do I make sense of this. But what does it mean. If she's dead like she can't be dead. I really wanted my cell phone and I had T and they did this weird thing where it was. It's like you have to listen to your message and delete it. And my mom had left me a voicemail from that day and I had to listen to it and and they wouldn't let me save it so I listen to it like ten times in a row and I was just crying in my hospital bed and so that's another thing that I never forget I can still hear it in my head when she was said. Hey Meg call me back. That was all she said was. Hey Connie back so I was in the hospital for ten days and because I was in there for ten days. He's they needed to do the funeral for my mom before her body got worse or whatever happens with that so if I wasn't able to be off of the chest tubes that was gonNA have to go with the chest tubes attached to me. They took the tubes out to see if my lungs were good enough on their own or my lungs collapsed again. Uh and they waited again to make sure I was okay and then I was able to be released from the hospital. It was afraid to get out because it was like this little safe cocooning away. I knew that they wouldn't let people come in unless they were family. They wouldn't answer answer anyone's questions on the phone about me. No one ever left me alone. There was always a family member with me and it was horrible but it was like okay. This is a safe little place and I started already. PTSD in in sleep issues. So I was afraid to get out because I didn't know what's life going to be like now. Oh and I was not comfortable to go back to the house so I went to my Nana's house. My Aunt my grandma had been released before me and they actually went back to the house where it all happened. The detectives. They said that this was like one of the longest crime scene things that they had ever done. It was like twenty four hours at least of being in the House and taking photos and taking evidence because the way that it happened it was like in every room. Mm All over the house. There was different bloodmarks than she used a knife that was from our kitchen. It was the biggest knife from the butcherblock because she had tried to go in a few ways it was even longer this. She was like outside of the House or whatever she was doing so it was a long time that she she spent in the house or I mean now that I think of it. She knew that I was in there because she had been watching through her window. They said in the trial and and through my window and so she was waiting for me to be quiet so there was a longtime of her waiting in like trying to figure out when to come in. So that's why now that creeps me out so bad and to think about just in your house doing things and not knowing that someone is you know they're waiting for you so so the day I got out. I came home in my hospital gown being in the car and being on the way home in like there was no color anymore everything was just like black and white A. and Dole and and I knew it was going to be so different. I was already afraid of a lot of different things I knew do. I couldn't be alone. I it just had like my body was carrying around like such panic and such I mean I I guess like in flight or fight all the time. So that's really exhausting and it was hard to laugh or show show different expressions in my family said the same that it was hard for them to watch me and it was a longtime I would say like at least a few months before they heard me laugh and smile. It just felt lake I'm still here. I'm still me but like my personality was just gone kind of you've as I tried to make sense of this new life where this actually happened to me and this is real and not ever going back to the house. I never saw my mom's room again. My Room was packed. Up For me. my cat was given away to somebody and then on top of that. The feeling of safety in the world was gone because someone did this in my home. I don't even know how I survived that first year it was. I don't think I slept at all. If Hi did was in the daytime and I could never be alone so I felt like a baby that always needed a sitter and most people understood and especially family any of course they wanted to be there for me and before this I was confident in. I thought I knew where my life was headed in a way. Hey you know I was going to school full time and my mom is going to support me until I finished school and then I was going to have my career as a teacher so that all changed. The First Class I tried to go to to return back to college was a photography class because I wanted to make it easy on myself and kind of fun and of course one of the first things they had to do is go into a dark room so I ended up dropping out because I couldn't be in the dark room. If I was walking and people would walk to close to me that I didn't know I would have to stop and wait until they passed me. I wouldn't drive. I didn't WanNa leave the house at night. I I had to face every window so if I was in a room I couldn't have my back to a window or door which can become complicated. I couldn't were headphones. I didn't shower alone so someone would have to literally stand in the bathroom and I would have to be able to look at them as I showered from the shower curtain. So all these little things that were just so there was all these rules. Then I had if I was in the house alone own I would start to be very hyper vigilant and I would not I would just kind of start thinking like who is around. What if someone's looking at me through window or what if someone's going to break in again and then because of that I was in this flight or fight response at all times so instead of feeling like I could go check? Click which would be. I've had a lot of people in my life. Tell me when I felt that like okay. Hey feel that way. Go check even really irrational things. Like I was afraid someone could be watching me through Event in the ceiling. Okay so go look at it. It's like no my body can't do that. I just shut down and I'm only frozen in this one spot and it doesn't matter if I have to go to the bathroom if I'm really hungry. It doesn't as a matter. I'm not going to move until someone is there with me. Who can check for me and everywhere behind the shower curtain cupboards where people can't even fit? It doesn't matter if that place has not been checked then. I'm not going to be comfortable so when someone wasn't available to do those things for me it would be me going in somewhere in just being frozen. What happened to me is one of those things where her people say like? That could never happen to you. And what are the chances of that happening so now once that happened. It's like will anything can happen to me at anytime anytime like it doesn't matter however rational seems even when I heard the noise at night. You know like we're just so used to it not being anything that wants. It is something then. Everything is like a danger to me. Yeah it was just so real and it's so hard to describe to people who don't know what it's like and it's exhausting and like I said the first year was just kind of like a blackout year for me. I don't know how I I survived it. I didn't really start grieving for my mom for a long time so it was just dealing with the traumatic parts of everything Right away victims of violent crimes started to pay for therapy for me so victims of violent crimes at least here in California is pretty wonderful. I would go to therapy and I would tell her like what are things average people my age are doing. They're going to school. They're getting jobs having relationships in. So why would try to do those things and I like I went to school in. That didn't work and so she said you know. Take a break from that Because I wanted to work with kids. Why don't you work at a preschool? Okay I'll try that but then it would be like but I can't drive I I'm not going to drive myself. So driving is a fear of mine. Even driving had nothing to do with that it was just one of those things and I can't be out after dark so I would have to like work around. All of these things is and so she told me that yes. You can do that but if you keep doing this your world just gets smaller and smaller which is very very true for a while. That was okay but yeah it was just so challenging. And that's why for a long time. I just. I wish that I had done to because they had such bad survivor's guilt. I wish that we just both died when I saw my mom getting stabbed I. I don't know I've had so much guilt about leaving the room. That was like one of the first things I dealt with in therapy was the guilt the survivor's Skilton and the fact that I left her and I didn't go back to help her. Because I'm I've always struggled with that that I think if it was the other way around she probably would have never left me and talking through that with people and with the people who are investigating the case they had said to me. If you went back you would have all been dead and I remember thinking well. I wish we all died. I wish I just went back because I just wish we all died. That would have been easier than dealing with this but at the time I didn't I just think that my natural assumption was that she was my mom and she was always very strong and I just never thought she could die. So if I'm getting away then she's going to get away even though I saw her fall down even I saw her being stabbed over and over. It's still just didn't occur to me that she wouldn't survive or that she wouldn't get away after Momma stabbed. She was alone in her room when the police did come. They went to my mom's room and she was still alive and she was still talking even though she had been stabbed over thirty times in the chest in that she was saying my name and so that was like. Oh my God. Probably like one of the most heartbreaking details was to find that out because I felt like Oh my God. She had been stabbed thirty times and she was thinking about me and that was really hard part because I felt like what kind of person leaves you now. So many parents because I've been to support groups and stuff and so many parents say that's exactly what I would have wanted. I would've wanted my child to leave the room to be okay so I understand that I know that she would be happy that I lived but it was a really really hard thing to me past you. Just don't know I don't know what could have happened but but I know like in the stages of grief that bargaining is a big one. Of course I spent a lot of time in that phase of thinking what could I have done different. And now it's almost been twelve years and really don't spend that much time thinking about it anymore but every once in a while I still go back to that in just think about what if something would have been different. My aunt had similar. Not Ah Shit issues like really betting anxiety and she's bipolar in different issues where she was also not able to do a lot of things and that was before. This happened so then after this happened. Of course we're all traumatized and we're all totally different and I was younger which yeah I think is why I am been more resilient in some ways but I don't know my mom was the one that was basically supporting us all in the house so then that changed than she was gone and I never wanted to go back to the house so they ended up having to move to and they moved to Vegas to be see with my other aunt. My Mom's sister and my mom's sister was my mom's best friend and she ended up taking the worst She was so angry and ended up. Having a drug problem in all kinds of things it was just one of those like domino effects. Where just because my mom was murdered? And I was there and I witnessed it and that's very traumatic for me. Everyone in my family had to deal with this in their own way and it changed. Everyone's ruins lives so much so many people move out of state there is like no way. I'm realizing now twelve years later how there is no way to measure like how many people were changed by this in my family because a lot of people weren't coming to me with their issues because I was such a mess myself a lot of times the murderer is kind of glorified or everyone wants to Google the murderer. Everyone wants to try to figure out why they did what they did. But to watch victims uh-huh who survive keep living can be really challenging because there's tears in their messy lives in their issues for my aunt. There's like doc. Drug problems in there is different things and it's just we don't hear about those things as often when I first got out of the hospital and was starting to talk to detectives in the people working on the case they had said there was no motive that if there was she would probably never say it. They said that she was on Meth and that she was coming down from it and so apparently you can get very paranoid. And they didn't know why she was focused on my house. We had a trial and that trial was for the the murder counts. It was like they were giving her time for each count like three counts of attempted murder and then trying to decide if my mom's murder was first or second degree and the jury decided second degree so I think what they decided was. She was trying to kill me but she ended up killing my mom and so I thought that was ridiculous. I thought she should still get first degree. But but someone described it to me as like if if you're in a car and someone was trying to kill you by shooting you. They're trying to kill the driver but the other person moves in the way they he gets shot. That's second degree because the intent was for the first person to die. So that's what they're saying happened in my mom's case so it was second degree. She wasn't trying to kill her but she just ended ended up being in the way but the second part of it was sanity so they were trying to decide if she was saying insane and she was trying adding to plead insanity in saying that she had a psychotic break. And that's why she did what she did. And the jury deadlocked walked on that decision. They couldn't come to agreement so it was a mistrial. That actually happened in two thousand nine in so that was actually three years and the second part of the trial happened in two thousand eleven. That was what took five years. The first verdict still had to stay still second-degree murder but the second jury decided that she was saying so then she was able to be sentenced There was really no motive except that they said she was watching me. She was on math. Coming down from it got fixated and that she had said at one point that she that God told her to do it and so that was one of the things she said but aside from that she never really said anything else about why I had no l. idea who either of them were and I never went to school in the school district so I didn't even know any mutual friends of theirs because Zayn always went to school for my Nana's house so we had no mutual friends. I had never seen them. They looked into all my records to find out if I had any like drug charges or any way like that and I never did so thankfully because then they probably would have tried to say that I had some connection but I know everyone wanted to make sense of it. And that's why why that was an issue but like that was one of the first things I heard was that there was a rumor that I knew her boyfriend and it was so frustrating. Because I'm like uh I wish I did know them so at least it would make more sense but then I also do understand why people have to come to these conclusions to make sense of it When I was in the trial they say is the person who caused this? HARMER's the person in the room and can you show me where the person is and I had to do that. I don't know how like a handful of times. There was a handful of times where I've actually had to see her and be in front front of her and I don't remember ever looking at me except once and it could be because I tried really hard not to look at her face until that one time but when she did look at me I just remember feeling like chills. It was just I. I didn't want to go to the bathroom. I was worried she would be in the bathroom and parts of me new like this is just irrational. Fear she can't be but other parts. It's of me were so convinced that that's a possibility. I just remember looking at this person in having a really a hard time grasping it again like this. The person that did this in especially seeing her in real close and being in in front of her knowing that she's listening to me. I mean I don't know what else she would be doing. Except listening to me. It was just so such a surreal experience to think this person. 'cause all of this you know. And she looks so normal and she's probably is a great parts of her. We're a great person for a long time. I I had these dreams of me talking to her and finding out why and I mean yeah that was probably a few whole years of me wondering and now I really don't anymore because I've realized that it wouldn't matter whatever she said If she he said it's because I was watching you and I didn't like you. It wouldn't matter in my dreams. I would almost feel bad for her and and when I would wake up I would feel really weird about that like I don't WanNa feel bad for her and I don't care what she did it so that would that's it's kind of like we're anger started to come from and yeah I don't think ahead very mature understanding of religion. I mean I was young but I also kind of have disliked fantasy of good and bad. I thought if if God was real and all these things that I was taught to believe why wouldn't have. He protected me. Or why would he let this happen to me. So I've had some really interesting in conversations with pastors at churches and and did a lot of like exploring that and I still have a lot more to do but some people say that it's just your brain. Uh kind of dying that when you start feeling these things or you have flashbacks of your life when you start to feel presents around you that it's just your brain shutting down and that's why that what happens in I don't really know like I don't have the answer to that. But in the moment I definitely felt the presence and I still believe that it was this God I had heard about support groups and I just don't think I was ever ready until in two thousand eleven. The time that the second trial was happening I started to go to a group called parents of murdered children. That's just how the group started but it's really for everybody who's lost anyone to murder even even if it's a friend and so my introduction was always when I was eighteen someone broke into my home and murdered my mom. She was his thirty seven and the murderer got thirty six years to life so it was hard but it was really kinda liked life changing being to be around a room of people who've lost people to murder and I met someone who was probably the most most transformative healing person for me and she looked at me and we looked into each other's eyes. It was like this really weird understanding bet no one else has ever been able to give me and she just kind of like looked at me and we both cried and it was like this thing that only people who who have been through this no and not only that but she witnessed her daughter being murdered so we were like on the opposite ends where my mom was murdered. Her daughter was murdered. Even now it makes me cry because it's just like wow someone else gets it before we when I would have dreams about her I would always wake myself up and I'm be crying. That'd be hysterical. In everything would only lead back to her murder and I would only be able the see her as being stabbed and like my mom was only murdered. Now I'm able to see her as my mom. I'm able to think of her as a whole person in and remember her in like I've wondered. What am I gonNA feel not healed? Because we don't think I'll ever feel one hundred percent better or like I'm over it but when am I going to feel better and it's like okay. No it's almost been twelve years and I'm finally feeling better so I guess the answer for me was like eleven and a half years. You might never feel better but your new normal will become. I'm okay you'll deal with it. You'll find ways to deal with it. You'll find ways to comfort yourself and and then it's like I also I feel horrible because you don't no one wants to say like oh it could be maybe like two to ten twelve fifteen years. I still have the issue where I know that everything can change. So sometimes I'll imagine like what would happen tomorrow if I had to leave my house or if my house burned down like it's it's not even just murder stories anywhere. It's like everything that happens in the world. I don't have that filter anymore where it's like that can't happen to me. I know it could happen to me. So that's kind of like a curse and a gift. I guess because I've survived something that I didn't think I could so in a way I feel all kind of like a bad sometimes. Oh Yeah I was stabbed you know. I survived that so I'm not that afraid of what people are going to do to me anymore. And it's not like I'm one hundred percent better but I feel a lot better. You can find out more about Megan and her story by going to Megan Ashley Rights Dot Com where she chronicles other aspects experience in her life including amd are therapy mental health and sexuality. This is actually happening is brought to you by the witness online. If you love what we do you can join the community on our official instagram rampage. At actually happening you can also rate and review the show on itunes which helps tremendously to boost visibility to a larger community of listeners. And if you want to help sustain the show over the coming years you can contribute a small monthly donation through our Patriot page at patriotair dot com slash happening. Thank you for listening until next time stay tuned.

murder Nanna Megan Ashley Louisiana PTSD Manana Iran official Britt Google Zayn Jason Harry
Embracing Confusion

Developer Tea

06:40 min | 1 year ago

Embracing Confusion

"What does it mean to be confused? What exactly is happening brains then reality? I want you to give this question. Some thought why you're listening to this episode and then I want you to imagine how this might apply to your interactions with the developers. Perhaps your manager or if you were a manager your direct reports the company. You lied when you think about the role of perception in the work. You do my name. Is Jonathan Control? You'RE LISTENING TO DEVELOP T. Goal of this show is to help. Driven developers find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. So think about this question. What does it mean to be confused? Simple assertion to kind of guide you in this this recognize. The confusion doesn't exist outside of someone's mind in this. We are including you know the the fact that animals can become confused but confusion is a problem of perception and does not even really a problem when you look at it from this frame. Because it's very easy to see that confusion can lead to learning confusion. For example in a child might lead to curiosity but in our professional lives we tend to see confusion as a sign of weakness or perhaps a lack of preparation. The truth is that we all have gaps. In our knowledge that we all have moments of confusion. Even about things that at one point we actually knew a lot about. It's possible that our perception has changed about even the same subjects that we have developed knowledge round in the past and so it makes sense that we should be kind and perhaps even invite confusion to be a more regular part of our work. So how can we do this for ourselves? And for others perhaps most importantly that's what we're gonNA talk about right after we talk about today sponsor Leonard whether you're working on a personal project or managing your enterprises infrastructure of Leonard has the price support and scale. The you need to take your project to the next level with eleven data centers worldwide. Latency is not going to be a serious issue. They have S. three compatible storage options and their next generation network. Leonard delivers the performance. You expect at a price that you don't and they're going to give you twenty dollars worth of credit disrobing a listener of developer t out there. Nanna plans start as low as five dollars a month. And of course that goes all the way up to dedicated. Cpu plans or GP compute plans block storage. Go AND CHECK IT OUT HEAD OVER TO LYNN DOT com slash developer t to start today. Use The code developer. T twenty twenty to get that twenty dollars worth of credit. That's developer t two zero two zero. Thanks AGAIN TO LEONARD FOR SPONSORING. Today's episode of Developer T. So how can we not only be kind to ourselves and kind to others? When we experience something like confusion but also invite it invite confusion because we know that after confusion often comes curiosity and learning it helps to regularly experienced confusion yourself. Try to expose yourself to new experiences that force you to think in ways that you're not necessarily naturally going to think in this experience of confusion will remind you what it's like to be a beginner again so you'll naturally can build some empathy up for that beginner mindset but it's also important to understand that sometimes the best people to understand confusion. The confusion of being a beginner are people who were more recently beginners themselves. So if you're running. An organization might make sense to not only allow much more experienced programmers to be mentors of younger or less experienced programmers but also to allow the ones who were beginners not. They're not long ago. Allow them to be mentors as well. The final Exercise that I want you you to employ When you are in a situation where one person is confused and another person is not walk through your assumptions walk through your Simpson's and verify. Validate those assumptions test yourself against them. Test the perception of the person who is confused who is expressing confusion. Perhaps they are seeing something. That is confusing. That you aren't seeing at all. It's very possible that confusion his a more appropriate response to whatever reality. You're facing together nine. You're the one who has the limited vision ultimately work to reduce the stigma around admitting confusion. Admitting the lack of knowledge admitting the need for help or the desire for a different perspective the idea that we can go it alone that we can own our entire feature. This is based on an old model of thinking and it doesn't really reflect all of the learning that has been done. Collaboration be quick to raise your hand when you are confused. Thank you so much for listening to today's episode of developer t then giving into Lynnwood for sponsoring today's episode. Of course you can get twenty dollars worth of credit by heading over to Leno Dot com slash developer t using the code developer. T twenty twenty. That's developer t two zero two zero all one word at checkout. Today's episode was produced by Sarah Jackson. My Name's Jonathan Cottrell until next time. Enjoy your team.

developer Leonard T twenty twenty Jonathan Control Sarah Jackson Jonathan Cottrell Leno Dot Nanna Lynnwood Simpson twenty dollars five dollars
Lung Cancer Screen Could Be Easy-pee-sy

60-Second Science

03:24 min | 10 months ago

Lung Cancer Screen Could Be Easy-pee-sy

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm wait gibbs. All imagine getting screened for early stage lung cancer simply by taking a deep breath from an inhaler and then peeing into a cup. Sangita Baccio a professor of Health Sciences and engineering at MIT described. How that might be possible in Ted Talk? She gave in two thousand sixteen. What if you had a detector that was so small that it could circulate in your body? Find the tumor all by itself and send a signal to the outside world. It sounds a little bit like science fiction but actually nanotechnology allows us to do. Just that his idea was to invent nontoxic nanno probes. That doctors could put inside your blood or lungs or guts to detect a tiny tumors. When they're easier to treat before they grow big enough to spread throughout the body and damaged vital organs. I dream that one day instead of going into an expensive screening facility to get a colonoscopy or a mammogram or a PAP smear that you could get a shot. Wait an hour and do a urine test on a paper strip in two thousand seventeen bought. His team reported a proof of concept experiment in nature. Biomedical Engineering that demonstrated Nanna probes like this working to detect early stage ovarian cancer in mice and now the group has refined this technology further to create a screening test for lung cancer. That is more sensitive than the C. T. Scans used today. The team of Harvard and MIT researchers described their work in the April first issue of science translational medicine lung cancer accounts for nearly a quarter of all cancer deaths in the US each year in large part because most cases of lung cancer are not caught until after the disease has already spread to other sites yet win lung. Cancer is caught and treated early the majority of patients survived the disease for at least five years but ct screening for lung. Cancer is not widely used around the world. Because it's expensive. And more than ninety percent of positive tests turn out to be benign growths not cancer. So this kind of screening leads to a lot of unnecessary and invasive biopsies in. Battista study which was done on mice genetically engineered to develop lung tumors very similar to those seen. In people the Nanna probes were able to detect tumors about fifty times smaller than other screening methods and it produced. No false positives. The NETA probes are designed to release reporter molecules when they come near certain kinds of lung tumors. Once released the reporters pass into the blood get filtered by the kidneys and then exit the body in the urine. The group is now working to repackage the nano probes into a form that could be inhaled as a powder or through a nebulizer if that succeeds then the technology will have to proceed through several years of clinical trials before it could be used to screen people for lung cancer. And I hope that what this means is that one day we can detect tumors in patients. Sooner than ten years after they've started growing and that this would lead to earlier treatments and that we could save more lives than we can today with early detection. Thanks for listening. For Scientific Americans sixty seconds science I'm gives.

lung cancer Sangita Baccio MIT Nanna Biomedical Engineering Ted professor of Health Sciences US Battista Harvard reporter sixty seconds one day ninety percent five years ten years
Nanotronics Brings Deep Learning to Precision Manufacturing - Ep. 109

The AI Podcast

23:24 min | 1 year ago

Nanotronics Brings Deep Learning to Precision Manufacturing - Ep. 109

"Hello and welcome to the AI. Podcast I'm your host Noah Kravitz. New York City has long been one of the world's great metropolises and a global hub for innovation. One of the coolest things to me about New York is how it's limited. Physical space has evolved over time to keep pace with all of the New People. Ideas and industries shaping the world as quick personal example back in the year. Two thousand our a Web startup focused and educational technology but our offices were in a former button factory on eighth avenue in Midtown Manhattan. Today's guest is at the forefront of leading New York into its next phase of innovation. Matthew Putman is co founder and CEO of Nanoelectronics a company that's aiming to revolutionize precision manufacturing through its use of advanced imaging robotics and of course a nanotechnologies flagship. Technology is inspect the world's first automated industrial microscope and the companies building. New York's first high tech manufacturing hub in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. There's lots to explore here. So let's get right into it. Matthew Putman thanks for coming on the podcast out. It's a real honor. Thank you so maybe you can start by just telling us a little bit about what Nanoelectronics is and what you do. But you did an excellent job of it actually. I'm going to stick with that one for an and next time we do this all credit to your colleague marriage really there has not been a real change in manufacturing and process control since the nineteen fifties. This is a big deal we've seen this exponential growth in new types of technologies but the way that those things are made has not changed so tonics is a science company that tries to address these issues and we do address them in a number of ways. We use AI. Of course we're talking about US factory automation. In a number of other ways we detect flaws in processes we reduce waste we do real time correction of anomalies in processes for manufacturing and we work through many different types of industries. When did you start working on the basis for what's become now trucks and as I asked that I'm hearing that the answer is you know when I was old enough to count is really when I started working on this stuff yeah? I grew up in factories. My father worked in a factory ran a factory when I was young then started his own business. When I was eight years old that I worked in so factory in process control have been a part of my life for many years. My father is by the way great inventor if you look at a lot of our patents. He is the lead inventory on a lot of patents confessed. So it's been this great relationship but the company that company was called tech pro started in one thousand nine hundred eighty two and you know that was early personal computer days. Yes you know. It was really early for putting personal computers onto factory floors process control. In fact for what I know from what I know. Nobody was doing it at all So what his business did was to put. Pc's right on different factory nodes in order to do as B. C. and data acquisition. The company that went on to make our own equipment primarily for polymers rubber and plastics chemical industry and eventually Acquired Swedish company called optronics at this company made a very simple imaging tool that was able to look at small particles in a factory process. No is involved with the project a European Union project to create the agreed tire so more environmentally-friendly tire so I've been working on both imaging and on factories since I was very young when that company was I went and worked in a university lab and that contrast it greatly at the university lab. I saw these amazing inventions happening. We were doing great things. And just as you're about to celebrate your invention. I had this memory of what at scale manufacturing was and was concerned that the great inventions that happened in the lab would necessarily make its way into the world so in two thousand and ten. I started Mana Tonics. Nanna tonics to use white light microscopy to try to obtain super resolution detect flaws and features end and identifying classify them. I thought a good way to scale some of the technologies that I thought were important in the world. What are some of the industries that you mentioned because I as you were talking? I was thinking about your own website and some other projects. I've worked on using microscopes automation to examine things that the I can't really detect and finding these flaws and manufacturing processes things like hard drives. So what are some of the things that you're working on well? Those are one by the way we work. We do work with the largest hard drive manufacturer We will look through two hundred layers of their process so a big advantage of what we do is that it's a platform that because artificial intelligence and imaging sensors do not care what it is. You're looking at. It learns how to understand no matter what it is and learns across many different levels of process we can look at two hundred layers of a read. Write head for for a hard drive rent us. Humans it mentioned hard drive. And it it actually. Does this interesting thing of willie consolidating a factory and making less room for error? Even within the factory itself the actual fab space is smaller at many of the factories that we work in because we have this convergent tool but we also work out throughout the semiconductor industry. We work a lot with the compound. Semiconductor Industry so next generation power devices flexible displays photovoltaics. We work in genome sequencing a lot. So we work with the largest maker of genome sequencing equipment. We'll goal to bring down the cost. In by increasing yields for genome sequencing. Then we work with the customers in that supply chain so I look at the world and the products around us as one large supply chain if I look at a smartphone for instance. I think you know. Nanoelectronics can image everything from the casing to the multi chipsets inside to the sensor to the screen. So we'd like to think in terms of systems your work is helping Creator biproduct over the right way to say it is of your work is helping create smaller fabs spaces on factory floors yes. I'm sure you're familiar with this but it doesn't matter where you are in the world real estate per FABS is the most expensive real estate by far than anything else. This is a great advantage to our customers to actually have a smaller footprint. Because we have a computational driven system rather than a system that requires a lot of very expensive large hardware now. This goes one step beyond just reducing the space in a company's factory. It goes to an ideology that the more steps of a process you have and the larger. Something is the more room for error. There is so we picture a factory actually getting smaller through time if it gets smaller you can iterative process these much faster and you can increase yields and reduce waste so. I know that there are a number of things that you're working on a number of technologies that are patented or pen pending that. You're working on but there's one that I wanted to ask you about. Aip see artificial intelligence process control. What is that so the way? Bits process control has been done since the nineteen fifties has been to optimize for every part of a process to make sure that you have the temperature. Correct on something. Or The you know your your process of making a semiconductor. Has the right photo resist? But very few things have ever been able to optimize for a final product and this is just natural. Because we didn't have the computational power to be able to run deep learning networks in real time on a factory floor Ipc uses a feedback and feed forward process by doing that. We can adjust actual controls in real time to make corrective action for any type of anomalies that occur. It's not so important to us. What the absolute value on each of the stations. It's that by the end. The product has the most reproducibility and highest quality. Possible right and so. It's being able to look at each step in the process as part of the whole with the end goal of crimen that product. That's up to SPEC bright. You know I'm going to just dive a little into the title of Neural Net. That we use one of the type. I think what's unique about the way we do this. Is it actually combines? Many of them were not so reliant. On huge amounts of historical data we realized the necessity to do things and learn as we go. And that's been a limitation to being able to implement a lot of key features in factories in the past so we use reinforcement learning in a factory. In order to assign several reinforcement learning agents with sort of subgoals rewards and utilization along the way in order to achieve the final process. So if you're rewarded for saying using for instance using the least amount of material possible and another agent is responsible for having the fastest throughput. That's possible they're all aiming for the same final goal both of these but they may not work together you know. These things may not converge. They may sometimes and it looks at it every single part that you're working on so it's anticipating going forward what it might do. But we put this into a a again agenda adversarial network Ben and the discriminator in the Gan chooses which are l. Agent is best suited for solving the problem in this case. Then you're learning a bit from the past the past being the earlier part of the process. But you're making predictions about what is going to happen in the future so it closes this loop and how challenging. How difficult is that to to design again based on that design principle? You're talking about. Let's say for a new client or a new a new process that you're trying to analyze. What are the efforts for a long time now and most of the funding that we have received up to this point has gone towards creating is close to universal models as possible? So of course. There's process changes in deployments. That are different for different customers that you work with in different scenarios but there are a limited number of models did our deployment engineers will choose from so trying to make. This is universal as possible has been important to us. We don't go to each customer and start from scratch by designing a new model. This is important to us for a few reasons. The obvious reason is it would be incredibly time consuming expensive for everybody involved and we wouldn't have a lot of historical data behind us and so we would have to to to spend so much time gathering training data but the other reason is that by the time we're deploying outta customer site we didn't we don't want to be reliance on the cloud anymore. We want a facility to be able to completely cut off from the Internet if they need to be for security reasons or for speed recenter so we don't do any onsite messing with the model. I think that's that's an important thing that distinguishes us we speak directly from the GP to the machine. Yeah I think it's a bit unusual so obviously a in artificial intelligence and all that that umbrella word means is a a part of what you're doing it Nanna. Could you think back to kind of the genesis of Nanna trying to work with imaging or or even your previous work before that and is there a moment or kind of a period of time when you first started seeing potential and using a in this work and then maybe you could talk through a little bit how? Ai has come to be a part of what what you're doing with. Nanna TRIX now I. It's become a part of almost everything that we do now right and we talked about the company starting in two thousand and Ted we were doing super resolution imaging doing interesting things with computation but with computer vision. You just become limited when you're dealing with things that are very similar in look in. The morphology is too similar. It doesn't matter. How many programmers are how many interesting computer vision algorithms you put behind it so I think the moment was around two thousand fifteen. Where we started to employ computational neural nets into our classification algorithms with our imaging. This was definitely due to the ability to you. Who's INVIDIA? This would be something that would have been not only expensive but there. Nobody would have thought it possible in five years. I don't think it's just us. You'd probably come across this a lot. There was a turning point Part of the turning point was invidia. realizing that the power that they've created for gaming and other types of rendering and things would be really applicable to deep learning and then party bus was realizing that's perfect. We're trying to accomplish so we moved from were used. Cnn's constantly but now we were using many different types of of ai from our ends to reinforcement learning to LS TM's to it's just the suite of things that we can try and we can try either locally on hardware the videos provided or we can use a number of processors on aws. So it's you know really every year if I look at what has been accomplished in. Ai From our company and the partnership with our company and Invidia. It's been enormous. And I think twenty twenty will be the same and to that end both specifically for your company and then also kind of broader for the industry the the world at large. Do you see that in terms of the use of of AI in different areas but also the advancement of the tools themselves through that suite of tools. You mentioned feels like we've been on this accelerated curve of growth over the past. Say Five years like you said past few years anyway. Do you see that that rate of acceleration increasing or staying the same or do you think things are are slowing down a little bit in terms of the the technology's itself well? I think that it's our responsibility to be more sophisticated on how we use algorithm. We can't put all the burden on hardware manufacturers to to keep up with a Moore's law type acceleration when we are just getting started with how to optimize especially how to optimize on a local level. I also think that the advances that the world has seen in a I have been consumer consumer products. It's been great search engines. It's or it's been you know deep mind winning and go it's been you know you're having an elected but those things that are underneath the things that either invidia mates or the rest of the hardware that did makes those things possible. Hasn't seen the same kind of improvement so exponential improvement in how things are made in using AI in the factory environment. We have a long way to go still so we won't be seeing the end of that anytime soon. Fall said we're talking with Matthew Putman Co founder and CEO of Nanna Tron. Ix a New York City Brooklyn New York based company that is advancing revolutionizing leading the field of precision manufacturing through its use of advanced imaging robotics and a One of the big things that Nanna tonics is doing right now. Is Building a factory in the Brooklyn Navy Yard? I used to live in Brooklyn. I've got family from Brooklyn. Remember Brooklyn in the Brooklyn Navy. I should say in the late nineties early. Two thousands as being a place where there were some some film production stuff happening but Kinda not really sure what else was going on there And now Nanna. Traffic is building a factory. So what can you tell us about that project? Yeah we chose this not just because I live in Brooklyn in fact we looked all over the country for a place to open this and I think that we will open others in different places but this is a great opportunity to be in a urban area where we can actually make things in a cultural and financial senator but this factory will be not factory in the sense that there will just be assembly lines to make our robotics. It is a place where we will be building our own equipment but the RND team who are making these. Ai Models that we spoke about will actually have offices that overlook the fabrication of our instruments overlooking them means also that they can apply the models to our own product so not only are we closing the loop manufacturing for our customers. Were closing it for ourselves and by doing that. It should be more robust for our customers a very Meta virtuous cycle that virtuous circle exactly. Well it's certainly should make the product better. I really liked the idea of distributed manufacturing. I want to make the supply chain as short as possible for the same reason why I want to make a Fab as small as possible. Every part of the supply chain can introduce a variability dad could affect the final product and lower yields increased prices. So on so if we can have a factory where we do everything from machining to assembly and then combine that with the actual creation of the algorithms to make them seems like a powerful idea that we can do ourselves we could do it in many different locations and we can also bring the idea to our customers and partners absolutely and how far along is the factory building project. Looks like we'll open fully in April. Wow as we record. That's a about three months away to three months away. So congratulations in advance. That's exciting yeah. Building projects are sometimes a little out of your control. Exciting every day to go over and see pieces go into place and we had some big equipment delivered last week so we know that we're going to be building stuff there fairly soon right. That's fantastic I want to switch. It's obviously very related but switch gears slightly. I know that amongst other things. You've interests in Your jazz pianist and your but more relevant to our conversation. You're also very involved in quantum computing toes. A little bit about your work in quantum computing. And you know in sixty seconds or less. What's the current state of quantum computing? The current state is that it's be come something that the world recognizes as possible and real and are competing in. It's no longer just esoteric lab work that's being done. There's companies that are investing in it. There's venture capitalists that are investing in it and there are really three competing types of technologies. That are making great progress. The reason I'm involved with it. Is that our customers and partners are involved with it. And I'm seeing such rapid progress that it excites me gives me a chance to see the things that I'd like to have. In the world actually come to fruition. Your company's called Nanna Tron IX. There's a great blog piece in video plug here on the video blog from December eleventh of two thousand Nineteen Nicole. Castro wrote a great blog. Piece on What track is doing with a in manufacturing so people can check that out for sure but folks WanNa find out more about Nanna triax or anything else. We've talked about. Where would you send them were? Should they look online? They can certainly go to our website. That's Nanno tonics dot. Co they will get an understanding of our company. And there's there's a section called think space is well on that website where you can get some ideas some blogs. We've written some podcasts. We've done to get a little idea of our philosophy as well perfect. I've been doing this for a while. I have two young kids who were getting to the age where they're more more interested in this New York place that mom and I talk about You know moving towards planning another trip back east. Maybe maybe I'll wait until your factories up and running and then come knock on the door. Yeah bring your kids will love it. They get to. They'll get hopefully see the future that they'll be working in soon. I mean as a responsible parent. How could I say no to that? Excellent Matthew thank you so much for taking the time goes without saying but all my left or Brooklyn all the best to urine. You're your teammates. And what you're doing to change manufacturing and change the world. Thank you so much. I love the conversation

AI Brooklyn New York City Nanoelectronics Manhattan US Matthew Putman Brooklyn Navy Yard Invidia New People Noah Kravitz Nanna TRIX European Union
Normalizing the Need to Rest and Retreat

