35 Burst results for "Nanna"

"nanna" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

03:10 min | Last week

"nanna" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"And i think my mentality on my business on to treat people on how to look at people and how to really support other people in this industry. It's hard it's isolating. There's so many places to hide when you're in the service industry you hide behind a smile behind the bar. Nobody knows what's happening. And i think community before profit has kind of morphed into coming more towards not joe's to of being like during the pandemic when march seventh hit. I didn't lay off any employees at in furlough any employees at it. Lay off any employees. A lot of my employees family members weren't working either so i felt a huge responsibility to hold their jobs to make sure that they were still getting paid to do whatever i had to do to make sure that they were getting paid so basically i went from supporting families to supporting. You know all fifty people. I employ ten people in most people have at least five people on their family. So it may that community before prophet a little bit more real to me and a little bit more like i have a responsibility when i employ somebody. I don't just employ them just for them to get the job done. I employ them to give them the tools they need to succeed to give them the tools they need to never have to work another entry level job again and to also make sure that their families and everything supported in one of the biggest things that came out of this for us was a sense of trust in a sense of loyalty for my employees which i never even thought what happened and that happened because i made that commitment right away. Okay if we do bleed an extra five six thousand dollars a month on payroll for them so we can keep everybody's hours so we can keep everybody on payroll so i don't have to lay anybody off. Then that's what we have to do. And i said to my staff if the ship saints. I go down with you and that meant that i wasn't just gonna drop everybody off. Which some people. Yes they had to do that. I completely understand that but we hinted peer and we threw something online. Saying hey at the end of this pandemic. Who do you wanna see standing. Do you wanna see the big corporations or do you want to see the small on pa companies and and the family owned companies standing at the end of this pandemic and it drew in an influx of orders over four hundred orders in two days after i posted a video online about. Hey we need help. This is scary to us and we want to survive. This and i need your help to help support these families that rely on me and really want me to make a difference in their lives and i think that that's kind of morphing back into community before profit like your bottom line is your bottom line. You have to have that to be able to support your employees but your bottom line shouldn't be your based decision during a pandemic during a crisis during a family catastrophe or something happening within their families. You have to look at your bottom line and make sure that your bottom line includes everybody in your business and who you've employed in around you in your community you don't just build and unlike exclude your community and hiring pool..

joe
"nanna" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

05:56 min | Last week

"nanna" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"This episode is part of our series exploring covid nineteen impact on nonprofits and small businesses in san francisco. We started the series back in april of twenty twenty during the height of the first phase of the covid nineteen pandemic and the shelter in place requirements over these past nine months the covid nineteen pandemic an economic meltdown has wiped out millions of jobs in both the nonprofit in small business sectors as well shuddered tens of thousands of small business operations the goal of the series to shine the spotlight on the nonprofits small businesses and their staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on their operations services and sustainability the series of interviews we conducted features voices from a cross section of organizations that make up the fabric of our community each of them brings a unique perspective on how they and we are dealing with the issues facing our community during the global pandemic an economic depression. Yes it's a pandemic and yes. We have to stay safe but we have to learn how to help each other. We have to learn how to support each other's businesses. We have to learn how to sweat each other's families and we have to learn again how to grow. Small businesses can. Because i think right now the government's focusing on the bottom down and the bottom down out small businesses where we should be focusing on the bottom up because that's where the economic recovery is gonna come from in this episode are featured voice. Is michelle pusa terry from nanna. Joe's granola nanna. Joe's coonoor is a wonderful example of a local manufacturing startup that has been incubated through. Sf made his owner brings her passion for both healthy natural foods. Importing the community before profits. Which is why at nanotubes. Granola every employee is making above minimum wage. I joined remotely via sim by michelle. Who atari from manages granola. Thanks for being here. Michelle and i think people would love to know why you started editorials granola and can you tell us a little bit about sophie. Gold award is so i started non-judgmental it back in two thousand and ten with the hopes of bringing back whole food ingredients into package food world on the grocery store shelves. I noticed that a lot bulls granola on. The shelves had a ton of sugar. Some additives preservatives. And really it started with me surfing and wanting to really go out and has a lot of energy and i'm hypoglycemic and i'm really sensitive to sugar so i thought you know what i'm gonna just create. I'm a trained pastry chef. And i didn't know. I didn't make it myself to begin with but i started making my own. Granola in as everybody's stories goes friends family loved it. They found that they were having energy. A lot of people told me that they didn't have to eat lunch. And that was mainly. What i was going for was using whole food ingredients and not having any additives or preservatives or a ton of cane sugar. And we don't use any sugars. We just one sophie award. It's our third sophie awards. We went to this year. We won the gold for one of our paleo orange which is my personal favorite and then we won the bronze for paleo so we did a collaboration with hugh chocolate based out of new york and it's delicious and then we also have a silver one from two thousand eighteen. So that's kind of why. I started on just granola and why i firmly believe that if you build a business inside the community like the dog patch doc in two thousand twelve. It was much different. If you build a community that way. I really feel like you have to support them. And that's where community before profit came in light to. Can you talk a little bit more about into the other. Big question is how has been impacted your operation in. He the staff of people that you have to help make the magic of jobs so before profit started that i can think it was two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen. It's a website. I'm been working on it but just haven't had a lot of time. But i was noticing that a lot of people were feeling isolated in lost in the service industry. I grew up in the service industry. Since i was fifteen. I was front of the house for a very long time moved from you. Know being a barista back in nineteen eighty seven. Which wasn't cool to being. You know a waitress and then a bartender and just that party life you know. And i made a decision when i moved to san francisco to get sober and two thousand fifteen. Two thousand sixteen there was about four or five people who committed suicide during that time. And i think my mentality on my business on to treat people on how to look at people and how to really support other people in this industry. It's hard it's isolating. There's so many places to hide when you're in the service industry you hide behind a smile behind the bar. Nobody knows what's happening. And i think community before profit has kind of morphed into coming more towards not joe's to of being like during the pandemic when march seventh hit. I didn't lay off any employees at in furlough any employees at it. Lay off any employees. A lot of my employees family members weren't working either so i felt a huge responsibility to hold their jobs to make sure that they were still getting paid to do whatever i had to do to make sure that they were getting paid so basically i went from supporting families to supporting. You know all fifty people. I employ ten people in most people have at least five people on their family. So it may that community before prophet a little bit more real to me and a little bit more like i have a responsibility when i employ somebody. I don't just employ them just for them to get the job done. I employ them to give them the tools they need to succeed to give them the tools they need to never have to work another entry level job again