The goop Podcast

47:05 min | Last month

Normalizing the Need to Rest and Retreat

"Hi i'm elise luna co host with gwyneth of the podcast. Today's guest is catherine. May before we get to our conversation. I wanna thank our friends at puma. Who helped make today's episode possible. I like to keep my closet streamlined. Which means having just a handful of pieces that i love. And where all the time. So what. I do have needs to really work for me. Meaning i feel good in it. It stands the test of time. And it's uncomplicated and unfussy. I tried to apply the staple pieces and my workout clothes to pumas new line forever. Lux is designed to deliver on. Both style and functionality is an elevated crossover between fitness and fashion delivering the best-in-class look and feel the line includes a high waisted tight amid impact bra and a pullover sweatshirt that comes in a range of classic color ways. If you'd like to check it out for yourself you can shop houma signature sportswear collection. Forever locks on the website or houma dot com. Don't hold anything tightly. Just wish for it want it. Let it come from the intention of real truth for you and then let it go. The mayo soul is like it's unbound. It's limitless but we will use words to limit ourselves when people stop believing that. Somebody's got your back or superman's coming. We turn to ourselves and that's where you become. Empowered courageous participation attracts positive. Things i'm going to paltrow. This is the goop podcast bringing together. Thought leaders culture changers creatives founders and ceos scientists doctors healers and seekers here to start conversations because simply asking questions and listening has the power to change the way we see the world. Today is no exception a letter. Leesville you win on her extraordinary guest all right over to a lease one of my favorite books. I read this year and one that. I'm sure i'll return to gain and again is katharine maze. Newest wintering the power of rest and retreat. In difficult times in it she explores how we can change the way we relate to difficult periods in our lives drawing on lessons from nature literature and mythology to normalize our need to retreat in order to tend to our wounds heal reflect and reemerge today. We talk about the ways that intergenerational taught to look down on other people's misfortune which in turn makes it nearly impossible for us to respect the sadness in our own lives we talk about being addicted to productivity and business which is something that i think rings true for many of us and she shares how she works actively except the sadness in her life and to see times of retreat a space for growth and learning while also recognizing and honoring its inherent. Pain catherine's work with berry. Welcome solve for me. And i'm excited to share it with all of you. We have got to stop feeding responsible for controlling that attempt to control. It is devastating to us and its ally we. We just cannot do it. The is learning to let go and to live with. Is there in front of a stir. Take it day by day to work out what we have to do. And to just walk alongside our human life okay. Let's get to my chat with. Catherine may in a way. I'm sad i didn't read wintering at a slower pace because it is such a beautiful book and I think it's really something to save her. and i. it was such a relief from things. That i have been reading that i just lasted through it and now i think i need all lovely. It came out this year in the uk and there are several people that have been tweeting me this week from the enough to say reading a second time. It's just the wind has come round. And they're ready for again. So i think is one of the people retentive. Yeah now it's so it's just full of these beautiful moments of complete and total resonance. And i guess we can sort of start with wintering. Which in a way. I loved your definition when you were talking about pulling your son out of school. Which is you know the active acceptance of sadness. It is actus of allowing ourselves to feel it as a need. I love that. That moment of of. Because i think that we all can deeply relate. Those needs to hibernate to retreat to lick our wounds to reconsider in a way we almost been in a collective wintering for the air. Yeah maybe longer. I mean i think when we look at political situation and not just your country my country too. I think we've all spent the last four or five years in conflict quite often with family members and friends and you know that sense of absolute tension and stress at having to tapan ability for how the world's going. I think we've all been a very long. Winter actually certainly really forced to examine the systems and structures and where we place our power. And you know. I guess we could even start there sort of in the preceding paragraphs to that sort of declared a definition of wintering. When you decide. When you're your son i related very much. This and pulled my son out of school and put him in another school. When you write about sort of his despair he was six right kindergarten. Yeah he was six which is infant school in in the uk and he just had got to the point where he was so stressed by school he was just melting down every morning and every evening and we tend to let to people for vice. But everyone's advice was like well you just have to find a way to force him back in. I mean they didn't say it like that. But that's that's message really yeah. I wasn't willing to do that. I won't hit to show my son. The i understood what it was like to go through a personal crisis into feel outs with the wild and to fill like stuff isn't right you know and i wanted to show him that i was listening and sour booed him out of school and homeschooling for nine months. Actually yeah and i loved that sort of how desperate you're for your time again but how you were willing to to to get him back into school by breaking him and it's such a you know and i'm sure that people who don't have kids can relate to this as well just thinking back on their own childhoods but there's no control and childhood right. There's no guarantee of following a path like there's no ad testing right. You're not like do this. And it will ensure this or that it is uncertainty nanna child who you desperately want to deliver to safety insecurity. Even that we know those are myths in some ways as well. Yeah i mean we're balancing so much on me. I mean. I remember those moments that are in childhood when we felt quietly. Desperate for to be able to stop something to make you go a different way. But we couldn't and now it's an adult. I try and listen to those moments. I also know the get. I buy some needs to sometimes struggle against something. He needs to find life difficult. Sometimes but i have to make a cool on how difficult i think. It's okay for him to find and when white pass that point for me but in this state is such a tricky thing to balance as a parent is how do we teach children resilience but also teach them how to take care of themselves at the same time. They can be really conflicting messages. I think absolutely. And i don't mind if i read this because i think it's so beautiful. You right as children tolerate working conditions that we'd find intolerable as adults. The constant exposure of our attainment to a hostile audience the motivation by threat instead of encouragement and big threats. To if you don't do this you'll ruin your whole future. Lie the social work in which you're mocked and tease your most embarrassing desires expose. Your new foreign body held up for the kind of scrutiny. That would destroy an adult And it is. It's true you want you want to sort of coach stamina and resilience and yet at the same time you have to allow for folding and maybe that's where we've gotten wrong and why book like yours is so essential because we life isn't this sort of slow march in the face of bullying and humiliation. We need the opportunity to retreat. We need the opportunity to feel our feelings and feel sad and to not acknowledge them as the ultimate forum of gas lighting. really goodness. yeah. I i think it's so true and i think we don't know how to take care of ourselves very well and so how on earth we teach children how to do it you know they well my son now because of the pandemic is signed up to like a kind of team confused the program. He can email his friends. And so tonight i looked at him and he was emailing his classmates in the evening. And i thought. Wow when do you get to switch off effort. Because that's going to get worse and worse than that's the only thing they know and i know that i spent times in my childhood of what i thought. The time was intense boredom but now it seems luxuria that time of my own to just be. They didn't get to be anymore very much. Yeah now but i think that the greatest gift really is is boredom in some ways and also this a deeper understanding of the cadence of things that you write about it in the context of nature and sort of how dead nature can look in the winter. yet it's just preserving its offer its next burst of light amassing its energies and also that we will all fall and we will all get up again and that. They're this sort of idea that there's a midlife crisis and you're going to experience a few hardships in your life and that's it as you track forward is just completely inaccurate right. I mean for me. It's about every three years. I think i hit some kind of a big change or crisis. And i really do think that we don't acknowledge how must retain it is for a half these crises these times when we fall through the cracks of life when everything feels frozen. I know that's a regular cycle for me. I know my set my watch by that. No matter how well life is going i come across some change that needs to happen and i'll always start by resisting that change every single down time. I wish i didn't buck. It's a waste the way right so we have to learn to win to. We have to learn to crash out and to see that as normal and perfectly okay and actually a time of enormous growth and learning but painful to like i. I don't ever want deny that wintering is really agonizing because it is an idea that we can shook a kite bath. Yeah but you also write about. And i think this is a if we can learn one lesson from this book how sort of intergenerational early we we've been taught to look down at other people's misfortunes right and you talk about how it's harmful not only because and here i quote you. It stops us from learning. That disaster happens and how to adapt when it does. It stops us from reaching out to people who are suffering and our own disaster comes it forces us into humiliated retreat as we try to hunt down mistakes that we never made it in the first place or wrongheaded attitudes that we never held but that this is everyone that happens to everyone. There's no enduring yourself from losing a parent. Losing a loved one losing a job. Losing an opportunity getting a diagnosis. These are as you said. If you're not alone. I think that these come every year for many people and yet we let people suffer in silence we count. Sometimes we can't relate but other times we just. It's almost like we worry. It's contagious one. Understand how this could have happened to them to make sure that it can never happen to us and really there's no protection. No and i think we think that that story is our protection that you know if we can find the reason that their wintering and the reason they've made a mistake that therefore we wouldn't make that mistake you know so. They've lost their job because our will perhaps they were actually bit sloppy or Difficult to be around. Perhaps they didn't do enough. You know all that marriage breaks down and you think well. Maybe i think we you know i know. I know i've learned to do that in my life. And i know that. I can defer to and it's a real practice to say. Actually that person is suffering is none of my business. Why they're suffering they. Just all and i've suffered two and i'm going to try and show them the same compassion that i'd like the next time it happens to me. It's quite simple exchange when you frame it that way. Let's take a quick break in the past. I've made the mistake of buying workout gear. That looks great on the hangar or in a photo but when i tried to work out in it it doesn't really perform the bras pulling in the wrong places. The shirt is writing up or falling down. The pants are see through. I'm sure many of you can relate. It's apprising lee hard to find pieces. That are uncomplicated. Beautiful and get the job done. Pujols new line forever. Lux does just that. The design and style are elevated and highly technical. They use premium fabrics. That looked great and can keep up with your workout. Whether that's tracy anderson the class or good old fashioned walk the line includes a high waisted tight amid impact bra and a pullover sweatshirt. that's good for cooler days or slipping on after a workout to shop whom new signature sportswear collection forever lux head to the coupe site or puma dot com and now back to today's conversation throughout the book. You sort of the book talking about your husband and then up in the hospital with and decided. Yeah you talk about your own fear of a diagnosis. You talk a little bit about your ass burgers which was the subject of your book before this. Yeah and then you right sort of so powerfully about your friend and her diagnosis of manic depressive. And sort of how. It isn't really a loved. This point thought it was so beautiful where she finally goes to different. Gp right like she was going in for her checkup and it was a different doctor and he said no. This isn't about you getting fixed. This is about you living the bus life you can with the parameters that you have and how dramatic that had been because this idea that we feel like we can forward march and life will tell us otherwise. Yeah mean for me. That's one of the big messages are wants to get across in this book but actually the change for accepting when we win to isn't always positive There's always a win hair. It's not like oh you're looking for the body of knowledge that will make this fine when daughter after being bipolar since she was a teenager seora at a different pay just one day just by accident. the other one was on holiday. Whatever and he said to her like this is not about you being permanently fixed this about you learn to find a way to live with how you are. Your brain is that weirdly. Was the this starting point for her to be able to get much more wealth than she'd ever been in her whole life and she did it by starting is swimming which maybe is not the approach that everybody would take but she essentially. She went to a spa where she tried to is plunge pool and found that it really calmed turns. I started swimming in the sea. And that means that she's been able to manage her bipolar disorder to such an extent that she had to cut off the medication last year because it was too strong for having it was making her own well and it's just fascinating that the instigating moment for that was her accepting that she couldn't be perfectly well she couldn't get rid of this thing and just adapting instead the such lesson effort i think such a lesson and then in in through that probably like found her way to a richer life where she wasn't in it sounds to me like she was in a bit of social overdrive or action as on that capture so many women in particular. Oh my goodness naturally that's what she's very careful to say. It's not just about the fact that she started i- swimming even though she feels like that. Data loads of good. She made loads of adaptations as well. So as you say she stopped saying yes to everything she start looking after everyone else's kids and running around to everyone else's house is the Tation she started eating better. She cut sugar from her diet. She did all kinds of things a whole list of things and she said she likes to keep her margins brew by which maintenance needs some extra space at the edges of her energy to make sure she's got enough she doesn't impinge on. You know the very raw of what she can possibly do. And i i mean. I relate to that really strowman now. Absent been there and i'm sure so many other people have to. Yeah and. I know that this book isn't about sort of asperger's but i'm wondering if you could tell me a little bit about like how you ended up with that diagnosis and then how when and how that change your perspective because you also write about sort of realizing that you couldn't power your way out of yeah. Yeah absolutely so. I mean i you know i'm forty three i. I prepared to admit that i'm right behind. Yeah we're getting there eventually. But when i was little gal. An ass burgess diagnosis. It would have been then. I mean actually. It's all just autism. Now that aspe- disappeared from the from the dsm. It wasn't available for little girls. When i was young there were plenty of people who thought that girls couldn't be autistic at all or most people thought that it was very very rare. And so although i grew up knowing i was profoundly different from the other kids in my class and anyone that i met there was no account i could make of my life that would have said this is what you are so actually i struggled through my childhood feeling like an alien i mean literally i used to fantasize of my skin and a human being would be underneath it. It was really. I felt so so utterly odds with everyone else and that continued and it continued. You know it made university incredibly difficult. It made holding down a job very difficult and it was only when i have my son and once again i found myself feeding radically different. The other mothers like not wanting to go to mother and baby groups and stuff like that and just feeling alien life again. I began to look this thing. Was i knew i had to find it and i happened across a radio. Show one day when us driving crazy. Isn't that these things that just come in toronto. For the first time. I heard a woman talking about what it was like to be autistic rather than single described from the outside by research. He wasn't autistic themselves. And i made recognize myself that experiential account of it was totally different to what people observe and i had had she rica movement driving down the street and took some time to process and that was a winter in itself and to get diagnosis but what that changed from the ultimate was that it. Let me understand my limitations. A not be ashamed of them just to see the difference. And that's all they are and that's let me make it up. Tensions i would never dreamt of mae king but don't feel like a defeat they feel like something that gives me life and means i'm not gonna go through. A complete burnout. Used to go through so regularly before. Yeah i mean in one of the defining. My best friend's son is on the spectrum. And one of the things that she grapples with and other sort of parents of children on the spectrum seemed to grapple with this idea of no empathy and in such an irony right. Like you've written a whole book. Your whole book is about your profound sympathy and empathy a- and so what. What are those things for you that we're so defining where you were like. Oh that's an articulation of what i've been feeling on. These are the adjustments that i need to make while empathy was definitely one of them. I mean there's some really interesting research that suggests that there's a kind of double empathy bind basically people struggle to empathize with how near a typical people fail an act. And but also your typical people struggle to empathize with us as well. So it's it's not a one way process but my experience was being overwhelmed by feelings of empathy and bike fin kind of engulfed in other people's feelings. Which is such a common thing for particularly girls. report also low to notes stick men. The other thing that i really recognized was the sense of kind of sensory overwhelm so talk smell noise all of those things and so when we talk about From the outside. that's often our response to overwhelm. You know that's a stress response that comes from you know noise being so incredibly intense like smell being overwhelming. Sometimes the texture of staff may be different for everybody. But these are the things. I really massively recognized. Suppose the other thing was having really intense passionate interests that a tight. Sometimes that feel absolutely glorious to me. That's what drives by writing. Definitely i couldn't do id to eat Out without his passions note fantastic but the quality of attention. People have that may be Exist outside of our world. It sounds familiar to me. And i would imagine like all things that the spectrum goes really wide right like you're experiencing something more acutely that anyone can relate to. Yeah i mean. I always say like what people forget is we're on the human spectrum. You know we talk about autism like it's kind of a completely different state of humanity. And i realized that it does look very alien twelve people but actually will do the other kind of regular human stuff just often. It's quite like the volume turned up on certain parts of that experience and it can't be ten very far down others. We our brains are wired differently. But yeah it i i would get to the point when it stops surprising people that they recognize loads of stuff in themselves because actually it's just another version of being human. We're human right. Yeah now absolutely. And i think that that makes sense like the dials for us are are turned to different levels of sensitivity or the filter filter can put on. Anyone and i loved the idea. And i think there's a as you said huge lesson for everyone in sort of understanding those moments of overload for each of us which will always be different. But you know. I love the idea that now when you send to wintering you begin to treat yourself like favored child with kindness and love and that you assume your needs are reasonable and that your feelings are important. I thought that was so beautiful. Just because i think like many women. And i also related at the beginning where you talk about like when you look back at an accounting of your days in time. You're like what have i been doing. I've been so busy. But what have i actually done. Yeah but this idea of being able to be kind to yourself and put yourself to. Bed is something i think we can all. Oh my goodness you know. This is where the disabled community of all stripes has so much to teach the. Whoa because we have had to give in to our needs right like we. This come a point for all of us where we have had to adapt and look after ourselves because otherwise we just couldn't survive tool. And i think that's so insightful. For all the people. I see running around like crazy things just doing themselves harm. I time that we all learn to do that yet. As you say to pass a two bedroom we're tired. I mean it's quite basic to drink water thirsty to eat when we're hungry to take a walk in the fresh air like all the basic stuff you'd tell a small child today. You need today for yourself. It's not rocket science but we make homework of it away. Yes and you know for me at least dizziness for me as one of my primary tools for shoving my feelings down which are often loneliness low grade despair and self dow stockley existential. Anka's we know. Have out that this year. And i think sort of when you talk about sadness and happiness and how. It should be respected if not savored. You don't mind my read this to you again. I thought it was so beautiful. You say if we don't allow ourselves the fundamental honesty of our own sadness than we miss an important cue to adopt. We seem to be living in an age when we're bombarded with entreaties to be happy but we're suffering from. An avalanche of depression was to stop sweating. The small stuff and yet were chronically anxious. I often wonder if these are just normal feelings. That become monstrous. When they're denied a great deal of life will always suck there will be moments when we're riding high in moments and we can't bear to get out of bed. Both are normal. Both in fact require a little perspective of that and a great deal of life will always suck. We can't stop from king. I wish we could but we really get this all sorts of things about life that saw coming. We live by pass standards incredibly luxurious lives. Now you know what my grandma of for central heating at ted down like mine does and hot bath water every day. My goodness thought that was such an incredible luxury. But that doesn't stop really terrible things from happening. People will always die. People will always get sick. People always betrayal terrible. Things will happen in the news. I mean great. Big pandemic land sometimes and threaten our way of life and it's terrifying. We have got to stop feeding responsible for controlling that because that attempt to control it is devastating to us. And it's a lie. We just cannot do it. The is learning to let go and to live with. What is there in front of us to take it day by day. Two walkout we have to do and to just walk alongside our human life. Yeah yeah and that you know you talk about alan watts and how he sort of tells you the truth and his writing harness it is to take in. The change will not stop happening. The only part we can control is our response which is absolutely true. And you think about it in the context of cova ed right. I mean this. Tiny tiny virus has dismantled all of the social structures and safety structures of the globe. If that is not a lesson in humility and of uncertainty than what is right and my goodness yeah for it to happen to the whole world wants. I think that is so striking about this particular crisis that nobody escapes this. And like we've politicized so much because that's what we do because we feel better about it if we can fight about it rather than just live within it but we are not in control of what happens to us. We never have been never will be but we can control how we deal with it in the moment. That's what we've got that. And i think that's even bleak you know i think that's actually that gives me enormous hope because i can just given up feeling like i can if i work hard enough if i need do the right things in the right sequence it reveals that magical thinking angry are so much you know i feel like i've i've gotten through this year and obviously i have all of my privileges and all of that but it part. It's just been a lesson and faith over fear and not sort of in a religious sense of religious faith or or idealism but this belief that that's this is life like this is this is it and i loved that scene where you are waking up at three in the morning because why not and then you you light a candle and you have your lamp and new right one. Light a steady insurer the other uncertain and flickering i open my notebook and work between these two poles on balance where i prefer to be somewhere in the middle certain t as a dead space in which there's no more room to grow wavering as painful. I'm glad to be traveling between the two gives me chelsea. But it's so beautiful like that. And and i think that everyone's sort of the myth of certainty has been demolished across our. We've been getting it profound lesson it this year in particular may bud maybe true certainty certainty is staff and and the reality is we can't now it's an illusion of control and there if we can find the way to sort of find our power and strength and letting that happen then. That's huge that transformative. Do you know what. I think's been enormous teacher. This year is black. Lives matter white people like me anyway. I mean i you know obviously the the black women who are leading that did not teaching this but that message that was sent rady strongly to say white people but out of this. This is none of your business your hair to just support this likening you can behave yourself around it but like your criticism is not welcome. You're putting in to tell other people have to do. It is not welcome. Do educating other people is not welcome like you sit down and be quiet and listen to what we have to say. And i. I mean like many people. I found that a profoundly unsettling moment like even my own instinct to russian and help you is wrong in that context. And i thought about this for a long time and thought that is such a valuable lesson for so much of life like my intervention is not welcome in so much of it but still i. Persist in china intimate. Get my little sticky fingers at and being told to sit down and be quiet just a pipe down for a while was really good for of us. I think if we could back to the sun which i accept is very very hard. It is very very hard because again. I think that's us sort of trying to establish some right to declare to the world that we understand. I can understand this experience and that we get a and yeah. I i agree. It's like it is a powerful very hard lesson i think particularly for i like to write. I like to ask questions. I'd like to understand. I wanna put but to be told not even stop talking but stop asking questions and just you here. Yeah i don. I mean that is a profound lesson. The all of us need to learn sometimes just to sit until listen entity center ourselves. Actually i mean maybe that's part of the wintering process to know that you are not the hero of this story. Sometimes like you have become a minor character in life for awhile and that is your job right now like you all falling silent. There will be moments when you're narrative art comes to the peak again and you saw the center of the universe. Maybe but for now you are taking a backseat. And that's that's a hard thing for us to do because we all told so much about how to be important and central and striving magnificent and you know what we ways and we can't be now. It's so true. I mean i think anyone who is listening. Who has lost. Someone knows that feeling when you walk outside and you're in the depths of grief and maybe you're leaving the site of the funeral and you look around and you're like wow. My life has stopped for these moments and yet look at the world. It just keeps going. It's a miracle and similarly you know when you lose a job and you're like oh this the business is still going. you know. Those moments feeling replaceable or like your pain is relevant to everyone. Else are really really profoundly. Humbling i think there's two ways of looking at a moment's know one is oh it tends. I'm not really very important. it turns out i'm disposable. That's massively painful. That the other way to look at that is the is to see that life is like a relay. you know. it's not a warm marathon. It's a relay race and sometimes we tag all the people in for awhile and and take harassed and that's a really healthy way to do it. We need that. We need that in order to get the help that we require to survive but we just keep on slogging as if it's a marathon that we can we know narrowed. We just call. Yeah and i think that that's so true particularly sort of in this moment of time with with social media in this idea that everyone's a brand you know hopefully more dice and you know there's some life yet has no because i think we also live in a culture where we feel the need to assert our relevance or share our gifts. Are you know they're a million ways to look at it positive and negative and to not feel like you're engaging is really hard but is the point of your book right. There has to be rest. So there can be renewal absolutely and also i think we need to realize that we. I mean we've actually spent a long time the last year saying you are you do. You're not you're not. You're doing you all you all you. You are enough like just existing is fine and sometimes that's all we can manage other times achieving stuff and it's amazing during the spotlight and we're doing great things but that be cut come a time when we have to rest again and you know there's a political dimension to this because we need to make this work in the opposite direction you know like when a woman goes on maternity leave when someone sick for year we to find a way not to forget them into welcome back in rather than to just fill in the space that they left and say. Wow that's a nice opportunity for me. Lay some compassion that we need to learn to find the recognizes that sometimes people have gotta dip out for a while. But then wigan let them back again. We're going to help them so that it's devastating when we have to winter. Yeah we've to hold space. We have to learn how to do that. Culturally we're not good at it sort of in going back to the black lives matter moment. But it's and i think it goes to what we were talking about earlier which is that we've been trained in this scarcity. Survival mentality of. i can't get off. The ferris wheel. Can't get off the trail on. Never be able to get back on because we don't have a lot of models for that at least in the united states. There's no paid family leave. Embarrassment the way that we treat each other treat women culturally and so it will require sort of a huge amount of care. And i think that i love this part to near the end when you were talking about this idea of usefulness and how we need to sort of Imagine the way that we think about you. Talk about like the things that give us law or the things that give us joy way. Are these moments of care and taking care of our. You know picking up our dogs poop as and we constantly are just talking about. The utility of people are what they've interrupt or what they've contributed and it needs to be me to get back to this idea of outer asian care and helping helpless citizens and that thrive. Because i have to tell you about my doc now safely. Talk about yes. She does peut definitely nearly exactly year ago. My friend was on holiday in less voice in greece. And she sent back picture of this little puppy with a broken leg and said i feel so sorry for. This pay is up in the mountains if i leave her hair. She's gonna die. Because winter's coming and i just in that moment had this incredible sense of mission is my dog. I've i'm a cap. I really like dogs. I that is my dog. I am bringing this dog home. And i've made this and we did. We had to crowd fund. 'cause you know took to ship a very injured dot com and then like massive treatment. Full her like she had elect pinned an repented a bone graft she got emiratis pay which is say for pets skin gross with endless. But you know what the joy that we have found in taking care of. The dog has been just the most wonderful thing but even more than that was the incredible affirmation of having to ask other people for help. We couldn't afford to her treatment ourselves. I mean it was absolutely like cost more than a family car and we had to also help so we crowd funded and the number of people that rushed food to help us. You know small donations and some massive donations from strangers. That you know we never met. We just incredible. It was such a great lesson about care and about how much we got from giving the cab like as much as that how much we got from taking care from other people as of hard thing for us to do. But it's worth it into no. I think that that's all any of us. Want right to understand or to know that we impacted someone's life more mean to save an animal's life like what a guest and you know that's the meaning making life man yet. You know. I think as you right we spent so much time in this business trying to do everything and as you write it ends up looking an awful lot like nothing just long hayes. Frantic activity with all the meaning shared away. That's how my working life over for left. My joe of yeahs terrible isn't that awful. And and i also i look back on that time when i was so busy and trying so hard to be like good at my job and i think about the brutal attitude i had towards others like nobody was stopping people in the back of a i was so frustrated with other people's desire to rest to you know to find it all too much and i had to tell myself that it wasn't too much that it was completely worth it and a suicide left that i realized what an idiot abandon how ya was too much. There's not there was nothing that merited that amount before it was insane and it just made me tired but yeah it's like when we don't show compassion to ourselves. We really struggled to show compassion to each other. And then i think that's what pops up these systems right. It's this like well. I didn't get any help. Why should i help you. Or i must vacation. So why should you take your days off and we have to break. That cycle happens personally. It happens in communities and families in the clearly happens. Systemically of you didn't help me. Why should i help you. And it makes society that is very cruel cold. yeah and it makes it wa. It really disadvantages women. I think i mean it. Disadvantage loads of people systematically disadvantages people who are having children. Because what happens is that your raising children becomes vulnerability. The other people can flow into to take advantage of that. And i think that's a tragedy. Say i remember big thing being made in my working life once. I'd had my son that i couldn't attend events anymore and it's like damn right i come back you could see other people rubbing their hands together saying. Oh well you know. She cut through that. Will i can do that and think about that. I mean why are we running in essential work events in people's own family time in the first place and why are we not all standing up and saying well actually if some people can't take part in this than we should be doing to with. Let's go to be saga tarazi. At some point there does have to be solidarity. And when you think about how many work avent's mainly you're talking about people who are differently abled that you think about work events that revolve around playing sports or going drinking. Drink yeah yeah or you know at night. it's it is complete parent and you know at least here. I don't have the statistics in front of me but here in america we have a very well. Publicized pay gap which is situated worried. That which is more more dramatic most dramatic for native women. Black women latino women but it is most dramatic for mothers. They are For women do not have children. It is dramatically smaller gap. So we penalize women in a way that's insane with the mothers already in a position where he feels like. You can't win whether you stay at home with your kids or you work. Are you do some combination of the two. It's terrible it's a pretty terrible experience. I think we're just gonna authority depressed ourselves now. But yeah i mean it is supporting and and yet when you look at the statistics for ethnic minorities in within those statistics women in general. It is shocking. Because that that means that within our oppression we're pressing other people as well just foaming chains of oppression in which we are just trying to scramble on top of the next head and i think we will have to take a look castles over that really mean not projecting out to other people. I literally mean we have to look at ourselves because that's the only behavior we can change a thousand percent and yes. It is a major systemic issue. And but we too often. I think sort of put our gaze there and expect that that's going to change that the fortune five hundred is going to start to look more like america and that that is. It's not a futile exercise. Of course there should be pressure. You're right the only thing we can really control as our response the world and it's incumbent on all of us to change this and it will. That's the only way. I think we'll start to see things shift Grow if big does not big but we are up for. I think you know to quote glennon dwell like we can do things with not start repeating that to myself shit a phrase that is i it to my so for now and he looks at me like goats like not again lady stonily. Well thank you. I can't wait to read whatever it is that you right and please be my best friend catherine. I'm here and your book is treasurer. And maybe i will also make it an annual tradition to remind myself of the gifts of wintering every year. Thanks for listening to my conversation. With catherine may for more from catherine. Pick up a copy of her book. Wintering the power of rests and retreat and difficult times. I cannot recommend it enough. That's it for today's episode. If you have a chance please. Rate and review hit subscribe to keep up with new episodes and pass it along to a friend. Thanks again for joining. I hope you'll come back for more. And in the meantime you can check out dot slash the podcast.

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Ep61: Sanjiv Patel

The Long Run

1:05:19 hr | 1 year ago

Ep61: Sanjiv Patel

"Welcome to the long run. Podcast for biotech. Adventurers I'm your host Timmerman. Today's guest is Sanjiv Patel. Sanjiv is the CEO of Cambridge. Massachusetts-based relay therapeutics. Relay is among a new crop of drug discovery companies. Driven by advances in Computational Chemistry. What does that mean as I wrote a little over a year ago? Quote the basic concept is all about starting with high quality crystallography images and using them to create movies of a protein target instead of just a snapshot with a more. Fluid Dynamic and biologically realistic starting point for drug discovery. Computer aided simulations take on a whole different meaning relays team looks at how those dynamic proteins behave when binding with different shapes and sizes of small molecule chemical compounds. So there you have it scientists at the movies. Grab your popcorn seriously. This is a vision. That techno optimists have touted for decades. It hasn't materialized yet but as relays. Sanjiv Patel told me a year ago. There was a false dawn. That's another phrase for premature hype but in the past few years. The picture has brightened somewhat. Rela- raised four hundred million in a series C deal in December of two thousand eighteen. Sanjiv a former ALLERGAN executive could've stayed in high powered. Big Pharma job came to start up opportunity. Instead another computational discovery company New York based Schrodinger has also had success in raising capital and in creating promising drug candidates with partners. It's now teed up to go public this year four people or companies who don't yet subscribe to Timmermann report I'm lifting the paywall on both my December twenty eighteen story on relay therapeutics and on an in-depth January two thousand nineteen interview. I did with Schrodinger seal rummy for read. These articles are examples of what tr subscribers get in depth coverage of scientific trends that puts you ahead of the curve. These articles will help support your understanding of the dynamics. I discuss in today's show with Sanjiv in after reading I hope you'll consider purchasing a subscription to get more of this kind of exclusive in-depth biotech coverage throughout the year. Now before we start the episode. I'd like to tell you about the sponsor of the long run podcast. Precision NANNA systems is lowering the barriers to developing gene and advanced therapies precision. Anna Systems is a global leader in technology and solutions for developing Aren a DNA crisper and small molecule drugs rapidly taking ideas to patients in working with over one hundred pharmaceutical companies globally precision NANNA systems expertise and proprietary. Technology is at the heart of many of the leading gene therapies owner development today decision Anna Systems nanomedicine development and manufacturing platform and reagents provide outstanding reduce ability versatility in scale ability with an intuitive workflow. That requires no prior expertise precision. Aniston's can partner with you to bring your programs to patients successfully to learn more about precision systems. Please visit precision ANNA SYSTEMS DOT com. Now please join me and Sanjiv Patel on the long run welcome Sanjiv Patel to the long run. Thanks Luke looking forward to it so SANJIV listener of this show you know that I like to set some contextual framework about the person first before we get into what it is that you're doing now that's of interest at relay therapeutics to the Wider Bio Pharma community. So just we'll start this off really simple worry from. I grew up in the north of England in County. Darrow's beautiful pool can of rural area and spent most of my childhood being educated in tackling Newcastle. Which is dusty little town about as far away the in England as you can get from London Air Was Jalek But it was a big part of the revolution by the late Seventies. Early eighties was in some decline But as I grew up in the north of England. And what do your parents do for a living My parents were immigrants in survey Had grown up in India My father grew up on a small farm in rural Gujarat and My Grandmother raised To Catalina Front Yard and my father was one of those people in his tent. Go to college became Adopted and so the time For a better life. He immigrated to Uganda and so him and my mother's very early kind of lives went to live in east Africa I think they were going to be there forever. Unfortunately they came across some very early. Idia mean who is To become a very notorious dictator. I saw firsthand. What some of the atrocities being committed especially in the air that they were And so they left Uganda just before the expulsion of the Indians And moved to the north of England and I became a family practitioner in a mining village. In County Durham now. Was this some kind of program in the UK where they you know. They needed more physicians in rural areas. Was He filling some kind of need there? I mean that's exactly it the NHA at the time was Severely short of medics And in particular Family Practitioners and so he applied and took this job in the north. Midland had no kind of Understanding of two different pieces of Joe Goofy and ended up in this mining town. Okay so so. What year would this have been? This was in the mid nineteen seventy early nineteen seventies. Okay now were you. Were you born yet? Yup I was just Born as they came in to to the area And the town was. It was a very small town. It was it was a mind which is just about to close down And then it was just like a church grocer And the doctor says and a public of course every time we had a pub of course the doctors were running the being that since the Second World War and they were looking to retire and my father was was kind of the year young doctor that will take things out but the session was in the House of the doctrine so You know more community work is than they were in the end practicing medicine as we know it today and it was It was a fantastic kind of upbringing in this environment. And so did you have any Any siblings I have one older sister And so the two of us Where we're brought up in this town And we'll see clearly the only immigrants in the town to start with there were more over time And we kind of live this double life almost one side. We were enjoying this wonderful kind of alien culture to us You know enjoying football soccer as a religion in the area Foods my father was getting involved in all kinds of community activities. Like judging the village fate vegetable vegetable 's how But on the other side you know they were obviously immigrants and they missed home so we would spend weekends and evenings trying to scour out other families that have come from the Indian subcontinent and spend as much time as possible with that was they. They missed Ho now. I sit now in being An English person that's moved to the US. If I hear an English accent on Charles Street in Boston you know I'll go up to the person and say hey. Where are you from and you know even though the sixty million people in the UK expect you know? Somehow I connected to them in some way. I read the BBC News. Every day And there there are quite a few. There are quite a few British accent that you can hear around Cambridge Boston. Okay so what kind of what kind of schooling were you exposed to Early on or moving into high school. Was this a small like local public school? Or did you go off somewhere so? Initially we were in the kind of local small public schools. In and around the village that we lived in But then for High School. We went to school in the local towns You know traveled every thirty miles into the local city on new console And you know it was a much more diverse catchment area and Really enjoyed school The Elvis great for me having grown up in this family of My father was a dumped. It was to be a a medic and never really thought about doing anything else You know as we Kinda came to the end of Highschool. I did economics for the first time was totally hooked by it and loved it and when you say medic you mean a physician a surgeon not not like someone who goes in the military and treats battles that's like the the term that we use here in the US. That's exactly right. I mean when I when I my whole experience invention was religious watching my father And so You know I was so he expected. The this was an expectation in the household that you would You Know Classic Immigrants Story like study hard. Apply Yourself Become a physician respectable. Noble calling yes. I mean it was never said but I think it was always expected that one of us kids was going to become a doctor and So into medical school Into moved south and went to Cambridge And it was a very traditional course. We didn't speak or learn about patients for the first three years. We was entirely can basic science in these wonderful ancient buildings in a very traditional structure And took a Outs in that cool to do research at a year of neuroscience research and it was then I realized you know and a few months into it this is not going to be for me We had to do some bench work very had to grow neurons and I could never get my neurons to grow And when they did grow they ended up getting infected. And so at the end of the town you know the the person that I was working for settlers I think you may want to stick to clinical mets so that was the end of my research before had begun And so second half the cost. I went to further south to London and became a clinical medical student and Every attachment I did. I was convinced that that's what I was going to be. So whether it was obstetrics so You know General Madison And one of the rotations. I ended up coming out to the US to Baltimore to the Johns Hopkins. Do Trauma Surgery. And I'd never really seen trauma in central London I mean there were rumors of you. Know severe trauma out in the US. And this guy's where you would go to see it the first evening in East Baltimore I can remember coming in and seeing like back after back. Gunshot wounds And some from the UK. It's never seen when it was totally. I out to sea sessions. No Patch back together. These poor unfortunate people coming in in a steady stream and so I was hooked. You know really so after that that that's what I wanted to wanted to be. A surgeon also told me not to go out late at night in East Baltimore and so I guess you're not one of those people afraid of the sight of blood not after that experience and so so came back And Finish my training and became a junior surgeon And so the first Thing I did was spent a year teaching and that to me And so I did. Dicit King's College in London. Just the strands of beautiful location. And we'd go off the strand up a few flaws and colleague an I would spend a year almost dissecting the thirty bodies you know we kind of got to know them over the course of the year you know these people to donate their bodies to medical science and our job was to dissect them all Was Pretty painstaking work and we do different pieces of the anatomy each week and then do that in the mornings and afternoons we teach medical students And it was wonderful way of learning. You know human anatomy and setting the screen Dacian for a career in surgery her And so after that. Yeah I started all of the basic surgical rotations and started to think that you know this is what I was GonNa do. The rest of my life The NHL something. I I really enjoyed working men's this huge organization Not So different. Pieces of events massive at that time was one of the largest employers in the world and this is before all of the kind of reforms in junior doctors hours so we would you know work a lot so we kinda come in on a Saturday morning writer to Monday nights in you would rarely get in the arrest of sleep inside of that And I could see. My career was planned in front of me. I would become a an attending and I would you know working to teaching hospital and you know I could say all mapped out in front of me. I just got married at the time and offers a dentist and Started to as we went through the next few years started think doing really want to have it all mapped out perfectly as it is in front of me. Why at that point There's such a big investment like you and the NHS have really invested a lot in becoming this kind of person and then your experience a cruise a cruise. Eventually you just keep getting better and better like surgery. Takes a lot of practice right at least So you're how did you? How did you end up having some some doubts or some other thoughts of what you might do with this training? Yeah I mean at this point. I was ten years in two to it so and you know as a medical school and I've been practicing. There were two things one. Was this kind of constant each around. Do I really want to have this laid out in the way? It is for the next thirty or forty years. The other side was I started to wonder if this machine I was working was effective in sufficient as it could be and that started becoming more and more of how I saw the Joe. I wonder if we could do this bed And there was never really an impetus for the system to try and make itself more efficient or affective. It's just it's just the way it was. That's how we did it And became more and more. You know how I saw things and I try to battle assistant bottom up. You know a small part in this giant Coug. Wouldn't it be better to try the other Iran and somehow trying affect the system Top down what would be an example of of the kind of inefficiency that you saw that you thought you could be improved upon. I mean it was just you know I was right in the kind of cold face of this system and so for example we'd sit in the operating theatre waiting for patients to come and the there were not enough on voters in the hospital to go and deliver the patients and so the machine would block. We would be sitting in the event of waiting for the patients. The system hadn't got enough people transport the patients the patients would sit on the ward waiting. And then you know we'd use the operating time and we would not be able to operate in all the patients who wanted to operate so it was very simple and a process management. If you think about it and I was thinking if I'm seeing this right at one end I wonder what else is going on in this giant system. That's not my picture of how a surgeon works in the US. I mean I I see them kind of like flitting from one room to the next constantly staying busy exactly and so for me. I mean I love the in and you know the service that it offers I I still believe is second to not and I wanted to try and do something about it but I just didn't know how to go about it at that time and so my life just about to have our first child saying how I WANNA do something different and I was really worried because obviously I ten years into this career now and We were just about to have our first child and I really want to do something different. She said well. What does it you WANNA deal? I said I don't know but I know it's something that is going to take a different direction. And I want to somehow learn skills of how I could influence and impact on the system. And so she's you should absolutely do The challenge for me at the time is I just didn't know what what and how I could go about. Their probably weren't a lot of other peers of yours in that on that training. Track who you know. We're going off to become management consultants or something like that is absolutely right. I mean I looked around and I couldn't you know this was just around the time Google coming out and I'm trying to figure out like what did these people exist anywhere and there were a handful of folks out there that had left the profession I went to talk to some of the senior folks I was working with and they said you're crazy. If you to do this you would never be able to come back to the medical freshen. I mean it would not be seen as positive and so I was really what as young as well you know. What if I do this and it doesn't work out you know? Basically you know unemployable. Wait when you say do this or are you thinking of what we ended up doing you went to BCG FOR CONSULTING? And so how did that? How did that come on your radar screen as a possibility so I had a friend Back from university that had gone into management consulting and as I was going through this journey kind of talking to lots of people I I knew and they said Hey. This is a great job like you go. And you learn lots of different skills don't have any kind of business or commercial knowledge and you'll see lots of different companies. Why don't you think about doing and so I thought well this is something I know? Nothing about But it does seem kind of like the direction I want to go and if I want to come back and influence is healthcare system. That's exactly the kind of thing that I want to experience in La and so so you know the time you write this. Handwritten letter my resume. Which was you know what about having operations done and send it off In about a month later. Got This response in the mail. Let's say a thank you. Don't tell your application but we you know we have a lot of applications and we won't be able to intervene but good luck with your career and so for about a week and I said well you know what about it and you know it was probably worth thinking about now. Just go back to to the career. Pathway that I thought I was going to go down and then buy two hundred GonNa let back from. Vcd Sang totally different person. Saying hey don't would love to have you for an interview and so never got to the bottom of what was going on inside of VC's recruitment to Poland. But maybe the left hand didn't know what the right hand was doing. Never really wanted to us. But anyway I went for the interview A few weeks later. And they you know if this long convoluted interview process but at the end of it They offered me a job and A couple of months later I went from one day operating looking after world full of patients to being in this really beautiful office in central London. Okay so this is this. Is that big fork in the road. Big Life decision Colleagues probably are like you know like you said. Are you nuts family? I mean what did Your Dad say? He said he d. Do you think you really want to do this I I really think I thought about it. I Really WanNa do this and like all parents he's like are you sure you and pay the mortgage the primary concern at the time and I said look I think so. My wife was the time dentists and we were pretty stable on higher income and I think I think I can take the risk And he's slow is is risky. I've never heard of of the Boston consulting group I really thing appreciates thing and I wanted to My mother on the hands like never really got over it I. I'm pretty sure she's still tells friends that I'm a medical student or doctor and I remember she asked me. What do you do in this Joe? I said well you know we go to companies and we figure out problems and then we solve them cyclists like being a doctor said yes. It's like being adopted And so so I mean it was definitely better coffee when I go to be. She was October of two thousand and one and so nine eleven just happened and we As a cohort had got there. I want you to Stanford and Harvard. Mba's and in a couple of medics And it was clearly an experiment. Obesity was trying that time To see you know could they bring in more diverse recruits and? See what they would do and then I have to give a lot of credit for being patient with us and I got the first day and I didn't know which icon powerpoint laws And the manager asked me to make some sizes which which one is it. Which color is it And so I could see that they were like. Oh this is going to be a lot of work and making slides is very important and I can remember using it calculated to add up numbers and somebody coming over saying you know you can use xl. So that I have no idea what. Xl is and so they were very patient with with us over the coming years but obviously as a doctor. You know you've got some aptitude and you've got some tenacity ability to get through that training. That's part of what they're looking for like basically good athletes that they can get on board and and train and so you get thrown in here on the deep end of the pool and you're working with lots of imagine different kind of healthcare clients learning different aspects of the business. Was this all concentrated in and around the U. K? Or did you get like global experience around healthcare? We did whole range of different work from healthcare systems as I had hoped to Medical Trade Unions to pharmaceutical companies To this point you know I'd always take in public transport all driven to the same place every day. And you know I'm sure that's what ninety nine percent of people do every day but this guy was the first time we would go to different cities different countries every week and so again. It was totally new to me. We would travel all over in the. Us and in all kinds of different tenses. We worked for some of these big Pharma clients and so I let a lot a lot around and it was very similar in many ways. We ask questions. We took a history. We made Different investigations or analyses. We'd come up with a treatment plan and then then we'd watch it And see what happened But the most important thing for me was just learning how to structure thinking you know. There was never situation that we would get into that. We couldn't structure our way out of. It was mainly healthcare work but I can remember being sent off to a French exhaust manufacturer and sitting down with these very skeptical French mechanics and helping them figure out why how to sell more exists And so that that has never gone away from N. Being invaluable you have to develop a certain kind of mental agility. You're not just building on one brick in the wall like maybe other kinds of fields. There's a there's versatility okay so you do this for something like something like four years. Is that right? That's right? Yeah so I did an MBA right at the end of it went to France And that was really driven by you. Know people just kept asking me. Hey how do you know anything about business and the commercials like your medic or adopted and so eventually I just said okay you know. Maybe there's something in this NBA. That I can't see so I did want And the most important thing is ever happens. That no one's ever asked me since whether Ohio I know anything about the congressional and so once I did the. Nba came back. It was clear then I really wanted to to do something and when I say they wanted to build our own something we would spend a lot of time with clients helping them build their businesses authority. I Really WanNa do this But this can start up. Culture was not really thing in in London at the time inside the big Pharma companies to interview and they had all these great rotations But I still just didn't feel rise and then came across a a West Coast based Pharma Company Allegation that was starting to expand its presence outside of the. Us was based in Orange County in California and they had an international headquarters in just Next to Heathrow in London And they had been talking to me back coming to work there. They were an. I can't company predominantly at that time with some newer sciences But they had this product Co. talks and they were building a Aesthetic Medicine Franchise and Oh talks cosmetic was about to become a thing outside the US and they wanted someone to come work in this kind of fledgling business and run small sales and marketing teams across Europe. And the thing. That really attracted me. Was You know I could get to actually run something? And so the head of international is a guy called David Endicott. Whose now ALCON. And he said look. You never had a real job. I said No. I've been doctor. And as a management consultant and worked service. You know fifteen years ago had a real job. He said No. You've never built owned anything to come and do this. Show a real job with accountability and profit and loss responsibility. Let get you make these decisions and you either succeed or people lose their jobs. Yeah that's exactly it and so it was kind of in my early thirties. I was Spent the last four or five years at BG working with you know very high up executives and divisional vice president's. We'll see and all of a sudden. I was in this job where I was managing two or three sales reps in each European countries spending most days in the field talking to customers And it was all driven by the CEO OF ELEGANCE. Very kind of Tended Gentlemen David Pyatt just made it? Very simple for us is just understand what customers want and make for them and sell it to them. And that's what the job was and I was in a rush in my career. I wanted to you know be in the same room as the executive team and the CEO. Because that's what I was used to and the advice given at the time was was not accepted by name very well at the time. It was the right advice which is look you need to learn how to build Atlanta own to be accountable for your decisions and know how to manage people his knee and that's all that matters in building a business and so for almost the next four or five years. That's what I did. I ran progressively larger sales and marketing teams. But they were still small. The most they were ten people in the country And spend time out in southern Italy talking to customers about aiming terms. You know we'd be out in Spain trying to understand the reimbursement system or what have deal with Nice. But it was really at the kind of coalface of of the business and Eventually stopped arguing with Folkston just bought into loved. It is h year. We'd make decisions in the next year. We'd see what happened And you either make great decisions and they would tell. You didn't and I did both essentially you had to work. Work your way up and climb the ladder. You weren't just going to walk straight into the board room and and give presentations. I mean almost four or five years. I never met the Sea of just the thing that you'd see on the website And so that changed. We got a new Boston. International Business Guy called Doug Ingram came out from culprits He has a great mentor of mine. he is the CEO Director on the board of relay in the he came out as than you have international. He had a reputation for not worrying about experience and just looking for potential. And so it's about two or three weeks after he came to the region of coming to his office and said. Hey We want you to do this. This amazing new John Wall is it. See we want to run emerging markets you know for all of allegheny businesses? You hope you now for all of these different countries Middle East Africa Russia Doesn't have a great business in any of these places want you to build it I said No. I don't WanNa do this Like I know how this works I I need to go to the US next and run a US business. Because that's the way that you know. The traditional pathway works for an executive And so he said No. You're actually crazy. You should do this job. And after some back and forth I agreed and he was right And he was right for lots of different reasons. I mean the I was allowed me to really to build entities from scratch elegant had very little presence in any of these countries and so as the first employee leave elegant in Russia built and bought back businesses. All over the all over these different geographies and so I saw firsthand what it was like to build something from scratch and we were really alone like out there on our own in some of these younger. South Africa Turkey Poland Ukraine. You know these were countries that are going to have a presence in And it was just basic things like you know. Car-parking caulking Moscow How do you try and transfer products across the thirteen timezones of Russia? And so it was really great interesting. Why I guess being a kid. Born in India means Uganda. I mean really of this so so that was great. Just learning how to do that. The second thing was just the the the business like you know. They were just very vibrant economies for us to to working and so the nose prize that the these were very successful pieces of all again that we built precision. Nanna systems is lowering the barriers to developing gene and advanced therapies precision. Nanna systems is a global leader in technology and solutions for developing our DNA crisper and small molecule drugs rapidly taking ideas to patients in working with over one hundred pharmaceutical companies. Globally precision systems expertise and proprietary. Technology is at the heart of many of the leading gene therapies under development today precision systems nanomedicine development and manufacturing platform reagents provide outstanding reduce ability versatility and scale ability with an intuitive workflow. That requires no prior expertise and assistance can partner with you to bring your programs to patients successfully to learn more about precision assistance. Please visit precision. Anna SYSTEMS DOT com. I'm beginning to see a pattern here in your life like with kind of first principles thinking very simple from the ground up. How do you build and then finally just it was just really interesting culturally? I mean some of these places you know growing up watching you know in the Cold War. We'd see Russia was portrayed as a as a certain kind of enemy and now just going to work with Russia and Russians are just normal people and same in South Africa growing up in watching the apartheid regime and then going to South African building a business understanding what. What really is the importance of diversity as you build a team and so those learnings have not gone away and so I love. I love doing that and Doug Ingram went back to California to be against President in. I went back to come off to improve my family at to Orange County California to run global marketing. Now this would have been your first time first time living in the US. I leaving the US first time in the corporate headquarters. And so I spent. The previous you know was ten years Almost battling against corporate Being all these disparate parts L. is thought when I get to Cobra. I'm GonNa make them see like what it is on the side of some of these choices and so so I find myself in charge of allegations earlier making decisions from Orange County around now. What was good for Japan? Always good for China And never lost the perspective of what it was like being on the other end of these things And was really excited about settling down and spending the rest of my career at elegant. I mean not already been ten years. Company was very stable growing year on year David PYATT BEING THE C O. Seventeen years it's going to be a nice transition to Doug Ingram and you know we were going to be there forever. And so that changed One afternoon The stock started to rise on afternoon. And it'd been in the doldrums for awhile. We didn't understand why and I remember looking at my phone thinking. Wow that's great. Finally the has realised why we'd underappreciated and this is long coming and then I started to see all of these text messages and emails saying get back upstairs is We all need to meet. And it was the start of a hostile takeover. This was valiant now. Sanjiv now we could probably spend our whole show talking about some of these battles that happen with values and and there were there other deals that actually did get done like you successfully fended off the Valiente deal. Which in hindsight looks like a master stroke the the merger then happened with aller Gannon activists and you would have been intimately involved in the with that one. I guess the the faded of Pfizer combination that you're dealing at the highest levels of corporate strategy now dealing with the CEO and the board and but in a kind of a behind the scenes role like you're on strategy. You're not you're not facing the you know going on CNBC or anything like that. But but what did you gain from all of those that of I guess like pressure-packed Four Five Year Stretch? I mean I never what is hard over that period as I've ever done And actually right David. Pyatt Doug Ingram Brent. Saunas was really kinda out front in public. I But what needs to get done as you know as you restructure your company or you try to integrate All of this is complicated. Work that just needs to get structured and executed on time flawlessly. And so that's that's what I tried to focus on over that time period What what helped me was this ability to think back to. What's it like at the other end of this? So you know having been in some of these disparate geographies knowing you know go per decisions get sent down and how they received was very useful. When you're at the other end of it. I use the most important thing is just simplify things And make as many decisions as you can. As far away from the center is possible But at the end of it always wanted to be part of all of these things and be the center of a large company and had worked almost ten years to get that and when I got I realized that that's not what I really enjoyed. I really enjoyed being out. In the in the periphery building things not looking at old charts of you know tens of thousands of people but actually knowing individuals by name and so became really apparent to me as we went through some of these transactions that wants to go back and build something from scratch. Okay now. How old are you at this point. I think by the time I left again was forty three. And so you know had had looked folks leaving big Pharma to go to small companies and they were more towards the end of that careers that made you know the name and in a big company in this was a kind of final can last job before retirement so for me it was. It was a very different proposition. This is really the the highest point of my career. Now this next ten years And was not an obvious choice game to life again about look. I think. I WANNA do this. Like she was always done. So yes you should definitely do That was easy but the hard part was finding Other people that believe that this was a good idea. Now when you say you mean like leaving to go find a a startup to to work at. Yeah so so both ways you know talking to people inside the company whose like. Why would you do this? You know you could definitely just stay doing this kind of work for the next fifteen years. You pretty experienced it. You know what you're doing. Plenty that you could have an impact in just the size of the impact working in an organization gallagher time with steady three thousand people. And so you know it's a giant portfolio you could have a lot of impact But on the flip side of it starting to talk to small companies feces. It wasn't obvious. They're like no cure commercial person strategy person from a big company. What what relevancy. You're going to have running an early stage research company. Usually this is a role for a scientist as right yeah I met wonderful Recruitment Person Steve Israel shoes just kept saying look. You're gonNA find something it's like you know any kind of matchmaking. You just have to kiss a lot. Frogs and you find the perfect match feed And so it wasn't a Russia allegance eighteen month period. I saw a lot of different opportunities. And one Friday afternoon coming up to Boston and I met Alexis bar see who was then at third rock. And then Marco's one of the founders of relays one of the earliest employees at Vertex. And you know winning about fifty minutes of meeting them. I knew that this was what I wanted to do And you know it's a tough choice. I wasn't out of the Boston ecosystem. I think one of the few Jan. Let's talk about the the families in Boston whether that's families of VC's or families of some of the the kind of foundational companies Vertex by Jan genzyme or you know some of the families of academic institutions. I just wasn't in any of the the normal pools of talent that a traditionally had got. Ceo's from relationships are very very important trusting relationships. Exactly in so you know from the West Coast kind of this kind of brush Medical Aesthetic Company It was not an obvious choice For them to make. What about relay really appealed to you though? Why did you know within fifteen minutes that this was something exciting that you wanted to take Take by the horns in typing. All you can get the people and like I met the Small team the rat twenty people in the company at the time and they will all laser focused on getting the job. Done they will. They will clear that they were going to change the way the medicines were discovered And just you know the passionate. They'll exuded in I I at that time didn't really fully understand the science in you know we'll talk about it. I'm sure in a minute but and you that you know if this doesn't work they were gonNA find another way to change the way medicines discovered and so that's all I needed to see you. Just you know having worked to this kind of early parliamentary. I realized that it's all about people at the end of the day. Nothing else So that was the now subsequently that the the three other things you know the first thing is just the mission The goal of the companies to drug. Make medicines for these intractable Targets you know. The industry has declared certain targets undrivable. And they're on juggle because the traditional approaches to making small molecules have not worked. But that doesn't mean that that's how it stays forever. And so the ability to find small molecule drugs medicines pills to drug. Some of these targets was really attractive. I mean nature gives us now only need to it. Only sequencing danger identifies the targets that a driving any diseases. We just drug them And then the second third. It's just the way that they were approaching at the time. There are at least two unstoppable forces. One is this increasing experimental resolution. That's now available to us to understand proteins. You know we've had a very limited understanding of the proteins are trying to drug. We see them as these fragments in static images and you know. It's no surprise that some proteins of being termed on drug lowly. See them like bowling bowls. Kind of account really understand where or how to fit small molecule. Now over the last couple of years. You see these techniques coming online experimentally allow us to intimately understand the dynamic nature of proteins. Proteins DON'T EXIST. static fragments. They exist like transformers in these chains ultimate domains constantly moving and that motion carries with it. A lot of information unlocks a lot of the secrets that we've never been able to see before. Now this is what's interesting. Sanjeev because I think you know you talked to any biologist and they would agree with what you've just said. Proteins are not static dynamic. We've known this forever but our ability to look at proteins has been limited. We've taken these static images like crystallography images and the analogy that I've I've tried out and with with proving tip Bernini Edifice therapeutical I think you know another computational drug discovery company is sort of like you know. I imagine like you're still photographer at a football game. Taking a picture of Tom. Brady's throwing the football and usually like he's got the ball at the top above his head and he's got his eyes on the receiver. And you just have that one picture but that I that is emblematic of what he's about to do but you don't you can't understand how he throws the ball unless you see the whole motion and that's kind of what we're getting now with structural biology taking multiple multiple images piecing together kind of like a movie and seeing like the whole follow through maybe the protein it all comes across in a different shape at one point or another and presents. A new vulnerability a new opportunity for chemical matter to bind with. This is like the. That's the thing that the concept basically that that I've heard from a couple different companies like yours and opens up a whole lot of possibilities right. That's exactly it. I mean taking these kind of grainy black and white images and now having high definition movies from multiple angles. It just gives you all this information that you've never had before and so so it's no surprise that it gives you information that you can use to now try and take some of these undrivable proteins and make them juggle and you know that was the premise which is could you take all of this experimental data and then the second half of excited me about coming to realize was that computational power that's now available to us and so there's been lots of discussion over the last few decades and you know can computation. Help us in discovering you mets. And you know there's been many dawn's of this but it's very clear if you buy into. The fact that the computational power is getting more and more powerful and is getting lower and lower cost and so our ability to simulate biological systems virtually has to be getting better over time and our ability related build these simulations using all of the rich experimental Dayton we've got and then to use those virtual systems to more efficiently find medicines. You could only do it if you have this combination of all of this rich. Experimental data and combined with the computational power on its own able to us so I think everybody knows that we. We've got a lot more computational power the the speed the the capacity is there from that side we're getting more and more images that can be analyzed in a like a very high throughput way. So there's there's underlying ingredients here to do something you referenced. The the many dawn's I mean there was a. I think you call it when we spoke a year ago. A false dawn or the May have been a couple where things got over hyped and that tends to depress or damp and an entire sector in case computational drug discovery so that What what kind of got you over that Hump. When you were looking at relay made you think okay Now now is actually the time when you can build something. I ain't never two things. One is the power is is is useful. But it's not useful in isolation. You actually need all of this kind of rich experimental data that we've just about to form the basis of any of these simulations and we've just never had that before and then the second piece is some of the early work that I saw was clear that using the simulations that we can now create You could actually now come with hypotheses that you could test in the lab and start to validate and so. This wasn't just hype. We are actually seeing Real feedback loops and they get more powerful than more simulations you do and the predictions you make and if you get that date. Both positive and negative They they start to form a virtuous circle so it was those two things But the computational power we're right at the beginning of this of this field and you know we will see lots of advances as we go forward but it's very clear that this combination of experimentation and computation will be the core of the future of how many small molecule drug discovery companies work. Okay now at the time you had this conversation with Alexis and Marco company I guess had been around for maybe a year twenty or so. People got some structural biology some some computation. People's medicinal chemistry like the core blocks. I guess But they needed someone to come in and build like what. What was the idea here for a company like to to do this? The right way you needed to create some kind of new processes and new workflow to get multiple disciplines working together to kind of go about drug discovery from a different way or a slightly non traditional way Is that was at the task in front of you? That's right you know. Both sides of these were were emerge in A. How do you understand all of this data? That's now available to us on the experimental side. And then how do you use that to build these simulations? And how long should you simulate four? What kinds of computational tools should we use because as a whole kind of Renaissance Obese tools being created by different collaborators. That we work with and so the the job is exactly that which is how do you sift through all of this and Produce something at the end of it and so I think we try to over complicate it. The we a small number of precision medicine programs. Alexis had just come from finding financial medicine and Blueprint medicines and so we focused on the small number off position on college targets And the goal was to try and create first in class medicines or best in class medicines as rapidly as efficiently as we could to validate the approach and we learned Land as we go along in for the first few programs we've and we tried every single kind of experimental technique. We had hands on. We try to every computational approach we could find and we just learned what worked and what didn't And it was clear and kind of eighteen months in that. We were seeing Insights from the approach that we couldn't see using traditional approaches and we were getting ourselves closer and closer to development candidates full These first few programs And so then. We had a fork in the road. Which is what do we do? Now with. This company do we. Do you know the traditional approach. Solve trying to get one or two things in the clinic. Get Proof of concept data as quick as possible shutdown research and focus on spending on clinical. And then at some point in the future. Trying monetize this either through an acquisition or on a ship or do we really believe that we have a totally novel approach and do we scale our research engine aggressively even before. We put something in the clinic And we had long debates and discussions about this internally and we came to the conclusion that we really believe that we wanted to try and get as many medicines to patients as we possibly could by scaling the research platform. And so. That's what we've been doing this last two months and a year ago raised a whole lot of capital four hundred million in a series see. It's a lot more than most companies are going to raise privately which comes with its pros and cons right. I mean it's great to be able to build up a platform and then prosecute lots of different programs within it but it also comes with a lot of pressure. There's there's you know you gotta develop deliver a massive valuation someday to the investors who put in that much. So I mean you get bigger and you gotTA hire a lot of people and make sure all those people are properly trained and on board with your culture that you want and all that Kinda stuff makes it more complicated. I guess in some ways. How did you think about like the right? Size of funding. Was for relay. What he wanted to do goal was to do two things. One was to take the initial clinical stay initial programs that we've been working on and take them into the clinic and trying to show proof of concept to these precision medicine programs and we should be able to get to some very clean data sense rapidly in and see where what we've got our belief is you know we we've got something real here. And so that was one half of the strategy in and the other harmful is to be able to scale our research. Engine both inside of Oncology And then looking at and other areas inside a precision medicine and so you're absolutely right. It is complicated undertaking for a company of our stage But it's exactly what we WANNA do. We believe that this approach you know alot early will be how Small molecule drug discovery will get done over the coming decade. You come you know for ten years from now you imagine. Every small molecule drug discovery company would have this combination experimental and computational tools and so to drive that We wanted to build The scale and I believe is the more programs we do the better. We get But it is complicated as you grow. We've gone from you know a hundred employees trying to keep that magic culture. I saw when I first came in the building. Twenty people you know when you reach a hundred and fifty people is not a straightforward And to make sure that everyone knows no seamlessly. What's going on is is not Something that happens automatically. So that's the job with the mountain. Not Having had to be outside. Raising money of this month has meant that. We've been inside building a company and Marco. Loko spends a lot of time with us. You know talking just about the early days vertex and they set out to build a company right from the start. They went in it to kind of build and sell late. They wanted to create something that was enduring. And so we started to build is coming back from the start with without nine and as it turned out with VERTEX. The things they worked on in the early years weren't actually the things that became the products that that made the company that that came later but they but they but they had the company the people and the culture in place to seize the opportunity when it came yes and I think that's a lesson is not lost on us right which is right at the beginning of this and success comes in many ways but you have to be ready to be successful But it may not be from what you do today. Yeah and I'll get into some of the technical parts for people listening to this show. I'm going to release a couple articles that were for Timmerman subscribers. Only which I get into some more of the details that led you to your four hundred million dollar fund raising One of the important ones. I remember Alexis forest telling me about last year was the when you show that the platform could predict a number of active binders against a site. That was of apparently a very difficult target drug. And you're able to predict with a high degree of confidence like a lot of active binders now. Though that doesn't make them drugs but that was something that people had worked very hard on that target for a number of years and The guys seem to be able to put a save some of that early time in nominating candidates. Yeah I mean there are two things that really struck us. One is the ability to find novel binding sites And it comes back to working on full length proteins. Traditional Discovery Works on fragments of proteins may be active side. But actually you know because we're looking at the full dynamic range of motion. We we work on full length. Proteins and that gives us the opportunity to identify potential novel. Bunnies onto the active sites circled alistair binding sites and so our ability to find these sites that are hidden in plain sight. Not The active site was something that really struck us This is really going to change the game and then as you say. The second part of it was using some computational tools to simulate an predict Bindis for these sites and to remove all of the labor intensive piece of the puzzle going into the lab and synthesizing in the wet lab going through cycles. That gus weeks and months but try and cut out a lot of the Labor. Intensive work by using computational modeling and then those predictions actually leave proving out. Those two things I think really starts to get US excited about eighteen months ago and that kind of triggered to think we we should really scale company and do you think of capital in this case as a competitive moat that that kind of wards off people maybe discouraged others from trying to do exactly what you're doing also attracting a lot of bright people early on when you WANNA hoover up the best in various disciplines is that was that part of the thought process. Seventy part of it. I think what we do will become industry standard at some point in the future and so so exactly as Vertex back in the day. Piney structure based drug design that became standard across many companies in our industry The the wolf a talent is hard. Because we're not competing especially computational side with biotech where competing with big tech and to them four hundred dollars. It's not a lot of money and so that that doesn't help us that what it does help us with is prosecuting more programs in belief. That the more that we can do The better that we understand this approach. Or right at the infancy of this But the challenges around with cruising a much broader than than this. This is an industry wide affect our industry will need a lot more computational talent in it and it currently has today so you WanNa get them while you can so okay now just real quick Sanjiv. You're thinking about the new decade like everybody else here. Early Twenty Twenty S A. Are you able to talk about where you might be with a lead program or when you might enter the clinic? The engine the clinic this year so The hope is multiple programs that we've been working on we'll end to the clinic in twenty twenty and so we disclose those over the coming months But it's a real kind of Inflection Point for the company. We've gone from this concept three years ago and the radical To real practical. We now have You know compounds in the clinic and so that will be a big milestone for the company multiple programs not one or two ultimately while so. This is going to be a big year. I mean you've been quite stealthy as a private company not out there talking a lot of the that. That's going to change at some point when we debate all the time when. When's the right time to do that? And they'll see there's a one-sided you're trying to protect IP But you know run the right time We will start to to definitely communicate externally. Well one thing that I will do as I said is. I'll share a couple of those articles. Which have talked about computational discovery as a trend in about relay in particular for for listeners? Who WANT TO To go deeper into the specifics but for today I just like to say thank you for spending some time with us on the long run. Three things you really enjoyed it. Thanks thanks for listening to the long run up. Production of Timmerman report. Peter Assad of head. Stepper media was the sound editor. Music comes from. Da Wallich. See you next episode.