michelle pusa sophie Joe Sf san francisco hugh new york
Nana Joes Granola

Voices of the Community

05:57 min | Last week

Nana Joes Granola

"This episode is part of our series exploring covid nineteen impact on nonprofits and small businesses in san francisco. We started the series back in april of twenty twenty during the height of the first phase of the covid nineteen pandemic and the shelter in place requirements over these past nine months the covid nineteen pandemic an economic meltdown has wiped out millions of jobs in both the nonprofit in small business sectors as well shuddered tens of thousands of small business operations the goal of the series to shine the spotlight on the nonprofits small businesses and their staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on their operations services and sustainability the series of interviews we conducted features voices from a cross section of organizations that make up the fabric of our community each of them brings a unique perspective on how they and we are dealing with the issues facing our community during the global pandemic an economic depression. Yes it's a pandemic and yes. We have to stay safe but we have to learn how to help each other. We have to learn how to support each other's businesses. We have to learn how to sweat each other's families and we have to learn again how to grow. Small businesses can. Because i think right now the government's focusing on the bottom down and the bottom down out small businesses where we should be focusing on the bottom up because that's where the economic recovery is gonna come from in this episode are featured voice. Is michelle pusa terry from nanna. Joe's granola nanna. Joe's coonoor is a wonderful example of a local manufacturing startup that has been incubated through. Sf made his owner brings her passion for both healthy natural foods. Importing the community before profits. Which is why at nanotubes. Granola every employee is making above minimum wage. I joined remotely via sim by michelle. Who atari from manages granola. Thanks for being here. Michelle and i think people would love to know why you started editorials granola and can you tell us a little bit about sophie. Gold award is so i started non-judgmental it back in two thousand and ten with the hopes of bringing back whole food ingredients into package food world on the grocery store shelves. I noticed that a lot bulls granola on. The shelves had a ton of sugar. Some additives preservatives. And really it started with me surfing and wanting to really go out and has a lot of energy and i'm hypoglycemic and i'm really sensitive to sugar so i thought you know what i'm gonna just create. I'm a trained pastry chef. And i didn't know. I didn't make it myself to begin with but i started making my own. Granola in as everybody's stories goes friends family loved it. They found that they were having energy. A lot of people told me that they didn't have to eat lunch. And that was mainly. What i was going for was using whole food ingredients and not having any additives or preservatives or a ton of cane sugar. And we don't use any sugars. We just one sophie award. It's our third sophie awards. We went to this year. We won the gold for one of our paleo orange which is my personal favorite and then we won the bronze for paleo so we did a collaboration with hugh chocolate based out of new york and it's delicious and then we also have a silver one from two thousand eighteen. So that's kind of why. I started on just granola and why i firmly believe that if you build a business inside the community like the dog patch doc in two thousand twelve. It was much different. If you build a community that way. I really feel like you have to support them. And that's where community before profit came in light to. Can you talk a little bit more about into the other. Big question is how has been impacted your operation in. He the staff of people that you have to help make the magic of jobs so before profit started that i can think it was two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen. It's a website. I'm been working on it but just haven't had a lot of time. But i was noticing that a lot of people were feeling isolated in lost in the service industry. I grew up in the service industry. Since i was fifteen. I was front of the house for a very long time moved from you. Know being a barista back in nineteen eighty seven. Which wasn't cool to being. You know a waitress and then a bartender and just that party life you know. And i made a decision when i moved to san francisco to get sober and two thousand fifteen. Two thousand sixteen there was about four or five people who committed suicide during that time. And i think my mentality on my business on to treat people on how to look at people and how to really support other people in this industry. It's hard it's isolating. There's so many places to hide when you're in the service industry you hide behind a smile behind the bar. Nobody knows what's happening. And i think community before profit has kind of morphed into coming more towards not joe's to of being like during the pandemic when march seventh hit. I didn't lay off any employees at in furlough any employees at it. Lay off any employees. A lot of my employees family members weren't working either so i felt a huge responsibility to hold their jobs to make sure that they were still getting paid to do whatever i had to do to make sure that they were getting paid so basically i went from supporting families to supporting. You know all fifty people. I employ ten people in most people have at least five people on their family. So it may that community before prophet a little bit more real to me and a little bit more like i have a responsibility when i employ somebody. I don't just employ them just for them to get the job done. I employ them to give them the tools they need to succeed to give them the tools they need to never have to work another entry level job again

Michelle Pusa Michelle JOE Hugh Chocolate San Francisco Atari SF Depression Sophie Terry New York
"nanna" Discussed on Voices of the Community

Voices of the Community

03:32 min | Last week

"nanna" Discussed on Voices of the Community

"To sweat each other's families and we have to learn again how to grow. Small businesses can. Because i think right now the government's focusing on the bottom down and the bottom down out small businesses where we should be focusing on the bottom up because that's where the economic recovery is gonna come from in this episode are featured voice. Is michelle pusa terry from nanna. Joe's granola nanna. Joe's coonoor is a wonderful example of a local manufacturing startup that has been incubated through. Sf made his owner brings her passion for both healthy natural foods. Importing the community before profits. Which is why at nanotubes. Granola every employee is making above minimum wage. I joined remotely via sim by michelle. Who atari from manages granola. Thanks for being here. Michelle and i think people would love to know why you started editorials granola and can you tell us a little bit about sophie. Gold award is so i started non-judgmental it back in two thousand and ten with the hopes of bringing back whole food ingredients into package food world on the grocery store shelves. I noticed that a lot bulls granola on. The shelves had a ton of sugar. Some additives preservatives. And really it started with me surfing and wanting to really go out and has a lot of energy and i'm hypoglycemic and i'm really sensitive to sugar so i thought you know what i'm gonna just create. I'm a trained pastry chef. And i didn't know. I didn't make it myself to begin with but i started making my own. Granola in as everybody's stories goes friends family loved it. They found that they were having energy. A lot of people told me that they didn't have to eat lunch. And that was mainly. What i was going for was using whole food ingredients and not having any additives or preservatives or a ton of cane sugar. And we don't use any sugars. We just one sophie award. It's our third sophie awards. We went to this year. We won the gold for one of our paleo orange which is my personal favorite and then we won the bronze for paleo so we did a collaboration with hugh chocolate based out of new york and it's delicious and then we also have a silver one from two thousand eighteen. So that's kind of why. I started on just granola and why i firmly believe that if you build a business inside the community like the dog patch doc in two thousand twelve. It was much different. If you build a community that way. I really feel like you have to support them. And that's where community before profit came in light to. Can you talk a little bit more about into the other. Big question is how has been impacted your operation in. He the staff of people that you have to help make the magic of jobs so before profit started that i can think it was two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen. It's a website. I'm been working on it but just haven't had a lot of time. But i was noticing that a lot of people were feeling isolated in lost in the service industry. I grew up in the service industry. Since i was fifteen. I was front of the house for a very long time moved from you. Know being a barista back in nineteen eighty seven. Which wasn't cool to being. You know a waitress and then a bartender and just that party life you know. And i made a decision when i moved to san francisco to get sober and two thousand fifteen. Two thousand sixteen there was about four or five people who committed suicide during that time..

michelle pusa sophie Joe Sf san francisco hugh new york
"nanna" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

Project Upland Podcast

08:03 min | 3 weeks ago

"nanna" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

"Get x amount of text and then you'll get charged just like a cell phone plan. But what's really really nice about it in reach with all the Garmin inreach products is it's a month to month thing. So if you're like, well, I'm only getting use it two months out of the year. You're only dead. Like pay for two months out of the Year 24 bucks call it right, but I'm going to be honest with you the more you start using it. You're going to just be like know that $12 a month is dead worth it. That's what it costs to get launched a gas station now, so that's you know make or break could be a lifesaver. The other thing I want to talk about real quick. Sorry, just to keep on rambling here. Now. Keep on going man this Thursday we brought you on. Well, I look at that 200. I also right. So let's call bird hunting season really if you want to get down to it could be theoretically 6 months out of the year, maybe longer depending, you know life and obviously training dogs outside of it. But my point is is that even if you're not running dogs with this unit, it's still just one of the best handheld GPS has that incorporates in reach technology into it. You know what I mean? So it's like if you're going backpacking trip or you're going, you know, wherever canoeing whatever you need to do. It's like just take that thing along and you've got an incredible handheld GPS with in reach into it, right? Yeah. That's how that's how long Always looked at I know when I bought my first Alpha 100 again, it was my first dog and I thought let's get the GPS and the caller and in the whole deal and never really looked back. But I also I had an old GPS that need that kind of needed upgrading and it just worked into that value proposition for me it well. Hey, this is a awesome GPS to that can do everything else. I need. I mean it's it's capabilities go far beyond me taking the dog for a walk in the woods with my gun. Yeah. Well, but you know, like I said essential Center party life, right? That's that's for dang. Sure. Yeah. Yeah and I I very much appreciate that. I think we've talked quite a bit about the alpha to Hunter. I know that there's a great video done by Steve Snell gun. Yeah, he's he's awesome at reviewing this stuff. Right when the alpha 200 came out I went and watched that and prior to that. I read some of the products sheets and I had some info on the alpha 200 that video really solidified for me a lot of the value in the new Alfa 200 Iowa succinct in in that it didn't cover every feature, but it took Talked about the differences of it. So I'd encourage people to check that out. I'll go ahead and throw a link to it in the show notes, but Steve really talks about I mean the user the user interface and the improvements which some of them you've touched on a on the ability to really customize anybody that spent time with an alpha 100 knows there's all kinds of stuff in there and probably more than you use. That's okay. It's nice to have it but the ability to customize a put the stuff that you want to use right up front on top. There's a couple more buttons with those quick keys that that make it easier to use and more seamless to get out the stuff you need. That's that's I think we're we're a lot of them prove it is with the 200 Beyond just the the technical advancements and the redesign of the hand-held and everything. Yeah, and when you really one to yes Steve's got a great video. I mean, he's got a couple different things out on it. And the other thing too is there's a lot of different people that I've got reviews on it or kind of are talking about it. And I think it's also interesting to you know, I mean if you're you're looking to kill some time, you know. It's interesting to hear what like Helmsman have to say about it just says, you know pointing dogs versus you know, so different perspective different perspectives, but you're absolutely right in terms of being able to customize the information. Like I said it really the the design of it was set up so that it's really easy to use but it becomes you know, you set it up how you find it most valuable and you customize that information that you can get to it quickly efficiently and effectively and so that like you said, there's so much information in there. I mean everything from timers to you know, Man Overboard son said, you know everything you could possibly need and it's really people begin this goes back to its like people find valid people hunt differently and people their styles are different and so it shouldn't be one-size-fits-all is how you have to do it. You should be able to customize it and how you how it makes sense for you and your hunting Style and what you find most important and you know the things that you want help with the things you dead. Help with them. So that's that's something that I'm proud of. I know everybody else is proud of here as well and and the sense of being able to customize that customize the information so that it's very easily digestible. Thursday is also a very just user-friendly experience. Tell me a little bit more about the Garmin Explorer app because this is something I've been hearing about and there's one there's one key feature that you've already mentioned and that is the ability to track you could see your dogs track on the phone the way I'm thinking about this is not so much for the the Handler with the alpha 200. Does this game to play if I'm taking somebody else out and I've got a friend can they all of a sudden get the Garment Explorer app and track my dogs on their phone or would that not work if they don't have the hand-held? Yeah, so you have to say you have to be within a certain range for the handheld right? And so it kind of tethers in two different things. So the Explorer app is using it in a couple of we have a couple different ones. It's a free app you can download off. For off-grid navigation, you've got you can you know easily trip plan thru waypoints everything like that you download satellite image. You can download satellite imagery. It's really robust and those directly off of your wage. And so it's just an enhanced experience mapping everything like that right on your phone itself. You can also sink into it with different products. Like I said with the 200 I you have the ability to laugh track a dogs off and stuff like that. So if you so choose like hey, I'm going to throw my handheld in the pack. I'm going to track directly off that you can go from it another continual advancement in technology and the grammar school system. I guess we talked about the watch as we talked about the alpha garmin's got a full line of I mean, you got the Delta Upland training collars, you got all kinds of stuff. I do need almost forgot talking about colors. I need to ask you this and you've probably been asked this before when it comes to grouse hunting there's a thing about beepers and I know that the the Garmin Alpha traditionally has not had a beeper and I juice. I think I'm going to cut you off in the past. All right going out have an Upland Bieber on it. I know I know yes. Yes, but what I want to get at is kind of the the thought process and I you know, whether it's a weather wherever this decision is made. I mean I get it I'm just like I'm only throwing this out there because I'm a grouse Hunter and I still appreciate a beeper and Garmin makes it be per they have a beeper and gave me personally. I know it's like down the priority list for houndsmen and people that hung out west and everything else. But if garmin's GPS collar had the ability to integrate a paper or add one in I would get value out of that. So that's why I bring it up, but I know that you know some things some things hit the chopping block. I mean, do you have any thoughts on it or like can you give us any insight there Nick? I wish I had. I wish I had this something that I could just wave. And here we go. Here's an Oakland be for a couple different thoughts are either. It's like there are beepers that are compatible with other collars, but when you think about it that the the GPS collars a lot of birth Work on completely separate systems. And so the existing ones don't integrate into it. That's just a limitation of the functionality of it. I'm not trying to sidestep this question whatsoever. What I would also say with it is like Nick is a grouse Hunter like, you know, you know bells and beepers. Like I know that's those are the things, you know, yeah, but I do think that there's a certain amount and again, I'm not trying to sidestep I guess what I would say is first and foremost, it doesn't that technology or that unit that we've got doesn't integrate into it. The other side of it I would say is I I personally I've never been I've never been a huge fan. I used to run a bell for a while, but I never really I've never been a fan of them and I know this sounds like you know blasphemy in some world so long, please take this is value,.

garmin Steve Snell Nick Garment Explorer Hunter Center party Iowa Oakland Delta Upland
"nanna" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