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Lonnie Love says are Black Men Unfaithful..You agree?

20 Minute Morning Show

22:04 min | 1 year ago

Lonnie Love says are Black Men Unfaithful..You agree?

"It was everybody before we start the twenty minute morning. Show let me tell you about anchor of you've never heard of anchor. This is the easiest way to make a podcast. So let me explain Blaine. It's free. There's creation tools that allow you to record. And Edit your podcast right from your phone or your computer anchors. Going to distribute your podcast for so it can be heard on spotify apple podcasts. And many more you can make money from podcasting with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast and one place so listen. Download the free APP right now or go to anchor dot. FM to get started and now stand by for the twenty minute morning show from our studios in Charlotte North Carolina and the black community. Going to speak for the black community but I do think that a lot of black men. They really don't know how to have true faithful relationships. You're listening to the twenty minute morning. Show for Wednesday January fifteenth because testing. Have money because they have powers that they can treat women any kind of way I love that is something we need to work on. We need to work on uh-huh empower does not mean that you can just do so many cultures that is the whole thing like that is Neko's across the board but I'm GonNa say it's not across the board because what is happening is that we are still dealing with the point of slavery and we are descendants of slavery and because our families were broken up we still do not have a idea of how to have together families So what are your. What are your comments on? The latest controversy surrounding Lodhi love talking about black men. Don't know how to be faithful in relationships. I also it just looks kind of cheese. Start off saying she's not speaking brawl blagbrough. She spoke ball black folks and then not only should try to every blackmail into a category. And I think that's unfair. You know the comments mustache. She made director Black Nanna. Loan visit though slavery into it. I didn't respect that at all which thanks I. I'm not really GONNA attack lining love because black man attacked black unprovoked. I don't think that cheating. He's racial and I don't think cheating gender-based because Mari tortured you are not the father so I do believe I believe that she had some points. I do believe that black men have inherit inherited A lack of family from slavery because she didn't make some points about you know black people being split up Gerin slavery and so I do. Belushi has some points regarding that a facebook post host and he got like two hundred in nineteen comments and I was talking about women like Lonnie love are wack because they any any woman I and and I know I'm GonNa get called on the carpet for this but I believe any black woman that takes a white mate a white man as her mate you you. You don't have nothing to say about us because the law you corny stand wait a minute. BJ black men have been so indoctrinated against black women who look like London love so that is a fact. Black women aren't the one singing rapping about the non black woman to our lack of black net. The average Black Women Lani love. They know. But if you're going to have a legit conversation unless have one if you don't WanNa have one we're not gonNA have even we say valid. I'm telling you I'm telling you. The average black woman look similar to Lonnie love in a big scope which is which is beautiful the BJ. You know. And I know Oh that black people have been indoctrinated against dark skin so we we're not gonNA sit here at like that's not a thing when it is. Here's the problem I have with. I think everybody comes from their only turns of life and that is not my experience in life. You know my Gra- I'll look at my my own history. My grandfather was a very fair complected man but my grandma has a very dark woman so I didn't even realize that there was a thing about dark and light the until I got after college so the knowledge that it is a thing though has nothing to do with this conversation that there are some in our rate who have a problem them with other our problem with skin color. Is it like a footnote. No not a foot. nope okay I'm saying is I didn't imply as a footnote I for my experience and and I'm saying I didn't learn about. Can I go to the college as well. I'm not saying it's not there. We all know about the Brown paper bag. We do know that Usually they put a lighter skinned individual in the House as opposed also the field that we cannot deny you. Let her get you away from the topic at hand. It is about her talking about black. Men Do not know how to be faithful in relationships. Ships what does that got to do or her being dark skinned absolutely nothing. She's indoctrinated and made a blanket statement that black men do not know how to treat black women women and then she goes and she got a white boyfriend. I mean please you a joke you. She's not even in the game that to make a statement like that and all black black women who use that as an excuse to date white men you according to me. That's reality that that is AFFEC- back see you know like So the plan double agent here. I shoot. Let doesn't you we're talking about indoctrination and how that ties into what lining love is saying. Because would I initially say it was that I understand. Atlantic love may have some resentment because because black man have been indoctrinated against women who look like Lonnie love so you were thinking that maybe where she speaking speaking from but it is true about black men inheriting not having a sense of family from slavery but I also said that sheedy is not ratio. Oh and I don't think he's gender-based either agree with either that will probably about that family Doctor Nation A. G. and I'm from my experience because in my life in the mid I low Elilott. They raised their families lake. Stay there on sorry that her experience only allowed her to see another side of it. But don't put us all in that same bassin because could will not there. Yeah you know right. Cheated is not exclusive to black family family and you will listen to the conversation you could see that I'm on your side. I'm saying she didn't is not exclusive to black man and she. But I'm saying that I'm not not gonNA Attack Lonnie love because black men attacked black women. All the time unprovoked and so I know where she's coming from is it that you are a platform On or black men are all attacking me Sada my just put any youtube and you can see how black Nah attack black winning. If I pull up youtube and I look for a black woman attacking black yet I could get on Lisa good three or four years out of it and your point I yeah. I think it's just me the point that actually I in tech attack black women unprovoked me all the time. No no no no no no no I never heard me attack. You really you when attack disagreed with you at that attack. Because I don't agree with you. Okay well let me let me let me throw this in there. I think that Donnie love is is incapable of making a statement like that unless you In the struggle to love a black man it is a struggle for is to love each other being how we came up in America and you know to make a blanket statement like that and you have a black man by your side that you're trying to struggle to love would disqualifies you from the conversation. You Know Dr who bought on my Johnson got called on the carpet and I agree with him. One hundred percent that your greatest this commitment to the black struggle is who you choose for as a mate so you can't be talking all this black stuff on TV black people this black people that and then you got a the white man by your side. Please joke to me. Every one Lonnie love their fifty Eddie. Murphy's that is true. He's a joke to to I'll I'll everybody's included in that. Everybody is included in that. Everybody I don't understand about this whole oh conversation and Bj you know a lot of people of course they do. I really like me personally to you. Know hooked hooked up with either a white woman or a lot of them and I was said in their face. But it doesn't mean that I don't like you or your mate. I'm just telling you I'm congratulate you. Hang out with anybody and not by. Okay I'm isolating anybody but most of the Black Man I know I'm married to black like women. Yes bottom line yes but again. I guess I'm the minority on the group because Y'all make me a lot of times like I'm important but the the black man I know American black women but you know a lot of people in my family to two white women you know and I get along with everybody. I'm I'm just saying that you can't be on television talking all this black pro black stuff and you got a white person by your side as your mate. It disqualifies you you in the in the struggle to me. Because you you'd be like I would love you too. Have A podcast. Every time you saw a black man with the white woman in your every podcast you have you see a black woman black man. You go ballistic. Look I've said this on other episodes you talking about go back in. I think look. She said that we are incapable of being faithful. Oh and relationships and you have to agree with some of the statements you know. Yeah we have all men have a problem with monogamy most believe me. Let me let me rephrase that. Now that's not a cigarette. What I just said not all men have a problem with monogamy and you said cheating is not exclusive to the black race but now you know we as men do have a problem with being faithful to our spouses? Now that's a AH subject to be taken out. I am a problem with that. First of all is my problem. Everybody's ideal faithful the air. Now I believe if you take care of your home you do supposed to do a man natural nature's to have more than one woman coming but since we've been in Christianity and we've been a European doctrine now we want we have one woman but you know Islamic countries around the world. Most men have at least two per live so I think it's a ridiculous statement here in America when they were not faithful will we are taking care of family because you have a natural to have more than one woman now all they will take. You know that's crazy to put a man in a box and I'd say Oh me when it's clear coach you it's ridiculous and that's what problems come and that's being quite well. I mean I mean they go to women as well who just had one me. Well we can't do that doesn't make sense biologically and break it down to in a woman can carry a baby for nine months right. And that's what she does. A man could literally one man I say eliminate every man but one the call around and inseminate everyone in the world and create New Light but a one could make one out at a time. I'll make violence. What does that have to do it or anything? And that only means that a woman could be get pregnant by one man that she can't sleep. Well Elvis washy pregnant not to say that that's like this. That's not a natural. I N natural `sound natural to me I'm talking about a repopulation the other men. Are you playing really well matter. Because you're only pregnant by the what man just different every time somebody sleep with. Somebody's because they want to get pregnant. No not at all the pleasure center but the thing is I think what's happening in America and this is the discussion we we need to have is. You're trying to put me in got an unnatural state and because women as well okay women. That's what you WanNa do but America especially I see more women tearing down there about every day and I thought when I heard what Lonnie loves it. Alabama subsidy offended because when she tried to act like like every black family. I disagreed with that and Sunday. You're trying to put women in a box you saying we're trying to put you in a box and sail you. You should be with only one woman but you're trying to put women in a box by saying it should be okay with you being the only one woman. It's not natural for us to have multiple artis. It's not so so you'll you'll ruin box well. People don't have to like it but it is what it is Not a natural thing for women to go after intimate different times. Look at wait a minute. When we look at any other species we are animals that are basic? Will you take a cow. You put one bill that he can inseminate all of them at once that they don't even want to deal with any other. How okay I see what that calf if you put a different ball in there? She'll get pregnant by him. She Ain't get frightened about the same pool. She'll get pregnant number full. What are you talking about? Offs are the more Sunday. You'll be okay if you're white cheat on you know no because standing the argument that you've got to have this ridiculous built different. We have all Taba consultant outside and I'm just like in anywhere but the woman let you inside of her. There's more to it for act like all we could do exactly the men you'll also also for you to it for you because just because every woman you'll lay down what made you fall in love. That don't mean every woman. Yeah the way. God made the woman spiritually as well as mentally makes mention what one man. I'm sorry Bentham in different women and I'm not about to say of this argument. That's a that's not even real this sound sexist to only be one day but let's go back let's go back to to Lonnie love because Lonnie loves. Statement is based off her deep disappointment and finding a black mate and I see I could respect that we have let the women down and we have to admit that it's got to be some balancing the compensation she we deserve that type of statement in a sense because we have not done right but we go right by women. I'm bringing balance to it because we have not done right women you'll be disingenuous to say that that black men have done right by their women getting them pregnant and then leaving them to raise their children by themselves. Answer some other questions that people don't want to answer. Yeah let's figure out why the black man has not been able to be a head of his household let's break it down one let's look at it Carson Racer to. Let's look look at the fact that we have these women out here now WanNa be noon and when a man tries to step up. Oh no you can't treat me. You can't wait a minute. I'm just trying China set order. They're not letting noon be mad. So there's a lot of the Senate statement you start taking. It was aroma. Just stay meridia. 'cause you don't let no man be a man man is a man and I don't know I'm GonNa let you be a man. This time held no the day what I mean by that in our society right now you as a man and father have no sale your child you know if they call the police. Let's look at our pedal legal system. All a woman has to do is see really WanNa get to you gotTA causing call to police down her side right if you get a divorce or if you take a towel support for where do you win at. BJ Come on begins. It begins the process before you even get to that. You got to treat the woman right to put her at ease. The makerfield secure these women are acting out of insecurity. They left out here by themselves because of ignorance this is the only recourse. They think they have calling the white man on us to get they live together. And that's the sad and that's our fault. As men we got to take responsibility. Disagree disagree I think the winner all screwed not absolutely a women doing the the payment other windows and when they need me they're not evaluating the value of them out of the hurt of so they pick men that will heart the live up to what they want does the problem bio soberness having a conversation about women. I'm not a male chauvinist. Listen I'm a real black children and Sunday is to Sunday's a real black man I am too. You just don't like what we say. Show I think you I remain a book but the truth is true and nobody wants to have a real conversation because take away whereas I have never never say you feel if an or you want to see it at different doesn't make a change. Biology truth doesn't change but all of a sudden you tell the truth on something and that's the thing look how hard she is on black men you a hypocrite. Look hard you are on have you. You don't say anything positive to reinforce us as black men on this show. You always put this down. You always thought about you know you don't need need a man you don't make me. I am a man. You don't let me focus on you being a boy and I'm not that but you don't you don't it doesn't mean you get a square definition. What a man is? Because I'll confused at that. Tell me what your definition of a man amendment is my definition of man. A manly he. He he holds his own. He's he's not scared. He's unapologetic He's not indoctrinated. Yeah Maisy Pammy those characteristics. We can deal with that art. He loves the black woman if he has it he has all those. That's a plus to me okay. You got all those. You'd scribe me instantly. No no I didn't I was looking on the Internet. uh-huh they want and everybody for listening to the twenty minute morning. Show a product of inside urban media Britain produced by Murphy from our studios in Charlotte North Carolina. Lana like us on Facebook at twenty minute morning. Show make sure you subscribe to the show on all the following platforms apple itunes spotify stitcher Google podcast gas radio public breaker pocket casts listen notes Anchor Dot FM and Soundcloud WanNa think daily contributors Sean Sunday AK and the the U. I. N. Uncut News Team Policy show six A._M.. Weekday Mornings so used share button reposted on all your social media. Make sure you're back here for the next episode of the Twenty Minute Morning Show.

Lonnie black community Black Nanna America Facebook Charlotte North Carolina Murphy spotify dot Blaine Lodhi Neko Google Bj Mari London director Belushi China
Microscale Machine Manufacturing (w/ Cornell University) and Stopping Hiccups with Science

Curiosity Daily

07:35 min | 1 year ago

Microscale Machine Manufacturing (w/ Cornell University) and Stopping Hiccups with Science

"<music> HI CURIOSITY DOT COM to help you get smarter in just a few minutes. I'm cody Gov and I'm Ashley Hamer Today. You'll learn about how researchers are manufacturing robots that are half the width of human hair in the second edition of our micro-scale Mondays miniseries series. You'll also learn about a science backed way to stop the hiccups with satisfy some curiosity. How do you produce robots that are half the width of a human hair? You're about to learn how in the second edition of our micro scale Mondays miniseries. He's our guests for this series are tycoon professor of physics at Cornell University and Paul McEwen Director of the Cavalier Institute at Cornell for Nanos scale science. They agreed that the robots were talking about are pretty small but here's Paula McEwen on what makes their tiny production possible. It's incredibly small but fortunately here at Cornell we have basically the country's best academic and Nanna fabrication facility the Cornell N._F.. evocation facility where the latest ingredients tools for we're making small things exist <hes> in a giant suite of tools that a student can go in and to a very sophisticated set of processes to make these small structures and again the basic core technology is stolen from sixty years of Moore's law of learning how to make smaller and smaller computer chips and then we're just adapting this technology to go beyond just information processing and making things that can actually move so in the end. It's the fabrication looks a lot like you're making a some sort of computer device. You have a waiver that goes through a series of lithographic. The graphic processes were metals are dropped down or semiconductors or what have you and then it's only at the very last step you drop it in an etch that sets them free and edges them off the substrate and you get in thousands or even millions of east of Isis off of a single. Wafer and I should say that's something that's very special about this fabrication approach that we use is it's it's massively parallel in other words. We don't make these things one at a time you don't sit there and try to construct them. Individually you make a giant array of them. We take a sheet sheet of material that might be ten Adam stick and then it folds up into this this robot so indeed were working with paper for our Origami that can go down to even a couple of atoms thick so when you get if you succeed but if you're fabrications exceed you end up with again thousands millions or even billions of them and as a result the actual cost per little tiny robot can be tiny if these went to manufacture they could easily cost less than a centerpiece why that how many many would you need working together to make it useful. That's an interesting question. It's a pretty active area of research this idea of collective motion and behavior of of swarms of robots we could envision going either way we could envision these machines acting independently following some chemical gradient. Maybe attacking a tumor <hes> instead of having the surgeon scalpels cut it out these robots with chewed up individually or you could imagine <hes> the robots behaving there's some sort of collective hole and there it's a little bit more complicated to think about how do you give these robots cues light driven cues chemical cues thermal cues and design the interaction rules <hes> sufficiently simply and yet robust lead to get them to do something that you want in concert and this might sound like science fiction but if you think about ant colonies or <hes> the way B.'s communicate with one another these are very simple interaction rules that lead to. Fantastic behaviors of these organisms yeah. They're just following an algorithm algorithms are great. But how do these machines actually move around. Don't worry we'll get into that next Monday. You just heard from e tycoon and before that you heard from Paul McEwen physicists at Cornell University and you can learn more about them and their research in today's show notes. There's a science backed way to stop the hiccups and fair warning. It's a weird one. We've all heard of holding your breath or are having someone scare you or eating a spoonful of sugar or drinking a glass of water until you just can't breathe anymore or drinking glass of water upside down yeah well. This is not one of those things but before. Are we get into this cure. Let's back up a second. I what is a hiccup. Hiccups are involuntary contractions of the diaphragm your vocal cords close every time it contracts the result and here's something weird. We don't really we know why hiccups happen. We do know some things that caused them eating too much or too fast eating dry bread eating spicy food drinking fizzy drinks or booze a sudden change in temperature gas in your stomach yeah. It's a pretty long list. All of those things tickle your freak nerve. That's a nerve that starts in your neck and goes right between your lungs in your heart all the wave your diaphragm right where the hiccups happen but you've gotta hit a different nerve. If you want to get rid of the the hiccups that's called the Vegas nerve. This nerve is like a super highway inside your body. It goes from your brain down through your face and down your torso all the way to the bottom of well your bottom. The Vegas nerve controls the stuff. If you don't have to think about like you're breathing in your heart rate. You know the stuff that keeps you alive. No big deal. This nerve can also help relax your muscles muscles like your diaphragm see where this is going. Many hiccup cures are meant to stimulate simulate the vagus nerve which in turn your diaphragm to chill out so stuff like gargling or Yanking on your tongue but there's no guarantee these methods we'll work every time and sometimes desperate times call for desperate measures so here's something else you can try. If you're hiccups just won't stop here goes digital rectal massage. That's digital as in your fingers and rectal as in your but no I'm not kidding so back in the eighties. There is a guy who couldn't didn't stop hiccuping after seventy two hours like thirty times a minute for three straight days. He tried every cure in the book but nothing worked enter Dr Francis fess Meyer he'd read a study where digital rectal massage lowered patients rapid heartbeat by stimulating vegas nerve so fuss Meyer quit using all those classic Vegas nerve tricks from Upfront and he opted for less traditional approach from behind and it worked in two thousand six the study earned him an IG Nobel L. Prize. That's the Nobel prize parody for silly and unusual but very real scientific research. Aren't you glad we got to the bottom of that one before we recap what we learned today. We want to quickly remind you to please nominate curiosity daily to be a finalist the twenty one thousand nine podcast awards you can find a link to that in today's show notes and you can find our show in the categories of people's choice education and science and medicine. If our show makes you happy then this is a great way to return the favourite Ashley in me and now let's recap what we learned today. Today we learned that researchers can build robots that are half the width of a human hair at a cost of less than a penny a piece and you can cure the hiccups by stimulant in your bud or if you've got a friend with the hiccups you can just threaten to do this and then it'll scare.

Cornell University Paul McEwen Ashley Hamer Dr Francis fess Meyer Nobel prize Paula McEwen cody Gov Nanna fabrication Isis stimulant Wafer Adam professor of physics B. Moore Director Cavalier Institute seventy two hours sixty years
Home: On #141  Threads Back! with Dan Seifert from The Verge