Project Upland Podcast

02:50 min | 3 weeks ago

"nanna" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

"So I don't know it's it's all of it. I like I said, it's it always just amazes me the stuff that you know, the team here thinks of and comes up with and you know, I'm proud of work in I'm proud with the you know, all of the units this 200. I I mean, I'm looking at one right off. On yeah, it's awesome. Like I can just go on, you know, go on and on. Yeah, so yeah, and I think you bring up a good point talking about when you're out in the woods or V. And you're actually living that moment. I mean, there's nothing better than that. That is the Pinnacle and with when it comes to technology. There's always a delicate balance like we can sit here and no doubt and talk about tech. Is it off detracting from your experience in that moment? And I think a lot of people would say, you know, there's a line where if I'm having to mess with something to the point where I'm forgetting to just lose myself in the motion. That's the problem. But like you said that the team at Garmin and the people that are working on this stuff the easier it gets to use and incorporate into these Adventures the more seamless it becomes and it's it takes away less the day of you're actually living that experience lets you enjoy it and then it's giving you the stuff that you can go back and reflect on and again for me personally. I find that value wage. You know government's government as a missionary every company have a mission statement and Gardens mission statement, you know is at the end of it. It says making products that are become essential to our customers lives thought about that and it's exactly how you described it right where it's like you have the ability to go and do what you love and be out in the woods with your dog and you can rely on your faith in Alpha to take care of what you need to take care of and then in the moment that you need to find a dog or figure out what's going on and where you're at. You can always just snap back to it. So yeah. Yeah, so that's awesome. And I don't want to leave this. We don't need to get into the nitty-gritty stuff about like pricing and stuff. But I just want to be clear about the in reach thing. Yep. You've got you've got the capability on your Alpha 200. I you've got in reached tell me the basics of how that works and with a subscription and how many messages I can send like what do we need to know about that? Yeah, so I'm also going to say really quickly before I forget the alpha 200 I thought That runs on the tt15 tt15 many t v same exact same Powers as the five fifty plus and the 100 so you can actually just buy the hand-held and use your old collars off by the way reminds me everybody, you know, always don't forget to update your units. Yes, but the long and short is with in reach. It's it's think about it like a cellphone plan page where you can go as much higher lows you want the sense where it starts at about 12 bucks a month and then it goes up to I want to say right around $70 a month..

Garmin Gardens
"nanna" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

Project Upland Podcast

05:18 min | 3 weeks ago

"nanna" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

"I'm a techie guy took like the stuff and I usually adopt stuff early. So when the watch came out I looked at it and thought man, I would like to have that but it's kind of a convenience thing. You know, I don't need it. I can just look down at my Alpha and grab it off. Well sooner or later. I acquired a Garmin first. I got a Garmin Vivio active young watched that they actually the integrated dog tracking app wasn't on there, but you could get a third-party one. So I got it home. Realized I loved the Garmin watch for a lot of things outside of hunting and dog tracking. I really liked the activity tracking and fitness tracking aspects of my Garmin watch eventually upgraded to a phoenix. And now I had a buddy he was out with his first bird dog. I talked him into getting an alpha 200. He got it like the day it came out and he was out there using it and just seeing him use a handheld and he was kind of like looking to me wage. So for me to look down at my watch and tell him where his dog is because it was so convenient for me to look at my watch and it just it it like kind of reiterated like just how nice that is to be able to just glanced down at the wrists where my dog is. I mean that thing works really really well. Yeah and those watches to like you talk about the Phoenix that's just incredible on-screen mapping, you know, everything like that. I kind of mention the Instinct as well. That's another one both of those just Incorporated solar charging Technologies. So I mean, I think I'd charge this Instinct once every forty days or something. Yeah the batteries on yeah are crazy. It's warm. Then there's also somebody just other features that you can get with it and information and that's the thing with the information even you know, with the alpha and with if you're saying your watch with, you know, Garmin Connect or anything like that where you're getting those stats from your health your, you know, everything you could possibly imagine within and it's like there's also the choice that you have. It's like how much information do you want like you don't you don't have to use it if you don't want to but the thing is if it's there and so if you ever do need it or want it you have the ability to just to check it out quickly on the flying. Yeah. So one more thing on the watch for the moment. I don't know if I've talked about this on the podcast before but what I have started doing with my Garmin watch and using the Garmin Connect app and the activity tracking is it is essentially the skeleton of my hunting journal and it's really easy to do. I have a custom activity on my Garmin watch that I is titled up on Hunt. So I get out of the truck. I do the same things. Everybody else does strap the colors on my dog load the gun cetera. I I pressed two buttons on my watch I start tracking an activity. So I hit the button on my watch start it I start walking I go hunt. I'm out hunting looking for Birds. Hopefully my dogs are pointing them on flushing them maybe hitting a couple every time I flush a grouse I do one long button, press on my watch that I've programmed to be the lap timer my buddy and I have creatively figured out how to use them up timer because what the lap timer does is when you're reviewing it, it drops a pin where you hit that lap and it's number two. So I hit the lap time or everytime I flush a grouse and what that allows me to do is after I finish my heart I get back to my truck. I stopped it. I get my truck. I'm sitting there taking a break catching my breath. I sync my watch to my phone. You can open up the phone and there's my activity encapsulated. It's just the date time duration of the hunt mileage. I walked weather wind and I can look at the track that I walked to the cover over the satellite image. And see every time I dropped a pin and flushed a grouse so I can see I flushed ten Grouse and I flushed him here here and here and here and forever that hunt that Upland Hunt is saved in my Garmin Connect app in the cloud. I can go back and review it anytime. It's like I can go back and review house. I can relive these hunts because I can see where I walk through the cover and where I flushed the birds. It's just to me I find that so I'm crazy valuable and I just I love using that I don't know if you've ever talked to anybody else that that does that with your Garmin watch. But yeah people also do that on a fishing side of things too. And I mean, so what you've kind of talked about is dead. Like I wish I could take credit for like that type of stuff and no again. I'm those that credit goes back to the engineers that just figured it out and what people do in love and that's kind of like not to keep going back to that but it's like talk about something that's enhancing your Outdoor Experience, you know? Yes, and it does that's always like, you know, I do it differently. So it's like all Market on the actual on the alpha and it's like, yeah. Yep. It's funny and so I can go back and you can see like you said relive hunts and like seeing what kind of where it was and the and everything about it brings back those members and I think in a weird way that's that's what we're all trying to do with, you know, if there's a way that I could relive those moments more I would but you can do that with like how you described your how I do it and it's that kind of continual on-going live journal or home experience and one we're in it in the moment. It's one thing right and the day after you think about it like oh, you know, that's great. I'll go back and check that out. But cheers down the road. You know, those kind of I'm looking forward all that like, oh, yeah my Glory Days back and I remember that Grouse or I remember sneaking here and that type of stuff. So I don't know it's it's all of it. I like I said, it's it always just amazes me the stuff that you know, the team here thinks of and comes.

Garmin Hunt phoenix Grouse Upland Hunt
"nanna" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

Project Upland Podcast

01:33 min | 3 weeks ago

"nanna" Discussed on Project Upland Podcast

"Thursday this is the project Upland podcast presented by on X hunt. This episode of the show we're talking all things Garmin with rayhana. Welcome back to the show for episode number 121 off off off a the project Upland podcast is presented by on X hunt creators of the most comprehensive digital mapping system for hunters use a promo code p u p 2 0 to say 20% on your on X hunt subscription today and buy Eukanuba premium performance dog food if you want to get the wage Starting your dog U need nutrition that holds nothing back to help unleash your dog's maximum potential check out the new Eukanuba premium performance lineup at Eukanuba sporting dog.com.

World Week Morning Shahzad

Chompers

02:21 min | Last month

World Week Morning Shahzad

"Good morning it's time for choppers your morning and night tooth brushing show today our friend Jasmine is here with an interview. Gentleman take it away. Thanks start brushing on the top of your mouth on one side and here's Trumpian Idris speaking Japanese to counter saw. How It's World Week and today our Friendship Zahed is here to tell us about Pakistan, the country where his family is from. High She's odd. Families from Pakistan and they speak earlier there. Okay and where in the world is Pakistan. Pakistan is right next to India and China. And South Asia. Switch you're brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush your front teeth to. Have you ever been to Pakistan I've indo-pakistan many, times? I used to go I used to go in the summer the kid to see my family especially my grandparents. Would fly to Karachi trustee is the big city in Pakistan And it's a city that has twenty, four, million people. It's one of the biggest cities in the world you might never have heard about it. Switched to the bottom of your mouth. And brush the molars all the way in the back. Okay so used to fly to Pakistan to visit your grandparents. So how would you say grandmother in early? So. Early, do with family members is very specific in. Titles. So you don't say grandparents really you say, my grandmother, my Mom's side or my grandmother on my Dad's side. So the data and Daddy are on your Dad's side and the Nana and Nani on your mom's side. The Nana Nani. Secure brushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. And give your tongue up brush to. What do you call your mum? I'd call her mother a me or Mama a me or Mama what about your dad call my Dad Baba. And I could also say a boo, a lot of families say Abhu we say Baba. Mahba. We just like how that sounds.

Pakistan Nana Nani Trumpian Idris Baba Jasmine South Asia Nani Karachi Trustee Nana India Daddy China
Travel to Zagreb

Travel with Rick Steves

04:38 min | Last month

Travel to Zagreb

"Let's start with a look at a European capital that's often overlooked by the beach crowd who enjoy Croatia's crystal clear coastline. But miss out on the scene in its capital city. It has a distinctively modern take on old world charm and it's just a few hours inland. To tell us about saga we're joined now by local guide Darya goateed. She's joined by Ben Curtis who writes about the Balkan regions elaborate history and thinks that Croatia's best period may be now Darya in Ben Welcome my pleasure. Same. Thank you for having. US Doria. You're from Zagreb your guide in Zagreb, a lot of Americans no Dubrovnik. Venice and a lot of Americans know the Anna Zagreb is right there in the middle. What should we know about Zagreb? Nanna. Saga is I would say the mix of. All these big capitals around and all these much better known cities around from historical perspective It was influenced by different cities and countries. So we have a little bit of all of that. What's an example? How is it a little bit of? How is it a little bit of Italy says it a little bit of the Slavic World So? obas part of the hops Burke monarchy later austro-hungary for few hundred. Years. And then architecture in town is very much what we would call out through nor Central European. So the mixture of Hungarian hungarian-austrian. We don't have much Dubrovnik textures that. Is Zog. Is completely different about the cuisine that scene is also very influenced by Austria but not only that we do eat struggles and. A lot of meat and potatoes and then on the other hand we also eat. A lot of Pasta beat some. We are very sensitive on coughing, and then we also have the Turkish influence because arguable also for few centuries, just about forty, five, fifty miles Sir north from the Ottoman Empire boarder okay. It's a crossroads release across through the s the Ben Curtis here in American who has a fascination and a deep interest in this part of Europe how would you say Zagreb is unique Zagreb is unique for being this gem of a central European capital. So everybody can measure saying they know Budapest, Vienna, they know Prague, but here's this. Gym of a historical city that hardly any American visits right and even though Zagreb stars rising on the Tourism Front these days but you can go there and it's not gonna be jammed with busloads of tourists from all over the place you're not gonNA hear a lot of other North American accents and you're going to be able to experience the city where the fabric of locals you're going to be sitting in a cafe with mostly other people from Zagreb, and that's great and it's hard to find that in Dubrovnik are in Vienna these days a year. Exactly. So if you had two nights in in one Danes, is there enough to keep you busy. Yeah. For sure I think, what would you do if you're gonNA show me around for a day the it's a great kind of one day stop if you're coming in and out for some of the coast. So Zagreb surprisingly has some of I think are the best museums of its kind in Europe now they're quirky right? You don't. Go desire grab for the Louvre or something like that. But you go to Zagreb for these unusual small museums like the Museum of naive art, which is great sort of not formally trained perhaps painters but really characteristic art with peasant themes. The famous one which is kind of made headlines around the world is a museum of broken relationships which is filled with these stories of couples who have broken up the objects that they have Meant something to them and they've given it this museum and so it's just a really interesting kind of poignant sometimes hilarious trip through people's relationships. So when we think of this naive art, I love this idea because you go to most art galleries in Europe Bennett, the opposite of naive arted this refined fully embraced high-society art but naive art is by definition just unschooled hasn't Sir Working People that just had a passion for painting. Exactly but are often very, very talented even if they didn't train at the academy or something like that but they're expressing the lives and cultures and artistic visions of people from the rural areas and it's genius really an undiscovered genius that happen to come out of the farm community or something absolutely. I love that museum by the way that that's really one of the unique things in Europe and it is in the capital of Croatia Zagreb.

Zagreb Croatia Zagreb Anna Zagreb Europe Darya Goateed Croatia Museum Of Naive Art Ben Curtis Dubrovnik Central European United States Austria Ottoman Empire Venice Doria Bennett Pasta Italy Budapest Vienna
Wildfire Ignition is Solvable