Home: On

1:00:41 hr | 3 months ago

Home: On #141 Threads Back! with Dan Seifert from The Verge

"The experts of the Emmy Award winning ask this old house show on pbs are now featured in a new weekly podcast to help homeowners tackle their toughest projects. Subscribe to the ask this old house podcast today, and we are delighted to welcome this old house back to home on. On this episode of home on Google Continues Nest secure while introducing new products that feel a whole lot more google than nest plus product announcements from Fight Yale, GE lading, and all with insights in perspective from the verges. Dan. Siefert this is home on home on. Welcome to episode one, forty, one of chrome on show about the I y home controlling automation from the Digital Media Zone brought to you by this old house. I'm Richard Guenther and I'm joined by Dan Seaford from the verge. Dan Hey Richard Glad to be here. Thank you for having me. I'm really glad to talk to you again I think the last time and first time actually that you spoke was on the smart home show and leave you join us to talk about all of the stuff that came out after one of these recent everything new from Amazon or Google events. If I remember I, think it was just about a year ago 'cause the two Thousand Nineteen Amazon Extravaganza? Yes. All right. So let us start with probably the biggest surprise news of the last few weeks, which is Google's announcement. Actually, they didn't even announce a damn thing. Quietly discontinued its Google nest secure alarm system and they pretty much added. So changing the buy now, button on the store to a no longer available disabled button they basically just yanked it from the store. Yeah. Then media found out I think customers tipped off media and then we went and ask Louie Google's like Oh yeah, we're done. Yeah who's quite a situation I mean this isn't even been out for three years yet. This hit the market in November twenty seventeen, it was expensive. It was a five hundred dollar system when it came out for ninety nine, each of their multipurpose sensors that they had which really clever actually clever censored devices were fifty nine dollars the way that you would basically enable it or disabled. It was by tapping tag that you might carry with your keys or something which I thought was ingenious really clever way of doing things but I always got the feel that this was basically them trying to almos- get away up on what? Ring. was doing in the alarm space ring had this great thing they were coming out with for two hundred bucks. They kind of got slammed by lawsuits and delayed meanwhile, Google comes out with there's much more expensive. Yeah. But it that price point I thought it was just a little bit too much for a diy solution I. Fully Agree I think that the initial price point was our big hurdle but then also when you look at the necessary monthly service plans that go along with it, Google was up there especially when you compare with simplisafe and then ring of course, ring is by far undercutting the rest of the industry. In in has Amazon's behind it to allow that to happen. But the cost of that Google is offering was high and then I never felt like Google really committed to this product they never really integrated with the nest thermostats in more than a perfunctory way right? They didn't bring out any hardware updates didn't bring out any new products or like Sary's you could extend this with. So it felt like Google released it they release added high price. The only thing they really did overtime was lower that price just slightly I. Think it went down to three ninety, nine right and that was it. There's nothing else the integration within. This thermostat. I can't even remember the exact integration. They may be able to use it for home away. Yeah. So like some basic home away stuff but not extensive, right the very clever sensors that you mentioned that combined motion with the door center and stuff like that. They never really detected temperature or anything like that. That could have been used as like a cohesive whole home. I've got S Thermostat I'm all in on the nest ecosystem with my doorbell and everything to think it just felt like this isolated piece. I don't know if that's because of the timing of it because of the ongoing struggle between who owns nest bring. Nest has gone from a Google Company to Nautical Company Tobacco Company, and that whole fiasco over the past years I don't know if this is a casualty of that but it just seemed like they were never committed and they release the product overpriced at the time and like you mentioned once rate did come to market at that two hundred dollars price for their security system, and then their service plans are like a third of the price or something what Google is charging service plane is ten dollars. Yeah and it includes all your cameras that's like cohesive. That's a ring ecosystem. Google wasn't doing that right? Had Ring Cameras and had that ten dollar plan that's included now. It's like an L. here was the last thing that I remember when I review the nest having to dig my memory back a few years now they never integrated fire department response so Google has smoke detectors which are excellent. Smart smoke detectors bite. If they detected a smoke alarm, the nest secure wouldn't call the fire department. It just didn't make any sense to me. They would call police if detected a break in, but it wouldn't call the fire department whereas ring and I know simply safe both offer fire department integration so that if your smoke alarm goes off when you're not home, it's better than like an APP push to your phone where you can't really do anything about it they send the authorities which amongst every other notification, you may not even exaggerate. So yeah, this definitely felt like it was kind of stepchild that they just never gave the care and feeding that it deserved, and then there was all this other stuff going on these nests, detect sensors, themselves that you were talking about their incredibly powerful and they technically work with other devices in the nest. Ecosystem based on the technology that they use, but they never did anything there. Now it may be hopeful thinking but maybe they might some way allow folks to tenderly transition them to work with other nests devices in some way maybe just as nest detectors, maybe just within the Google home and Google assistant ecosystem in some way independent of this guard unit. That basically tied it all together. Yeah. It would be nice if they did that I would say that that would align with Google's marketing around sustainability and ECO conscious manufacturing. They've done a lot of marketing around that with their recent products with the nest speakers and everything like that. How are made from recycled plastic? Yup. First step of the three RS though. Is Reuse. So let's reuse these sensors. Exactly. No, that's a really good point and I hadn't even thought about it that way now before everybody freaks out and loses their ever frigging mind because a lot of customers are pissed about this Google has said the existing systems will continue to work. Now they didn't say for how long we could infer for. A while but you can't assume forever because never forever and frankly Google has a bad history of just cutting stuff off at the knees that doesn't meet the metrics that it's expecting. We see that happening software all the time we have seen it happen in hardware. So we'll have to see how long does support actually occurs I think the hardware will keep. Working unless you break it like the hardware is not going to stop functioning in terms of detecting a door open breaking of like that. The big question here is how long Google going to offer the subscription service that really makes home security system, a home security system that allows you to have I called when you're not home or you're sleeping or. What have you how long is that going to stick around and that's the big question to me yeah and that's where I'm going to start to parse Google's actual statement, which was that we will continue to support our security users in this same ways, and if remember earlier this summer I spoke about Google's interesting investment of nearly a billion dollars in at. when that announcement out I was like So they're investing at, but they still security system how long is this going to? Guess now we know. Right yeah. We'll have to see where this plays out, but this was still a surprise. If you're a customer of this stuff, I would not get off readout by the one thing that I'm hearing with folks who are probably already disinclined to trust Google is see never buy hardware from Google I don't think that you need to take that extreme position on this in less you're kind of anti Goule don't want their stuff but now it seems like they're not going to be dropping Google home stuff anytime soon, I don't think so they're not. GOING TO I don't think dropped the mainstay of the nest brand thermostats and Hey, speaking of that, why don't you tell us about a new Google thermostat that's coming out now? So to restore your confidence in Google's investment in the brand, they have announced a new nest thermostat they're calling it just the nest. Thermostat we're familiar with the nest learning thermostat and the nest learning Thermostat E, which is there to models that they've had over the past decade or so in various generations now they have the new thermostat in it's lower cost model it's one. Hundred Twenty. Nine dollars as opposed to the one, hundred, seventy nine or so for the Nestea in to forty nine for the top of line model and simpler model, it has a new design that does away with the rotating dial that is such a signature of the nest thermostat. So it just has a little bit of a touch strip on the side for controlling. It's got this mirrored kind of finish on the front and the display shines through that, and the big thing to me is that they've dropped the learning name from it because. It's not a learning thermostat. It's a smart thermostat connected to the Internet and you can control it with your phone. You program it with your phone, but it's a much simpler system where you basically just program schedules like you would with a forty nine dollars honeywell programmable thermostat that you might have had on your wall for the past fifteen years. It's just now you can do it through the APP and you can do it with a little bit nicer hardware and Google says that it's like specifically designed to cater to that customer that was like. The smart thermostats making all these decisions for me, I just want to make a program. That I'm familiar with and I think they might be right there. There might be some people who are certainly hesitant to do the full thing. Now, lower price point simpler design maybe there'd be more interested in something like this I. think There's a market for this, but there are so many things that just make me scratch my head. One of them. Well, let's just go with the obvious because if you look at this thing and pictures, it comes in these new fashion colors that you might recognize from Nest Speaker as an example color match your thermostat to your neck speaker. Right they call them snow charcoal sand in fog, which is really white black and welcome back to the eighties dusty rose and green. And you know I just don't understand what they think people's homes look like black and white or dark gray and white sure. That makes complete sense but rose and mint green I just. I'll say that. They neither of those colors palettes would work in my home, but I'm not everybody. So maybe there's somebody with a nice soft pink all that this dusty rose thermostat. Good. Yeah I don't know. The other thing is that I feel like they've removed a little bit too much of the things that made nest as good. It is even without the learning and I've never used learning because I'm a control but. Aside from that, there are other things missing like you mentioned the dial that was the biggest usability feature of this because he just know how to use it. It's inherently obvious how to use this thing and I think that that's going to be a little bit harder for people who don't necessarily have smart stuff in their home already tap to yeah. If you've ever used a nest learning thermostats dial and you've ever turned it, it's a very nice turn. It's a very satisfying turn and I'm a feeling. It's wildly overbuilt firm what it needs to. Do and how much turning you have to do. This thing will last way longer than you'll be using at your home will crumble and the mechanism here will still be working. So clearly, there's a lot of costs involved with that. It's a very premium product. It's premium feel removing all of the moving pieces out of this obviously brings the cost way down low school, the manufacturer less expensively and sell it for a lower price to me that seems like the driving factor for getting rid of the dial but you're right it's a known quantity like you. Look at that like, Oh, I, want it warmer. I turn it to the right and I'M GONNA Cooler, turn it to the left and I'm done and now you're either using your phone voice control or you're using a swipe touch pad on the right side, which is definitely not as obvious. Right how would you know that? I mean there's no physical variation to that side from what I can tell from the images that would indicate touch here I mean just how do you know now the other thing is that it doesn't have the side capabilities of. The third generation standard learning thermostat. That's that thing where it's sensors detect movement pretty much anywhere in the room and it will light up to show you something of your choosing whether it's the current temperature that target temperature, the current weather conditions, whatever you can actually change it to a bunch of different things that's exclusive to the latest generation of the nest learning thermostat. It's not on the e not on any older ones and it's not on this. Unfortunately, also not supported by this any remote sensors, which means this is for a room a single room. Nest. Was I think the longest to hold out on providing any sort of second space sensor capability they finally did and it even worked on their nest either lower priced thermostat as someone who's owned every generation nest thermostat up to now I can tell you it works great with them by it's not going to work with. So that's kind of disappointed shame that it just doesn't work like I understand not putting it in the box making it an extra purchase something you want but like to just remove the functionality. Google. said to me I asked him point blank. Why doesn't this have? This they're like we are going for a simpler approach here we think customers would buy. This aren't looking for extra add ons aren't looking for more complexity I get that but you know that simple approach lasts for only so long and after a year or two, you realize he can do a lot more if you have a little bit more functionality and being able to add a sensor later on a nice appealing thing. So it's unfortunate doesn't have it in your post about this talk about a new APP experience to my understanding is that they really want people to use Google home go. APP to use this Thermostat, not the nest APP does the nest APP even work with it at all. My understanding is no you set this up with the map and you do all of your management and programming and so on and so forth through the Google home APP. Now, we'll have you out and say that I have not experienced this myself the demo that I got was virtual through briefing and I. Haven't had a chance to test the new thermostat yet, but the way that they pitched it in the way they explained everything was that it's all through the home APP. Now, in theory, I could see that if you've got your Google account in your nest account linked already, then maybe it will show up in the next APP as like another device in your home, but the real push here is to do. Everything in the Google home APP Yeah. I don't like that I. Don't know why I don't like that because it makes sense to control everything in one place I. Think I don't like it because it hints at a move in Google away from nest as a thing. Yeah. You know I think that's fair. I mean the net speakers, the nest audio and the nest many those all set up to the. Google. Home App can't do anything with those in the desktop either for now, the smoke detectors and s protects are still in the APP and frankly don't really do anything in the Google home APP, but you could easily see where that could be switched over. So it does feel like once they started the push to migrate or combine your Google. Nest accounts that the end of this is to eliminate than stop entirely. All right three more ways that they save money on this I don't mean to make this sound like terrible about because it's not it's a good entry level product, but it doesn't have an on board battery. So while it may still be leaching power off of your system, like the others did many configurations could require a common wire when I asked him about that they said it does have broad compatibility I believe they quote something like ninety or ninety five percent of HVAC system should be compatible with this we'll have to see wants variable to test it. How much of that is reality of do you need the common wire more? So than you did with the nest learning Thermostat, which had that very clever like you said, power leaching system when I went to test this with Mike Different setup, stand using their configuration thing every single different configuration I have required a common wire adapter or power added to it. So I really am curious you know they're saying ninety five percent systems are going to be compatible. Is that just in total or are they seeing ninety five or going to be compatible with their power leaching? Because it wouldn't work in my situation anymore. Yeah. That's an excellent question and it's kind of counter to the whole simple approach of the vice and the whole pitch of it's simpler and easier to install. If you don't have a common wire and you have to run a common wired after your simplicity of install has just increased by an order of magnitude. So I don't know if they're just assuming people have comment. Wires now more so than they did ten years ago when the first nest thermostat came out, but I be surprised if that was the case I don't know, and then finally no back late included fifteen bucks. If you want a dusty rose back late matches your wall I can't get too upset about this. This strikes me as the whole thing like apple not including the power adapter in the new iphones I just couldn't. Care less about that it saves them money it's less to package. It's stuff that people throw out or throw in a drawer. I take the other approach on this one I think they are nickel and diming a little bit with this because frankly that mounting is a piece of plastic that cost a nickel to produce, and in my experience every smart Thermostat I've ever had to install, I've had to use the mount. Include because I don't want to be spackling patching holes walls which are always left behind always, and since this product is really being pitched at someone who is upgrading from an old thermostats been on the wall for decades probably, there's going to be holes that are not covered by the back of this thing, you were going to need that plate, and so the majority I think people would install this are going to need. Not including it. It's like. How much does it cost of produces thing not that much but you're going to charge fifteen bucks. That's a really good point and I doubt it's going to be on shelves in stores. You Probably GonNa have to order it online Okay. Well, so Google Taketh away in Google gift. Let's move onto other stuff. We have a lot of news and updates about lighting products. The first of these is from fight fight is one of those companies that you probably know more for just light bulbs that you might find an ace hardware or other local retailers. They sell all kinds of specialized products like they have bald that would be great and kids rooms with colors and sparkles and all kinds of stuff, but they also make a lot of really. Good. Utility products just good lighting and good flexible leading solutions. You know they were doing the color changing stuff way before you could find that from Halo and home. Depot's storebrand version in big box stores. So they've come out with a bunch of additional smart products before they just had bulbs in Kit. Flavor. And none home kit flavor they've added to the non home kit line bunch of things like some filament bulbs some cameras with lights built in kind of like rigging has their security cameras and security. Lights those are now available as well. All working with our other stuff these all work with Amazon and Google's assistance. They do not work with home kit and they haven't done anything more on their home kit line. Really what I thought was really interesting here with their vintage bulls other things that came out was an R. G. B. W. meaning a multicolor filament bulb. It's the first one that I've seen of these in a smart line so you can control the colors of this thing and it has three. Color filaments and element all kind of bundled together in the bulb, and then just it up to schedules or whatever. You know. It's just a cool looking thing and I remember at late fair. A couple of years ago Sylvania is playing with this concept and they showed it off as the first Rg beat Philemon bulb but brought it to market. So cool on fight for goodness out the door. This is kind of fun. That's interesting. I'm trying to picture in my mind what a purple vintage bulb looks like. Just because in my mind of control has that warm, very, very almost yellow Edison Bowl type of appearance. So it's interesting to see that you could do it in the green or purple or read in. and. What's funny about that is that fight has been making color filament bulbs for that style of to something fun. You know use them for kids rooms or for certain style or whatever. So they've been doing that for awhile now, they're applying that technology in a new way which I think is really really smart. They also came out with a new doorbell this kind of surprise because I didn't expect to see them hitting this market. This was just announced. I, don't believe it's technically available yet, and they're telling me the pricing on this is going to be like fifty. Bucks. That's very aggressive. Yeah. It's very aggressive and here's the thing that's cool about their cameras, their cameras do everything locally They don't host anything on the cloud you put storage into it it can store I. believe up to seven days on a given card based on how you can figure it. You use their cloud to connect and see stuff live and watch historical footage but nothing stored up in their cloud. So if you're concerned about a cloud. Service that might have your video somewhere. This may be an interesting solution for you. Cool. They also talked about the one sink line and I have to tell you I started my conversation with their rep about this. As now I know you have this other one sink line that you sell but I'm not really that interested in that and he completely changed my mind on it. So one sink is a collection of products that exclusive to Home Depot. Now and they are connected lights that work together through two point four, two AVI controlled together to be dimmed together as I understand it, they tie into line voltage and they can even be dimmed by line voltage, which is very rare. The only other company I've seen doing that his singlet. So that's pretty cool. But you know my big concern about it is it's an island like I don't want another island of things that I have to. Use their controller and their little wireless thing that looks like switch. But of course, it's bigger than a decor so you can't put it in to the space that you have and I just don't want that but they're going to create a bridge for this coming out in the spring and the bridge is going to tie all of this into your assistance or your automations that you might already have set up through your assistance from Amazon or through Google. It's kind of cool. All right. Well, I, think there is some stuff coming out from jail now too. Yeah. So yell announce this stuff way back at CBS which I don't know if you've experienced twenty twenty like I have feels like a decade ago. Right but they are finally shipping this new smart delivery box and smart cabinet lock effectively the product that is. Being shipped is a smart cabinet lock and the delivery box is a way to demo the smart cabinet. But what it is, it's a little plastic lot that you can mount inside of a cabinet locks the door shut you can use the Yale, APP or even at August App because it's all running on August technology platform to unlock it remotely locally you can. Set it up with timers and stuff basically behaves like an August door lock or a yield smart lock just GonNa Cabinet. So they pitch it as you put it on a liquor cabinet, you can put it under the sink to keep kids out of chemicals and stuff like that. I believe it will withstand about one hundred pounds of force. So it's not something. You would put on a gun safe. It's not related to that level depending on how well you screw it in. Yeah I mean, yeah you're trusting screws and maybe some vh tape to hold, but it's a deterrent and that's really all it's meant to be. Yeah. Those are about Eighty Bucks with Bluetooth if you buy with the WI FI bridge which allows for remote. is about fifty bucks more so they're kind of expensive but Yale tells me that they are going to sell multi of these bring the price per unit down a little bit Dan you know if you already have a Wifi bridge because you have a yell lock, can this use that same bridge or dedicating? No, it's one to one which means that each cabinet lock needs its own bridge at least that's what it is right now they kind of winked nodded at me like that's changing in the future but for now, each lock needs its own Wifi Bridge which is kind of not ideal and I have to back up from the Mike when I say this, but it does I did like that. I honestly don't know I'm guessing because they're building August stack of technology that was originally built on a one to one system. Sense your front door, and the bridge close to each other. So on and so forth. But yeah once you get to this, it's like, why is this built this way and it doesn't make any sense. So I don't know how long it'll be before they change it. They kinda winged nodded like for now they didn't officially confirm that it would be able to support multiple locks on one. Bridge. But for now, if you want Wi fi control, you buy one lock and you buy one bridge and install them, and then if you want a second one, you buy second lock and second bridge and find another outlet in your home to occupy that bridge on and manage it that way, and it's definitely less than ideal. This runs on a CR battery from I understand. Yeah. CRT Yup. Basically, locking. It's a latch that you put on the inside of a door and then a catch that has the mechanism in it with the battery and everything. Exactly. What happens if the battery on the catch dies when it's locked? SO THAT'S A. Great Question I asked him about that and it will alert you in the APP when the battery is running low. So it'll repeatedly alert you on a progressive schedule as it gets worse and worse, and then when it gets really down to the wire, just before the battery dies, it will unlock itself. I believe is the functionality that they explained. So it won't ever be locked shut with a dead battery in it. It's not ineffective luck. However, if the battery is it's not gonNA be locked forever. We'll I'm glad that's how it works. But this is just kind of a problem that you have to think about if you're creating a device like this, this is not like something that's accessible from inside the home if you can't get to it from outside. Exactly. So okay, right. Then the big part of this is the delivery box, which is basically a plastic box that you're supposed to put on your porch inside of it is one of these cabinet lock latches and the idea in theory is that your delivery person from Fedex or ups or DHL USPS or whoever the carrier is we'll come up to your house open the lid, your package in close the lid thing will automatically. Lock, and you'll get a little push notification on your phone that it's been locked, and then you can come in later and grab your packages keep them safe from porch pirates, keep them safe from the elements and just be a place to put them as opposed to just thrown on your porch like I'm sure many of us experience. Now great theory love the idea and concept I tested this thing for a week I get a lot of packages in my house between our own personal Amazon orders. But as a product reviewer, new packages come to my house multiple times a day one person used it in the week that I was testing it one delivery carrier every other one just decided. I don't know what that is. I'M GONNA throw it on the porch even though it says deliveries on it even though it's fairly obvious location. So there's some problems with the product which you can get into, but the problem isn't so much with the product. The problem is more about education and partnerships that are necessary to really make this work. Yale. Needs to work with ups and Fedex get driver's train. have it so that their scanners that there are already carrying unlock the box automatically when they. Approach they know what that is. They know the packet goes in there and then it locks automatically when they leave. That's the only way. This is gonNA. Make any sense otherwise it's just like you're basically on the honor system unless you put up a tacky Gaudy sign that says, please put packages in this box with neon lights shining at it it just never going to work. I don't want to disparage the delivery drivers all that much. They are extremely busy especially this year the amount of workload that. They have is through the roof. The onus really has to come down to the company's trading, and if they did the training from the top down and made it a thing that delivery drivers have to do. Then we're going to get more uptaken more support for this. But for now, it's exactly and I was surprised that they didn't have partnerships surprised that they didn't work with the major carriers to get them prepped for this idea because this was the hottest since es involves a problem that A. Lot of people have been trying to address a listener to the show has been working on a similar kind of product to ride this sort of capability and the road to success requires partnerships I. saw this and I was shocked to see that it isn't part of Amazon. Yeah. That's just a natural natural thing. Yelled get say that they will have a big announcement by the end of the year I believe I read this thing about a month ago still no word yet we're running out of time. Here they say they're gonNA big partnership but really they need all the partnerships they need all the carriers onboard and you would think that a company, the size of Yale would be able to make that happen. I. Totally understand a startup having struggles. They're not able to get the contracts design and stuff like that yell is owned by Assa. Abloy one of the world's largest lock manufacturers I feel like they have the size to make this happen and they didn't I don't know. Yeah. Also, by the way, yell already does Amazon key with other gail locks. Yeah. Excellent point. Okay. We're GONNA take a quick minute to hear from our sponsor this old house. I WanNa tell you about a podcast. I think you'll like. The trusted experts of the Emmy Award winning ask this old house show on pbs have offered homeowners advice for years. Now they're bringing that home improvement expertise to the new ask this old house podcast hosted by this old house editor Chris Irby's you'll hear from home enthusiasts around the country who ask questions about the toughest projects in their homes learn from trusted this old house experts who share tips and tricks to help listeners tackle their home improvement projects with confidence from electrical issues to landscaping ideas, painting tips, and so much more. Learn from the best in the business with the ask this old house podcast subscribe to ask this old house today wherever you get your podcasts. That's the new ask this old house podcast and we thank this old house for sponsoring home on. Why don't we move onto some updates I? Think that's pretty much it. Again, a lot of lighting oriented stuff. But before we get there, you wrote a review about the new Amazon Echos and everybody's kind of curious how these fair to other Amazon Echo I hate to admit I've been. To my echoes lately because they've been so slow. I'm hoping the new Windsor Better Yeah well I'm happy to transition to speaking about a product tested that I liked. I feel good been. Dragging Google Dragon Yale for most of the show but I really like to echo. It surprised me in a number of ways that I was not expecting when I was testing it. It sounds fantastic for hundred dollar speaker. This thing it has stereo separation without having to units. It's subtle but it's there. It has base response which speaker at one hundred dollars or less to have any sort of base response not that you can just here but also you can feel it in the floor is nice a win. And it looks cool because it's an order Brian it. So it's the first major redesign of the echo since basically the echo came out. So they've gone from the tall cylinders to shorter cylinders, and now we have an orb. It looks really cool. It sounds really great. It sounds noticeably better than the nest audio, which is the same price and it sounds almost as good as the Sonos one, which is twice the price. So I think it's a win on a number of fronts. Now you mentioned Amazon's assistance. Meant slow for you. Lately, I've seen a lot of chatter about that in my twitter feeds online and stuff like that seems like recently spent issues I haven't experienced it. My Amazon assistant devices seem to be working normally and on this particular one, it works the same as it does on others. Now, this has the new easy one neural engine chip inside of it that supposed to accelerate the response of all your voice queries, right? Because it's doing a lot of the processing locally. Unfortunately, that's not turned on. Yet so I wasn't able to experience that, but he was as fast as any other echo device in my home, which usually means that it's faster than a google device, not quite as fast as a home pod device in terms of hearing my voice taking action on it but other than that I. Think it's great for one hundred bucks. It's a win all around. I haven't heard the new pod. Minia, maybe that'll blow me away but I'm kind of skeptical that it will considerably smaller. So I think it. Made a lot of significant compelling updates to this too. I think two things one if you've got old echo if you upgrade to it, you will noticeably here a difference and if you've got an echo dot, you will get a noticeable upgrade here. So a lot. So how about the dot did you also get a chance to test the new dot I? Do I've got I'm GONNA hold up. To the camera which our listeners can't see. But I've got the tiger dot here and I'm in the process of working on my review of the Dye, which will hopefully be out at some point in the future but not a ton of time spent with the new dot yet not as much time as I spent with the Echo my initial take and I will say the new dot is Not, as much of an upgrade as the new is because the speaker inside of it is effectively the same as the prior generation the housing has changed its now that sphere shape. So there might be a little bit of improvement with audio there, but it's only one driver and it's still relatively small that said small rooms bedrooms, obviously the marketing the kids edition, two kids, rooms, and things like. That if it's in nicely, the one caveat that I have is that I really liked the old dot designed because you could stick them anywhere and mount them anywhere really easily they could mount them a wall outlet super easily there's very inexpensive. Plastic mounts that you can buy to do that. That's obviously a lot harder now that the thing is a sphere that's three and a half inches tall. That's a little bit of a bummer but other than that it is effectively the same kind of echoed experience. I was reading another review I was Jenny. That mentioned that very point and that may in fact be why you can still by the third generation dot. Yeah. If you need something that is more discreet and can be mounted that's a better solution for that, right? Yeah. This is really whether you've got the dot where the larger echo. It really dictates that you're putting it on a shelf on. A mantle on the table like it sitting there, and you've got to run the power cord to it, which we're detail here. Power Chords are all white this generation, which means if you have a black echo, you get white power cord not a lot of people are like in that based on what I've seen and I kind of get the complaint there. Yeah. That's kind of terrorist. Very weird change is the power cord permanently attached no detaches. Barrel Plug. So there's no. USB. See here or universal connection. It's a barrel and I believe that dot is fifteen walk log, the a thirty plug, and they've got a wall war just like before but it is a new world war. So it's got a slightly different design and it happens to be all white from the cord all the way to the wall plug. You would think that it would be easier to hide it if it was black especially if you have a black but they didn't. So I, really hate that. I really hate that I like. Just, that alone I'm rethinking my purchase. It's such a minor detail but you have this installed in your home. You don't want it to draw attention to sitting in your kitchen and on your black counters, oh? Yeah. If you're black counters. Yeah. You're done I mean. Okay On the design, the other thing that I liked that a change is that move from the cylinder to the sphere means that it's as a directional speaker. Now, whereas the cylinder was really designed to throw sound in three, hundred, sixty degrees, Amazon had this idea that people would put smart speakers in the middle of their rooms nobody in. Does that because nobody wants to run a power cord to the middle of their coffee table. Raise like lifestyle photos that have no visible power whatever that looks lovely on your coffee table has an outlet under their coffee table. So they've learned over six years now, since the first echo that people aren't putting them on shelves Mantles, things like that it makes more sense to have directional speaker. So that's this new design is Directional I. think that improves the sound quality improves experience. It makes more sense for where people are using these. So as much as I don't like where the design changed in terms of flexibility on the DOT I. Do like that it is a directional speaker now that makes sense. All right. Next up. Let's talk about see by GE's by came out with a bunch of product announcements at the beginning of the year, and somehow I missed that all of those now had hit retail they'd come out with some to wire versions of their wall switches and stuff like that which for some reason, they inexplicably insist on calling three wire. Because that's not going to confuse people when the entire industry refers to a switch that also requires the ground wire as to wire switch. It's an industry standard but Gino's best for some reason. Anyway, those are all out. Those seem to be doing well, people like them and I liked what I saw because it's an easy install didn't matter which was load which was line. They had an adapter that allowed you to handle dimming if it turned out that your circuit and your bowl didn't work well together without some sort of resistor in line. So I think it was a pretty good solution they now have new. Products out that are direct connect and what's different about these addition to their existing Bluetooth radio. These new bulbs in a New Light stripped also support Wi fi directly. So that means you can have your see by GE bulbs directly communicate with the cloud and therefore you're bent you don't have to pair them to some sort of bridge device in the past you either would connect them with their bridge or you would connect them with their see by GE plug, which had wi fi built in, and it would relay the Bluetooth now these bulbs and delay trip can connect directly to Wi fi i. guess this is good. Confusing to me because they're still designed to work. With Bluetooth, they still have the Bluetooth radio in them. They still meshed with the Bluetooth. The Bluetooth still actually allows you to direct connect with a Google home device, which is awesome. I've done that before you do that Bluetooth pairing and it's kind of seamless. So I don't know this strikes me as an odd change and by the way still not on compatible. I will say, no hubs is I think in general a good thing people hate hubs you gotTa Find Power for a lot of times you got to run a hard line Internet to it. Hubs are knowing that said like you just mentioned there diminishing their feature list, their functionalities less if you've got Amazon assistant or Google assistant in your home that you're all set. But if you wanted to use it with home kit, these products aren't GonNa work for you. So I get why they would get rid of the hub, but I also feel like as a diy enthusiasts. You and most of the audience probably is the hub adds a lot of functionality for us that we would take advantage of to the best of my knowledge. These products are supplemental to their current product lines. So they haven't as as I'm aware talked about eliminating. Existing products, and that means that the C- Bridge or see or whatever it's still functions. It still allows you to connect to some not all their bluetooth devices and expose them through home kit and the plugs that have a bridge to why for the Bluetooth only bulbs they're still going to work and be able to connect this getting confused as it is in some ways. I'm counting like four different communications things going on right now what I'm curious about is okay. Well, what if you have one of those Bluetooth Bulbs That's Bluetooth only and you have one of these new Bluetooth and Wifi bulbs like the plug can the new bulb act as a bridge get to the cloud I couldn't get an answer for that and I'm hoping to get more information on that. Soon, that would be very interesting. Right then I see some value because otherwise now we have some things connected directly to cloud some things connected cloud through bridge something's connected to the cloud through the plug it seems like it's getting. Confusing and the whole point of this product line is to make this stuff easy for consumers. Yeah. This is like the product that you find most often in your big box store. So it should be as simple straightforward as absolutely. So more likely as Richard mentioned earlier. Mariss. They've got a smart led lightbulb that's got honky compatibility. It's now available. There's two very interesting things about this to me. Maybe you'll agree one is home to compatible with hub. So it's directly home kit compatible, which means that it's obviously got WIFI in there, and then the other thing that has is a support thread. So threat is back baby like. You know the threat is supported in the home pod, which is out of the blue like why is that? Okay it does it does thread thread spin out for years threads Ben and never era product. It doesn't do anything in any era product, but it's back. Now we're GONNA be talking about this with the next product line to we can speculate why. It's chip it is. What's Nice is that chip is actually finally having some impact on products that we can go out and buy news whereas opposed to being a bunch of in theory and press releases and things like that. But yes, to your point threat is super interesting, right? Exactly. So for those of us who have been talking about this new standard, the connected home over Ip. Project where all of these major vendors are going to come up with a way of making their stuff compatible. The good news here is that even though they're saying that products won't be out necessarily until sometime next year the reality is that many of the vendors are can hedging their bets and working to build products that might potentially be upgradeable to work which it yeah, and so this. Is Interesting. A hub is home get lightbulb is not something that I've personally had experience with. So I'll get my hands on these and try them out all the ones that I've tested have required a dedicated hub, take expose them as like you said in Hong, it says kind of interesting to pass for twenty six or twenty eight dollars pretty competitive pricing especially at this I. Think they are multicolor as well. So to bulbs that price is pretty good absolutely and kind of the same lines there's news from Nanna Leaf Nanna leaf is coming out with some more traditional lighting products. Now, they have announced a new light strip it's going to be in years standard they're saying forty eighty, but come on can we just admit these are one meter and two meter lengths? Of led strip, the pricing is much more competitive. These are fifty dollars strips and they are very much like the hugh strips focused not just on delivering color, but also they're focusing heavily on being able to provide good cool white and warm white temperatures so that you get that white tuning capability that the hugh strips are good at reproducing accurately consistently and brightly if brightly is a word what I'm most interested and curious about here is there new lightbulb? The New Light. Bulb is going to run for just twenty dollars and it is multicolor bulb that has how many edges here one hundred and twenty edges you want to try and pronounce. Richard. Tried to see if I can pronounce this before we started this. It's a Rumba coast sided deca Hebron. Yeah. That's all right. I'll give it I mean I don't know if I have that right or not. But hundred twenty edges basically. Are Squares. Pentagonal some are triangular. It basically looks like a mini version of the epcot sphere as a light bulb. That's a good analogy. Now, if you remember Nanna leaf from its early early days, Natto leaf started with a light bulb that was a bunch of exposed led's on boards that were all tied together in these weird shapes and everything, and it was a cool concept. But completely impractical is a light bulb because you were looking at fully exposed. It was glorious as hell they've clearly refined that and this will be available for just twenty bucks soon. I kinda, WanNa go on and it supports thread and these products support thread exactly threads back maybe. I'm excited to try this. Obviously I'm very excited to try to many mentioned a few minutes ago, which has thread support euros had threatened a long time didn't get really any uptick we've got chip. Now if apple's onboard, apple's a very good driver of standards, the industry, right? Maybe we'll see much more things. Natalie has already a significant partner here to be using thread already. So maybe we'll see some thread hugh maybe we'll see some thread other stuff it's yet another standard, but maybe it will be the standard. So this one actually slipped my radar before researching for the show apparently sonos speakers can now directly communicate with GE smart appliances. So does has already been doing this with Phil to light bulbs, which is kind of obvious integration the now you can get. On Your Sonos speakers from your GE oven or machinery or dishwasher connected device you have it will send a notification to your speaker so it can say the laundry washing machines done or Pretty, heated, which is NEAT. It seems like a purpose to have connected oven in my experience. There hasn't been a lot of reason to upgrade in oven to connected of an aside from maybe there's safety factors that can come into play but this gives you a little bit of a convenience if you happen to have Sonos speakers and you happen to have these GE appliances small thing but it is one of the first non music integration says, this NGO Article Puts It. So that Sonos very very slowly trying to be a platform which I don't know how I feel about. Platform. Already ranked sodas needs to be a platform, but it's doing it. So yeah, I. tweeted my thoughts about this and my thoughts were pretty much the way that I would have written this headline which was of speakers can now communicate with General Electric Appliances for some reason. I really just don't get it. Yeah. If I'm buying sonos speakers that can also be an assistant because pretty much any of the new ones now can, YEP, why would I direct connect this and not just through the assistant? I don't get it. Yeah. That's an excellent question if I step back and think from Sonos perspective in the. Patrick Spencer CEO Speak Numerous Times about how it does not want to be beholden to Google or Amazon certainly, not apple and it has talked about developing its own assistant in its own voice controls I wonder if getting these pieces early pieces into place is what it's doing before. It launches that own assistant own platform of its own where you can do hey sonos. Turn. So, maybe these are the first little bits were seeing that. Again, this all comes back to me as a consumer as a user like why do I need this in my life? You know like I've got enough of You guys already worked with Amazon and Google I don't need this but if we can read into it a little further that might be where this is pointing. But who else I'm concerned that consumers have trust issues with Sonos these days, and I am not convinced that they'd be all on board with necessarily buying products that are compatible with Sonos when Sonos. Has perhaps an unfair reputation of sunsetting products Arguably, Sonos has actually been probably better than most companies at keeping old products alive they've had some PR nightmares and some poor product decisions that they've backpedaled from but I don't know that consumers want this and frankly as an owner of a connected General Electric countertop appliance, I don't want General Electric wasting its freshness. Integration budget on one off connections. Yeah. They should improve the platform and the capabilities of what they've already put out there I agree I think this kind of speaks to do what you know Sonos wireless speakers really well, and they do music really well, are they a smart assistant integrated platform expert. Ge's certainly isn't a smart expert and they have to like you said have a limited budget and they only have so many to work with and you know they should put the wood behind the Arrow that matters. But like us many resources on this Jeez many racers on this, who's is for is a good question. Let's see I think we have one more update here, and that is from abode also at CAS. This year way back four, thirty, eight months ago we saw. A New Camera for outdoors from abode they were showing off a new two way camera available for one hundred, ninety, nine dollars hooked into their existing security system, and one of the things that really kind of interesting about this is you can technically use this camera as a doorbell through its integrated facial recognition capability. It can determine if there's a face there in view at your door, and if it sees one, it can ring chime. So it's a virtual doorbell without actual button. kind of cool. It's a clever idea. It's a clever spinning of their existing technology and product, and maybe a new application for I. I to potential problems with this one people don't like facial recognition as a rule, a lot of people are out by. So there's that concern and I'm sure a boat has a response for that about how ever their processing I don't know the exact details but in general facial recognition on cameras is kind of tichy subject for a lot of people. The second potential issue with the exact same problem that the delivery box has and it is an actual education thing nobody walking up to this is going to know. A It is a doorbell or be isn't a doorbell if you were doorbells belong and they're just GonNa poke it with their finger trying to ring it and it won't ring or anything of that sort or they're not gonNA knowledge and be looking for a doorbell to do something with. So in theory, this is a kind of an interesting concept interesting application of technology in practice I could see some roadblocks. Yeah. I. Can see that I was to say this kind of gets us to that Star Trek future where you don't have to ring the doorbell, but they still have doorbells on the ships don't they? Okay well, never mind that I did. This I think it's, and in fact, it can even be tied into your low voltage wiring that's in place for your doorbell. So you could replace your doorbell with it. That's very clever. You don't have to use it as adorable. You don't have to put their you could mount it elsewhere. You could attach fowler to it and mounted elsewhere, but I just think this is clever. It's an interesting use of technology. I like seeing companies you know really pushing the. Limits and trying to see how to eliminate friction points. This man some confusion in the process but I'll be curious to see how this is seen in the market saint. All right. Before we get out of here, I have a quick message from someone that I wanted to read. He is a listener. His name is Charlie and he says I was listening this morning to home on when you talked about Button Cell Batteries, I, use a ton of them I buy. All my batteries from Amazon I agree that one's better off with the brand name but even doing that I still see between ten percent and twenty five percent that are not one hundred percent when new beating how they're charged. I read that there are only a handful of large lithium cell factories in China. So probably even brand name batteries are just a licensing deal. Oh well, I never install new button batteries without checking them I on A. Z.. T. S.. M. Bt one pulse load battery Tester. It's expensive ninety five dollars, but it's extremely accurate and reliable and will load test every possible battery. You would ever run into I, never install a button cell the tests less than one hundred percent. I routinely find new batteries that test it less than fifty percent of life and the embassy one is a valuable battery tool. Love Link in the show notes to that tool. You know I also use a battery tester on stuff. I will shamefully admit that I don't actually test new batteries before using them I test batteries that I threw in a drawer to find out. Did they have any juice left in them or not and I test my rechargeable batteries to see if they've drained while they were in the recharger but I've never actually tested a new battery that's such a good idea. Yeah. I agree I've never done it either got a battery. Tester. I don't have a fancy as this one but just like you if I find a battery in a drawer, I use the test, it's still good or rechargeable batteries of elder charge. I've never thought about testing a new battery packages I just assume that like I'm getting a new battery here I don't even test it, but it's going to be and it's a fair point because as I'm sure many of your listeners have experienced button. Lithium batteries could last three months or less three years depending on whether it has a full charge and it's really hard to tell whether it's your device that's over actively using it or if you just got a bum battery when you bought it new, so this is a good tip. Absolutely. So thank you. Charlie, thanks for writing in about that. Sorry took so long to get that out to everybody if you listener you feedback you've. Topic ideas for us you have questions for us. You can reach us at home on at the digital media, zone, dot com, or use the contact form on our website. Dan. This is a lot of fun. Thanks for joining. It was thank you I'm glad I could be here if people want to find out more about what you're doing over at the verge. Well, first of all, like what do you do over at the verge? I oversee our general product reviews program, which is all of our product reviews all of our buying guides, Oliver Service journalism related to product reviews. So all the beats fall under my purview we obviously have reviewers that covered phones and laptops in gaming stuff and things like that. But in addition to that I, kind of do a lot of our smart home product reviewing and coverage. So I- opportunity to test a lot of those things everything that you want to. See is at the verge dot com slash reviews. That's where all of our stuff is of course, the verge dot com has much broader stuff as well. You're interested in science or entertainment or other technology news I'm always on twitter DC for at twitter dot com, and then I'm Dan at the verge dot com if you want to send me an email so that's how you can retrieve and SEAFORD isn't obvious to everybody. So That's D. C. S. E. Jeff. Bigger Danza fun follow and his account is not encumbered by all of the political opinions I throw into by feed. So definitely go and check that out on twitter mostly my bad technology opinions. So that's You make me laugh every day. I'm glad to see your stuff in my feet anyway. Thanks again. I really appreciate it. This show is brought to you by the Digital Media Zone at the digital media zone DOT com. You can reach us on twitter and Instagram at digital media. Zone D I G I media zone. I'm also on twitter at Richard. Guenther. For everything all my voices on my thoughts all mashed together into one place just follow. Richard Gutter you'll get other voices there. You don't have to follow them just follow Richard. Got There I echo everyone. We have another show entertainment to point out where we talk about digital media technology entertainment. Specifically, I host that with Josh Pollard and we do that every Tuesday. Night, we even do a live thing you can follow along, and of course, home on is part of Technology Dot FM which is a collection of great shows including the home tech podcast, the Food Tech Show, and my other show the smart home show which I co host with Adam Justice you can find all of these in all the places including Pandora. Now, how about that? If you like our show, let someone know give us a rating and that is going to wrap episode one, forty-one Cutter I was joined this time by Dan Siefert. Thanks for listening. Please join me again in a few weeks for episode one, Forty two where if all the stars align properly, we will finally be talking with someone from Moen. Home All.