Solvable

04:55 min | 2 months ago

Wildfire Ignition is Solvable

"Right. Now, if I look out my window, I, see a very Brown's guy. It looks like it's twilight but you know it's ten o'clock in the morning and it should be a bright and sunny grew up in California I'm Californian for almost my entire life. And you know I have many graduate students in my lab at Stanford that come here from all over the place and they sort of assumed that it's normal. And I had to tell him now I mean I don't remember this ever when I was growing up I mean you'd hear about. Fires every once in a while on the on the news but it certainly in the last couple years has become a completely regular thing. So I can certainly understand your eagerness to to help solve this problem, solve ables about how you're GonNa do it what's your solvable for dealing with these fires? Many many millions of gallons of retardant. So used every year right the iconic red stuff you see being dropped from planes. And that's really only ever used reactively. So once a fire has started. Our main approach is trying to stop them before they start. Now one of the limitations that we're trying to address is if you want to go and pre treat areas where you know fires are going to start. One of the primary limitations of the current hardens that they don't stay where you put. A high wind or heavy do is enough to wash the retardants off the vegetation. So they stopped working off. So what we sought to do was to to not create a new retardant let's say 'cause we're using the same active fire retarding agent but instead tweaking the performance additives so that the retarded stays on the vegetation. Throughout the duration of the fire season. So you can spray one time in June. Let's say and have protection against fire starts. All the way through until the rainy season comes. So can you describe this stuff? What's it like if you touch it how does it feel? It's not quite a lot of people think of Jello and they think of a gel in it's not thick like that. It looks Kinda like cream really So what we developed in my lab improves the adherence. So more of what you spray actually sticks on the vegetation and it improves the durability. So it's really only once you get into the ratings season that the materials will wash away and simply biodegrade on the soil. Yeah. The evidence in I mean you know it works yes. So we did pilot scale studies to test ourselves and we tried to burn it It was actually. Kinda fun because you know we would do the experiments and and see the fire would not actually ignite even through extensive weathering. So we rain to half an inch on it and let it sit in the environment for six weeks. The treated grass, it wouldn't burn. So some of the folks that we're working with started just drawing funny faces in the grass with the with a torch because even if you took a torch to, it wouldn't ignite. Wow. Then we were able to step it up and actually do some full scale pilot studies in and treated a number of roadside segments in southern, California many of them are small but every one of these ignitions requires crews to go out and put him out. So they use a lot of resources that take a firefighter time that they could be spending doing things like controlled burns. And we reported that they were zero fires in the treated areas Eric, this targeted intervention, right? You don't need to treat the whole forest. You just go where the fires most likely to happen. Yeah. Exactly. I think that's An important misconception that I see a lot of places know we're not talking about treating the entire forest like you would with a controlled burn. We're talking about treating only right where the fires likely to start, and so if you envision a roadside where if you have a car that overheats and it pulls over into the grass, right next to the roadway or somebody throws a cigarette out of their window, it only lands right next. To the roadway, and so you only have to treat right there and what's beautiful about that is that let's say a twenty foot wide treatment protects all of the forest beyond it. Yeah and this cream that you're spraying is it is it safe for plants and trees and birds and animals and people I mean something about the look of that read stuff coming out of planes I always think I would not like to be underneath it. Yeah. So we when we were developing this, we specifically designed it to be safe. That was one of the the primary concerns because anything you're putting out in the environment, you want to be one hundred percent certain that it's safe and effective. We designed it using cellulose, adjust plant matter, and a thing called Colloidal Silica, which you can think of as Nanna sand. So it's just primarily sand and

California Nanna Sand Stanford Brown Eric
Pre-commit Framework: Git Hook Scripts

Talk Python To Me

05:42 min | 2 months ago

Pre-commit Framework: Git Hook Scripts

"Be looking for employment after that I might turn out in my turn out your program right now you can do it. Awesome. It was always a chance the for sure you've got to give it a shot. That's awesome. Well, let's talk about this project that you've been. Working on for a while, but like I said, has gotten a little bit of traction a lot of traction lately because of tools like black in other things that have made recommit hooks awesome and exciting all the sudden. But before we talk about what you've been doing, let's talk about the idea recommit hoax in general. Sure. What is this for a lot of people who are like? Yeah I kinda what it is I kind of use that or maybe if even used like Zip. Zip and name of a date as a source of. Final one one. But yeah, the idea behind get hooked specifically the because I think that's probably the one that most people get the most interaction with. But there are a bunch of commands in get where you can register call backs as scripts to either do like validation or seen some people use it to like send emails or like close tickets all sorts of other The main focus around get hooks to me is the pre commit hook where you can do glinting. And Code Validation Code formatting you can run tests or other stuff like that I guess the pre push hook is another one that's also kind of big in that same space where you want to do validation of your changes before you send them off to like. Right. So you like maybe reject some kind of reject the get push if the formatting is wrong or the header is missing or something like that, right you can take a lot of those like. Easy validate things and do them in a kind of a quick fast manner before you would do your larger test suite or something catch a syntax era before you spend a bunch of time spinning up systems, right? Well, speaking to see I to me this seems like the next natural progression from having I, do these tests, right so there's different levels. The developer should probably be reading in running tests and making sure that the test passed they should be like formatting their code before they check it in stuff like that but when you work. On a team, my experience has been there's a wide wide range of how much people are willing to do that how much they care about those kinds of things and what that means is maybe you have CI continuous integration that runs automatically during check in once check has done and so then they might check in something might say, Oh, the bill does now broken because you didn't bother to run the test, but you broke the tests but because you didn't run them, you didn't know it. So now tree falls in a forest. Here's right. And that sort of thing, and so then you end up the situation, the people that care about the build, working half the track down the person who broke it who didn't actually care is just these layers of like annoying type of thing, and if you can make the push that validation to the location where the person is and all the people rights even if you care like, you might not want to break the build. You might rather just get a warning or just automatically have it fixed and pre-committed commit hook seemed like that's the natural place that. Kind of mentality I always had is. If I'm waiting 'til CIA to get feedback on nitpicks around commas or white space syntax or whatever that to me is way too late in the process because I've already like out you know I've pushed I've already gone off to the next thing I'm already answering my email are looking and get habitual user. Talking in slack or whatever and like I've already conduct switched to a completely different situation in I could've been. I assume do as good because. In pushed right I never make mistakes. So yeah, exactly. Zero Fault Code get pushed. The final action now you're done, right? Yeah but like it was. Frustrating. To make a push on, then have some either build system telling me that something was wrong or in view someone was like Oh awhile you could have reordered these imports. So they are alphabetical or something it's just like, yeah, this is a big waste time. Let's Kinda. Put this as far towards the developers possible such that we can be a better a better situation. The other thing I think is interesting around these ideas is. There's been studies that have shown that people are more willing to take. nitpicky advice from a computer than from human. There's like, okay. Well, the computer requires that I have this kind of white space for this kind of imitation are like this type of fort like you said, order alphabetical ordering or whatever, and when it comes from a person in a code review, it's like well, that person is just a jerk, right? I, wrote good coach. Taking this flack for this thing. So having this happen like automatically think takes away the need to review the kind of stuff. It takes away the need to complain and be that that person that does that you can even go farther with tools like black where it doesn't just complain a just goes I fixed it for you actually the way that I usually talk about this like the absolute. The worst situation that a human tells you that something is wrong the next situation that like. A CI system tells you that something's wrong better than that. Is that an automated local tool tells you that something is wrong and the Golden Standard is that an automated tool just fixes it for me I. Don't don't have to worry about it all it just makes it happen. Yeah, and it also results. You don't have this sort of like dueling alternate format style, right? Like if I like working pie chart, you'd like to work in vs code our formatting rules vary ever so slightly. Commas between parameters or there to space between the Coal Nana type annotation. We both reformatting document they cycle back and forth right and this way you can sort of just hit it with the same format. Right before goes every time. Of course I'm at also helps with things like get blame really noticing when patches or

Developer Coal Nana CIA
High-Elevation Hummingbirds Evolved a Temperature Trick

60-Second Science

01:52 min | 2 months ago

High-Elevation Hummingbirds Evolved a Temperature Trick

"A humming birds of your garden, you've no doubt seen it flipped from flower to flower hovering midair as it sips on nectar that activity requires plenty of energy. So hummingbirds need a lot of nectar to feed their hungry metabolism's some of them probably drink two or three times. The Body Mass Index Everyday Andrew McCartney an ornithologist at the University of Pretoria in south. Africa. mckanie and his colleagues have studied hummingbirds extreme. In the Peruvian Andes to survive, they're the tiny birds have developed a few tricks for one their blood cells are unusually efficient at transporting oxygen. It's more difficult to hover in the high altitude thin air, and so the humming birds at the higher elevations much prone to pushing while they feed. So that does seem to be one way in which try and reduce the energy expenditure. Now, Macaque Nana's colleagues have found another energy-saving adaptation. The High Mountain hummingbirds can lower their body temperature by extreme amounts of night going into a state called torpor. tencent appearances, they essentially did they. That's unresponsive. The scientists caught six species of Andy and hummingbirds and monitor their temperatures throughout night and day, and they found that all six species could enter some type torpor. They lower their body temperatures from about one hundred degrees Fahrenheit by day to as low as thirty eight degrees Fahrenheit at night and being essentially conserves energy. The details are in the journal biology letters although some of the birds low body temperatures are on par with those of hibernating mammals. It's important to note that this is not fully fledged hibernation, which is a longer term response. True hibernation has only been documented in one bird so far at least common poor will in the US south. West one of my career goals is to find second harmonizing but in the Andes, he says, it's going to be the first place he looks.

Peruvian Andes Andes Biology Letters Andrew Mccartney University Of Pretoria United States Nana High Mountain Tencent Andy Africa.
Bricks Can Be Turned Into Batteries

60-Second Science

01:47 min | 2 months ago

Bricks Can Be Turned Into Batteries

"Are one of the oldest known building materials dating back thousands of years, but researchers at Washington University in. Saint, Louis have found a new use for bricks as. Storage units a team of engineers and chemists have found a way to transform an ordinary house brick into a pseudo battery, allowing it to conduct and store electricity. The bricks are powerful enough to illuminate and led light bulb and cost only about three dollars to make I love. The idea of adding value to things that are inexpensive things that are affordable things that we kind of take for granted Julio, Darcy is an assistant professor of chemistry at Washington University and one of the researchers on the project. The brick battery relies on the reddish pigment known as. Side or rust. The gives red bricks, their color, the scientists pumped. The bricks was several gases that react with iron oxide to produce a network of plastic fibres. These microscopic fibers, coat the empty spaces inside the bricks and conduct electricity or we're trying to do is we're trying to make specialized. That are only used in the Nanna scale where we use very little plastic on we can actually embed that plastic inside construction materials that can store energy. This study is in the Journal. Nature Communications in the future Darcy says. Could. Potentially serve a dual purpose providing structural support and storing electricity generated from renewable energy sources like solar panels. The technology is still at least a few years away from being ready for the commercial market right now, the energy storage capacity of the bricks. Low about one percent of a lithium ion battery. The team is now testing ways to improve brick performance because it looks like you can teach an old brick new tricks.

Washington University Darcy Assistant Professor Saint Nature Communications Louis Julio
Hurricane Nana hits Belize, drives across Guatemala

Rush Limbaugh

00:09 sec | 2 months ago

Hurricane Nana hits Belize, drives across Guatemala

"Knew okay. Nana made landfall early today in Bailey's pelting a sparsely populated stretch of the Caribbean coast with Heavy rain and wind before weakening back to a tropical

Nana Bailey Caribbean
Hurricane Nana nears Belize as residents brace for landfall

WBBM Evening News

00:16 sec | 2 months ago

Hurricane Nana nears Belize as residents brace for landfall

"Storm Nana is just off the coast of Honduras and is now on a collision course with bullies. The storm is moving at about 15 MPH, expected to strengthen before making landfall in believes as a hurricane early tomorrow, believes has issued a hurricane warning for its coastline.

Honduras
Beirut explosion: Ammonium nitrate caused deadly blast in Lebanon

1A

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

Beirut explosion: Ammonium nitrate caused deadly blast in Lebanon

"Minister says it appears that ammonium nitrate more than 2700 tons of it cause the massive explosions that killed more than 70 people in Beirut. More than 3000 others were injured in Tuesday's blast at a dockside warehouse where the chemical had been stored. Not a Homsi reports that she and other residents of the area are shaken. I was at home when the first explosion hit on and then it was followed by a much stronger, louder second explosion that by Windows and doors shuttered and exploded. An entire building shook I went out on the street. It was completely devastated with glass everywhere. A facade and here of all the storefronts were completely destroyed. Nana Homsi reporting from Beirut.

Beirut Nana Homsi
"nanna" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

Book Club with Julia and Victoria

05:01 min | 4 months ago

"nanna" Discussed on Book Club with Julia and Victoria

"I don't know like I- oddly really empathize with that even though she's Really. Cool. You mentioned robbery, but I. Phil Yeah. So the very ending scene. She and her dad and her brother. Stand against their wall for when the. Bomb Hits and they stand in different poses every day. So like what messages do we want to send to the people after this loop ends? What are they gonNA find us. And they WANNA. Make funny shapes so that like. When they get burned their it sort of leaves a shadow on the wall of kind of the outline of who they are and they're like ooh. I WANNA make it look like this and they sort of moving around. That's actually referenced to Ray Bradbury Story from like the early fifties. Called, there will come soft rains. and. It's it's a post apocalyptic story when they were all freaking out about the invention of the atomic bomb of I'm. After basically it's a scene a very eerie scene after bomb has gone off and you sort of this very mechanical house go about its day even though the owners aren't there. So like cooks breakfast cleaning, it makes tea in waters, the plants in whatever I'm reciting this poem. No there? At the very end of the story, you see the sort of shadows on the wall of where the owners used to be. So they basically burned. Alive in this sort of shadow. is what's left and so I feel like he's sort of. Playing with. that. Pretty well, known story I would say. It's taught in a lot of like short-story classes Who are people once the situation and the fact that they're do making the shadows on purpose to have fun you know. It's not like they were unsuspecting of it. Right? They're doing it to like be cute. Family outing they're like Ooh, what are we GONNA do today we're going to be animals do yoga poses. I had was very clever and I it's not like. It's pretty obvious reference, but if he never means it specifically. Yeah. So we only hit on like our. Top even call them top stories just the ones we were like most excited to talk about. A podcasting because we have also descended like question lightweight What is? In the not that green podcast content as sitting in thinking. So Yeah. There's a lot lights bitter super fascinating about. Can Violence Line in the spider SAIGA. Folks Hail Woven with a modern day story. against someone working. Kind of. Retail. Job But for hardware. Company. Harbor. Story. The hospital aware get super I'm a writer right about being a writer but it a really cool way. Lark street talks about abortion. Very. I've just keep saying interesting over ever and I can't think of a better attitude having because he is very original yet every all of his sort of. The way he approaches every single subject is like very clever something team before. Yeah. Like a pro at. He's a pro just thinking mashing if Xyz happened and then he just goes for totally. Incredible. In one of the interviews I read all Lincoln in the notes the heated with the Guardian. He said he had like. Eighty stories. One hundred something like that news like, yeah. But like seventy more, that's one of the not in this bug. That common thing you hear from writers, which is so truly you need a ride a lot before you get the best ones but. They're all salad. Often say of collections of there's. Not a single one that could be discarded in the bookstore standalone. The, knowing glance there are there are some the Aren't my favorite Shomron maybe but. They're all. Hit for those who this what would you recommend next? Yeah. I've got a couple. son by Lois lowry..