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Hour 2

Marty and McGee

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Hour 2

"Yes, sir. Who knew all ready on the SEC network. We're presented as always by progressive own. You all guests appear via the shell Pennzoil performance lot, including Tom. Whoa. Pat, Luke Duke joining us at the bottom of the hour on his flip phone. Give us a call eight eight seventy nine three seven seven six eight eight say ESPN, it's time for straight talk. Brought to you by straight talk wireless. I wish I could. Best networks, no contracts. I wonder if maybe maybe that's straight talk Livingstone that Tom. Oh patas. This wish you guys could see if we could have a squirrel the town that we get. There are friends. We. We. Oh, Jimmy Johnson. Jimmy Johnson's are boy, man. I love that dude. Like a brother it was. I get a text from him a little while ago. I can't I can't repeat it verbatim. But basically, the basic message of it is wait a minute. You to idiot television program. Would you see, you know, champ? That's we got a full Johnson. It's how we feel to. Hey, let me ask you question. So part of the one of the biggest news stories in sports over the last twenty four hours, Manny Machado who has been a bunch, and we're new stores, Manny Machado, Butch my brother. Sam ghee last year. He called us around this time. He was down at Orioles fantasy camp. He's crushed. Manny Machado is headed out to the west coast. Honnor large guaranteed, man. Hey, so this this is a question that paper, the horsemen mal college roommates. We used to ask question all time. Would you? What would you do four million dollars? Or what would you do like like the grossest thing would come up with? Would you do that for many dollars dirty would always answer? Yes. No matter what it is yet. But then it was what would you do if you had the million dollars mardi? What would you do if somebody painted you a guaranteed contract for three hundred million dollars? What I ever see you again. No, you wouldn't but I would become an in all seriousness in all seriousness. I would give a whole lot of it away. And I'm not making that I would. But I pay off my house. You know, that kind of thing make sure my kids colleges were handled. But like, I don't know man MO money moat problems. I might just walk into the woods. But I mean, you might never see you might I might just walk into the woods. Like, you just would be one of those Rogers would disappear like shoeless Joe Jackson into the tree line. You never see me. Again. The number of the first thing I would do is. There would be no more social media who I'd be alone dome. Waylon som- familiar. He's out. Yeah. I'm gone, which may end up having any way. I don't know. But yeah. I would I would move to the islands or somewhere. And the only time you would ever hear for me was when I pulled a, Tom. Whoa. Pat and called into the McGee program because it wouldn't be the mardi deprogramming anymore with your burner phone. I might give you some money. Yeah. That'd be that'd be very what Maima bowl we've been France for twenty five years. Here's four million. Okay. And we'd be much better friends chain. I give me a flip phone. Would you? Go get you an e got if you had thirty three hundred nine he got I might get him by you. And he goes, I do is. I'd go on the internet, and I would go. So when I was in little league football. I remember I forever for my whole youth. I kept these trophies that they give you of course. And I think I still have on the gab and he's got his hand up like this. It's like this Radio Marti is now posing like a like a trophy from down there at the corner trophy show. I would create their own EMMY, I would just make my own EMMY, and I would have a mardi mardi mardi. Yeah. Okay. We could do our own award show. There needs to be a motive McGee awards, then I could win some. Yeah. The m so we get sued, but we have someone else. The more day would sue us. They like us to the mic Marty's. The sounds like some. Like the newest copy option of McDonald's. Marti's I like this. But yeah. Three hundred million dollars. I thought about that a lot like, and you're right Momeni more problems. But yeah. Three hundred million dollars. I feel like I feel like I could make some stuff happened. I I might do that deal like Lance Bass from from instinct, remember, he he he he bought a ticket to go into space like he like what to the Russians and wrote them a check and they put him on a rocket and send them into space. Right. Well, not believe this. Okay. Okay. Way home from vacation two nights ago. Right. We sell SpaceX. I saw the rocket in the sky. Did you really taking the rations to the whoever's up airspace station? We saw in the air out the front of the plane, people don't even know that things up to there's a space station up. There this big as a football field and people have no idea I feel like for three hundred million dollars. I could get myself up there. We saw the rocket Dylan's bass make it into space is Lance Bass from backstreet industry instinct is instruments ever resume. That's like a Belva revolving when when slash boys ditched, axle and went and bought another guns and roses. I in street is like the fake man, you see legends theater down at Myrtle Beach. What was their dance though is their dance like. Hey, Travis Travis did Lance Bass make it into space where research in that. It looks like he tried but didn't make it, and you can't just go to I see a headline Lance able to though Lance Bass bass officially kicked off spaceflight. So I'm doing some research here. But how try he was going to write the Russians like you at the time to make some money. The Russians had a deal where you could pay some money, and you could go up on a rocket and go to space. I do that it out. They do that they failed to raise the two hundred million. So if you get the three hundred million you can much out of it Manny Manny lot of Lance call Miami. Go go to a Padres game spin the couple of hundred sitting there not row, and while manny's index circle propose, Manny, let's go to space going the space figured it out to Lance Bass took over the mardi McGee Twitter account. Oh, look Justin has what happened just in Hannah who just is a machine on the Twitter machine during this Gimmie three hundred man, I put a Chick-fil-A my backyard. L you'd make at three hundred dollars back already minutes man, you'd have you'd have you'd have lined up around the block. Yeah. That's. Three hundred million dollars. I don't know. Yeah. We used to play that game. What would you do for me? And how many years was the contract ten? How does that riot? All right. That's correct. Ten years. Thirteen million. This man, he's young. How young Travis held as many much out as man which out of twenty six years old twenty six if he's still hitting three twenty and forty bombs at thirty six years old. Yeah. Really it. Randy Randy Travis is used to this. I don't know if you are yet. But are you ready? Bowl Marshall, North Carolina exhume. Loan just Monroe turnpike from here. We could go out there. They took the signs down. You say home arraigned try we talked about his finest on the mayor. But reindeer you used to us treating you and Travis like, Alexa, and just yelling out questions. See we. I mean, that's that's what we're here for that. Then what am I doing use Alexa as a learning to for my children? Yeah. And here's how I say. Alexa, play cuts like a knife. Bryan Adams, y'all listen. Does it understand you though, sometimes 'cause mine doesn't understand me? Does not understand should hear me talking to so Marlene are both are addicted to the voice to texting because our producer Melinda. Adams with wins. Tonight. We travel on she was laughing at me because I was walking around writing script like hold my phone and going Zahn Williamson. Because it's easier to do that than titan. And you do the same thing. It's a now what happens to me is like the other day. I had a conference call and own the conference call because you do you have to you have to say the. Innocence with period or closed quotes, or whatever. It's a willing to converse called the other day. And it's a round where you think about that. I go. Well, I doubt ended up period. Are you trying to make a point? And I'm like, no, I think I'd just divorced with a little tired. I was a. I had a bus choose. I had to cover to Johnson Johnson. Text update. Jimmy Johnson seven time Cup series champion. We're family program. Saw can't this cannot be verbatim. Quote. Right. But he said, well, this was taped delayed or something you idiots or I'm glad you're talking. We're actually talking about you, brother. We do we do. Indeed. And we love everybody. And we appreciate you joining us. And this is all just a big countdown because the bottom of the hour. Lou Duke will be joining us and Luke Kuhn. Hey, by the way, this is straight talk. Brought to you by straight talk wireless nationwide. Coverage on America's largest most dependable four G L T networks, and we will verify whether or not straight talk wireless provided Tom. Whoa. Pat with his flip bone morning McGee on ESPN radio and the SEC network. Radio computer your phone? Choose tell your smart speaker took play ESPN radio ESPN radio ESPN. Everywhere. I can't believe it that Gerald is presenting the quarterly budget report with finger puppets. Here comes a one point seven percent decrease in fixed overhead I know everybody. No, I can't believe how easy it was to save hundreds of dollars on my car insurance. Gyco. Are you projected increase in organic three revenue? Believe it. Geico could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance, Natalie. Yeah. Smarter me radio news network. We're presented by progressive insurance. All guests appear via the shell Pennzoil performance line, Tom. Whoa. Pat going to join us at the bottom of the hour. Call us eight say ESPN, eight eight eight seven to nine three seven seven six mardi get triple action protection for optimal engine performance shell v power nitro plus premium gasoline were and that was the voice of my mother-in-law nanna Lynn who lost on Friday. And I appreciate the number of tweets have received this morning from people who've been longtime listeners of the show and nobody ever sounded like nanna land because she had that thick savannah accent. And the best part of when we want she listened to radio show. But when we started doing TV in the fall, she became obsessed with our hair and our look. Doc, and what exactly was that? We said when we said it, and I would come back to my house to the answer machine. And this is the ala have voicemails and messages left from from from now Lynn, and here's an example of that. When she she had a question she wanted to make sure that I knew what to do with my makeup wants to show our way. I was call you last night to tell you to be sure to wash your face. You get all that make up over you face. But I love this year last night. It was a great show. And I know everybody else loved it too. But I will probably try to anyway, just to make all when you get it bans. That's our United. I love that Kojak gets really was is really sweet NICKY. But okay United. The will must must've. That's greatest message. I've ever heard my life. Well, after every show, this mess is our gift from a mother in law and include is we're about we take that was after our first show. We I went on television last fall. And then she grew up Savannah, Georgia as a teenager would ride with the family who keeps the others would ride from savannah of to Athens road in the back seat with other in her lap for at least one game. So she grew up Georgia fan, she became a Tennessee fan because they lived in Knoxville, and then became a Kentucky football fan for no reason other than she watched this show when we will television fall, and we had coach stoops on. And she thought he was the greatest guy ever. So as a Georgia fan after the LSU game. This is the voice mail that I had. Horrible football game. I watched today door to Florida LSU, and they looked horrible. But anyway, I just saw pigging at and then also I think it seemed one today and then fraud today too. So that's a good sign, and I'm gonna what he did. But anyway, I just called you that on the air. On the arrogance because I know you didn't know about it. Okay, baby. I love you. Thirty latest. But these are the everyday voicemails that I will have particular after we did the show and she wanted to make sure that you and I need to take a makeup off. And she was particularly szeswith your hair get that make up off make sure you wash it face. So when we have always done a show in mardi will say mardi McGee. Like, how do you say it Madi that was for Nantel in nanna Lynn shout out the alleged legendary we appreciate the kind words as always. And as you know, as I told you to health wasn't great over the last couple of months, but she's free of that pain now, and and she will live forever on this show. And I appreciate you Bryson Anna and the greatest southern accent that anybody's ever had and hers was for real as opposed to ours, which people continue to tell me is fake Madi. Mahdi? What about girl the, but? Yeah. Can you imagine? Like, she told me, and it was funny. She tell you stories I got an owner for ever decade and a half and one day. She was like, you know, I wrote I did a story a couple years ago for UCLA magazine with all the Matt live mascots Ramesses, North Carolina ralphie the buffalo say, yeah. Ramos sees thought it was. Ramsey's ramseys. I don't know. If you add it to me, I always call for your EMMY. That's right. From you got that. I'll that I'll buy one get mad which autos got sounds like something that's going to be making my breakfast in about ten years. He got burrito. Yeah. I drove down to Disney's e park last time beers around the world to the arts festival to got. Mandalay when mission, but the yeah. But she can you imagine. No like had such a great life that. Oh, by the way, my son-in-law the covers ESI football. I used to ride with in the back seat of RAZ, right? Yeah. That's pretty great. So have there you go. The. Utter. Somebody asked today. This was talking to college class about live mascots. And I said, yeah, I said other one time use the restroom right by my foot. And and I smoke you one time I saw try to attack the Alabama Chilean squad. I've take this thought though, that would be lost his mind. When after that was scary, man. It was scary beaver got ticked. Was scared beavers like get your little bulldog self out of my face. It was Holly Holly. Rowe was standing there unless somebody from our group withstanding. I know there was a whole lot ogre moments was ever like thirty forty people standing right there including somebody and it wasn't Holly. She's really famous somebody really famous standing there and had a oh my goodness. React like trying to take pictures. I who was who was in vivo battle. I feel like Matthew mcconaughey has more than like six feet away from vivo. Well, about burnt orange Sudi had on you see that. When he's telling the boys get up off the bench and be happy. Yeah. How about Matthew kind of hand his Lincoln ads now where he's like playing pool and talking them. So if you ever see the. GM Carey off the best spoof of that Lincoln commercial. Assume we just watched it. The other on vacation was crying. No. Hey, by the way, I another right hand random turn happy birthday, RIC flair. Yes. You see that party nature? Boys him. So yes, I did see the party or boy arosh McCarthy work as it was there. And it was and he said that the guest list, he tried to list on social media all the people that were there, and he just gave up he lists all these names at the very end. He goes, and basically everybody else it it looked like an amazing party. And we love we love you h happy birthday, brother. He is. You taught me you talk about legends. I mean, we're, you know. We flash four all the time. I forget we're on TV and radio. Just like you got you got a I'm putting up four fingers for those going to get the doughnuts. So standing in victory lane. They told him for an hour. Half waiting on the race to end last Sunday, and they have bleachers now. There's one section of bleachers for fans. You I guess you make your life by certain ticket. You know, there's two there's the risers were the photographers are and there's a riser now where these fans are sitting. And I'm standing there watching this little tiny TV with all the NASCAR people and Masha girls whatever we're waiting on race. Then also these guys hill apart at these guys yell McKay, and I'll turn around and look and they're all up there drinking beer in victory lane. I'm like, how did you get this gig? And they go, hey, and they held or phones up and I threw up to four fingers because that's what I do. And that goes back to before some I called roommates super Dave dirty, low octane Dave in a soup Collins, and we were throat the forefingers and those guys tweeted the picture back at me, and they were like I can't believe four fingers yesterday. Laney got on the Twitter machine when we landed on the plane, and there was a pitcher me talking to her on the plane. Some guy was like sorry, man. I did a drive by I didn't you know? I'm I didn't wanna bother you walked by you going back to his seat and took a picture. Yeah. That's why you can't. We're was one time. We almost got in a fight of the Detroit Tigers game. I remember I grab morning I'll go. Hey. We can't do this. They said why we're going on the inter- the Twitter machine. L Chesney was rock and Ford field at night. We we stole saw probably had him on lions helmet stole some of his Pat favorite team. Number is going to slap across the hood of this flip phone. Join us. Oh Marty McGee. Mardian mcgee. Not your typical radio thing about the original wiffle bat put tape on. I don't know if that's legal at what? Just it was legal. No, worry more Mardian McGee next. That was about a one point six transition TV radio. No, hold on just a minute. Being nice. Hold on y'all. It's more to McGee to use and radio, India C network. Give us a call you better. Hurry out. We're run out of time. Seven to three thousand seven six. It's eighty eight say ESPN is someone who has called us right now. Hey, man, I'm gay. Don't even now understand Tom. Whoa. Pat. Welcome in the morning McGee, or friend. Brothers. What's where where? Where are you this morning? And how you feeling where am I let's see I'm in northern jersey. I'm feeling good. Excellent. We we appreciate you making Tom for us. And. You betcha. Yeah. Well, or just we appreciate your enthusiasm to when we when we asked if you could come on the show. So you don't you don't understand, Tom. We are both in our early forties. And so the soundtrack of our youthful Friday nights was the dukes of hazzard. And then as soon as the Dallas theme started, mom and daddy said get you button bed. So you you and John or like some of our greatest heroes. So I can't imagine what what do people say to you. Now when you're out that are our age about what the impact that show had on their lives. Well, it it there is some. But I mean, you know, there's a big deal. It was a huge deal at the time. And you know, backing those days there was only three channels to choose from. And you know, people chose us. We had a really good time. And you know, it's kind of withstood the test of time and become one of those iconic shows. I mean for me, I guess if I had to compare it to something for me. It would be probably the Andy Griffith show where I can sit down and watch four or five in a row. Well, do you have do you have any idea? I mean, when this was going on at the time that I mean here we sit I mean, I mean forty years after the show debuted would. No anything like, there's no way, you can know anything like that. I mean, well, we were doing it. We had a great time. You know, it was an immediate hit as soon as it was on the air. It was in the top twenty and spend a lot of time up in the top five over the next six seven years. So we knew it was popular. But there's no way you can know that something like this is gonna be around. I mean, it's going to be around long after I'm gone. What was it? What was it com robbery like between the cast members because you guys were all on that show together for a long time in a minute, though, we gotta get into coin Vance because that was an abomination or whatever. Facetime. We had it. We had a great group. And and you know, we went to some things, and and the Kalyan Vance thing is one thing. But I mean, I see iron shero time these days, you know, what the duke's events, we have, you know, probably half dozen dozen events year that we will get together. And so, you know, he's part of the family as well. Everybody else, we we we had have had cooter on promoting Cougars place. And of course, the reunions that you have one of those reunions like I mean, what do we I I saw. They're all little different. I mean, the ones that we do through couture's ones with with that we work with those are really like little family reunions, and the the fans have come to really enjoy and embrace them. I mean, he did a thing. I guess two summers ago. Now, the Cougars last stand. I mean, there was twenty five thousand people they're crazy. But you know, also got the thing come in this year. We're going to do a let's call the good old boys tour, it's gonna feature bunch of us and some ours and music, and we're we've got three of them booked in California. So far, I think they're supposed to be like another dozen this year sometime. What do you think is the most iconic episode, Tom which one stands out the most? Well, I mean for me, I would have to say goes to general Lee is probably one of the best ones. I think a lot of people really really enjoy that way. I mean, I also did I directed a few of them. I think the boys nece bears is a pretty good one. There. You know, there's a bunch of them. There's a bunch of them. And there's there's like one live, though gets knocked out. And then he when they come back to consciousness. Is is talked into the idea that he's boss Hogg. There's another one where I get a hold of some bad water or something, and I turned into evil, Luke. Baloney, but it was so much fun to do. So when you're at these events, I've talked we we both know race car drivers, and professional athletes, and and the strangest stuff that had autograph. What's what do people people? Have you? Autographed our bodies and. You know, not so much anymore. These days back in the days could be kind of embarrassing where they'd ask you this. You know, we the twenty thing is we signed a lot of car parts what he'll bring their if they've got a replica the general they'll bring a door to sign or or trunk lid or something like that. So we do a lot of that. How much improvisation was there during sorry? I got one finger in my you're trying to make sure I can hear everything how much improvisation was there, Tom when you guys were shooting. How scripted was everything how much did you in John and everyone freelance or wherever they had they had some scripted stuff. I mean there there was definitely a script. But we would try to make it palatable. I mean, I was never that impressed with our writers. I know that especially stuff like with boss and Rosco. Those guys they created a lot of their own stuff. And they were they were brilliant that it it was like watching laurel and hardy do stuff, you know. It was amazing the stuff they came. Up with and me, John, you know, basically, we just had a good time. We would say kind of what they wanted us to say. But we might say it in our own way. And of course, there's no Cussing, no blood, no sex. We had a lot of fun anyway. Well, James bast? I mean, he lived here North Carolina not far from where we are sold him doing some phenomenal reasonable theater around here. I know I know you obviously have had a great stage career we talked to berry Williams from from the fan of CB from Brady bunch about this. And he said the best part of his life. Now is the generational part of this which is people bringing their kids and grandkids. And now they love it just as much as their parents and grandparents did is that's something that you see these. Oh, yeah. We we definitely see that. It's crazy. It's crazy when an eight year old come up and call you call you do boy. When you when you were when you were aspiring, you know, when you're in a Spiring actor and this show has not materialized yet. What did your dream look like your look, no matter what you went on to do after the dukes of hazzard. You're always Luke do your Duke forever. And so what what what was the dream for you? And what was it like when you realize? Okay. This is an iconic character. That's gonna follow me. Well, you know, again, like we said before you can't really know that. My dream before. I was on Broadway before I did dukes. I I did a Broadway show called I love my wife. I played lead one of the leading guys. And surely after dukes, I was back on Broadway and ninety one replacing the same guy in another Cy Coleman show. And there is a pretty good segment of the population on the east coast. That's familiar seeing me and in Broadway shows, and I've had a great deal of luck. There one thing that was interesting back when we were doing the show. Actually, you know, we talk about Jim best in the range. He had the Elsa taught a class and one of his students was named Quinton guarantee. No. Wow. Well, so tarintino show up for gyms class, and then he would sleep in the classroom. Jim let him sleep in the room. And then he come to Warner Brothers the next day. And he was on our set when he was a teenager. And then lo and behold, you know, five six years ago. Hired me, and I had a part in in Django unchained. So came full circle a little bit. I just watched Django like two nights ago. Yeah. No. I don't they. But that's a that's the guy in the in the beginning who calls him out when they're in this loon. Tom. Awesome deal Tatum. Tom. Whoa. Whoa pet. Joining us more McGee, Tom we'll get you out of your own this. What are you working on? Now for folks that don't e- gots earlier, but you're a Tony nominee multiple times. I've been lucky I've had a pretty good amount of success. And whatever I've done I one of the things that are very very much enjoys I've always been a singer, and I've turned into I think of decent songwriter. I got a new record coming out this year. It's called world, Pat. If I wanted it to sail, I guess I should've called it tonight her, but it's. And that should be that should be a couple of months. And then we've got like I said we're doing there's a promoter in in California who's putting together tour of dates that's going to feature bunch of us from dukes and car show besides and then some music with featuring Waylon Jennings grandson who sounds so much like him can close your eyes. You can tell the difference. China's how close to break. You can. That's none of question. Okay. I got I got one more. I got. There so many scenes in the dukes of hazzard where you and John are in generally own freight around has county being chased by Roscoe and flash how often were y'all actually moving and how often was there just like a screen behind you Wissam trees blowing by you do most of the time as you would you'd take off. And then you then we'd be in the car with the screen behind us. And then you see us drive into somewhere the drive ins and drive outs. Where almost always shot. They always were that was not a scream, but then what would do sometimes they mount mounted camera to the side of the car and give me the clapboard. You know, the thing that says, you know, we'll take whatever cut, and we would go out, and John, and I would do the scene. We'd come back. We'd do the same two or three times driving around and come back and say, yeah, I think we got we got a pretty good. I think so do you have a general leaf do? I. No, I I've been driving Broncos for thirty five years since nineteen eighty two. Wow. Why then this year I put my Bronco in rehab. He's got a. A friend of mine who works with Benham, and he's completely rebuilding my car. He teaches a class in automotive repair. So he's completely doing my ninety six Bronco and I bought a about a Range Rover. My goodness for what. Vehicle. Listen, we're gonna we're gonna keep you phone number. And as you hit on this tour. We want to hear about it. And join you out there one day, that'd be great love to see you. You're the man yourselves. If you if you can if you can't just watch out for the cops. Yeah. We'll talk with concert football. You got it, buddy. Anytime anytime, how about the bucks. That's right. Thank you Bye-bye. Let's loops fluke. You all staying if you've been well that's just the beginning. If you've been with lessons four zero six since the start of the podcast, they called us, the Duke boys, and all we ever wanted to do is have a Duke boil on the show. And now we've got one of two Bo we're coming for you. It's Marty McGee use peed radio and the SEC network mardi McGee. Not your typical radio show. Really really nice tractors. I'm tractor twelve. That's that's the sign of a redneck of no worry more Marty and McGee next which we're going roller own down there. Okay. See, of course in ochre driver says he's feeling lucky after seemingly normal rod. Request led him to a scene swarming with police Tuesday afternoon. Multiple officers reported amid I Bank on north may avenue. Also called the scene was Uber driver. Brandon case unbeknownst to him another overdrive dropped off. His would be passengers then called police three teenagers told the calling party. They had a gun. They walked into the Bank said they were about to get pumped a dispatcher could be heard saying after the first driver alerted them. Turn the corner and come up on mid I Bank and all I see your Cup. Caller, said case, I'm like, this is not normal Oklahoma City police heaven entities or the people involved nor have they. Outlined. What happened when individuals walked into the case thinking he was waiting for his would be passengers watched it all unfold from across the street. He says he saw three people handcuffed and put into cop cars that he said is when an office officer walked across the street to talk to him. I said there's somebody rob a Bank. He said, well, attempted case said they called me for a getaway car. You're going to do something like that have your own. He says it gives him quite the story to tell. But more importantly, he's thankful. Officers got there's I quote had the cops not gotten there before me. It could've turned out completely different. He said, I don't know whether to laugh or to cry I feel like we could control see that one quote there. This is not normal and just paste that into every hillbilly headline, we do that's the most millennial thing. And it's the most money over we just robbed a Bank. We can't even get our own getaway car. But you know, what he'll be here in three minutes. It says he's nearby. Let's take it on down Opelousas, Louisiana. I'm pretty sure I'm saying that wrong Opelousas. Coach owes listen, Colin correctness. A Louisiana woman is accused of shooting her pet llama who says who she says attacked her sixty seven year old maddalone booze doi- told Saint Landry. Pera shares dip it is that her Lama attacked her last week while she's working on her pasture. She hit the Lama and he escaped passer, but she returned with a gun and repeatedly shot him in her pet Llamas. Name was Earl black eyed peas. They. Me. Blitz. Good producer right there. Dixie chicks, y'all. One of Earl after all these years, we find out that early disown was actually alone. But you got. Redo lakes Opie p officers. Hello p p officers allegedly called the break-up Brown Tuesday after two seniors got into a physical struggle over seating. During the gain and other residents at the old age home. No. Oh, no. Officers responded to the fight between the as seventy nine and eighty six no at the unidentified long term care facility. Lakes township at around one fifteen in the afternoon, of course, one fifteen in the morning, I seriously hurt and no charges were laid police said, that's how it read. We got PP officers at the radio lakes. No charges be lay. Well, I can tell. Nanna Lyn all day. And I could tell you Anna Lynne was living in such facility for the last several months, and I can tell you that if you want to wake everybody up, and you wanna get everybody going, bingo, bingo is serious business. And by the way, in Bucko Narda, bunko know, I've heard of bunko, but I don't even really know what it is not cached. Hey, by the way, I got a this is an official hill the headlines don't have time, but I will say that in Zevulun North Carolina and street, which is a near Raleigh near a hometown. Number three for me for a man with charged with the salt after police say he hit another man with a porcelain watermelon. Oh, man that hurt that sounds like something he founded his I'm on lists. Grandma's house. Watermelon off the deal. That's thanksgiving. The centerpiece of the random shelf of horse win stuff little kids and like random fruit baskets made out of porcelain. I'm sorta surprised that cornucopia of bad decisions did not make its way ONA. Somebody already tweeted this morning that said that y'all made a cornucopia bad decisions with get that about my haircut a lot it is. It's definitely a cornucopia bad. Hey, how about you even talking about when I said, I don't know. It was my seventh grade haircut. That's what it would. How about you getting a text from Jimmy Johnson during the show me too? And then also Tom Opebi known. I was legendary morning McGee. We're gonna try to do better next time if we can, but we won't you go get some sleep. God bless nanna. Lynn, Dr Meltzer, next ESPN Serb sports fans, anytime anywhere ESPN, plus more sports. More leads more teams more ESPN don't know the for visit ESPN dot com today.

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Ep62: Jane Grogan

The Long Run

55:53 min | 1 year ago

Ep62: Jane Grogan

"Welcome to the long run. This cast for biotech adventurers your host. Today's guest is Jean Grogan. Gene is the chief scientific officer of South San Francisco based arsenal bio like the name suggests arsenal is putting together a stockpile of potent tools. Weapons if you will of modern biology as the company says about itself quote Arsenal will integrate technology such as crisper based genome engineering scaled and high throughput target identification synthetic biology and machine learning to advance a new paradigm to discover and develop immune cell therapy's initially for cancer and quo. There are more than a couple of powerful technologies packed into that tight. Little description how they will be integrated together in a clever way to deliver that ultimate product. Would it calls programmable cell therapies? That are safer more effective and even cheaper and more widely available. That's a very tall order. It's a vision. That will take many years to realize if ever gene is a great person to discuss this moment of possibility in science and technology when entrepreneurs are able to dream big along these lines. She's an immunologist by training and she came to Arsenal last year. After a long successful career in research and development at Genentech you may also recognize her voice while at Genentech Jane founded and hosted the two scientists walk into a bar. Podcast as you'll hear in this episode. She's been practicing her science communication skills for a long time. It shows before we start the episode. I'd like to tell you the sponsor of the long run precision NANNA systems is lowering the barriers to developing gene and advanced therapies precision. Nanna systems is a global leader in technology and solutions for developing are a DNA crisper and small molecule drugs. Rapidly taking ideas to patients in working with over one hundred biopharmaceutical companies globally precision. Nanna systems expertise and proprietary. Technology is at the heart of many of the leading gene therapies underdevelopment today precision Anna Systems nanomedicine development and manufacturing platform and reagents provide outstanding reduce ability versatility and scale ability with an intuitive workflow. That requires no prior expertise precision. Innocence can partner with you to bring your programs to patients successfully to learn more. Please visit precision ANNA SYSTEMS DOT com. And I'LL BE REMISS. If I forget to say that if you liked the long run podcast you will love the Timmerman report for just one hundred forty nine dollars. A year per reader you get two to three in depth analytical articles every week about the latest innovations and trends in biotech. You'll get to read my articles but also benefit from the insights of an outstanding cast of contributing writers including David Shaywitz Stacy Lawrence Asher Millard. Alex harding and a few other. Excellent people I'm recruiting. As we speak discounts are available for corporate groups and bigger discounts are available for university libraries. Asked me about a group deal at Luke at Tillman. Report DOT COM. Now please join me and Jane Grogan on the long run. Welcome Gene Grogan to the long run kids pleasure to be here so Jane I want to say I that I'm really excited to have you here as a scientist scientific entrepreneur but also one of these rare people who has been part of the podcast community. You had your own podcast who scientists walk into a bar from your past job at Genentech yet. It was a great podcast where we had it for three years. It still going. Even though I have now left the organization to scientists walk into a bow and I got to sit on your side of the microphone and chat with people that you do so so thank you for having me on your show. Iran huge in my review. Both as a kind of a journalist a podcast and as near as well. We'll thank you one of the things that I want to say that I really liked about the two scientists. Podcast is that obviously your very credentialed experienced scientists. But you had this interesting banter with your producer. Wellington who would ask like basic kind of man on the street kind of questions and you had a nice way of answering those in plain English. And that's just something. I think. I'd like to see more of just you know respectful and educational dialogue between scientists and the public. I think it's really important communication of science and scientific ideas it storytelling and it should be storytelling. And when two scientists together you know Really breaking hot experimental pushing biological soil. It can be a language in of itself but that commute that which has to be communicated those stories have to be communicated to the public and so one of the things that I loved about the podcast that I had to scientists walk into a bar. We kind of tried to pitch it to high school. Kids reading things like the new time science fiction and and above and what was really remarkable. Is that we found that. Not only were students listening and potentially employees so the company were actually using this as a reference but I as I traveled around the world giving talks from my job people listening to this in high schools in England as part of this science programs and it was. It had a really far-reaching audience which was unexpected and really exciting. While that's that's more interesting than even thought. So who knows? Maybe these things will live on in the archives and you'll get students calling you back in ten years saying you inspired them to start a career in science and one of the things we did was really try and interview. Some of these biological experts around the kind of Star Trek moment was where they thought the field would be ten years from now irrespective of their own work just to try and get kids. Students really excited about where and how they could jump into science and wipe would be you know what was encouraging exciting. All frontiers they needed to come in and crack so hopefully inspire the young kids to come in. Move into the field and move as fellas out. And I don't think you're about ready to move out the reason I have you on the show and we'll get to that but let you mention every every scientist has a story. They got inspired somewhere along the line. A little bit about your journey. You're you're from Australia. I can take from the accent. Oxo whereabouts cycle lump in a town. Just south of Melvin Attend College alone. Which is a blue collar town small End have really kind of regular suburban life and Then I always knew through high school that I was analytically oriented and really driven by signs and I went off to Melbourne University and did an Undergrad in in science majoring in pharmacology by chemistry. Well let's rewind a bit science. You caught the bug for this early like in Grade School High School. I was just good at analytics and I didn't know actually I was going through high school if that would end up being a history major and writing or whether that would be science and I was really. I just really love physics and I really loved the Pie. Mathematics and somehow trying to understand the structured Rules around the world around me and around us was just really compelling so it was kind of brain. Ah Plus in those days it was like the school. Our that which is a fabulous school is like. Oh you're good at science you should go off and do science was public or private schools. Private school okay. And what did your parents do my? Both my parents were pharmacologists or pharmacist. They would business people and they had a chain of pharmacies around the area that we lived in and so they encourage this Budding interest in science and their their teenage daughter. They always encouraged all of us to really follow our hearts and our passions. So they've always been supportive of my choices. Okay now how about teachers? Was there any person in particular who stands out among the teachers really came more from my university? He is actually there was there was one teacher. I should say at high school. There was one teacher. I had who was a physics teacher and actually I was one of two women in our clause in physics and He left US along while he told the boys in the class. And so this Gillan I who's also coincidentally cold. Jade really rallied together and manage to to do really well in that and that kind of taught me that some perseverance as well way back at high school so so the leaving alone. Curtin in university. None of that was high school. That was high school. Okay so you really do literally to yourself and physics and what do what did you decide to major in so I decided to major in Pharmacology and biochemistry and that was largely to do with the teachers. I had at the time and I had done a couple of uses as quote unquote a minor in Germany. Too High spoke. German had been an exchange student in Germany as part of my high school experience and I thought studying German literature in German would-be fun and it wasn't until a point but then I had to make some decision or I'm which starts now is going to take and so I got really interested in pharmacology and how different growth factors could affect the outcome of cellular differentiation. Though we thought about it in a different way back then even as an underground it was slightly different. We were looking at so in Australia as an undergraduate degree bachelors. And then there's an opportunity to do an honours year which is like a little mini masters. And I did that at a place called. Vincent's Institute of Medical Research Andrew. A direct Who was quite a mental to me Jack Martin and he ran the institute and this was the early days of cloning. This is the early days of running where you actually lifted by hand samples out of Water Basta to cycle through you know very hard medium hard Kuwa- cycles ladies somewhere definitely late eighties. So and I just got really excited about the scale at which one could do sign some having working from university into moving into an institute the scale the focus the direction and starting to realize that actually could pie your scientific knowledge to patient diseases. And I think that's when my interesting really focusing on the biology of human disease began to be very interesting to me Physics applied math and analytics. That kind of quantitative rigor is not always found in budding. Biologists disagree not okay. Well so but you stayed with it. Stayed with it. I disagree because I think that that thoroughness and that objectivity to do absolutely a reductionist perfect quote unquote experiments. That are reproducible. Is is critical for in any scientific discipline not just physics math but also biology and I believe that is very true to this day. I guess what I'm getting at is. How was it helpful to you as you thought about becoming entering biology it was more on the statistics you know? How do you set up an experiment? How do you pose a hypothesis? A set of experiments that you could disprove essentially right. That's the basic premise of hypothesis driven research. And do it in a way. That was statistically valid and. I think it's the math behind the statistics. That was really important. I think these days computation. Biology in those skill sets coatings statistics a hugely important for disciplines of biology. Okay but it sounds like you're getting a nice well-rounded. Set of course work to enter some some mathematical rigors humanities there with German literature. You're thinking about you know long term patients early nineties. Things are starting to happen in. How did this get? How did you decide to find a graduate school or mentor or like get on a focused track? Yeah so this is hindsight right at the time. I don't think there was a load of necessarily rational decision making about some of these career decisions and I encourage any young listeners. Out there to to take that into consideration as well. I was thinking about their own careers I got to the end of my on his. Yeah and had done very well and was kind of being pushed off fast tracked into Graduate Program and I actually halted and for. I don't know if this is what I want to do. And so in Karelia taken on some nights studies in journalism and writing and I saw that I would maybe want to be a journalist a scientific journalists or a scientific writer and so in order to pay my bills. I got a job at the Walter. Analyze a hole institute in the laboratory of a Shock Miller and people in his laboratory for those of. You don't know Jack Miller was arguably the sound of found Ruth T. cells in the role of famous and the response. Just win the Laskar. He just went sixty years after. I know he's just incredible. You know as a segue and we can redress this later if you like. He told me mythology. I didn't know much about him analogy until I started working in his lab. But wait a second. Why did you have some cold feet? They're about science graduates. I just think you know to dedicate you'll live to scientists at chunk of years doing graduate program. I just wasn't sure if that was where I wanted. My life to land at the ripe old age of my early twenties so And I wanted to explore this passion of of journalism so I got a job at technician. We were making some of the first juice reporter. Mice is doing micro injections of genetic material into oocytes of of mice and creating the first in some of the early transgenic mice. And then but what I did was. I set up a radio show and this was on community. Radio called three C- in Melbourne Australia and it was a fairly liberal. Still is a fairly left wing liberal leaning organization station there are a little reluctant science program on there but I convinced them that we could have a show that talked about issues hopefully in a very non biased way whether they be national issues international issues all local issues to the community and they they said yes. And so I did pre recordings. We had weekly show. It was real to reel back then. None of this digital technology and it was very successful. It got picked up by National Public Radio Australia. It's still going to this day. Wow so this really presasure careers of podcasters and then at one at one stage. I realized I'm ready. I'm ready to actually really dedicate myself to science and I want be on the other side of the microphone as an expert to say your day job was doing this technical work on making transgenic mice and you know the child. The job was the radio. Scratch that edge and he thought you know what I want to drill in and become an expert on this thing and again you know with hindsight I think at the time I didn't really understand the science and the storytelling could come together. And then it's really important and that science or the pursuit of scientists not about uncovering truths looking for next frontiers. Trying to describe the world around us. But it's actually telling people about that whether it's writing an article for journal whether it's writing thesis whether it's talking to someone on the radio the dinner table ETC COMMUNICATING. It is really important. Yep Yep so with Jock Miller and then then what happened so then as I was thinking about taking on a graduate degree a PhD. I thought well if I'm GONNA do this. I don't have to limit myself to Australia. There's a whole world out there that I could get involved with. People really affected me and I'm not sure if he knows this or not Professor we used to have on radio trumped. Sometimes when I couldn't find anyone else to interview he was always my backup. He always had these great stories to tell him. Mrs Ankle Graham Mitchell who had been The head of the Parasitology Group Wall Street is a Hole Institute. He went on to become the director of the Royal Mountain Zoo. And he's probably one of the first immediately parapsychologist out there I think. Later on he went and became one of the research heads at the CSL the camera serum laboratories in Australia. And and he and I got talking a lot as I was studying the immune system with Jack Ma and Thinking about how could we understand the immune system the load around us? I got very interested in parasitology and Thinking if we could shoot a parasite or understand tropical diseases we might get a you know. It might lead to better outcomes for people around the world and so it was through talking to him buzz online and offline. Let he put me in touch with a very very close knit and very academically rich community of parasitology based largely out of England and in the Netherlands and so through some perseverance and letter writing. I got the possibility to go to Leiden University in the Netherlands to work with an incredible mental A woman called Maria yes batch. Who's now the head of the of the tropical medicine and Parasitology Institute in Leiden And so off. I went to the Netherlands to China. Understand the role of the immune system in certain parasitic infections. Long Way from home. He was fine. I was happy to go sad to leave it heavily. And so you did your PhD work. There I did my pasty there and it was involved with woman. Fictions actually helmet infections a particular infection cold. She still some Isis and My Professor Maria had cohorts of patients all study sites around the world and one of them was in Gabon in West Central Africa and they were running studies out of the hospital in Gabon. And so of course. I had to go down there a couple of times throughout my my graduate degree to get patient samples isolate blood and try and uncover what was the immunological response. Underpinning some of these diseases all leading to the lack of clearance of these parasites so for me. It was actually really understanding the early days of chronic immune activation And you're exceeding the world and how people live around the world and are affected by these things so this is like it's according to experience real right. Yeah you know working with some of the Particularly and children who are affected coming into the local hospitals and some of these parasites can be very easily treated like in helmet infections. It's just the life cycle that needs to be broken that what we did was really. What they're still doing is really trying to understand. What kind of immune response is being mounted? What kind of immune response is being mounted two different cycles of the parasite And what are the rules that driving these these chronic inflammations and immune responses donald sounds like pretty basic were B. Cell t cell responses. Which you need four we can even begin to think about vaccine strategies or anything. Yeah as somewhere. I'm now I'm still in the world of immunology and the whole explosion in the last decade of understanding how the immune system works in the context of cancer has really brought me full circle around and around thinking about how chronic immune responses get initiated set and then regulators whether it be Avar Lynton viral infection parasitic infection or or arguably Kansas known. This is a great place to start because a parasite I mean by. His definition is quite foreign to the immune system. So you can. You can even with the tools that we had. Then I mean we're able to measure things quite quite well and and articulate things that people couldn't well I think I think things have changed now. There's a lot more characterization of what what does foreign parts of the vector what what those components of the parasites were that the immune system was saying and which one of those were activating which ones of those are more quote unquote polarizing. Oh immunosuppressive and there are parts of the life cycle of parasites. That turn on. The moon responsiveness of is kind of activation dangerous signals. And they set off the part of the immune response and there are others that really drive. These long term chronic immunity whether it's activated T. cell or even they can drive bizarre responses to induce these protective. Antibodies as well so a lot of these Worms or parasites in the body can be covered by the immune system that actually Texas from attack by different parts. Immune System Sison NANNA systems is lowering the barriers to developing gene and advanced therapies. Precision systems is a global leader in technology and solutions for developing RNA. Dna crisper and small molecule drugs rapidly taking ideas to patients in working with over one hundred mile pharmaceutical companies globally precision NANNA systems expertise and proprietary. Technology is at the heart of many of the leading gene therapies underdevelopment today precision NANNA systems nanomedicine development and manufacturing platform and reagents provide outstanding reduce ability versatility and scale ability with an intuitive workflow. That requires no prior expertise. Precision systems can partner with you to bring your programs to patients successfully to learn more. Please visit precision. Anna SYSTEMS DOT com. So how did you come to the US? Yeah so one of the frustrations I had at the time the joys and frustrations had at the time of my PhD was realizing that there was army sci-fi you could go in understanding the immune system by looking at preferable readouts from human patients. And I say that cautiously because the world has turned dramatically since the mid ninety s then I realized that if I was going to be Truman August I had to go back to understanding some basic principles of the system in in the dish and in animal models mouse models as well and so I I actually segue for two years through bill into the German rheumatology institute in billion and did a mini postal there as an Alexander von Humboldt fellow and started exploring mouse models there and then I moved onto. Ucsf to what was a rich loxley to understand how t cells regulate chronic infections? And then understand how these different subsets of t cells could be regulated at the genetic and EPA genetic level. Now what did you think was missing when he were just looking primarily through the Petri dish petri dish in mainly my hd or while you're talking about peripheral blood or giving you sort of a partial view? It's so I think a few things when you were limited tools for measuring the blood. There was not the large scale. Genetic and genome wide analysis or computational power that we can bring to understanding human disease today and A lot of the business of the infection is where the parasite chuma resides. And it's very difficult to get access to human tissue and that is still a problem in understanding human disease and Deacon volving. What's going on in a tissue through the peripheral? Blood doesn't always add up and suddenly without the tools that's very hard to do and so what was really interesting at the time. It was very hard back in those days to have high impact papers in terms of peer reviewed journals. That were around human immunology and I would argue. It's almost the reverse at the moment where The world scientific communities clamoring for more information around human immunology and we have toolboxes and took its with which to start tackling. This problem and I think will learning more about marine system that we had mapped out through a lot of animal models and we're kind of proving which from an extending now some of those findings but at least at that time you knew that had to do some in Vivo. Work in the mouse get granular. I had to get down to a very reductionist system with which to ask. Ask Hypotheses Intestine questions and I think even now in my work over the last couple of decades flipping back and forth between understanding human disease testing things in animal models gaining insights from biology in animal models. That you didn't predict or you specifically probed for and then and then seeing if that translated back into human disease this kind of fold in reverse translation is critical for understanding human disease and really a necessary part I think of a biologist experimental life. When did you going to genetic so I went? I joined Genentech Fifteen years ago and I joined as a scientist. I was recruited straight out of my postal and I moved into the immunology department and my focus there was really on. I worked primarily on CD sells their different subsets. Gen- generally of t-cells out this CD. Four CD eight some cell types. Cd Four had been my specialty and the kind of effective functions and the growth factors and soluble factors secreted and how they affected immune system had been my bread and butter and so I joined Genentech to think about those cells in the context of auto immunity because we know in order. Immunity that those cells. When they're overactive can start recognizing self not farm. We talked earlier about things that have foreign to the body parasites. Sometimes the immune system is either tricked or escapes mechanisms that blind it to self and it starts attacking itself like the joint soil. No various things in cheats sheets in the brain in MS for example. And so. Yeah so I had a research group. That was focused on immunity largely around rheumatoid arthritis and then Later on in a Lupus so just continuing to publish doing the classic. Genentech thing like a little bit like academia but in a company was it like that I actually. I had been very worried know. I think that even a mental today a lot of students still say to me industries the dockside. Or if I leave. I'M GONNA lose my kind academic edge. I think some that's largely not true. And it's especially not sure at a company like genentech where the pursuit to uncover biology. That's the cutting edge. That's truly going to make impact into patient's lives. It's just a core part of the identity of the organization and I should not. This is a very cool part of a cultural identity that I want to build together with my colleagues at Arsenal bio as well so yes. I got to work with incredible colleagues. At genentech and clinicians we had access to amazing Clinical trials and clinical trial data. And we we. We made some insights kind of questions arriving you so again. I ve always been Tesol immunologists. I keep coming back to this. It's one thing that's very consistent in my career We were really interested in looking at novel ways in which we can manipulate. T. cells to to have some kind of therapeutic outcome. Could we turn t-cells owner off in a joint and Really decrease the inflammation and so I was working with colleagues genentech early on. We were trying to come up with Jean said theme knowledgeable proteins or receptors on the cell surface. That you know. Classic IMMUNOLOGISTS had kind of ignored. Because the hadn't reveal themselves dramatically in certain animal models at the low hanging fruit having been picked and It was through some of this work that that myself and colleagues identified a very novel contagious. Tgi T- that stands for T cell McGraw Bulent Containing Molecule and it a. It turned out to have Very we describe its function. We named the gene. It turned out to have a very Dominant role in Syed Sarah Responses and this was these were cells that I had sadly to my own. Misfortune largely ignored an autoimmune space. But turn out to be pivotal cells in regulating tumor responses and as we uncovered a really exciting role for this in two minutes. My work rapidly. Switched into more immuno oncology perspective so these are the CD eight t cells these so-called Killer. T. Cells that we now know are important. You want to read those up to educate them to unleash them to attack the tumor absolutely and I think it's no surprise to anyone at this stage that doing that has provided an incredible incredible therapeutic benefits so with the discovery of molecules and therapeutics targeting things like ct La four of calls. Jim Allison and others have the Nobel Prize. Today's those really exciting discoveries the PD one pedia one. Pathway these checkpoint inhibitors so molecules that regulate the the activation and limit the expansion unaffected function of cells of immune cells and that by blocking nasal targeting. These by a variety of mechanisms has just proved transformational four cats patients definitely one of the big stories of cancer in the tens definitely and then closely followed. I think by the fact that not only can you manipulate cells in the body with various antibodies that target them and actually small molecules as well all assault factors and happy to talk more about what they might be but also that you could actually engineer sell outside of the body so take a T. sellout engineers to make it a suit up version or a better version of what it is and put that back into patients the same patient and drive really incredible therapeutic benefit. M M in that space as well and the so-called cats catchy therapies so this moved all fear very fast in the last decade and you all along. You've been a T. Selling Benalla. Gist and suddenly like a lot of people are interested in your work. It's it's no longer You know you and fifty colleagues noted. It's like fifty journal Articles Dale Miss. No in one wouldn't have predicted that back in my twenties thinking about where I was going to land in my career. I think it's made so has been following the science and then following following the science that under schools patient disease in real China instead patient disease. And when you follow the science well It reveals itself and so I think the world has come to understand that the immune system is really important in regulating. Lots and lots and lots of responses in in Vivo. So clearly we're now in this cancer. Immunotherapy era with both antibodies that stimulate in immune reaction against tumors but also cell therapy's that that recognize certain antigens on their surface tons and tons of industry investment and scientific energy being poured into this area. You're at one of the great science based companies. You can do a lot of these things but then you decide this year within last year to take the leap to stardom ideas. How did that happen? It was it was not plants. I have to say but as I was building out strategies. Full Immuno Oncology. All the ways we can manipulate the immune system to fight cancers. It became clear that Self therapy was going to be part of the quote court arsenal that a physician was gonNA wind up. Having having to treat patients with and my career at genetic it focus large molecules are protein therapeutics essentially as well as small molecules working with some of US memorial colleagues around epigenetics genetic targets and and then working out ways with which we could selectively deliver these tumors Or somehow reduce side effects. Lots of work in that field. But I'd also together with my oncologist colleagues. Had become really interested. In what the effect is that a driving immune response and we talked earlier on about. And I'll get directly to answer your question a minute but we talked early on about foreign foreign things Dr Immune responses and that it became very apparent that these these protests go neo. Antigens also drive to really robust anti tumor immune responses that that would later on become exhausted and these so called neo. Antigens are antigens that become expressed in cancer cells mutate and saw the not normally occurring cells in the body so when they start to appear in these cancer cells the body season as foreign and Genentech together with a company called adaptive biosciences had had done a deal trying to explore this. And they're exploring this this landscape together. I became interested in Nanan will. How do you Beyond that kind of teach our SEPTA recognition. What else can you do to a cell to manipulators in a very positive way that would make it a more powerful therapeutic and if you think about a T. cell not only? Is it the drug like you want it to be a better effect to kill up? It's also capable of in the context. Maybe even being the manufact- you know that the little product plant for drug or delivering payload as well and I think this space is it's nascent is in its early days works through people. Cal- June have shown that it's going. It works CALHOUN Steve Rosenberg. Other leaders in the field is that it works you. Can you can transfer patients with souped? Up T. cells cottee cells what he sells specific to things like Harris Mutations and they can drive responses predominantly in the haematological space. But there's more evidence. This is true in solitude as well so I was excited to join a company that had this at hot. Let me back up a second. Because there are lots of different ways to go after cancer. People Talk About. Different modalities right. There's large molecules small molecules. And and now we have cell therapy. You're making a bad here with your feet on cell therapy. Why do you see that as the end game? Is this like the ultimate way to go after cancer? Because I don't know. Tumors are bound to develop resistance against one of those existing modalities or do you have a view on cell. Therapy is is the place I think. Self therapy will be a very important part of a doctor's toolbox it a. I think there's very successful responses and absolute places for Proton therapy and small therapies without a doubt but they're not true and a lot of cases. And so we need Bene- therapies. One thing that really excites me about the possibility and potential of self therapy's is that if you can truly engineering multiple components into the one cell. Then you could arguably provide many different. Sarah -peutic modalities within the one cell. And so not only so it may not be one dr one target. You could combine multiple targets for example. You could hit some exhaustion. Nodes these checkpoint inhibitors you. Can you can optimize the binding of Your T. Sarah Septa to its target antigen. So you get that killing. You can start to manipulate exhaustion. Mods or activation persistent nodes once. We uncover a lot of these into new to sell weaken engineering. Kema kindel all a molecules that are really important for cells to traffic through solid tumors to get to where defies wow. This is the kind of thing that really F- forces you to stretch your imagination because like where we are today I mean we have engineered cell. Therapy's that go after a couple of different validated antigens CD Nineteen. A lot of people are working around with T C T cell receptors. But that hasn't really worked yet for solid tumors or well. It's early days. Those clinical trials are still in front of us. And we're all going to be learning from this collectively. I think in in terms of a so just want to answer your question fully. It was very hard for me to leave my my position that genetic because it is such an incredible organization a startup and provides an opportunity to focus on one thing. It just do it really well and do it at the full front when you don't know if it's GonNa work or not you really in front of the wave. As as opposed to behind it an asthma bio really cold me and spoke to my heart scientific hot for a few reasons The scientific founders and CEO SOC- is Ken Raisin and he's He's building a wonderful company with a really strong culture. A very matrixed organization and the sounders every single one of scientific founders is in the game is publishing in the field and is brought really unique ideas and technology to our organization so things around genetic crisper understanding the complexity of all the different types of t cell. Subsets that Important or impaired T cell immunity in human disease and You know experts in these genetic synthetic socrates as we call them ways of optimizing synthetic circuitry so we can make a real sell with synthetic components so to speak a salvage engineer to do more than one thing mullahs month in multiple things. There're challenges there. Of course right such as well. The challenges are the challenges is working at one of the nodes. We actually want to put in so say mentioned there. Are Things out there that that other companies non academic academic groups early pursuing is it one exhaustion is one effective knows. How do we think about the Nigel's that we wanna put together in a very organized structure and how many they've will we need? And then I guess technically do this is is involves genetically In End the field is limited by the size of the genetic editing that we can do The number of bases like the number bases number nucleotides the stretches sequences the more things you put in a string of boundaries jeans together or a bunch of notes that can regulate genes and their expression takes up genetic. Will we hold real estate? And there's only so much real estate that one can knock into a cell Andover Express all. We'd lentiviruses systems and defeated really has to solve this problem. And we're hoping that we'll be up to tackle a load of this without technologies asthma. While you know when you look at the word arsenal like I said at the start show. It suggests this whole set of of weapons to go after to defend or go on offense or whatever I mean on your website. You list like lot of things that got some. Buzz is cloud computing or computational biology genome engineering crisper machine learning synthetic immunology. It's all of this and all of these tools that have become widely available. Allow us to see things we couldn't see and do things to cells that were previously incomprehensible. But you can't be just one of those things you have to put the pieces together right. Yeah I think this is one of the complementary unique group that we have asthma while we have clinical expertise. We have t cell basic expertise. And then we have computational and gene editing expertise and one of the things that we really want to do is to study that the natural mechanisms cellular regulation that have really being already defined or refined by evolution and Deacon volve those and then Pulled them back together in a way that These natural components in a way that Don't exist right now. But we know that they're important in terms of immune evolution and the way to Deacon Volt that is to send human disease set up a lot of functional models and and screens and Run these through very analytical programs and in a way that we cannot hope to Deacon volve really rational pathways in the immune response now. Juxtapose will be important for that. Aren't wires cloud computing? Just because of the scale of the genetic information and sequencing that will be generating and that we need to understand. So what's the kind of the basic substrate here of samples human like healthy versus disease and then comparing it with some of the animal models referring to earlier like how you would flip back and forth? Yes so I think there's many ways you could tackle this approach. And currently focusing predominantly at US my on on on Sunday human disease and trying to model that in a dish and so we're taking data that we are generating also taking advantage of our data from scientific founders and data in the field about a. What are the different States of t cells in in human to human tumors ahead differ to normal tissue Annette's predominantly probably easiest to uncovering peripheral blood. Back to the problem I have is a PhD. Student is now a good thing. I'm have at at this stage And then we've also sitting up a bunch of in vitro models way. We're trying to capture these disease states and understand them and then Run genetic perturbations to see if we can uncover node so we can flip cells into different states or we can stop them from becoming exhausted. We can drive them to have better effective function. How many crisper edits do you think you can make on a T. Cell? How many crisp edits can we make on sell? Well I mean how many different functions can you you mentioned? There's limited real estate. Yeah so limited number of things that you can do to dial up or dial down. I think he can do. Actually Multiple Crisp edits one thing to bear in mind in the context of trying to make a tea seller CATIS. Our colleague Tico is that. There's manufacturing in clinical component to this as well like the more that you do the moment relations. You have to make the longer that time that takes. We're trying to do these one construct so it's a one shot integration and decided that integration is going to be very very important could vary depending on what modalities we want to go after but if you think about the challenges of Kati Cell Therapy. It's especially at the individual level is how can we get sells out due out? Crisper manipulations manufacture those cells very short amount of time and get back into a patient in a way that just decrease cost of good in general both in the manufacturing process and in the time. That patient is spending in hospital as well. That's what they call the vein to vein time. We you give your cells. And then they go to a lab edited manufactured and sent back and that can't be three months four months six days and this is a challenge for everyone in the field and it certainly will be for us. It's key in front and center to what of the the goals that we want to try and attack with some about platforms and technology and of course this problem. Just a general level may be different for different toomas. It may be different for different states. Toomas different types of solid tumors and so understanding the rational rules with which we can genetically edit and then those rules might be different depending on what we're editing into those cells and how those edits read out could Depending on the and the car receptor interaction with the Tumor Antigen and for different. I think there are no rules right out there at the moment. For around WH- Katiza. What are the rules Tesol interacting with its tumor Antigen and then what are the rules around all the signaling? That goes into the T. cell beyond just TC activation and favorite activation Christine military molecules. The sounds like a lot of pretty basic off. I mean they're I say kind of academic like it was very cool. I mean just think about where the field of monoclonal antibodies was decades ago. And certainly only therapeutics. You'd have a target you'd screen you come up with one antibody and then you know you didn't work out if it worked in the clinic upsets immunological. You know. It's it's working. It's not now. We have very sophisticated understanding protein structures. Different different appetite. Binning so you can start to make different. Antibodies to the one time. Good Siamese small molecules of just doing these random screens you can do structure based designed self therapy who move into this space where it's a lot more. There'll be lot more rules and it's a lot more obvious about the kind of new populations that you can do genetically the size of inserts and then what a T. cell can actually tolerate and it'll be a balanced right. You WanNa ten on enough. So it has robust effect to function be. Don't want it to die either right and reach. Senescence. Oh you don't want it to become exhausted but you want it to become activated enough and so. I think we still have to understand how this is going to work in a dish. And then how this will actually performing patients? I mean it sounds like you building off of this foundation of twenty years of experience in the basic immunology of t cells. And they're still some questions new questions that keep coming to you and that need to be answered before you can go full throttle with a therapeutic strategy like okay this is the target and this is the modality once those. If I'm hearing correctly once you have some of those basic questions answered then you ought to be able to move quickly on a development player and I think you know like like most science especially in industry. It's they'll be parallel tracks right. You know small companies really. We will have to focus really quickly on on how we're going to deliver on on our products and our first clinical experience based off the all these different components that we're building and then we'll have parallel tracks which we building out the platform to inform the next generation and then one could even imagine we could apply to non ecology settings. How can we can we take the learnings from the synthetic circuitry that we're building apple understanding of these regulatory pathways and how comedian bill? Dumb Lego blocks into other cell types or even other diseases maybe come full circle to auto immunity. That could that could very well be the case and I know you know. There's certainly people out there thinking about your cell therapies for auto immunity especially if you think about things like language T. cells or That that a that. A very important for switching off immune responses. What's the most exciting thing and scariest thing about going to start up? The the most exciting thing is just working with a bunch of very motivated people in one direction. And that's not to say I haven't had that in previous experiences. But there's this sense of like everyone's in everyone's working everyone's working together it's Sola team wherein it like we're all in singles room together that's really exciting additional part that is just really wonderful coming in as a CFO and working with the rest of the executive team is. How do you build a company from scratch? What's the culture? How do we have we reward? People how do we motivate? What's the vision? Where do we want to be five years now? Where do we want to be ten years from now? How do we build external relationships? How do we have relationships with members of the board and the founders and it's Everything everything has to be mapped out. there's a whole people component when you're listening and it's wonderfully important Djing Grogan thanks for joining me today on the long speed and absolute delight. Thanks for listening to the long run. A production of Timmerman report in a recital of stepper media was the sound editor. Music comes from. Da Wallich see next episode.

Genentech scientist US cancer Australia Nanna systems solid tumors Jean Grogan partner Timmerman Pharmacology and biochemistry tropical medicine and Parasito England Professor Hole Institute Jane Grogan Anna Systems
Ep58: Jigar Raythatha

The Long Run

1:11:50 hr | 1 year ago

Ep58: Jigar Raythatha

"Welcome to the long run. This is a podcast biotech adventurers. I'm your host Luke Timmerman. Today's guest is Jigger. Retha jigger is the CEO of Cambridge massachusetts-based Constellation Pharmaceuticals. This company is built to develop drugs against epigenetics targets simply put this is a way to turn genes on or off without altering the underlying DNA. The pharmaceutical industry. Fancy this idea about a decade ago as a way to shutdown specific disease processes but by binding with enzymes that can be reached with classics small Molecule Chemical Compounds that the industry knows quite well concept however soon fell out of favor. Some of the early compound scooped up by big Pharma. Never lived up to the hype. Exciting new modalities like gene. Therapy and cell therapy emerged win. Genentech constellations big partner walked away from an option to acquire the little company in two thousand fifteen consolations suddenly had a lot of explaining to do jigger entered this situation as CEO in. May of twenty seventeen raise money crafted a new development strategy brought in some new blood and took the company public. This year. Constellation burst back onto the biotech main stage with some preliminary clinical data for a drug candidate for Milo fibrosis the compound. Cpi Oh six. Ten is a Bromo domain extra terminal domain inhibitor. It has been tested. In a phase two study known as manifest as a single agent and in combination with excellent nab the Jack Inhibitor marketed by insight as Jack Affi- Constellation has looked at treatment refractory patients as well as people getting their first treatment. The results are striking as I discuss with. Jigger in the latter part of the show more than ninety percent of patients are seeing improvements in spleen volume reduction in total symptom scores while also seeing their hemoglobin counts which were depressed. Come back closer to normal results. Were even better. In the first four treatment naive patients you can see the abstracts published on the American Society of Hematology website in advance of that medical meeting December. Four to seven twenty nine thousand nine in Orlando Constellation will be presenting updated data at that meeting. Constellation stock. Touched a low of about four dollars a share this year but as of this recording heading into the ash conference the stock is worth forty six fifty six share a market valuation now exceeding one point five billion. That is the turnaround. Now before we start the episode. I'd like to tell you about the newest sponsor of the long run. Precision systems is lowering the barriers to developing gene and advanced therapies precision. Nanna systems is a global leader in technology and solutions for developing Arnie DNA crisper and small molecule drugs rapidly taking ideas to patients in working with over one hundred bio pharmaceutical companies. Globally precision NANNA systems expertise and proprietary. Technology is at the heart of many of the leading gene therapies underdevelopment today precision NANNA systems nanomedicine development and manufacturing platform and reagents provide outstanding reduce ability versatility and scale ability with an intuitive workflow. That requires no prior expertise. Precision NANNA systems can partner with you to bring your programs to patients successfully to learn more about precision systems please visit www dot precision anna systems dot com. And Are you a marquee service provider eager to your name out in front of the biotech leaders who listen to the long run Stephanie? Barnes can help you learn more about sponsorship opportunities find her on the contact page on. Timmerman report DOT COM. And if you haven't already now is also a good time to subscribe determine report for you. Do take a look at the testimonials page. You'll see industry leaders who have subscribed since the beginning in two thousand fifteen as Bob Nelson of arch venture partners. Put it quote. Timmerman is always ahead of the game. And so what are you waiting for go Tim Maroon? Report Dot Com and hit the green button that subscribe groups that meet. Certain conditions are eligible for discounts. Ask Me Luke at remain report DOT COM to report DOT COM slash subscribing. Please join me and Jigger Retha on the long run welcome Jigger Rafa to the long run. Thank you very much for having me. Look so jigger. I'm really excited to speak with you today. there's a story here about a company turnaround as well as some really interesting data from your lead drug candidate heading into the American Society for Hematology meeting up the ash meeting coming up so lots to cover here as you know from listening to this show. I like to talk a little bit about who the person is before we get into what they do. So where does your story begin? Where did you grow up? So I was born and raised in New Jersey actually born in Hoboken New Jersey and lived my formative years in The Central and northern New Jersey. Most the time actually in a town called Edison And you know growing up We were a family of four. My parents had moved India in the early seventies and my sister and I were were really kind of a first generation Indian Americans in the in New Jersey and this is Greater New York New Jersey. What did your parents do for a living? So they were business people They owned a small business. They had A few actually retail stores of Ladies Clothing Stores Actually. She spent a good a good chunk of my Youth helping them out And in various ways in In that business and it was it was probably a very formative experience for me in terms of learning a variety of different things that that probably helped me today but but certainly Times it was a struggle and so also learned a lot about resilience from that experience to but but they they were. They were business. People At one time they had up. You know three different retail stores. You know at their at their of their peak of that interesting. So how young would you've been helping out around? Oh Jeez I was pretty young. Probably Spicer in helping them. When I was a six or seven years old I remember taking trips to the with them to to New York City in our station wagon to the garment district at the wholesale stores and and would pick up boxes and boxes of women's clothes and haul them back to Toward Stores New Jersey. And then those might be my job to To open them up and hang them and over time actually One of the things that got pretty good at talking to people and and trying to I mean. Is this little kid and eight years old and go up to You know some of the customers stores. Hey that dress looks really great on you. Know as a as an eight year old kid and so But I think that that actually taught me a lot about you know how to think about talking to people and relating to people and In selling to people actually a lot of what we do You know these days actually is telling the story on helping people understand what you're doing Itchy point back to that experience quite a bit as a formative experience in in my career very fundamentals of business. And did you stick with it? Did you stick with it like going through teenage years? How much yeah I mean. They wound down the business. It got pretty tough after a while. Especially when in the nineties there was a bit of a recession Nearly wound down the business kind of in the mid mid nineties or so but Yeah helped him. All the way throughout Spent a Lotta my weekends. You know working with them in various different capacities Trying to try to help them out. So you decided. I guess that you like this business. You decide to go to rutgers and I see that you majored in biochemistry and economic. Yes it looks like so I can imagine this is sort of. Like in retrospect an ideal sort of back to going. Yeah I attack the plan from the beginning. It certainly wasn't the plan. I think you know like most most most kids in College. I was figuring things out You know I liked science. I was good at it as no in In High School A lot of my peers. Were also my good friends. Were also Becoming scientists and and so that they felt like a natural thing to do but also Again me needed a little. Bit of war shadowing One of the things that that I become quite good at it I think is is putting together information from a lot of different areas. And that's been a theme. I think in the various career choices I've made And so I was just interested in a lot of different things and so You know I took all kinds of classes. I actually I if you if you saw my transcript Load up my class schedule. Every every semester with Almost a maximum I could take. I took classes in philosophy. I took classes in communications into classes in economics and science and I was working in the lab and you know kept super busy and so it was just one of these things where over time I had just accumulated a Lotta credits. Also an economics and so it it was just sort of fell into it. But you know looking back. I guess it was a pretty good combination for what I'm doing right now but that wasn't you know a specific program that rutgers offered to you know aspire to just kind of it kind of happened. I wish they did actually have actually reached out in a couple of times help. Help think about how to help. Students navigate their careers if they if they realized they don't WanNa be laboratory scientists in which they do. But I'm still working on that. So was there a point when you decided the lab? Science wasn't really for me. How did you get on the track toward you know? Business of Pharmaceuticals or biotech. I learned pretty early on in college. That be you know being a laboratory. Science wasn't wasn't GonNa be for me. You know I I was doing research actually all four years. I was in college but I was not not good at it at all. I think a lot of it has to do with fundamentals of the the patients that it takes to to stick with convey it very detailed scientific question over the course of many years and I was always much much more Kind of bigger picture. I guess in a way I thought about things in a routinely I routinely messed up the experiments as working on and it was. I found that to be very very challenging so it became clear to me that working working in a lab. Just wasn't the right place for me to excel. I still enjoyed science though I did well. In my science courses A I thought about different different ways but that that was actually working in the lab and not being very good at. It actually helped me to think through. Well we'll what can I? Is there a way for me to then combine kind of an interest in science with with something else And that's eventually led me down the path that that that went down so you you finish your degree at rutgers you go on to get an MBA Columbia. What was the thinking there? We'll in between I actually before I went to Columbia I spent a few years. My first job at a college was working at a consulting firm call T Kearney And it was typical management consulting. I think the first Prejud- worked on was at NABISCO and we were working at plant operational improvements in next project that got assigned to was actually at Roche. I was super excited with maybe get to combine science and business but but it was very very much Not really science at all actually So then after about a year of consulting I wanted I actually proactively decided to Kinda make a move to try to break into the biotech field And I didn't really know exactly how to go about doing that. And it got a little bit lucky. We're we're biogen was recruiting For for an analyst level role in their near New Planning Group And I was lucky enough to to to get hired into that group and it was Looking back it's kind of a. Who's who in that was in that group Carry feffer bill did but you know Katrina Bosley. Was there a stewart? Polar getting core were Steve Till crinoids. It was it was a very solid group of people that that I got to learn from and I spent four years working at by. Jin doing arrange different things and that was a tremendous experience because it was a a real golden age Abidjan where we were just a couple of years past. Avonex launch company was fully integrated global and and there was just a lot to do. And if you're young and you initiative recently smart you got to do a lot of cool things that you may not get to do In a much bigger company or a much smaller company where the opportunities might not be there and so so before going to Columbia Business School I worked at I worked at biogen for four years and We're going to rain different things that were that were really really educational. Yeah Yeah and this would have been late nineties early two thousands as you say. Avonex was just then taking off and biogen had to figure out how to maximize that and also you know. Keep the pipeline moving along and build like a bigger sustainable company for long-term yes. There was a lot of strategic thinking that went on in that group that I worked in Was kind of the nerve center and in the way that I approach. Things was really being an information node. You know to get Scientists and business people and clinicians in manufacturing folks talking in the in the with the right language And and actually the the job that enjoyed the most there was actually a program manager program leadership type. Aerobics allowed me to really dig into He could've drug and move forward Which was quite gratifying. Also did some really interesting deals and things of that nature but but the program leadership The program management piece of that was tremendously educational and biotech. It's something that people should really consider doing at some point in your career. Okay now this is actually funny. You mentioned for years. I notice a pattern here somewhere about four year. You work in four year chunks and then you move on that about but my wife was Was asking news yesterday. She how long have you been back at? Constellation coming up on three years and she's a year ago and I was like no no. That's not that's not the plan it's just a I guess You know it certainly not the plan going into it But I guess it's enough time where these can change in grow when you can have a real impact and it's a good moment to think about where you are and reflect and whether you have an opportunity to keep growing in the role that you're in It just so happens. It's happened to me every four years but But certainly not the plan and certainly not what? I'm planning right now. So you have this experience at biogen is a good one. You learn a lot. You're in your twenties and you're thinking okay. This biotech thing. This is for me for the long term. Is there anything of great importance going to Colombia? Or is that just like getting a credential and learning a few more things to advance longer term? I guess I never took the step of getting advanced degree in science. Although I was I was really capable at communicating Along those lines I I did think that having some type of advanced degree would be important. It looking back a mature. It's crucially important but I but I definitely did learn a ton of Columbia. I met a lot of great. People Broaden my horizons a bit And you know got to live in New York City for a little while to and so so that that was really the thinking behind that But I I did go into business school with a plan which was I wanted to graduate and get a job in venture capital And a half. It wasn't for all the right reasons. It was really for probably all the wrong reasons because they just let it was a really cool job to have And that was the plan. And that's that's what the planet went with going into it. And what what I coming out of it wrong reasons like what well you know it just it. It sounded to me like it. Was You know you get to decide whether you're going to invest in these companies and you get to make all these great decisions and Invest Capital and in? That just seemed very very fun and energizing We truly having understanding of what that was all about at that time in my mid twenty S. It was definitely a learning experience. A good job to have But again From the kind of you know when when folks asking you know talk to me about their career choices I always talked about like why do you WanNa do it? What makes you happy? And that certainly wasn't the thought process that was in my mind as we made the choice Not to say that it ended up being a bad experience at all. They can also make a good amount of money to you probably. That's right that's right. Yeah that's right. Yeah and it's just looking back I think You know sometimes At least for me. I spent four years doing that as well at some point. Isolating and I found it also A bit a bit too on the surface These these the with the type of investing was doing it right abby And so I felt like I needed to go much deeper And and so really reflecting on what you're good at. What makes you happy I think is a crucially important thing to do. Not just focus on you know the the cachet of career or just a financial aspects of it. Yeah Yeah so. You went to read. Abby actually got a Kauffman Fellowship which is a pretty prestigious thing. I mean as a young guy I I would imagine like. That's a that's a ticket to. You could continue on in on that track if you wanted to. But what kinds of things did did you invest in an or science or companies that you got exposed to that interested you during that period. So Red Abby it actually was a relatively small fund grew out of there to To folks who were business partners Frank Bond Soul in Philip Frank was one of the original three partners at any a Ann. Philip was a scientist. He trained under Sydney Brenner. Actually And then Eric Del so he you know he had a very strong scientific background. He also came from a very very wealthy family and And he moved to Baltimore and And he hooked up with Franken together they were investing in scientific entrepreneur activities. In part of that was a co-investing You enter the. Lp's in in several funds that you know can nea. Inner West Polaris Domain funds. Lp's and every now and then they would co invest alongside with their own capital and that that co-investment piece cut to be large enough that that they wanted to make that a A freestanding independent fund And so so that. That's that's what we started. And that's that's what I joined. It was a small team. It was myself Phillip Frank and a couple of folks that were that were involved in that we also. I guess today we call crossover investing. We didn't call that back then but we did do. Mostly you know series B. or C. Rounds where we try to find very interesting companies that you know other. Vc's had started up We also did invest in public companies. But more through private negoti deals either pipes or registered offerings and so Got a good exposure to both Private investing and public investing and we were fairly agnostic to Therapeutic areas also invested in some devices so it was actually a looking back. It was a wonderful opportunity to get a lot of exposure to a lot of different Different types of companies different people as well as public and private investing in a very interesting time in the market actually It's something that I I remember very clearly because you remember that that was a very very choppy time in the market. Which years are you talking about here in venture capital two thousand five to two thousand nine? Oh Yeah I remember that. Yeah and you'll in the public markets. Were actually working in companies. Were getting public. They were raising money but it felt a little bit like like two thousand sixteen right all the time where you're just making it out and And it wasn't you weren't really creating a ton of value and it was hard to really grow a business and sometimes you meet people who have been investing. These days. They weren't they didn't really remember those times. And you can. It can get quite hard and we really need to be mindful that it's not always going to be probably this this easy to raise capital and so we have to keep in mind as we're as we're growing our businesses. Well Yeah Yeah. The financial crisis hit hard in two thousand eight people. Forget but that was that it wasn't it wasn't easy. I felt like two thousand five six seven. We're not easy times sir. No No no the number of IPO's in those years was oh. It was minuscule compared to what we see today. A dozen companies will go public all year and and yet and then the financial crisis hit and all kinds of investors turned conservative. And so what happens to you? Then it's sort of like the first thing yet to to get rid of so. It was a very hard time but you know I was paying attention. I was writing then and there was a whole lot of cool science the science. Yes that's right wing to make progress and you saw this to this. Is What was Constellation. Right. That's that's right. That's right and it's funny was what's new now was new back then too. So it's a lot of a lot of things that were just actually starting to take form can cell therapy was starting to foreign back then and no one was really paying attention viruses and gene therapy normally pay attention that stuff back then and now and now people really are But that's right. That's it was from that experience that a decided to to move back into the operating world You know where where I found myself was particularly with the kind of firm. That Red Abbey was It was hard I felt like it was hard to have a true impact And and while I greatly learning about a whole host of different areas and in meaning a ton of people both investors and entrepreneurs. I really long to get deeper into things And it was very difficult you know. We had twenty five different companies in our portfolio and We're relatively small investors well and even the bigger investors I felt like had a tough time getting overly deep And so You know I had actually called one of my one of my one of the folks that actually hired me by a genetic Kerry feffer You're asking for some advice in an. He told me shut down his consulting practice in join this new firm that he started up by a third rock ventures and they launched a couple of companies in One of them was constellation. And they're looking for someone to do all things business and I flew up to Boston. I met the team and it was incredibly exciting. Mark was the interim CEO and Bob Temper with UNUM CIS OH and The new exciting here of epigenetics endless possibilities and we're super early and it was a it was opportunity for meter really stretch into an area that that was very different. I hadn't worked in small molecules really before You know directly in certainly not at this type of early stage and so it was a great opportunity to really really spread into a new area. Now what was it about epigenetics? At that time. It's ten years ago. I remember lots of interest in the science. This idea that you could control. Gene expression turn genes on or off without altering the underlying DNA. So you didn't need to do gene therapy. You could sort of silence jeans without doing complicated gene therapy. You could do it with small molecules. Yeah and I think it's still a tremendously exciting area. That is is not at its infancy. May maybe were more toddlers or or maybe getting into the tween years now in terms of understanding. What these targets are. What they do. We still don't understand is is how to had consistently link the biology to patients and that was a big theme in a media. Foreshadow again to to win came came back to constellation something that's become a very important piece of our strategy but but precisely. I think The the notion that we could essentially Y- conduct this orchestra of genes. That are creating GonNa the the music of how how everything's supposed to work on her body with with small molecules. That can they can tune things in the right way. I think it was a tremendously dig idea and Instill has a huge amount of potential. And there's only been a handful of targets where we really have mind and explore the potential in a in a deep way. And there's a there's a lot more there. Yeah so at that time there would have been you know a couple of programs that were pretty far along the H. Dak I believe from Merck histone deacetylases inhibitor. There was one that Gloucester I think got acquired by cell gene so there were a couple programs that were pretty far along or maybe even FDA approved but then there was just this whole like greenfield space that a few third rock and and a couple of others EPI Zein was another contemporary of Constellation. Trying to figure out like okay. Where would you? What were the right targets? And what patients could you? Could you help? That's right? Yeah Yeah so. It really got going when Actually One of our founders Danny Ryan Berg Was was really intent on trying to launch a around. This and currently our chief scientific officer was a post doc in his lab and the two of them were GonNa hit the road In were pitching the idea of creating a small molecule discovery company around this in the column group on the West Coast and Bob Dave Goodell who really Really believe that could happen They wanted to put the company in the East Coast. And so that's how third rock involved in. So obviously Dave in Mark Levin knew each other quite well Third ROCK IN IN THE COLUMN GROUP. Really carry the weight to To build a company in Van Rock also join in those early days to the company going. Okay so you join. Two thousand. Nine company is like less than a year old. I mean how many employees were there. I was probably in the first twenty. I was the first business person that they hired. Okay and so what was your mandate everything from you know thinking about How TO DO BUSINESS? Development deals and kind of sell this is again. Mark Levin was the the CEO was legendary doing And so I think he had a vision of recreating millennium in some ways. And so really thinking about a business. Development Strategy was was front and Center. also You know thinking about how to build a this is one third rox first forays to into company building so really they were Honing their craft there too. So we were gonNA thinking about work. Didn't work in. How do we think about follow on Financing's at syndicate do not syndicate business aspects? Were things that I had to deal with. As as well as a lot of operational issues like real estate and You know a little bit of financial planning And basically anything that was not directly related to move into science forward but also even though I was gonNA perfectly helping on that with Building the story that we were in that we were working through this getting deep in the weeds. You wanted to get deep now. You're getting deep now now. I'm the that's right and but also working with a Mark Levin who is famously visionary and seeing the bigger picture you've got exposure to both big picture and the details that's right that's right. Yeah so it was again a tremendous time. So you're there for four years and then you get that edge again to go do something else. You went to what what prompted that. Yes so You know just kind of While we were working through the building the science at at Constellation We started to get traction run a couple of new targets. One was quite When was quite a competitive was each to where there was a handful of companies that were not and it was? It was challenging and difficult from a drug discovery perspective. We were making headway there. And the other was the best family of proteins and that the scientists could have exploded all around us and You know really Jaber Anders Lab IN GS K We're really driving to the forefront of the biology around Benton addition And the discovery was certainly more tractable around Ben Hitter in. It was around things like each tour mental transfer raises So those two programs ended up being the lead programs in our portfolio in and we got to a point. Maybe what three years into the company where we had a line of sight to development candidates and potentially moving into clinical development But we also had a lot more that we need to do and so we were pretty active on the Business Development Front which which was quite hectic at that time anything at all the big Pharma companies were looking for a way to build an epigenetics capability internally in most either doing it on their own or trying to ill partnerships to do it In around two thousand eleven We were in very very active dialogue with multiple different companies in one of those which then tech and this is very famous deal that we ended up doing where you know. Genentech had prioritize. Different Areas Immuno Oncology and then epigenetics as if you truly oncology pipeline and they hadn't made a lot of investments in epidemics internally. They really had hired a couple of folks that cared about it. A Lot And so so they worked with US To essentially help them build that And so we put in place a three year. Collaboration where you everything we did was with Genentech. And they brought fifty scientists. The table we've worked with the scientists the table And and really focused on your new target discovery in in early chemistry But but then there was the the lead programs that we had that That we didn't want one include in that deal in. Genentech really wanted them in the deal. And so the way that we squared all that was with an option to buy the company and we we prebaked that and that was going to be triggered with the first phase one data from either one of those programs and so once we put that deal into place You became a new very much execution mode on on the the science and you're driving something clinic and through the phase one and delivering that package. Genentech and so from a business perspective. I I I. I wasn't fully fully utilized and so Agean I didn't. I never really wanted to leave constellation but but I just didn't have a fulltime role anymore and so I spent half my time working with third rock to incubate new ideas in one of those ended up being John's precision. Nanna systems is lowering the barriers to developing gene and advanced therapies. Precision systems is a global leader in technology and solutions for developing our DNA crisper and small molecule drugs rapidly taking ideas to patients in working with over one hundred biopharmaceutical companies globally precision. Nanna systems expertise and proprietary. Technology is at the heart of many of the leading gene therapies underdevelopment today precision NANNA systems and nanomedicine development and manufacturing platform and reagents provide outstanding reduce ability versatility and scale ability with an intuitive workflow. That requires no prior expertise. Precision systems can partner with you to bring your programs to patients successfully learn more about precision Anna Systems. Please visit www dot NANNA systems dot com so twenty eleven two thousand twelve. We're still in a downtime for biotech venture capitalists are not looking at some rose the IPO market. Or you know even multiple bidders like even if you've got good science so there was a concern like okay if we're going to put in X. amount of money how are we going to get y out and and the words around this time some deal structured that you know me could make you could cap your upside so to speak so you can kind of become a research wing of Genentech essentially a for epigenetics and if you hit certain milestones you could reach a predetermined acquisition price. Which would make the investors reasonably happy. And the you know the quiring company could be reasonably confident that they've got something that they can pick up and then run with but that's not the kind of deal that you would do today in a hot market. You don't want to limit your options right. That's right. Yeah that's certainly true. I think I think that was part of the Calculus was that we believe that there's a lot to do And you're already raised by that point. Seventy five million dollars in back back. In those days. That was quite a bit of money. For preclinical stage company to have raised and the prospects of of a newly investors achieving some type of liquidity through a public market was non existent And Working with a partner where there was some reason. Possibility that can lead to A multiple on investment acquisition. I think was was a was exciting As well as being able to work with a very strong scientific partner in Genentech who really understood Cancer and drug discovery quite well to serve multiple factor leading to take that route. So genentech. It's you know this great science based organization on the West Coast. It's also like very strong and biologics not so much small molecules at least in those days three year deal. You're going to come to a fork in the road and they'll decide whether they want to acquire the H. Two program or the bat the Bromo Domain Extra Terminal Domain Inhibitor Program. Right yes so. Their option was to acquire the company. So that's it was triggered by data from either one of those two programs but they had to take the whole company or or not. Okay so how did this partnership go from the outside? I do know we're aware that after three years were up. Genentech decided to walk away. Yeah so I was there for maybe the first almost a year of it and certainly After that I wasn't I'd never front row seat to it but I think it was a challenging It was it was a fruitful partnership where there was you know very very good science that was generated but I think it was challenging for sure I think for for both sides. I would likely say where. Constellation had a very We were used to doing things the way that we wanted to do. And all of a sudden we've got. We've got someone that we're working with and you've got a really GonNa bend to a little. Bit of the compromise of what their their needs are too and this is one of the things that companies need really need to keep in mind as you're entering partnerships. Is that anytime to working with a larger company even even through the best of intentions. They've got likely a much larger portfolio in a much different set of decisions that they're managing than you are and And that certainly was the case with which Where where we felt that you know. Hey We've got this great program that moving forward we want. We want unleash Resources in a way that we would have done narrowly in a much more Much less risk averse manner and for Genentech it was like well we gotta take it to the RC. And and you know it's GonNa Compete against you know everything else portfolio before we decide to kind of in these those resources and so certainly Issues like governance and things of that nature became quite clear as the importance of of of those types of things and I think those those ends up being challenging for constellation engine intact to really align on over the years and while. I don't think anyone really likes to say this. But probably had some impact on on why they chose not to acquire the company to its natural tension between small and large company. You've got a couple of programs that are your your bread and butter and it's like do or die with and there's an. There's an urgency and speed a focus that comes with and and that's just not not the nature of of a larger company. But as you say they've got other things to do but but okay so three years come up and then they walk and I remember now. You weren't there at this time. You had left as you said you had found some other things to do with third rock and there was this company jounce. I don't really want to spend any time on your period at jealous but constellation a they. They held like a little independence party in tweeted about fifteen and I remember like I think a lot of people looked at like. Wait a minute and then tack walks. That doesn't really look good like maybe maybe it's just not that power promising right. I mean really hot stuff. Genentech would've bought the company. Wait a minute you guys are having a party. What's that about. Yeah Yeah so. Probably NOT. The best choice of means to us But but just knowing with the company was going through. I understand why that happened. At the way the deal was structured. Genentech trying to figure out which was going to do for quite some time. and Genetic every last second that they could take and so You know which was probably quite frustrating for the folks that Constellation An you know especially going into through two thousand fourteen fifteen which was the some of the hottest capital market years in the public market in having that kind of pass them by was probably quite frustrating to see so I understand it You're probably not the the the wisest choice of Internet. Memes the US though. Okay so you in two thousand thirteen. Just as a short detour. You go to John's. You're one of the very first employees. They're building up. That Cancer Immunotherapy Company. Cross town really grew that up into a nice success so one hundred employees took that thing public but then twenty I guess twenty seventeen. You get a call from someone. I guess on the Board at Constellation like Hey. Hey Jaeger You WanNa come back so we actually had a It was it was one of those moments again whereas quite clear that after four x four and a half years at a challenge. We did a really nice deal with cell gene And we took the company public And so you for from a strategic perspective I felt like I had accomplished a lot. And where the company need to go was more? I guess experts in certain areas. You know things like You know financing an execution mode and that's kind of where I was at least at that time and so it. It just became apparent to me that you know it was. It was likely the right time to look something new and so I talked about it actually pretty openly with the leadership at at at Johns as well as Some of the board members at at Jounce one of those was Bob Pepper in. Bob Was a common board member between Constellation and Jones And we talked about a number of different things. I talked about You know joining up with Iraq Becoming ER and helping them launch new company and then in those discussions. Bob Said you know. Hey Bill you know your old company doesn't have right now and things are a little bit complicated and You know really we can maybe use some new leadership in help To to get things on track and you know this would be an opportunity to To jump into something. That's not a nascent idea. But rather you know pretty mature organization and if you can get back on track it'll be it'll be pretty significant pretty quickly and probably more quickly than than Brand new idea that you work with us on and so so really it great. I mean you know Bob said you can do either one You Love we love to have either wine and It wasn't the obvious move. I think You know most most most folks probably would have said I WANNA go do the the hot new star Trek but but remember. I actually never wanted to leave. Constellation to begin with. I still had a lotta great friends there. I really believe in science so I decided to dive in and learn about what was there and You know what what went wrong and You know after doing working kind of looking at that for a few weeks. You really got the conviction that we could Figure things out And probably rather quickly as well so I took on that challenge. You were the chief business officer at jounce so the senior leadership team but this also represents the chance to come in for the first time as a CEO to to really put your stamp on things. Run things and by this time. You're you're about forty I guess about that. Yeah Yeah so. He almost own the. I just turned forty. That's right so you're right. You've got enough experience. The right kind of experience. You know this field well this this appeal to you and but by this time epigenetics is kind of old news right. Everybody's like hot over gene. Editing and gene therapy is back again right so this was like not the obvious. Hot New thing. Yeah you know but but I I actually have a really good perspective on that sort of thing. I mean I remember when I first started working in the Biotech Industry Cell Therapy Gene. Therapy were dirty words. You wouldn't you wouldn't go near that stuff with a ten foot pole in so I sorta felt like we were in the early innings of understanding. What the power of epidemics could be In in the main thing that I thought was missing and this was actually a great lesson I learned from my climate giants was. We were all about translational science at Johns Linking linking patient populations to biology in the drug discovery was the piece that was more enabled in certainly molecules. It was readily enabled But we were missing you. We had interesting targets. We had a very very interesting biochemistry and even early biology but we were really feeling our way through the dark on who the patients were that we're going to benefit from this and the early clinical testing was was really kind of Not really driven by the suspect by Margaret Strategies. In the ones that were that were there weren't necessarily You know deep enough or through well enough to really kind of pan out and so what. I noticed that we had we so we had multiple programs that were active as single agents New but we weren't seeing the blazing signals that you'd see in your targeted oncology like In the cases where were the driving mutations and that's not necessarily gonNA see in genetics but there but I did feel that. There was a way to to identify a biomarker driven context of drug development and it will take more effort and it was taken investment earlier. The situation that you entered here taking the job in two thousand seventeen coming back to be. Ceo At constellation mostly preclinical. Had there been some some clinical work done with these two programmes. Yes so actually. So I mean that was the beauty of it. It means so here. Here's a company that Has Two programs that are in the clinic that had shown single agent activity in cancer in so so? I found that just kind of on on on the face of it to be very attractive. Rates of the challenge was in what? Constellation didn't do a good job of coming out of the genetic partnership was really define. Hauer going to get these drugs. Approved that the mindset that we were in was more enroll patients in looks look for signal in them will figure things out. Rather than going to mapping out a true strategy but how to get a drug approved and we didn't really have the team to do it either. We had a a clinical development team of three people And so it was. It was really not very clear that the strategy was to sell the company to Genentech when that didn't pan out You the more F- into independent companies. All right it was still. It was still chugging along with that same strategy but without without the option to be acquired So I saw that as a very clear Just by just what needed to be done with so clear to me We had programs in the clinic. They were working. But but we didn't have the right after registration mapped out. You needed to zero in specifically on the right indication or the right patient population within an indication. Yes that was the fundamental piece of it. So so we a leadership team You know he said look. We're about ten years old at the time. Were coming up on our tenth anniversary and so we were not in a place where we were going to be able to take a long time to figure things out and so one of the things that we wrote out really a one-sentence vision statement captured. Everything that we would do In that was part of that was to launch a drug in the next five years And then also have a pipeline that was translation -ly driven where we'd be able to identify who the patients were n be able to have the biomarker strategies in place to pursue those first trials. We passed that we were out of the gate already with that needs to programs so we have to backfill some of that and that was the mindset that we went out with and everyone bought into that but but that made it super clear then so okay we want to launch. In five years the lead programs were both being developed and lymphoma. This was in two thousand seventeen. Your car keys. Were about to be improved Episode was ahead of us in in infomer- freeze each to their multiple different combination studies at Ron. Going WITH. You know different different arguing so it just became clear that if we're GONNA launch dragging five years. It wasn't going to be well and you've she put you've got other things to worry about too. I mean you got you know no more money. Research Support Conference Genentech. So you got a raise some money. You got to recruit some people in clinical development in particular. And you've got to I. I would imagine deal with all this external negativity in the world because I bet I like the first six months or a year. The first question anybody wants to ask you is like why did GENENTECH Walk that question? The other question was how is this different design and I don't get those questions at all anymore and so really happy that we were able to kind of you know traverse through that. But but you're right I mean but in part of getting folks to You understand in one invest in the story was to demonstrate that we could execute on the New Vision. That did require You know substantially more thing. The team You know we we brought in a new. Cmo We brought in a new head of business development and you. Cfo New legal We promoted somebody from within the CFO in so is pretty much. A brand new team Almost top to bottom except for a couple of exceptions and you needed to do a couple bridge financing. I mean how much money was in the bank. Run on fumes after a while. Yes so I mean. The great news is that we had very very committed. Investors in particular of the column group was Was tremendous and they you know. They had strong conviction that the science underlying science at Constellation was strong. And they were gonNA stick with it and not only did they stick with it but they actually Put together And this is even before I got there a syndicate investors of their their own limited partners to support the company. And that was that was a blessing and a curse at the same time because I think it also It didn't put pressure on the management team to really figure things out You know without that that that kind of cushion that they had there but they had raised post Raised one hundred million dollars Or at a year and a half period. You're not in danger of running out of money. Yeah but we didn't have a year of cash either so we had to figure things out quickly and we did have to raise extra capital and so so one of the things that had to do was to get these various In the three major investors in the company were still in the Column Group Third Rock and Rock and they all have very different ideas about how to create value And and getting them all aligned around a strategy to To ESSENTIALLY RECAP. The company was not simple and had to prove to them. That wasn't going to be possible to finance the company the way that we had been all the while In the science we had to you know get moving into clinical development to get moving in your direction to actually attracting capital But but you know I play ball with them to to to try to raise capital at kind of a flat round You know we weren't gonNA be able to do that and so we did. We did eventually you know could have all the same time kind of lightning struck a bottle we had new important. Clinical data emerge from One of the programs that were in the clinic At the time that we need to raise money And we were able to pull together. Probably it was the in two thousand. Eighteen is by the biggest crossover round in year. One hundred million dollar round and in an I drove up. Personally evaluation down Because I because it to get to where we need to get to Targeting hundreds of millions of dollars and I needed evaluation to be in a place that it could support. Not just that round but the future around the IPO. In onwards right. Because that was a crossover around you're aiming toward an IPO hopefully later in the year correct. Yeah that's right okay. Okay so what was that piece of data does that gave you. And the investors confidence there in early eighteen so this was a new direction that we took our easy extreme program into CPI 1205 and we recognize that That prostate cancer was an indication. Where it easy to end Hypersensitivity guess where we're there was synergy between engine receptor signaling Took us to thinking about where we can apply that tune. That was in second line that static castration resistant. Prostate cancer in once a patient fails and they are therapy. Usually take another one doesn't work that well and with a synergy that we're seeing in the preclinical work that we had done. That was a good application for that. That was outside of infomer- where where competitors for and You know the the first three patients that we treat it had these blazing responses they had their. Psa drop eighty percent in one patient. Had their own mess disappeared had A partial response by resist which is quite rare to see in prostate cancer. Not got it went pretty pretty excited okay. So and those are well established drugs. And if you're showing benefit above of aberration or ends Luta Meyde like that's pretty clear big market prostate cancer. A lot of people understand it that that's a story you can tell okay. But what about this bet program? And how did you end up on Milo fibrosis as the the right indication? It's in the meantime we had in the background we had we had this data and after merging and it was a little bit less slow-burn so we we were you know the the Achilles Heel venevision has always been on target cumulative irreversible And that's why we haven't seen more Advanced the clinic thrombosis Pini for those unfamiliar. It's like a decrease of platelets bleeding can lead to bleeding episodes. That's right correct. Yes and so we will. We noticed with. Cpi Zero six ten is that we had a very different profile. We did see on target beside opinion. Play the reduction but it was not irreversible it was not cumulative and we had a nice window to work with where we saw activity at a whole range of doses below the maximum tolerated dose where we saw You decided Pena as those toxicology and so we dug into investigating can what was behind that and that led led us to The biology behind a myeloid cells And specifically the differentiation. A MINUTE CELLS INTO MILITARY SITES. A military sites are the key cells that create platelets the ones that are that are being inhibited by bet nutrition but but there was an insight there again this is going back to the translational mindset that those are also the cells in the bone marrow that are proliferating that are crowding unhealthy cells that are damaging the environment by spewing out kind of inflammatory cytokines. And so that if we can if we have this window that we can take advantage of that no other Has been able to that. Maybe that maybe we could We could provide a respite to the bone. Marrow to heal in articulated that One of the clinical investigators was working with us a runoff in Mount Sinai said it was really Enticed by the idea in order to try it we we we. Kinda we Kinda took a flyer on it and we modified our anal- trial which we're about to bring to a close end. Just let him enroll patients in those patients all started responding to so we had these these two programs which were Kinda struggling to find a footing now. Both of them were seeing these blazing responses into different areas. That we cannot conceive before and Milo fibrosis for people not familiar. I mean it's just like the name Sounds Milo. It's the blood. Forming cells fibrosis scarring or damage. That happens in the bone marrow and it's often been thought of as a pre leukemia syndrome. But I don't think people call it that anymore. I mean it's it's really like its own form of cancer in early cancer and its effects quite a few people a tens of thousands. It's not a very very tiny indication and there's not a lot there I lot of people have tried there's Jack Affi- now the JAK inhibitor. But not a lot more so like I. I'm sure he's sizes all up and thought maybe there's a role for us. Yeah absolutely especially with the results that we were seeing. I mean the patients that Ron Hoffman and enrolled in the study. Were probably the sickest of the sick patients in these all these patients most of them had mutations that predict for non-responsiveness to Jack Affi- You know these patients were a very very poor prognostic factors role anemic. One of the four patients was transfusion dependent getting transfused as a result of their their bone marrow. Not doing its job. They were unable to produce. Enough red blood cells they relied on blood transfusions. Every every three or four weeks that patient is is now you know the last time we reported results in this patient was April. Seventeen than this patient was sixty nine weeks without a blood transfusion and counting At least six months now so so So that's been a those are the results that we're seeing But you know remember this was. We took a flyer on this. We amended our email protocol. It wasn't quite ready to be a full-fledged Ms Study we kind of we had one site. When investigators enrolling patients we really had some operational work to do to get that kind of moving in the right direction. But but jigger pause here you through studying your the cleanliness. Let's say of the side effect profile. Is that how you came to better articulate that mechanism about the activity with dampening down the NF Cap Abi and the Tgif Beta signaling? Which is a big part of the problem. Yes so precisely. I mean one of the things that we do know about about innovation that does have an effect impacted. Inflammation and inflammation is a big part of of m. f. But but the new insight was really this insight around Myeloid cell differentiation and The the the cells that are responsible for reducing platelets are also the cells responsible for a driving disease or causing the disease in. So we've we if we have a window there Where we can affect those cells without having rampant opinion without without was the key insight. And that's that's really played out where we're actually modifying patients. Disease in fibrosis is reversing Scarring the bone. Marrow is actually getting better which is a very rare to see So so it's really. It's really going to play out in the exactly the way that we hoped it would well so this you started with the science. I mean you had people who had been working for long long years on the science and now you're you're finding a patient population that that looks promising. And that's when you decided to prioritize this manifest study with multiple cohorts both the sickest patients and some who are treatment naive and this is the data that you are now preparing to present here at Ash. The abstracts are up. There live on the website. You've announced it. And this is the part that made me and I think the stock market say wow for for people who who have not seen it. You're looking at a variety of different end points. Here it's a little different with mile fibrosis than your typical cancer. Looking at tumor shrinkage. You're looking at things like spleen. Volume reduction total symptoms scores. But you're seeing ninety more than ninety percent like twenty nine of the. I thirty one patient seeing spleen volume reduction and total symptoms score. Two Thousand six hundred twenty eight patients seeing improvements in their symptoms ninety three percent. I mean wow and not just a little but like a lot of improvement. Yeah and so. These are the patients that have specific data referring to are the patients that have already failed Jack Affi- and really don't have any other options. I mean there's there's recently at another Jack Inhibitor. That was approved that looks very similar in. They have a bit more of a safety hurdle. So so there's really not much available to these patients And and sort of see these types of effects none not just in the spleen symptom but symptoms but also reversing their fibrosis in the in the bone marrow and then also seeing that translate into natural improvements in hematology function like hemoglobin increases now. These patients aren't as tired as they were. They don't need to get transfused as often patients have become completely transition independent And so those are pretty striking effects. The challenge In that context is that there's nothing approved in this post Jack Affi- setting in. So how do you think about the right? End Points How do you think about you know the right studies to do to get a drug approved even though we have really striking compelling data is not simple and we do have We do have things that we think our path forward there. But but that's kind of what led us then thinking about well We've got this ability to to have this impact on patients we at. You've already shown that we can combine six ten with Jack Affi- And have an effect and also do it safely and so that leads the Aha moment that we should perhaps not just focus on the jacka fi failures as our primary strategy. But rather shift or primary strategy to Jack Jack inhibitor naive patients so essentially move frontline and try to establish a new standard care and so there was a second abstract also published that showed our first four patients in the Jack in Hebron is setting all had a response both on spleen and symptoms in those. Those are the points that you'd use for an approvable study and so now all of a sudden it became crystal clear how to get the drug approved As well as a much larger opportunity to change standard of care and really essentially grow the IMF You know the you know the the number of patients that could benefit from therapy. M F canal grow Exited the number of patients who can't tolerate Jack by now now. We pitching access those patients and provide them therapy. And so I think that's the major excitement is all about. I think people really really excited about the second line data but the possibility of of doing something new in the first line setting even though it's a small number of patients I think has gotten really really everyone's attention treatment naive patients. Now it's still as you say. Small numbers four out of four four patients but That's really encouraging. And you're seeing a greater magnitude of improvement on the screen volume reduction and the total symptoms. Then you did. In the sicker patients which again is encouraging. And as far as safety goes the throne beside a Pina and the anemia that you might expect it's it's down. Below fewer than ten percent of the patients assessed yes point. That's right yet again. Speaks to the the differentiated profile of six ten versus other bet inhibitors and also versus Jacka. Fine I mean so one of the things that you'd expect with Jack. Affi- is at forty five percent of patients would have grade three four India in the first few months of treatment and insofar were worse. We're somewhere on ten percent And these were actually patients that were anemic to begin with And so again the that if we're we're actually able to Help the main reason. We're one of the main reasons why patients don't buy that. Could that could be tremendously helpful to expand the opportunity in okay. So you're going to present an updated cut of this data at ash correct. That's right yeah more patience with a little more follow up. Is that what we can expect? Yeah so what we'll have in the. We'll have two different presentations. One will be oral presentation. They'll be focused on our Jessica fire resistant. Second Line patients and in there. We have a very nice mature. Data will have forty plus patients that have no longer follow-up we would see the ability of the effects of six ten in a larger number of patients And then we'll have a first glimpse was in the ash abstracts in we'll have now ten to fifteen maybe closer to fifteen patients worth of data in the Jack in Hebron context as well. Okay Okay and this is setting the table for an ambitious new clinical development program like a pivotal set of studies in twenty twenty. That's right we're we're we're gearing up right. Now we're doing all the blocking tackling in the preparing to launch a pivotal trial or a phase three study in mid twenty twenty We also did announce that we've expanded a number of the cohorts in the face to study so there could be upside opportunity. The where or those two cohorts could lead to some regulatory interactions. That means still exploratory. But there could be offset opportunities but the base cases that we'd start a phase three in mid twenty twenty. I mean it's really all happened pretty quickly. I mean you know you've only been here for two years in your return or two and a half years coming up in three years yet. You know this thing. Was you know it was kind of a little drifts for a while? You know it got on track. You took this thing public at fifteen bucks a share. I think as of this recording or somewhere around forty. Maybe you've got a clear path. Forward here with Milo fibrosis. We haven't even really talked about easy. H. Two but that's still alive to. Where do you think this thing is going to go here in the next four five? You're not going to quit after four years. I I tell you. That's not the plan. That's not the plan. The most proud about really is is the team that we built I mean it's truly a remarkable group of people That we have you on the executive team as well as You know people supporting them. and we all get along really well We all understand each other. We have our moments but everyone knows becoming a good place in the all rely on each other and help each other And that's a major portion of the culture in a major major reason. Why I think we've been able to Chievo achieved and the goal is to keep pushing that Where we've could transition the company into from early development too late development last couple of years. The goal is to take the next step into going to build out internalized Those late development pieces also think about commercialization And so so. That's what we're building towards you know like several other companies ahead of us have done and so there's a roadmap. I I think to follow their but but You know building that team in having the Sustainable Jin and you're right. We haven't talked much about easy to have multiple each two inhibitors. That are now in the clinic as well as a discovery pipeline where we Reimagined rethought some things but we think that it's sustainable and so our vision is to create the next flea integrated by company. It's really awesome to hear jigger and I can hear it coming through your voice that that resilience in that it takes to get to get through a rough patch because all companies through it at some point or another. Yeah that's right and then the enemy comes from those early days. Spent in my parents store the resilience aspect of it. Well thanks very much for joining me. And Best of luck Hadash. Okay thanks a lot. I really appreciate it. And and good luck to you on your Your next flying. Okay thank you. Thanks for listening to the long run. A production of report or Assad of stepper media was the sound editor. Music comes from. Da Wallich see you next episode.

Constellation Genentech CEO scientist Nanna systems rutgers NANNA systems New York City partner New Jersey Luke Timmerman jigger Mark Levin US Columbia DOT COM Constellation Pharmaceuticals
201  Automating Your Home

AppStories

42:29 min | 3 d ago

201 Automating Your Home

"We are back with another episode of apps stories. I'm john voorhees and of course with me. Is our editor in chief of max stories. Dot net federico vitucci federico. What's new well. Hello hi i'm i'm working on. I'm working on a bunch of things. I'm i'm slowly catching up to work after taking a bit of a holiday break. Okay the top of my list. I guess content wise because admin wise working on a bunch of things for max and all of our other properties in twenty twenty one but content wise so simply the list the the annual list of my. You must have apps for iphone ipad. This is a an article that i've been doing for the past. I don't think ten years. But i'm approaching that number. I think i've been doing this forever. Really and used to be an article that i published in in december and then last year or a couple of years ago. I think i started publishing the article in january. And that's because i wanted to account for the fact that in the in the final part of the year i always take a lot of time to rethink the opposite. I use and to You know get rid of a of a lot of betas of apps that downloaded in september. You know for the review season of us. And which. I never deleted from my devices. Talk always take that time in november and december to you know to clean up a lot of different things and i figured it's really inconvenient to to publish that story in december as i'm going through that process and so i started doing this a while back in january but now my i guess my the thing that i'm considering on thinking all right now is should that article be a reflection of how the previous year went so when i published the have apps twenty twenty addition i guess he should be a reflection of of twenty twenty right because it's titled here's the opposite. I used twenty twenty. However i already know for example we talked about spotify and i already know that in two thousand twenty one i am going to be using spotify. So is the article a reflection of the year that was or is it a summary of the year that was with a preview of what it's going to be the following year. You following me like shoot up. He like here's what happened in in january to the from january to december or should he be. Here's how i'm approaching the new year based on how twenty twenty went and i'm not sure i'm leaning toward. Here's what my must have. Apps were for twenty twenty spotify is the main issue right now because i started using spotify in december shire's the last month of the year and i decided i'm going to be using these for the entirety of two thousand twenty one. So does he qualify as a master of app for the twenty twenty round up or not. That's my main question that that's the thing that i'm considering the moment given how much you and i switch apps all throughout the year. There's a there's a legitimate question is any app. Must have app at this point. I don't know well. That's and that's what makes assembling these article really challenging for me right. Because i have a collection. You know in the sixty or seventy ops. That i'm going to cover. I do have a collection of utilities and apps the never change right. I still my main text editor craft. Of course it's the that i've been using for the for the past four months as my only know taking up. That's going to be in the list Reader that's not going away. The official twitter up. That's what i use. But there's other categories where. I like to switch around because those are the kinds of sanctions on the app store. Where there's a lot of innovation there's a lot of There's a lot of different developers trying different things trying different approaches and so for example one of the things that was beneficial in the over. The holidays was i thought a lot about us. Good task order on us to do east and that was useful. Because i used to good task for the better part of twenty twenty but then i got an amazon echo and i started thinking. Do i actually want us to do. Because it sparing together with the echo. But through the entire process. I realized i value the customization and the integration with my devices of good task reminders. More than i do for to do it and the echo. So even though i like to switch around. It's not like. I'm trying to different task manager every week right the fence that i drew the fact that i talk about me trying different things and you know sometimes people see shop of like an icon on my home screen like oh so you switched again like that. I just. I just run all of these different tests. Because i like to know what's out there but it's not necessarily a commitment right right spotify. Spotify is the only the only really particular situation going on this time around right. Well that makes sense. I mean i think one of the tricks is when you try a lot of task. Managers is when you switch just to leave some old tasks in at least that apps i can go through and tested again really easily and build from there because i know i've done that with with a bunch of them. All right federico. I want to dive into our main topic today. Because i have an awful lot to talk to you about okay when it comes to homekit because we're gonna talk about home kit today and moderation and this is something that's been on my mind for a couple of reasons recently. I've got a bit of a story to tell you. Federico okay go on. I'm ready for your story. Alright so right. Around the time. I started testing the homepod mini and i recently reviewed the homepod mini. I had a bit of a home kit disaster. I have been having some icloud troubles. And you're aware this. I've mentioned this a few times here and there on our group thread and what happened i. I really don't know what happened to be honest. But for a while apple. Arcade was stuck. I'm you know. I've got a A an apple one premier bundle and arcades part of that and arcade. On all my devices. I'd go and it would say sign up for arcade. I couldn't get any of the games and i was dealing with apple support. Not really getting anywhere and then one day. I had one of those ideas for a project. Which was i thought i would do. A push cut shortcut server on an old ipad and have really. And i wasn't even sure this. I think this this might be a first janai pad that i have and i hadn't charged up in a long time and i thought you know i'm going to charge this upturn on and see if it supports that app and i did. I turned it on. It asked me to log into my home cloud account. I did and magically my arcade issues all went away without apple support doing any think the downside was is that it simultaneously wiped out all the data in the home app on every single device. That yeah it was gone. It was just the home was gone. The devices were gone. It was an empty app giving me the prompt. Like i'd never opened it before and i just bought my first iphone and i have a fair amount of home kit stuff and so that was kinda distressing but it was still the holidays and i still had the weekend of new year's to rebuild everything which ultimately is what i did instead of dealing with apple support because i just figured while it's a hassle to do i could do it relatively quickly when i had a little extra time instead of instead of having the frustration of dealing with support calls so i did that what was really difficult about it turned out. Was that while everything was in the u. I had been blown away. The home app somehow still knew about the most of the devices which required me then to go through an half to restart all any kind of device. The had some kind of restart capability which is usually like things that are attached to you know have some memory of a of a wifi connection or something like that so i had to go through and do that which made the process slower but the the silver lining is. I went through and i redid everything and i reset up. Everything from scratch tried a bunch of new apps. Thought about what. I've got automated. And what i don't want to have automated and went from there so i've got. I've got a homekit on the mind because it's only been a couple of weekends since is you know i did this. Leisurely processed to not frustrate myself. Too much i. I started with the the the really important things. Like the lights in my studio and things like that and then fanned out from there and each over. The course of two or three days spent like an hour here. They're just putting it together. It probably took me three or four hours to get all completely reset up but now everything is working in. it's great so i guess it all zell all's well that ends well but i'm deathly afraid of opening up that ipad ever again. I have no idea what happened when the i walked into my on that thing. That sounds wild. Wow it's weird. And i've since had some issues still with i cloud on one of my max and i think i may have flushed out all the problems by by sinaia that mac and then signing back in later but who knows i mean. That's the problem with icloud. You never really know if you've solved the problem or what things just get stuck sometimes all right so everything is back to normal now though right it is everything is back to normal okay. So can you describe your your home automation. Your your home sat up I i think it's important for people to get a sense of like the number of accessories that you have I talked about mind before. I live in a very small apartment. We basically like our devices now. And i'm going to talk about my setup later but at the moment all we have is five. Smart lights All made by phillips a couple of door sensors made by and We don't have any homepods in our household anymore We're going to talk about that in a few minutes Okay but basically all we have is like to apple. Tv's smart lights. Couple of door sensors which i use for the custom home security system. I put together But that's about it. We don't have any doorbells within have any an nato weather station that works both be a with homekit and the amazon echo. But i don't use it in. I have homekit about. I don't really use it there And that's about it. We didn't have any. Oh yes of course. I'm forgetting cameras. We have three cameras. And that's it no other fancy. You know i see all these people would like doorbells and You know these smart blogs that turn on all kinds of different accessories we don't we don't have those and once again john you've seen it. It's a very small apartment and writes a we're renting so that we cannot make them any modifications to our current setup. That is true so let me. I guess top level to discuss what my set up is is. It's really a home kit only system. Now i mean there are plenty of devices that also will work with google assistant or amazon alexa. But i'm using everything from the starting point of. I'm not going to buy something that doesn't have home kit. And it wasn't always that way. Because i've had an amazon echo before too but i found that having some sort of mixed environment like that where you're relying on different assistance for different types of devices just to be just became a recipe for frustration and complexity where home automation is still a little complex at times to begin with and adding various providers of different systems. All into the mix at once. Is i think just a little too much. And it was more at least more than i wanted to take on. So i've settled on. Get because while. I don't love the home app in some respects. I mean we've talked about this before. It's not great on the iphone. Because i in those big square tiles to take up too much space There are alternative apps that you can use and those tiles are fine on the mac and on the ipad for me so i i think that app is come a long way and it's a lot better. It's not. it's far from perfect. But i'm i'm a lot happier with it now especially on things like the ipad where you have the rooms aligned on the left hand column so it's a it's a new design but i guess i should. I should dive into what the setup looks like and it's unite talked about this a little bit before we started. which is. it's a little counterintuitive. I suppose that the areas of my house that are the most automated are the ones where people are around. Least and i think that that's driven in part by a couple of things. One is that not everybody in. My family is as enthused about home automation as i am. And on top of that there's no real system to detect presence and by presence. I mean like knowing. It's not just geofencing your home and having things happen when you come and go. It's who's at home. And where are they in the house type thing because if we had that with the home app and with homekit i think you could get a lot further with automation and do a lot more interesting things. But you know maybe that's going to happen some day with the u. One chip but right. Now there's not a real good way to to do that but we should probably start outside. Because i've found this has been one of the one of the best places for my home kit devices. I've got a couple of logitech circle to cameras. Circle view two cameras out there as well is a logitech doorbell. That's brand new. It's the circle view doorbell. That just came out like two or three weeks ago. And i've been they set me one to task. I've been tested in right about on the site at some point But that's out there too as well as garage door openers. I've to garage doors on my garage. So there's a garage door opener for each home kit and a garage. I mean come on. that's set. You got going it is. It is and the garage door openers. Work well except when they fall off the network. Because you know it's separated from the house it's the it's not attached to the house so separate from the house and the wi fi is pretty good there but not great because you know the the garage door. Receiver is behind closed door most the time. It's not like the garage. Door is open all the time so when she close it sometimes falls off the network but for the most part that actually works pretty well And then. I have a lock that i reviewed recently. It's a level touched lock. That's on my unwanted my doors to and that's been pretty nice as well. The thing i really like about carplay is that as i get towards my house homekit pops up a little tile showing me my garage door and it's been trained by the fact that i usually drive. Just i have a car that i normally am the one driving and so it knows which of the two garage doors to display. I tap it. I'm a block away. It's opened by the time i pull in. My driveway is just kind of nice to have that very easy to use the the the the lock is great too because in a one of the things about locks and i wrote this in the review you have to be really careful because unlike a normal lock that you might have on your home where you can. If your door doesn't line up perfectly you can kind of turn extra hard or you can kinda push the door a little. You can get lined up manually as you close the door. You have to have it. Perfect for one of these automated systems and that was hardest thing about getting this installed. What's nice about it though. Is that now. If i'm working i have it set up so it automatically unlocks during the weekday when my wife comes home from work so she doesn't have to be from looking for a key. She just walks in the house and during the day. It's locked because i'm often wearing headphones. Listening to loud music. And i wouldn't hear of someone walked in the back door So those are nice touches. The other thing worth mentioning to the doorbell isn't logitech. Logic cameras are the best cameras. I have tried of any because one. They are always on the network. That seem almost never drop off and the feeds start almost immediately which is not true with every camera. I've tried And the doorbell is particularly nice. Because it's got hdr built into it and what it's doing what what enables is that it you know at night when you're looking at your cameras and the lights are off. If you have a logitech circle view for instance everything looks kind of black and white but with this camera. It's doing some processing inside the camera to actually give everything a little color so it doesn't even need much light. If it's a little bit of light you can see it and it just makes it easier to see what's going on through the camera and having the the doorbell before i had one of the circle views looking down from above the front door looking almost straight down which is fine. You see kind of the tops of the heads of people who had come to the front door but it was great for packages right with the doorbell. You get a bit more natural. I guess point of view of when someone approaches the door. And because it's a wide view angle lens you can still see the packages and for me really there. Aren't that many people coming to our door most days. It's it's really packages that are coming more often than not so nice to have that nice to have that that they're the other main areas that i've got homekit devices in our my studio which is in the basement of her house. Okay which is and that's mostly just that's mostly just lights I've got overhead lights and a table lamp and a standing a floor lamp. That are all there And those these lights are probably the most automated in the house. Because i've got a motion sensor that sits near the top of the stairs that when i start heading into the basement to work it detects the motion at turns all the lights on for me which is just kind of nice There's a smart plug down here to which i use connected to a heater and that heater keeps me warm in the winter time so i can and i do things like you know. Space heaters can be dangerous. You don't wanna start a fire in your house. So i have a bunch of automations set up so that when the lights go off in the basement the heater automatically goes off to that sort of things that i don't accidentally leave it running all day long because that one there's nobody down here So that that those are all cubes and you know. I'm pretty happy with you bob. Except that i don't like the fact that there's a separate hub you have to have and i've found that sometimes you bulbs if they're a little bit too far away from other jobs or the or the or the hub that they can become unresponsive in the home app and that's been a problem for me over time. It's gotten better recently. I don't know if that's a firmware thing that's made them better homekit saying or or what it is but they've gotten better one one kind of light though that i've kind of keeping my eye on. Are these nanno leaf. Bulbs which apple sent me one when it sent The homepods miniature review and the nanno leaf bulbs use bluetooth. And they don't have a hub But they've they use they use thread to which is new right you know. It's not super new but thread is. It's a protocol for devices to communicate with each other. Said they don't have to rely on your wifi network so your wifi network can go down and there's still a mesh network of your thread devices right now. You know my mesh network is a mesh network of one. It's a single lightbulb. But what's nice about these national league bulbs and the nanna league is known for making those geometric shape panels. You can put on your wall that light up different colors. But now they're also making this This essentials line of of devices that includes regular light bulbs and light strips. A little bit more like what he does but there are a lot less expensive bulb from nanna leaf is like twenty dollars whereas from hugh. I think it's more like forty dollars something like that. So it's about half the price so that's worth keeping an eye on because thread to uses uses ip six. It's it's really low energies so that you can especially if you have things like your door and window sensors you'd be able to put a battery in those and it would. They would last for like two years because he's a so little power Which is something. That i'm interested in because i've been doing i've done some door and window sensors and like those eve ones a lot but you do have to replace the batteries every now and then and it'd be nice if they lasted a little bit longer beyond that main. I've got a lutron switch in my living room. That controls lights there. They aren't smart lights. They're just the lights that were in the You know what what what is which what does look like it. So it's a wall switch. It's dimmer switch right. it's it's was installed by electrician. I actually had a laotian installed fancy things while so it it. It's on the wall and it works like a regular light switch and connected to regular led bulbs that are in the ceiling And as a result because in the wall you can use it. This is one reason. It's nice for people who aren't as into homemade automation. As you might be is that you can use it manly you can turn it on or you can dim the lights just by pressing the buttons of. That's what you want to people. You mean your wife jennifer you've called her out and you know you know what i'm talking about and and as a result that we can do that and that works pretty well. I have kind of moved. Move the home automation. More into the main part of my house. That's the only thing in the in the real living broom area of our house that is automated those lights and because it has Because it has a manual. Switch that works. There's a. there's a front room in our house. It's a little bit off of that. That has Hue lights and this nanno leave to as well as our eco thermostat for the heating and cooling but that is a little off to the side and having it be controlled by the home. App is fine with everybody in the house I have expanded a little bit. There's a back entry into our house. That has some lights in it. I've automated those predictive camera back there that i was testing last year Just as a way you know. It's by our back door and that's where someone might come in. If i'm downstairs. Working listen to the music. I was talking about This way can kind of be alerted to when someone comes home. Or something's going on and i can do things like with the door sensor someone opens the back door. The lights just come on which is kinda nice. Because usually they're coming in from running errands. You might have your hands full with groceries or whatever it might be. You don't wanna have to deal with the lights so the lights just take care of themselves and they turn off after five minutes but yeah. Those are those the highlights. I mean. I have another hugh ball by my bedside on my bedside table for reading at night which is a nice along with the pod. Many but Yeah i think those are the main things i know. It's kind of a lot. it's it is so what are the different ways used to control these accessories like based on automation. Or do you actually use the like. Do you have shortcuts or do use the home app. Do you use siri requests. How does it work in practice. I think in practice. i use. Siri syrian awful lot to turn the lights on on and off. I mean i use siri with lights a lot so usually since we have homepods in our living room which is kind of a combined space with our kitchen. There's homepods are always kind of within earshot. So that if i forget to turn the lights off in my studio i just ask siri to do it. Or if for some reason the automation that turns off the lights by my back door after five minutes after five minutes from shuts the door. I can just ask siri to do. I do use a lot. But i do also use not so much scenes but more often automations. Where for instance. There's a humidifier connected to a smart plug by my back door. And when i also have one of those netapp mo- whether stations like you do and it has an indoor sensor that detects the amount of humidity in the house and in the winter when it gets really cold it can get really dry in the house too because the heat running so much. So if at ten pm the humidity level is below a certain percentage it automatically turns on and it runs at night. So that we'd have to listen to it Because we're upstairs sleeping and then in the morning it automatically shuts off like six. Am or something. So i use a lot of those kinds of automations or a motion sensor triggers. The lights by the back door five minutes later they shut it shuts off automatically so that if someone just forgets to shut off the lights you know they're probably in the back door and they're not using those lights anymore so i can shut it off automatically so that's the kind of thing i do. I use alerts. I suppose like during the day. I'll i'll have that if someone comes. Leaves something at the front door. I'll get the you know Homekit has detected a person alerts which is really good for packages. That's one thing i do. Okay so what about What about shortcuts. Not a lot really not a lot. Because i find that i use the i do use the home autumn. Probably start in the home app more often than anything else and i don't really combine the home automation functionality. In the home app with separate shortcut functionality. A need for that at all. So i don't. I don't do that a lot although i have at times. Use the remote keyboard and mouse app. That i've mentioned in clawback back stories from in maximum. His weekly a couple of times to do things like when the lights are shut off in my studio. Sleep the display of my mac. That kind of thing that that's kind of handy because it's it's an app on ios that can control different system features of a mac and it has shortcut supports. You can set it up to you. Know work with a with a home automation that way. Nice you gotta law going to. It's us to much. Sometimes i wonder i go through spurts of adding to it now and then i think about it pretty hard before i do only because i don't want to ever become something that i enjoy. It gets in the way of everybody else in my family and so far it's worked out pretty well. I think it's interesting because it put you just described you put in a different context like all of your complaints about the design of the home app on on a us. Have you found any like any improvements with. Us fourteen in the new the new sensor indicators that you got to the top of each room in the home app i've found those beneficial to successor. Is that you have. Yeah absolutely. I like it a lot. I mean it gives me surfaces information like the temperature humidity for instance A lot better than in the past. I also liked the fact that you go to a certain room. It will show their what light bulbs are on and you can just tap on it and shut them all off that way as opposed to dealing with the individual tiles. Think it's a really nice system You know you can you can. It can fill up pretty quickly if you have a lot of things in a room but for the most part even with the number of devices i have it. Hasn't that hasn't been a real a real problem for me. I've i've liked it a lot. All right well we just heard john. Talk about is very complex. Homekit setup for twenty minutes and mine is very different than i am. I cut back on homekit. A lot for reasons that i mentioned here an unconnected before and i think it was a you know these things happen gradually and then suddenly as the saying goes and we i guess i should say how we time we realized you know talking together. See van i how much we because we live in a small place and we done have a lot of things to control and we don't have a lot of control ourselves over you know. We cannot change the thermostat but cannot video doorbell that kind of stuff. We realized that we need a few things to work. Well and we dislike automations in the sense of things changing on a schedule you know automatically without our direct input because You know for example. We used to have an automation that changed the color of the lights in the bedroom to blue to a dame blue at nine thirty pm but then realized well. That doesn't always work. Because what if it's eleven thirty pm and we are in bed by. Were trying to get some work done. Steel we're using our ipads and mac and cds out of macbook. And we don't want to put the lights in the in the you know. I'm going to bed kinda mood and so realized it. Whenever we decide that it's time to relax and go to sleep. We want to change the color of the lights manually. And then at the same time you know all all of the issues that we had with with home pod with random siri activation 's and how i eventually realized i wanna try the amazon echo again. It was sort of gradual process that eventually become became a sutton urge to get rid of the homepods and embraced the amazon echo ecosystem. And that's all we did. We have Two echoes to We have two regular like last generation echo wanting to bedroom while in the kitchen and we have an old amazon echo spot in the in the in the hallway between rooms right And we been using this setup for the past month and a half at this point. And what i really like. How because of the nature of the echo in the ecosystem of skills and integrations surrounding it. We've been able to integrate with the few access series that we wanted to control without having to rely on something like home bridge for example which is discussing server to add homekit support to devices that do not really support home kicked out of the box and it's a custom server. They used to run on my mac mini. Which meant that every morning. I would have to turn on. My mac mini to make sure that home bridge would start. Because i also don't like to leave my mac mini running at night because it's in. It's like two meters away from our bed and we don't really like the you know. Sometimes he would spin up the fancy. We'll start noise season. We'd really like our dogs than really like it. Either because you know especially ginger thought it was like a mosquito or something and she will wake up and you know. She's very afraid of of insects for some reason. We don't know why so. Every morning i would have to wake up and turn on the make me to make sure that breach was working for any any forgot to do that. It meant that. My dyson purifier. For example or my tv would be unreachable in homekit that was part of like the frustration. And yes i could have gotten a raspberry pi and install home region raspberry pi and lee running all the time and i did but i found home reach to be super reliable when installed raspberry pi and it was much better. We're running terminal on mac. Os mcmenamy so. It was a combination of all those factors that eventually. I realized you know this could be so much simpler if i just use the echo instead and so one of the things that i'm noticing now is how for controlling my samsung. Tv in the kitchen. All i had to do was enabled. The smart things skill in the amazon echo. And that was it and the to control the dyson purifier. I just needed to enable dyson skill. And that was it arguing with my account and allow access to you know. I allow amazon to access my dyson devices. And that's it. And what i appreciate is how alexa turned. Tends to be pretty forgiven with the kind of syntax that you use so i can see like it just comes naturally to save things like hey mute. The kitchen tv right and that works and then. Today i noticed how i said on new to the kitchen tv and i didn't really know that i'm mute. Was commanded just came. Naturally any worked right worked. Because that's what i would say like a mute. The tv so the the things the fact that i can say those things and it understands my requests. And i can now which is also something that i cannot do with homepod if i want to. I can talk in either english or italian which is something that i'm learning to appreciate again because for so many years i forced myself to only talk to siri in english because the homepod at a hasn't been updated to support italian language which is incredible. So i'm having a really good time with a few accessories that want to control on a daily basis so my tv my lights and my dyson fan and purifier. They just work and in terms of controlling the lights. What else appreciate is how. All of the scenes that i created in the hugh app for for the the philips light once you embrace the echo ecosystem but once you're able discuss the the the hughes kill you no longer have the problem of like the mismatch between scenes. You know sometimes you and you have the mismatch using that way. Yeah between you and homekit. And now i just don't care about it anymore because all the scenes that i created you are accessible right at the echo and one more thing that i want to say. He's how the echo as these really cool feature that he didn't use to have it years ago when i last tried the echo. But now it's it's one of the one of the core features of the experience routines so we routines you can say. It's like a way like shortcuts on our. Us what you can do is essentially. You can assign a custom phrase to a series of actions so you can put together a series of actions. You can say. Hey when i say these custom phrase do these in these in this and then you you have a single phrase that triggers a bunch of stuff. But we'll see what's also more interesting is how you can sign a custom freeze like a shorter phrase for a longer request so for example when i out when i wanna know the temperature outside normally the default phrase would be hey assistant asking tot more about the temperature outside but with a routine i was able to create a shorter phrase which is which just assistant check temperature outside so when i say that it simulates me asking the longer question and returns the data from the nataatmaja weather station outside so i can simplify the phrases that i would normally have to ask the echo. We routines and custom and custom implication praises. So there's also very cool and then of course there's the audio component and how you know the acco supports spotify fico but that's something else we talked about it last week ray right for home control. I guess i'm just having a really good time. First of all with the right with the reliability of it all the factory. It's based any pence to work all the time. There's no longer a concern of a mismatch between homekit between hugh that kind of stuff but also the freedom to talk in either language. I'm rediscovering the pleasure. Never had it. Because i never really had it. I never had with the homepod an ever had with the echo years ago. Yeah no i totally understand that. And i think in a way our approaches. Aren't that different in the sense that my system that i've got at my home is obviously complex from the standpoint that i have a lot of different things but i've never used home bridge because i just really don't wanna go down the complexity path with whom bridge and the things that i automate are pretty sparse for instance. I don't think i mentioned it. But the main automation is just the lights outside lights on my garage and lights over the front door and those are set up to go on on on and off on a schedule at sunset and at dawn and that works because unlike the situation you're talking about when you're sitting in bed and you may not want to be winding down to go to sleep. That doesn't happen outside because everybody's inside so it's okay for that sort of situation but i've run into the exact same thing over and over again. It's like i thought. I'll put a motion sensor somewhere near my desk and if it doesn't detect motion for thirty minutes all the lights downstairs chicago off. Well that's fine unless in the other part of the room my son is playing the. Ps four which happens to be kind of across the room from me because then he'll be down here playing a game and the lights go off on him. And that's that's what i mean by presence and and maybe better smarts as to what exactly is happening in your home beyond just you know motion sensors in that sort of thing. So yeah. I have kept the the automation somewhat. Simple as a result of that. And i i do think siri has gotten better. I know that you've had a very bad experience with siri personally. And i think the homekit part of it has gotten better over time in terms of the commands. But it's far from perfect and if there's a lot of you know it does have issues with white noise once in a while. Like when humidifiers going that i told you about if i'm up in the morning early humidifiers still going and hasn't shut itself off yet and i'm trying not to make a lot of noise because other people are still in bed and i'm issuing commands to syria on the homepod across the room. I don't wanna be shouting at it and sometimes it just won't hear me or it'll get something wrong. Because there's this humidifier blowing a fan in the background in it misinterprets. What i'm saying so yet series sir still got a ways to go. It's one of those technologies. I think that when it works. It's kind of magical but if it doesn't work even two percent of the time it super frustrating and people just abandon it. And i think that apple still got a ways to go in terms of the reliability before people can really before i think most people would be willing to live with it. I i the other thing it does. Sometimes it seems to. It's lost the personal request. The personal request features that shuts itself off. That's happened to me at various times and various versions of ios and it drives the rest of my family crazy. Because i'm trying to get them. Then this is not a home kit thing. But i'm trying to get them into the habit of asking. Siri add things to the grocery list. So when i go to amazon to make our online grocery list i don't have to have people texting me lists i just have it all their and reminders already. But it's unreliable enough that it hasn't really stuck. Which kind of frustrates me. Okay federico that's a good discussion. It's fun to talk about this. Because i've talked about little aspects of it here and there over the years and written reviews of various products. But i haven't really explained the setup in one place. And i think it really i if i had any advice for anyone it would be very careful about what you buy tried to get things that are that are reviewed as reliable and there i would say the logitech cameras are really good all the home products. I've used a really good. Hugh is good but not great. But you don't have a lot of options and tickets. Slowly as the other thing is i would say is you know if you're gonna wanna add onto a system take take your time and doing it and figure out where it fits in your life and the other people that you live with so i think that's also very important. Well that is it for this week. Federico you can find the two of us riding over at mexico's dot net. Federico is at vitucci on twitter and instagram. that's v. I t. i and i'm at john voorhees. J. o. h. n. vw r. h. w. s. Talk to next week. Federico child john.

apple amazon john voorhees federico vitucci federico nanna league nanna leaf siri federico Federico hugh zell icloud app store nato phillips logitech twitter john
No Filler Sidetrack: Hey Mercedes - Frowning of a Lifetime

Rock N Roll Archaeology

44:04 min | 8 months ago

No Filler Sidetrack: Hey Mercedes - Frowning of a Lifetime

"And welcome to no filler. The music podcast dedicated to sharing the often overlooked hidden gems that fill the space between the singles on our favorite records. My name is Quentin. Got My brother Travis with me as always. Henry ran that gravy train brown. And by train I means school bus. Last week we covered hot Rod, circuit. And we're going, to cover. Some label mates today for our sidetrack band called Hey Mercedes. When you listen to this ban is a bring as much in south. Asia to you is does for me the tractor. We just played for the intro in the tractor to recovering. Yet are the two tracks that do that for me because I. I don't think I've ever listen to this all the way through and those two tracks have just stuck with me for years so glad that we're we're. Talking about? Especially the tracking in particular today we're talk mark. It's killer, track, man, and it. It's good. There's a reason that like I I always go back to it. Yeah so our interest song was called a-list. And so there there are no singles on this album. It's all fair game I really wasn't planning on doing much at all for this episode. As far as like diving into details about the band anything like that. We're just GONNA. Play one song, and just one and done, but I kind of looked into it, and these guys kind of have a history. As Group. So we're going to have a little deeper, did So for starters. They are on the label vagrant records when this comes out. Again this is two thousand one same label that hot rod circuit was on so jump back to our episode from last week and give her at circuit a listen. I got to know about vagrant vagrant records. Is They just turn out the fuck enhance and they just? Polish these. emo, pop punk bands, and this kind of spit out radio, friendly kind of stuff. The guys in Hey Mercedes were in a band called braid. Have you heard of braid before? I Actually Yeah I. Think I've listened to them of rings. A bell rang yeah. Yeah, so they are an emo post hardcore band. They started out in ninety three, so they were early on in the game. And they've been off and on. Always present day. Here's the thing about braid. Seventy five percent of hey, Mercedes is bread, so they released three full length albums before disbanding in nineteen, ninety nine, so what happened was one of the dudes split off to dig to dedicate more time to another band that he was in. That was just a side project at the time, and then he decided to go full on with APP and. Here's the thing so I wanted to play a song. From Braid. And we'll treat it like it's the same band you know. It's pretty much the same guys, and let's just see what fragrant did with him. You know just like with with hot. Rod Circuit. So a song from braid from. Their third fooling album called frame and canvas. And, here's the first track on that album. It is called the new Nathan Detroit's. Start. The bird. Talk. You. Thanks Man I. Like I. Like me, too. Yeah, I've actually listened to. I listened to that record, but I've listened to the one that came up before that called the age of eighteen. And I think I listened to a little bit of their first one Frankie welfare boy age five. Yeah, that one has twenty six songs on it that first one and Most of them are minutes. Yeah, so yeah, much more sporadic. Way More interesting. Yeah, I think so too, but but but the funny thing about this. Is, Kinda like with Harasser circuit last week. When we played some of the early stuff, it sounds more. I don't WanNa. See genuine, but it sounds more like yes, amateur more raw while yet. No, but like so. That's what we were Kinda. That was our conclusion with hot rod circuit. They whiz vagrant vagrant. That's doing that right. Notice the other vocalists that that also plays a in braid, his name's Chris Broach. He is the guy that leaves the band. NARCAN and so hey Mercedes does not have him present I think he his voice is a really great like. It's really good match with the lead singer Bob Nanna. I think they play really well with each other 'cause Chris. Broach brings screams the the more. Vocals. Bob Has a very delicate voice and he. Brings out along with them to Hammer Sadi's and again they get signed a vagrant. So we're going to jump to two thousand one with hey Mercedes first full length album. It's called every night fireworks. So Travis. I think we've mentioned before. pitchfork either love them, or you hate him while at I think we've also of about are like earlier pitchfork. Kohl's and review seemed to be super pretigious in like Rudolf to to the point. Where like I I think it was what? It was called pitchfork right, I mean I feel like that's what they're what they set out to do. You know what here's the funny thing dude I just realized. He! No, it's called pitchfork. 'cause fuck than hitch. I mean. Maybe it's a IT'S A. Double meaning, but you know what a pitchfork is artists, the thing that you frigging? Your fucking poetry or Not. You. You tap it and it it has you know the the pitch? It's Kinda. Shit I WANNA. Get like the. Guy. But yeah, but the. The logo is a pitchfork, not a tuning fork which you're thinking of tuning for. TUNING FORK DOT COM. All Right? Well I I would just think about that the other day. And I Canadian. Totally. All right well, so they gave this album of three point out. A good reason for doing it. They did and here's the. The Dang. it. Thanks, so this guy who wrote this article. Or who wrote this review, he's a Bright Fan, okay? Well, Do, that makes perfect. It's like if you're a blade does and you're like I don't like this box. Courage Bullshit. Well, here's what here's what he does. Dude! He blames it on paper. Okay, he says. I totally understand I agree with you. Although I like the stuff you know, I I like this song a lot, but I wasn't a fan before, so yeah, so he goes. Here's a quote here. From from Pitchfork, he says given vagrants habit of churning out slick pop punk product for chain wallet. accessorize irs that just came down. Bad Boy Lincoln eighty-two Bender. The warning flags were raised. So with that, let's play our track for the day I. Mean I feel like you and I need to to praise it a little bit before we play that because an hour. Just like okay, you know. Listen to what this guy says about. How terrible says knowledge? Know what I was going to save this quote for a little bit later, but here's how the Guy Ins. The review and it's can spot on. Did okay he goes. Of course. It's completely possible that I've just outgrown. The Tar target audience for Nanna and Co. somewhere in Suburbia, I'm guessing there's a fifteen year old kid just now discovering hey, Mercedes, on thinking, they're the greatest thing ever to He goes a skip ahead and he goes, and maybe my dissatisfaction means I'm actually disappointed and angry with myself for outgrowing that rockin inner teenager and becoming a crotchety old fogy. He's also now dude. Dude I mean we weren't fifteen in two thousand one, but we were damn close to your Rabab. and. We may have been fifteen when we grab the record. Yeah, we. Will let me say this about this about every fireworks. The album is a whole. It is kind of news fast. Yes, and it is kind of a safe bet. Radio friendly album that's. That sounds like that's what vagrant did. Yes, and so, but I am up. Slap him on another thing that they lost though with with Chris Broach was his guitar playing which also complimented Bob Style of guitar playing really well so now it's just a little more tame. The song that we intrude in with actress and this song that we're about to play. Are the best moments the record. So. Here is our sidetracked for the day. This song called frowning of a lifetime. AW Shoot. Porn. Just fucking Banger Man Yeah I. Love The course I love the. I love the harmonizing. Yeah. I've always loved the the Bow Arrow Apple. Yeah, imagery is really cool. You take person with an apple on their head at least I'd or apple in their mouth or something like that. Oh, yeah, narrow, so many eminent narrow at them. Let's read the lyrics there. He goes some days I can't help but wake up helpless. This good night. Girl has got me all arms ready. She might sell them all, but I can tell the worth of her three weary words, not what you would guess, go check Arrow check apple check. Oh, I didn't even th-. Yeah, forgotten about that. The other guy says check the other guy says CIA, and that's cool. Yeah. That's one of those one of those. CD's that picked up at CD addict. We talked about that store last week. Shout out to market. What's it called? Now? my mad world record Denton. Yeah shout out to mad world records and Denton. That was one of those CD's that He. Pointed towards and. It must've been used CD because I. I took it out and listen to it. He had CD players set up around the stories. You could listen to it. And? Yeah I mean it was one of the things I must have listened to for the first three songs, or so because track three his a-list actress, and I was hooked. On fucking buying this today for sure. So I will say Kinda like what that guy was saying from pitchfork review. It is. kind of a snooze fest. But I'm going to quote someone else here from music. Film magazine called Hybrid Magazine I. There's No date on this review, but I'm guessing. It came out when the album came out in two thousand one This person says you all said and done. Hey, Mercedes are just plain fun to listen to their spirit and ambition are definitely infectious and I. Defy you to sit still while listening to this record. This is not one of those records where you give up on it. At least you know I. It holds my attention enough. Yeah, yeah, it's a fun record. We'll just leave it at that definitely worth the sidetrack I think. Yeah, it's a good sidetracked for hot rod circuit because they're both on the same label and. kind making the case here that proves but vagrant yet to these boys right super produced Yeah, but but you know polished right I. Mean Yeah, that has a lot to do with the person that produces right record to j robbins. This pitch for guy refers to j Robbins as the increasingly commercially minded guidance. Every rough edge is polished up to a shimmering radio friendly gleam to. See, I don't know if that's an insult. Our compliment I mean dude, if if that's your job, then that's a compliment sure. But you know. You can make the case like a good producer knows when to lead something. Be More raw and emotional you know have a vagrant was like Robbins. I want you to be spent not ready freelance. Bro Schirn, but that the job job Michelle accomplished. Anyway but yeah that same Mercedes. That's every night. Fireworks nother album just filled to the brim with nostalgia for me did. Indeed! And that's what this is all about to this all strips. Are Accused of next week. We're going to change it up a little bit. as far as the sound and. What else what what can we say about this record and I don't know man, but this is an episode that I am super super excited about doing dude and plan. These tunes with Human Abbott listened to this album with you and a longtime. Yeah, there's something about these these tracks, men and we. We saw these guys open for foo fighters, which was really cool. Record called antenna. By band called in came out in two thousand three, so we're GonNa right along here on the bus. Stop yet. The bus tour and yeah, this is a little bit more a little bit more heavier it's. It's not I. wouldn't call it email at all No, this is more rock, but hey, this is another one of those examples do. Jump back and listen to their older stuff. They were heavy. Do have e- before this album. Would you call? Them was a metal. It was nothing that screams. We go dude the. Repeated page. Metal core is one of their. Metal core post jumping the gun, and and maybe we'll go back and listen to some of their older stuff. Kind of like what we've been doing here. Yeah, just yeah. See I wanNA with his and we'll finish up actually I think I just answered the question, don't. Don't spill beans. Man! Okay well, this is going to be. This is going to be another case of get signed to a record label and come out with antenna. I tried now maybe I. Just wasn't the right age or yeah I didn't I didn't know better. I wasn't end to any kind of scream. Kinda music when I tried to listen to their older stuff, but it's nine day so anyways. We're going to cover that next week. All, right dude. Switcher her time and hey, we should mention. We just threw together a spotify playlist of all of our what you heard songs from. One until now. And every single song that we've played on this podcast as a what you heard is on this playlist, so every single week or an updated and throw on new songs. If you hop on our twitter page I've got a link to the playlist. Search for us on spotify and you type in what you heard. With an Apostrophe, that's confusing. Just look for us and what you heard. What Watch? That it's kind of I, think should be what space CIA heard. I'll leave it wisely. It fine I can. I can change it. I don't know what what you heard. That's always say I don't know how you. How phonetically would that be spilled out what you because? I think the past few go don't according to urban dictionary. You don't even need the apostrophe. Okay well. I like it. It's never anyways dude right now. This thing sitting at seven hours long. Over one hundred zones hours and twelve minutes? What the Hell's wrong with my computer dude? Eight hours twelve minutes hundred twelve songs. That's crazy. Yeah that tells you how long we've been doing this Q.. And anyway so. A little Easter Egg Cookie if you will. If you. Hang on dude. Is it I an east, or is it a cookie taster? Okay, so a little Easter egg here for anyone out there who may have stumbled upon our music blog that we've mentioned from time to time that we used to run called new dust. The little doodle on the cover of this playlist of the what you heard playlist is done by Quinton stunned by me, did the one and only accused and ran here, mom, you're not sitting right here. Sitting sitting here shouldn't in Washington I am setting up here. You drew that for for the blog and this was like an early logo. Actually you had you had the. The logo the word nudist spelled out by the core that goes between these two cups. Yeah, it's one of those like string and cup telephone. Yeah, and then talking in the other person's listening. It's perfect for this podcast to vic for her dude, and it's perfect for it's perfect for the podcast. That's you. Oh, you're right. That's me chat link over the Internet. So Anyway? So yeah, that's it. I got to what you heard that I'd love to play for your I. Sure let me let me go first because it sounds like the one you got in store may require some. Some some chatting about right sure. Yeah, so this is the one that I actually. Is that what you're at I had store for last week, but then I listened to that song from tops and wanted to bring that instead so I. Listen To this record now for about two three weeks, and it's solid man. It is a self titled Record. By a band called Big Bite I. Don't know much about them. sounds like they are from Seattle. Cuny the from your neck of the woods. Co and It's. Shoe Gezi. But not not over the top like over the you over the head with it. Is It's dream pop shoe gazing, so it's no my bloody battle. Now it's not that it's not over the top read urban shit like that, but it's it's got that kind of you know it does have reverb, but I'll. I'll let you decide you. The Guy seems very with a very monotone voice Okay, the kind of reminds last shoe gained right of. It actually reminds me of Mr Nathan Forster. He was on a episode. One of our radiohead episodes anyway, so we're going to play the very last track on the record, which proves that I've listened to this all the way through to that that proves it and proves it. Every retracts at Binger at the last one. So, this says. The song is called paralyzed by big bite. Off. SWAP. Not just checked all the rent boxes did. All of them. jumpings great the baselines, great tars great his voice. I'm just go ahead and added to the playlist man. This is so convenient to him here we go. They go if you're if you're following our. Here's the funny thing to you. If you follow are what you heard playlist, you will get to hear it before the episode even comes out hall that I go that route. Yeah, against US cool. What's cool? Yeah. Yeah, here's the thing if you. If you follow us. You'll get to hear the coming weeks. What your herds like before? Anybody really, and you'll get to hear US talk about it, so you can hear it. In then you can hear us. Talk about it and kind of give some background to the band on the on the following episode now. We just have to actually remember to do this every time, but the should be relatively easy since we play these spotify so anyway again. That was a Seattle band called big bite. And I'm GonNa Quote K., e. x. p. here q they've got an article on these guys of course. Your GO-TO FOR NEW MUSIC! They say here for such a focused set of songs. Big Bite has crafted an album expansive in the duality of its moods, equal concrete and ESA Tarik Moody and buoyant, overcast and scorching. Big. Bite has unexpectedly joined the Pantheon of stellar. Who Registered Pantheon? Dan podcast come of stellar rock records superlative for plowing through a Seattle summer. They got nice. It's recommend two thousand eighteen. They do have any record out since then. I haven't listened to it yet. Anyway those big bite all right. Sounds like you. You have got a band that actually reached out to us. Is that right? Yes, I swear I have not listened to this yet i. remember seeing the email and i. I didn't Didn't play. It didn't get around planet, which is good because now I can react to it. Live right now here we go. So one cool thing about you know are having having an email set up for people to reach out to us. You know we don't cover brand new albums. You know as our main topic for a show. That's just not a thing we do here. But we have our western hurts. You know so. And and you got something new. Or something old in any. Want us to give it a listen. Send US an email. I guarantee you. It will reach out your buds. Are Email is no filler podcast edge email dot com. This is a band called hoven weep. It's all one word they are. Self described desert rockers come there from. I WANNA. Say Phoenix Arizona. And so they are. In the desert. They're literally desert. Rockers who they just released a four track. EP came out earlier this year. In March, Marta excited about that artwork. I know right isn't a bad ass. I love the font. It reminds me of like the font that that a Lotta the yes, albums you know Yeah, did so are were the progressive anyway? There are a lot of things new me. Just so they are quote a potent mixture of heavy psych, stoner, rock and doom. sonically rich with Psychedelic wizardry yet locust and dynamically explosive PSYCHEDELIC. This PSYCHEDELIC wizardry wizardry. Okay, the. The hype now let me just say this real quick dude. Most of the songs are close to seven minutes. It should none of them are under five. Rolling to a couple of minutes of it, but all these songs deserve. Listen all the way through because the songs. Kind of progress in chambers was interesting. If you like this. That single a lot because you're, you're You not as seasoned a fan of of doom, the fact that they sprinkle and psychedelic. That's probably what's bringing you in right because you're a big second. Absolutely, all right and Yeah, let's do it. Let's play the first track on this EP EP is called Salvin Journey. The song is called Cave True! Yeah? Yeah, good stuff could up so I'll tell you who I was reminded of, and hopefully this is not. Hopefully. They're not like hawk. Really! because they might, they might not like this, but I think I'm reminded of the lead singer of King Buffalo. and. Some pallbearer as far as like the instrumentation. It's a little bit of a little bit of those guys in there for this. Is Your your wheelhouse, abn no idea who you don't know tall bearings. Man, teach me. okay, so pallbearer was like. The poster child of leg doom a few years back. That sounds like a compliment to me than it is a couple of, but you know depending on. You know how some bands you know. They they they are. They want to be their own. Sure sounded I'm not saying by any means of. That, what I'm hearing is like They're obviously trying to be King Buffalo or Pablo. That's what I'm hearing. which is a compliment and I'm also hearing a little bit of elder to and I. Don't know if you've ever heard, have I? Played elder on this podcast for it's possible. Yeah, it wasn't a watcher because I just went through the whole damn catalog bird watcher at songs one of these days we'll circle back to doom, and we'll do some pallbearer will some elder coal although I wouldn't really call elder doom, but that's another conversation Q. Anyway. Elders more kind of like the psychedelic the. PSYCHEDELIC side of it, so that's probably where I hear to some elder in there, but yeah, it's it's. It's solid down for sure yeah, and so these guys have only been around since two thousand eighteen and this, this is the first recorded efforts man. I'm excited to hear more from these guys well yeah, That's that's brings up a good point if you're if you're a band out there. And you want to you want your music to show up on on our podcast and talk about it. Shoot US an email, no filler podcast dot. COM Shoot US linked to your your band camp, or your soundcloud or spotify and We'll give it a listen, and if we like it, then we'll play it on the on the show and that. Anyway. Yeah, so again. That's an album or a little four track EP by bank called a hoven weep. Album is called Salvin, journey. Dealers wrap this puppy up. Yes, yes, this is a long. Sidetrack episode. But. All Good Fun cure all having having a good time or just traveling. Talking about her on the school bus down the road and do the next step, he's going to be foot home. This is one of those way now. We've talked about albums before. That have been on the on the the master plan of albums to talk about since the origin the inception of this podcast, and this is one of those albums that has been. On our list of records to cover, and this is a perfect time to do it like this is a great great time to do it, and there is something. Exceptional about this record. And we'll get into all that next year I. CAn't wait to revisited man. Yeah, it's. It's great so again next week recovering cave in and their album from two thousand and three antenna. Yes. That's right. Cue All right. If you want to get in touch with us, you can. Chat with us on twitter. At No filler podcast is our handle. Shout out to tyler who's been chatting with us back and forth. A little bit recently we. Connected with spoon. With the band spoon. And I think that Tyler Darling Tyler he's bigger spoon fan than we are outside. I'll tell you that much. Yeah, which is saying a lot? Yeah! Yeah, he he's. He's active on the. On, the message boards and so I went, I went on the message boards, which are still active, which is crazy to me, 'cause it's. Is it still spend the Ban Dot com? Yeah, it is. But he like, he might as well be the moderator he's. That's all the poster from him. He's either interacted whereas posted something anyway Yeah so I think that was our entry point for him. He found found no filler. When we did that stint of spoon records, we covered like four or five spoon records. Anyway Yes, so you can talk with us on. Twitter were pretty good about responding. Tell us what you don't like. Tell us what you like. Tell us what you want to hear us. Talk about and. Chances are. We'll find a way to to to to chat about it. In one way or another whether or not, it becomes a full length episode. You know that remains to be seen, but. Just, chat at us, but we'll talk with you. and then, of course you can find this on our website. No filler PODCAST DOT COM, where we have all of our previous episodes going back to episode one, you can find shown outs for each episode. Including track lists every track. We talk about including what your herds will be on that page. The episode page for that. For that episode, our done it is. Anyway and of course we are part of the Pantheon podcast music network podcast network I should say which is A. Network of like minded music podcasts. you can find a ton of great music podcast on that network. Everything from. Shows voted to Weezer to shows that dive. Deeper into the history of rock and roll than we ever do you can find it all on Pantheon PODCAST DOT com. Lot of great content on there. And that's it, enough Yemen. Next week we'll talk about Keegan. That's going to be an amazing episode. I can't wait so cute what he got for our Altro Song here. All right man, so hey, Mercedes! Released every night fireworks for its fifteen year anniversary. And they tack on. An EP there is called the weekend which came out a few years later and then they also threw on covers that they did. and I was pleasantly surprised to find out that they covered this song. Shiver remember or know the song. The promise I feel like that is ringing a bell right here. All the artists has called a win in Rome. Sure sure yeah. I know that song well. They fucking Nalen out and it will do lammers eighty spin on it is so we're gonNA run with that for the ALTRO. and yeah. Thanks so much for listening. My name is Quentin. My name is Travis. He'll take care. Stray. Dog. One. Turn. Sir Want. Thing. My name is Demon Carter. Aka Dem were and I'm along, and we're two thirds of the crew that host the deadlock rap pod. Third Co host is internationally acclaimed hip hop writer David Ma as the name of the go suggests dead. One rap pod is a podcast where men of a certain age discuss the debate in dissect rat. while. We are somewhat classicist in our tastes and grew up listening to hip hop from the eighties. Until now we're also interested in the music's present and future over the past hundred fifteen episodes. We have been interview. Rap Legends like Fritz Paul del the Funky Homo Sapiens. A cool Keith Egypt premier. Even the Proto rap group the last poets just. We also make point to talk to writers, commentators and creative shaping the John Ria. We've interviewed journalists and bestselling authors like Nathaniel Friedman Jeff Weiss and up to keep an atom man's back, and as nate mentioned, even though we are products of the eighties nineties, we take time out to talk to some of the most important voices and wrap today, groups and individuals like little, rather open Mike. EAGLE BILLY WOODS! Thoreau. If you don't recognize any of those names. 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Coping & Dealing With Rejection In Your Relationships

DivaSpeaks

47:23 min | 1 year ago

Coping & Dealing With Rejection In Your Relationships

"Speaks podcast is the premier relationship podcast explicitly deals with relationship matters from a woman's point of view. No subject subject is off limits relationship challenges sags intimacy dating infidelity finances heartbreak and situation ships are all part of the discussion. Your relationship matters welcome welcome. Welcome to another episode of diva speaks go. This is your hostessing gala and once again we have in in the studio miss jazz festival to the people jasmine. Hey everyone hope everyone's having a good week so excited. You guys tuned in you are you're in for a treat owed. Blau set a treat instantly. My mind goes to something sweet. Because i like sweet treats so we're going to discuss today. We're gonna talk about rejection and rejection in relationships. I i think that a lot of people are hurting. Some possibly don't know that they're hurting in others are not finding my name constructive ways to deal with it. So what do you think about our topic. I think it is important because a lot of people today especially my generation don't handle rejection will one because they feel like they're entitled to everything so that's a good point <hes> but yeah definitely i'm not understanding what does rejection really mean and how to move forward after you've been rejected because it's not the end of the world is not the end of the world and you know a very wise wise man. Once said is not what happens to you that matters the most is how you handled it in and i think that once you can wrap your mind around the fact that rejection has occurred to you or has happened onto. You and you can acknowledge it. I think then the heal and can begin. What do you think about that. I completely agree a great. Absolutely you got to recognize it to move forward right also understanding. I think people kind of forget like a flow chart of like is this is rejection. Is it personal rejection at your face personal and then. Is this something being that if you try it again would you be. Would you be okay with trial and error. You know what i'm saying. 'cause sometimes you gotta yourself off and try again or is this something you should. Did you see now leave alone. She you should just walk away from so there are instances that you're saying that when rejection is happened. Just just leave it at that sometimes yeah sometimes you just have to be okay so you know what i like to do before we really get into the meat and potatoes titles of the discussion i just wanna thank our listeners for tuning in and if you like what you hear if you are excited about the content it and if you are in join any or all of our episodes we're asking you listen share support and subscribe and and not necessarily in that order so in that order so yeah so yeah. Let us know what you think or if you had. Let's have some additional comments our email or my email addresses. Diva speaks official edge email dot com you can also hit me up on facebook split in or instagram so let's talk about it so here's what started this journey on the way to this in particular episode so you know facebook. Has this memory <hes> feature right so yesterday. I had a memory to pop up and my memory was from ten years ago. Let me read it to you. It goes rejection is a painful reality. Eh especially when it comes to family never pretty always painful. I've learned to rejoice now. Maybe it's god's way of redirecting worked in my steps from closed doors to other awesome blessings. The bible does say the steps of a righteous man order why go down down a dead end road. Why now going to door there will never open. Thank god the next time. Rejection rears is head. God could be speaking. I wrote that ten years ago. Wow ten years ago. I wrote that and i revisited my emotions from when i wrote fat and it was coming from a very painful place now i know that they've podcast asked about relationships and the romantic side of relationships as it deals with matters of the heart and we're going to get into that this episode but but i think also that we also have to talk about rejection in the family structure absolutely because it is within the family unit senate that rejection often tends to hurt the most or you feel the most impact because it is within that family unit that the stencil is made on how you handle rejection moving forward whether you heal from it with you grow from it which whether you're educated from it or whether you became bitter as a result of it i usually can start a wool star within the family so here's story many many moons ago natalie not telling my age my birth mother passed away and there was a disconnect between her assad the family and my father's side of the family with whom i'm blessed that raised me and i had a really really good life in terms of never wanting or needing for anything as far as material on my basic needs were met. My spiritual life was fulfilled. <hes> i had the education has the proper upbringing as far as etiquette and manners things of that nature you know the basics so when i graduated eduated from high school i went back to my birthplace and i found my my birth mother's people and the sad thing about it is they rejected me. They received my sister verville where there will they have a loving open warm camaraderie relate type of relationship with her her but as for me they don't even acknowledge my existence and my uncle who was my mother's brother recently just committed that to another family member that he didn't understand why that side of the family chose to embrace one of his his sister's children and basically ignore or discount the other now i have felt that way for quite quite some time which is the back story to that particular post that that type of heard that type of rejection and wanting to be received from another part of you it can break your heart and people don't understand that when you have a void in your life and you're hoping that this particular taylor something someone or situation will fill that void and they disappoint and or they reject you it can send you down a path or spiraling if you don't catch it but blessed diam et no god what i have a higher power you know i have faith and it is that rejection that actually set me on fi that made me <unk> determined to relocate in reposition myself which is would put me on a path you know coming coming from dallas texas to charlotte north carolina and my life couldn't be more fulfilled now had i known that the love that i was wanting from somewhere where else would lead me to the love of my life. You know maybe i wouldn't have taken it as hard you know and to what do you say to that. I know that you have lived through some of the painful nights and some of the memories that i have been there with me. So how do you feel about what i've said. I definitely can understand you know one teen to have that relationship with your family and not understanding why i'm open. I'm ready. I want to have a relationship and just getting that and and i would say it's it's definitely hurtful because that's your family. You know that's the relative role. It can be replaced. Family is considered you want your relatives abroad blood but one eighteen to wanting to have that relationship with your relatives <hes> definitely hurts when you're trying and it seemed like their dismissive or rejecting you and then also having a sibling that they entitled embrace but at the end of the day. I think we have to remember that. Sometimes you know they're human and they get to decide who they want in their lives and as much as that hurts that does hurt as much as that hurts so you know you have the same option so you know granted. They decided not to embrace you but you get the opportunity to embrace who you want you get to decide. Who's your family in not have that dictated because imagine it's as you know they were. You know excuse my language half ass in it like okay yeah yeah. We're bringing you in but it's because of the fact that you're simply related not because we want not true true and you know. I think that we all have our little backhanded comments. It's about social media you know and the side effects of it the culture that it has breeded but i think one of the things that has helped to reinforce what i've already known before a family member had the discussion with my husband but you know we would they would uncle would invite me into their family group chats and they would all be having a conversation and i would try to chime in and people talk all around my comments and i'm like nick so you're really going to pretend like i'm not here and you know to have to have that rejection on repeat repeat. I think is an unhealthy thing. I think that for others who have experienced rejection within the family unit i think we have to identify by it and not deny it early on not be talked out of what it may look like or try to interpret or analyze closet from what it actually is sometimes as they say in the backwoods you gotta call a thing 'cause betas fame call a spadea spay and just accepted move on from it grow from it and leave it. Leave it alone. Which is what i have done and i'm a healthier person person as far as my state of mind because now i'm not trying to fix anything anymore. I'm not trying to fill the void. I recognize the spaces they occupy in life which is one full of love success opportunities in growth so why revisit something and i said it's anyone that is experienced rejection. Why revisit something that constantly causes you pain. Can you adelphi with any level whole of rejection. That has had an impact on you. I definitely have had a couple is sincere news news in the workplace. You know school friends only beloved do share. We want to hear about this. I mean just more recently recently. Which i thought was insane so i had this friend tasha me her and another young lady august thickest these we you know eat always saw one of us. You're about to see opry of us. <hes> and it was so interesting because an event occurred. I won't get into the nitty gritty details but essentially you know something ended up happening with tasha's car while we ran then we came back. Everyone's got a little liquor under system but we're trying to you know help and she just starts gone ballistic on one of our other friends and then i'm just at a loss for words because i'm like. I can't really help decision relation but i'm here in the next morning i wake up. I've been blocked on all social media. She's not taking my call. She's blood my ted's. That's every every dairy extreme. Everything and i honestly had no idea. Ask select what i've done. <hes> and so- months went by hadn't seen her and spoke to her. I changed numbers probably why i've had received any calls or texts but still like you know. I was blocked on all social media so she wanted to talk to me. All she had to do was on block me so she and you know she's right but still she ended up relocating up north in before she left she he kept trying to reach out through other friends because i wanted to talk to me but at that time i had already gone through what i would consider a grieving process because i after the the initial incident you know i felt totally rejected by my friend and i didn't understand why and you know that you know a girlfriend girlfriend. Is you know when we break up her full day events update hard yeah. They thought i was like my little dog. She knew my secrets. You know i'll talk to her about everything when i was going through so it was definitely definitely hurtful in shape how i handle my relationship my friendships moving forward because i in my head you know i didn't want to be vulnerable to somebody who for whatever reason linkages flipped a switch decide. They weren't gonna talk to me. We're going to give me a chance to you know apologize if i'd done wrong rectified anyway <hes> but at that point in time once she started hitting me up like i said i'd already gone through a grieving process of losing a friend <hes> and i found light you you know even if i had done something wrong that she would have given me the opportunity to correct it. I would have because that's my friend but the fact that she didn't do that. You know it just gave me another opportunity to invent invest my my friendship in other people that would be willing to if we we had to fit there was an issue be able to communicate that with me and i think if they hadn't happen i wouldn't recognize that you know what i don't wanna fran dan who won't give me that opportunity because we're friends. You should be able to let me know if i've offended you if i heard you heard it if i've hurt you <hes> you know anything but to like i'm saying this was like a seven eight months difference between the then occurred when she tried to reach out and we're in the same mm city so we have the same had the same group of friends so yeah that that was definitely definitely a hurtful definitely something i learned from in my young adult life. You know it taught me valuable lesson on how to treat people when they do reject you because once she reached out you know you just you can't come walk back into my life. Because you feel like talking right it will person who who is emotionally immature and it speaks also to her to the way a guest she felt about the relationship because it didn't seem like by what you're describing that she valued the relationship as as much as you did and that that brought me to sense i was just like you know because if we were such an my you know i may be hurting my feelings for a day or two but and i'm not gonna block you on everything and i'm not gonna not reach out after that like you know some for you not to communicate. It's just <hes> it really showed me like you said the value that she had on our friendship because i'm not gonna just throw my friends away. I'll maybe upset right but matz. Maybe a week. Maybe we go out. Maybe two weeks to visit some crazy but it was just it was like you know. This is a lesson that needed to be learned true. You know what i wrote down. <hes> tell me if this fits your situation relation that rejection can shape you emotionally and it can change the landscape of your emotions <music> and how you move forward which is kind of like what you just said it can shape you and kind of like what i was describing earlier you know within the family structure structure you know when you're dealing with something that speaks to your emotion when someone has disappointed you when someone has broke your heart or hurt your feelings. I don't think people the the offender's house don't really take into consideration that at one day you may mature one day you may grow from whatever happened and you may want to revisit the friendship or the relationship relationship. How was the person that you rejected going to receive. You don't think people think enough of of that such as your friend tasha you know so you know. I think that for people that are experienced in it. I want to stress again. The way to one of the first things to overcome and rejection is you have to. I acknowledge. You can't heal something something. If you want admit that it has happened to you you know i am. I also feel like keno another. Another good friend of mine said this you know disappointment or rejection is shouldn't deter you right because if if i had let what happened between me and tasha really just sit in my spirit and not just carried that around i am you know i wouldn't have made more friends. I wouldn't have had that same openness to give back out there. I'd just be stuck. Does minus one friend. Oh you know you multiply by way of subtraction run make any sense yes that does ugly but but like you know even with your the way you felt about your family. You could have just sat in that and just been like you know. I don't want to open myself up to more people and being rejected but like you say found the love of your life. It didn't deteriorate. It is motivated you to reposition energy that you were trying to give in a thing that people you gotta remember. Don't let it deter you if you want if you you want a kind of relationship and you realize you're not getting it from that particular source. There are other sources. There ought death say see that again. There are other sources. Get what you need from other things and most people use this particular reference in regards to romanticism mm-hmm but well one won't another will another will so we'll one family won't give you another. Can i married into a major hispanic. Family is is so many of them right. I can't so i have all of the love and spend the rest of my life getting to know you you know my in laws and my husband's network of people but also i wanna do this. I wanna make light of it but i also wanna give a shout out out to our nanna in our pops who have been almost feel offended for even saying the word saragan family but nanna manana stepped in and came in and the time in my life where yeah you know where it was needed. You know god it doesn't make mistakes and they have continued to rise to the occasion. They never disappoint. They are the true sense of family and and like you said i didn't get discouraged even on the journey from dallas to charlotte manana. My family has been with me every step of the way and you know here's another thing i want to point out. You know what we talked about. You may not whatever circle back around like your friend tasha. D you know she kind of not came full circle but she circled back. We'll never know what she wanted. Talk about because you didn't give her the opportunity but that doesn't happen for a lot of people who have experienced rejection so what i'm saying is you have to make peace with with it. You have to make peace with the fact that have been rejected. You know i wasn't wanted for whatever reason why wasn't embraced and you have have to move forward. You have to move forward so this little are but i want to transition conover into rejection as it relates to matters <hes> the art. Are you ready yeah okay so as a woman. I can say that any woman that is is living a walk in the face as of the earth. I think most of us have experienced rejection in a relationship and i don't want to you know doublespeak speak but whether it was from when you were dating someone you were seeing someone you were married to someone or <hes> whatever type of relationship or situations ship it is or was i think most of us have experienced rejection shen and that could be so painful to deal with you talking about devastating. Oh my god is to experience rejection from a member of the opposite sex that you work emotionally invested into now at at the tender age of twenty six. I'm not sure if impaired any experience. Have you been dating since i was six years old six now. I'm just well. I would say yeah and this was a pretty interesting experience because goes i had dated outside of my race and me and this guy met. We went on a few dates dates. We hung out kind of been around. His friends been around a little bit of family and all of a sudden. I get a text and he's just like you know. I'm really just not that into you. I holds search and i was just like that seems interesting because we've been on three or four days. I would assume after the first one you know <hes> but yeah and i was just like well. What are you really mean because i'm just i'm not understanding of course in myself. <hes> i'm i'm the each like why are you not enemy and he was just like you know. You're really not my type and i just realized that this just isn't going to work and i was so crush josh i seriously i cried my eyes out. I was so hurt because i could not comprehend why do like the after four days. I'm like you know you. I love me like so. It took me. I would say to me about good two weeks. I don't know why i took two weeks because we we we weren't dating that long but i just i took it really hard. I think because aw i just couldn't fathom. Nobody not like it being like i just i'm. I'm sitting there questioning like well. What specifically did you not like was in my laugh was like like we ride down the street now as to stop it. Sonic is at a mcdonald's. That's what women do. Let me tell you now. You know what rejection will have you questioning yourself yourself. Were it will have you questioned. Sometimes your value emma pretty enough. You know my fine nine enough food business. My booty big enough is my class flat astronaut gene you know it will it can have have the potential to have you questioning yourself and feeling insecure if you don't check it right away and so tell us how to in fact <hes> well. My sister got on page saying some crazy stuff but non-point no callers. We're not accepting calls right now the bicol so but i think honestly one. I'm gonna play from the himalayas malaysia so i was able to get them back on line. By the playoff mayhem diva from dallas calmed down but go ahead so so but i think it just it just helped me realize that one you're not gonna be everybody's type and sometimes it takes people hanging out with a second begin to realize like that again. I'll read the tell them again. It's like sometimes not going to be everybody's type in what i think he not only physically attractive but once it started getting to know me you know he knew things about himself. Thank you realize you know. I wasn't the one for him and even though we had fun. This wasn't something that he wanted to pursue further and i can't be mad at that because that would really been upset. Have we been six nine months a year in and he's like you know what this is not going to work on time or if you have prematurely ventured into fix and complicated the matter are sexual and then you discovered that it wasn't the right and do what you would ask yourself at what point you got the cookie now then it was going on but it also it also gave me some pointers and also how to handle people. I'm not interested in because one of interject say. I've been rejected so i'm just like you. You know what it does. It does take hanging around slowly kinda learning like okay. I like this but i don't like this and oh. This is a red a flag so i'm taking notes but i'm still trying to you know see what you're about so. I can't just hang out what you want. You know be able to tell by then it. It took hanging out a few times for me to notice. You know what this is something that i'm gonna. I'm gonna pursue further. This is something that i'm gonna take slower because i'm not sure this is just something that i ain't going to do just because the x._y._z. element of p <hes> so it really gave me on insight in although i was disappointed disappointed because i thought he was going to be my boyfriend. It didn't deter me from going. I mean side note here. I think you you been on the in the reject and the past few years then you have been on the receiving end of rejection but you know what you just said. It's something doing <hes> doing your sharing. That leads me to something else. How people people deal with rejection after sets. Does that make you question your bedroom skills. Does that make you question. The other person's motives were is sex was all you wanted to you could have been fraught on me. I think people tend to get a little bit more intense. It's and spiteful when rejection happens after the bedroom. What do you say to that. I mean i thought about it. As you wish on your story i could agree to a certain extent only because sometimes you just is not because those are the six flip man just been the timing six happened just had to let you go like <hes> of course you know ridiculous particularly from both without too much but i'm just like okay like i could. You know a guy filling you and like maybe your pressure sexy uses like oh my goodness. I'm not feeling you damn much and then you have sex. He's like i'm really just not feeling like the all of us. We're in part of the problem. We thought it was going to finally give him this cookie like no well. He didn't even want to be in the candy store. Now you can game the cookie. You're upset or for men you really think she digging you and she's a second okay and then finally finally doing it. She was just like oh my goodness. I could've saved my comment energy omar. Let's shake it up a little bit more for the men. There are men dan who want their wealth their coins and four men that maybe he's taken the female out on a few nights dates restaurants and on a couple of shopping sprees and then he gets dunked <hes> because it isn't always have to be about six getting dumped has mars the woman there are armed men who get rejected after bitcoin and they feeling you know some type of way so what the i think men sometimes can handle aw well let me just be that. This may offend some people. I think black man can handle rejection a little bit better sometimes than people of other races. This is just me. I don't know that that could be offensive to samba. I mean i've watched a lot of movies. Yeah 'cause be ready to put you in a freezer after he gets rejected gemologist lead jamal just mostly what your best friend afterwards talk is going to be that hurt me. I've a couple of movies too right wasn't helping you think men handle rejection better than women or does it depend on the type of or the age. What's what's your what's your take on because i personally think that men handle it better than women. I'd say men handle rejection better only because they're used the two shooting their shots like women. Don't shoot shots on a regular basis. So of course you've been practicing shooting your shot and you'll get rejected. You know you probably five shots you throw one of them rejected so you're okay women. We don't shoot our saas. Oh wishing are shots and get rejected kissel. The game shut down the core worship down the arena shut down the manufacturer. Every light off in the world because offset just watched a video online the other day where <music> this woman down near florida. She called her boyfriend range rover parked outside of his side chicks house and she spray painted vehicle. She took a baseball bat. She took out all of the windows on the vehicle and she actually julie stuck around so long that the police actually showed up on the scene and call her own at india act and arrested her all because she called well her boyfriend cheating which is a former projection. You could look at it as that so that's my example that women we really don't don't take it that will especially when we've been intimate. We started a family. Perhaps which i'm going to segue which potentially going back to some some of the bullet points from my last episode as far as red flags what to stay away from leads to drama when you started a relationship in a family somewhere and one of tends to move onto another relationship <hes> nausea right in i thought she said she did not she. Every right she lucky shingo shingo to the door swinging debate and house okay lucky. What are you saying mess up. His car races all the windows since chino us. Let me think oh my god. I live between love and hate this one about that. That's one of the best movies and she would shoot crate. Thump hitting us up in orange isn't edness over the lock this story that is explain but it it could it can happen right is jackson. Make you do some crazy things if you don't get a hold of it and fix it as a very true it definitely can can have an impact act on a lot of different emotions especially if you're not used to rejection who okay train wills because you will need some if you're not used to rejection action but you gotta remember that is not the end of the world. Just because you're rejecting here doesn't mean it's going to stop. You know there. Other opportunities like i said earlier there other sources. If you realize you know you were trying to didn't work the doors closed okay. There are thousand more doors vive to go. Oh to yes it is but wow you know i think the most painful part of it that lingers with you is rejection would definitely magnify your insecurities. If there were some there that will unchecked act in the beginning of you insecure on any level whether it was about your physical appearance whether it was as you know i'm having fillings issues of abandonment you will be in rejected definitely will haydn those feelings and and calls you to react in a way that what have you lookin crazy in these streets right you know and i think the purpose i'm behind. This particular. Episode is to let people especially women men know that it happens to all of us and it just doesn't have to be matters of the heart. It could be rejection in any a particular area of your life whether you are you know in a professional setting. You're in the workplace in your the coworker that tends to get sean d- or you know people don't seem as warm and friendly to you whether the you are the you know the loner who has attempted to be a part of different social circles and you just can't find your niche rejection can happen from that particular point too within the family structure and matters of the heart it happens it is nothing to be ashamed of and it may or may not be your fault but it is definitely your responsibility disability to choose to grow from it and move on from it anything you want to add. I completely agree. I completely agree you cannot say stuck in your rejection move forward because whoever rejected you or whatever rejected you definitely will so while let that be a reoccurring thing you know because what do you stand to gain. If you don't grow you don't you don't so grow from it it it. It probably will hurt <hes> nine times edited. Additon is probably going to hurt. It's going to make you feel some kind of way but don't say stuck in that moment. That's like heaven twenty four hours a day and for one moment something rejected did you. You still got the other however many minutes twenty three hours at a day. Don't let him and that's that goes for the rest of your life. Don't let one bad break up one bag relationship of family not accepting. You knock getting promoted at the job. Don't let that offer a friendship. Don't let that it takes so much power that it's almost like the story just ended there no all right. That's the end of one chapter on the right a new right and you get it to make your book as small or as big as you choose an hour love to just you know use my life as an example of that stayed in that particular place emotionally that i was in i i'll moles. It is painful to think where i would be. You know i wouldn't trade even a relationship with those people for where i am today because it was that particular pain and rejection that set me on a path to where i am now and if you have faith if you do believe in a higher power or if you do believe in god and if you do you know trust trust what the bible says that that a righteous man steps order then i know that from looking back over my life that and my steps were ordered here and sometimes it is the rejection that sets you on the path to your true destiny or it sets you up up to go in another direction so you can receive the blessings that god has in store for you you know i i couldn't imagine not being here in this time in this moment in this space even with you sweetheart i mean this. This is where this is where i feel like i was supposed to be there. How your life would be different a completely different because i because you've name you completely different but there is redemption in your rejection. There is redemption in your rejection. You're so intelligent. I dunno where i did it for. You got it for me so just to leave you. <music> is with because we wanna be educational right so here's what i would suggest dealing with rejection objection to move on from it you gotta. I acknowledge that it happened. We talked about that right jasmine right okay second. You got to find a way to make peace with it now. I can't necessarily give you the step so how to make peace with it but i would say one one of the ways you can make peace with not rehearsing it over and over. You have to set aside those thoughts. That would be damaging. You know talk to you and then i would say. I don't know what you have to you have to find value. You have to find yourself work. You got to discover what makes you happy. You got to tell yourself over in over for an over again. Even if you have to stand in the mirror and convince yourself that you are worthy to receive the type of love <music> off the type of embrace and the type of affection that you deserve you've got to find your self worth and then i would say you have to find the lesson in the rejection. What can you learn from it. How can you grow from it. What can you take that particular lowest point in your emotions and move forward in your life. Those are my particular. You learn nuggets of knowledge on how to move on from rejection jazz. You have anything you want to add off often. Honestly i did that. You really did i did. I'm trying the thing. What didn't you already say what. I've left her speechless which doesn't happen often. You guys so just know next time. I'm here on my head like a whole powerpoint ready to conclude the show since she just two words. Yeah i think i i really did. I hit the most important points in just the understanding that the understanding the importance of moving off for rejection because it can test your adaptability. You know how you move forward or respond to change. Its you know in your life. Moving forward from rejection could ultimately stem from that and you have to be able to adapt and adjust this is very important so we hope that you have enjoyed. This particular. Segment of divas speaks where we have discussed in detail. We'll <hes> rejection in relationships and how to move on from it. The plan was to get into matters of the heart but i think that there is enough off of that being discussed across on the media air in airwaves as it is so not really covering in that i think you guys will survive but at a later date we may revisit that particular topic so we hope that you will like like our page on facebook. If you need to send us a message our email addresses david speaks official at g mail dot com and dan jasmine. You want to tell our listeners goodbye and what can they do force absolutely so again. If you like you heard do us. These small all favours if you could please tell brennan streams more. We're on all pretty much every platform you can think of we are there. <hes> long share eh subscribe support by subscribing right right okay if under that. I won't be like the lady house with the day. We're going to take that as a form of rejection. You are rejection us and we won't deal with it. Well hello k podcast is the premier relationship hot cast get explicitly deals with relationship matters from a woman's point of view. No no subject is off limits relationship challenges sex intimacy dating infidelity finances heartbreak and situation ships are all a part of the discussion your relationship matters.

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