Phil Yeah writer Lincoln robbery Ray Bradbury Lois lowry Xyz
"nanna" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

04:03 min | 5 months ago

"nanna" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

"We talk a lot about anti-black this on the podcast, and that it exists in so many areas, and this is another area where you do have just levels of anti blackness. Absolutely I mean when we look at WHO's being detained the most when you know who is being detained the longest. Who is the most likely to be deported? Who are you know is is the least likely to be able to get out on bail? WHO's bonds are the highest you're talking about black immigrants. We are targeted and profiled as black people, because we are black people by the criminal sanctions system, and then we are targeted racially profiled in treated differently in the detention system deportation system, also as a result of being black and I say all the time as a hundred thousand. This is according to the Prime Minister of Ireland. A hundred thousand undocumented is people in the United States. You do not hear about is going to Saint Patrick's Day parades hitting the pubs you know and looking for those undocumented Irish people that doesn't happen in yet see the ways in which is and the police target black immigrants, an immigrants of color, and we know where this comes from, and so it's really important that we talk about that and that we center that and that we don't allow folks to invisible is black people in the immigrant rights movement. Those visuals he just gave in. I'm thinking about it. I'm like yeah. You never see them at those festivals at all. They advertise what no problem people attended with no problem by when we gather, it's OK. Who Can we get? Who shouldn't be here? Absolutely. Two or more of US may not be gathered period. In some cases, that's law. Right the way that they frame below that it gives them more capacity to stop us to Frisk to arrest us to detain us. we see who is being detained the most, and who's being ticketed most when it comes to covert nineteen for example right, we see that with these protests that we were engaged in and continue to be engaged in lifting up anti blackness in this country in particular as As it relates to police that they engaged ice, right they went and got is to come out. They went, got the customs and Border Patrol to come out and they're doing that. Understanding this to be a black led movement, so who that is targeting in other people's minds. They think Oh. That's to target the Brown. Folks, but no, they don't see this as a brown movement. They understand this movement for black lives as the black. Black Movement that is to make sure that black immigrants feel afraid of coming out. Because where the started the epicenter in Minnesota. You had so many black immigrant youth from Somalia from Kenya from other parts of the black world who were right there leading the charge a in this push for our lives, and they wanNA. Make sure that we don't come out and that we don't engage. You're absolutely right and we are in this historic. Historic Movement of activism protesting and there are so many people who want to do more so for those people who are thinking okay. What are my next steps were I? CAN HEAP INVOLVED? Keep this conversation going. What advice do you have for? Those people who want to make sure that they're not letting this? Just be a moment that they're doing everything that they can. What are some ways that you think people can heighten their activism? So? We always tell people to feel free to.

United States Historic Movement of activism Saint Patrick Prime Minister of Ireland Border Patrol Somalia Minnesota Kenya
People come to America for a dream

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

06:13 min | 5 months ago

People come to America for a dream

"Today we had the honor to talk to Nana Xanthi. She is an attorney and the executive director of the Black Alliance for justice immigration or. She's also the founder of the Community Legal Clinic and Transform Justice Center in legal these workshops as well as the founder of Justice Warriors Black Lives I. Hope you enjoy this conversation. Nana how are you today? I am well well, as can be expected in during these times and hoping you're well as well you know I am well despite everything, but one of the reasons that I'm grateful is because of the great work that women like you do in this country so excited to talk about the Black Alliance for just immigration, which is one of the organizations that the BG and wonder me a network which produces the BG podcast has been encouraging our audiences to support, so thank you. These organizations are critical in times like this. Thank you so very much? We appreciate that support and the support that we've gotten from black folks all over the globe. Appreciate it. Tell us a little bit more about the Black Alliance for just immigration, and what brought you to the organization? So the black lines for just immigration is a national black lead Immigration Rights Human Rights Racial Justice Organization. We are the largest of our kind in the United States. We educate we advocate. We organized on behalf of the. The roughly ten million Black Refugee and immigrant families in this country as well as black folks who are trying to come into the country, whether it be permanently or temporarily, and those who are seeking asylum. We have our headquarters in New York, but we also have offices in DC. Miami Atlanta Los Angeles and Oakland and we have staff in Houston, and in Minneapolis, so we pretty much are all over the place as well as doing work on the. Episode of the border in Mexico, at the northern border with Tijuana, and also we've been doing some work the southern border of Mexico in Chula where you have black asylum seekers coming to the United States through Mexico. In that way and the work that we do is national in many cases in terms of policy, and you know we've been very busy in that regard, especially in with this administration, we also do national work with respect to racial justice our. Former executive director open committee was one of the big three that started black lives matter, and so by has been involved in black lives matter since the beginning and we do that work, and then we also do local work regional work. I'm both on the policy side, but as well as more, and with even more vigor on the organizing side to make sure that we are pushing for racial. Economic and social justice with an right alongside our multigenerational African American siblings. So much work, such powerful work. As. You said you've been very busy with this administration echo, they're just keeping everyone busy with their foolishness, but I definitely do a suit top about Daca so for our listeners, who may not be familiar Dhaka's stands for deferred action for childhood arrivals and the Supreme. Court decision around Dhaka now allows immigrants who ever see Daca status sometimes referred to as dreamers so if you seen the Hashtag is sandwiched dreamers. That's what that means. It allows them. them to stay in the country safely without a threat of deportation, but one the things that we've been really seeing missing from mainstream conversation over Daca was that it also impacts not Hispanic and Latino communities that there are black and brown communities impacted by this as well other black communities that are impacted by this as well. So, what was your reaction when you hurt the decision? And what are our next steps in the Dreamer, movement so? It is really important in think I really WanNa, thank you for lifting up the fact that yes, there are dreamers who are not Brown folks. That are not Latin next folks. That are not black right that we have black Latino next folks as well as black dreamers from the continent of Africa from the Caribbean from Europe right we think about. Twenty, one savage right and how this came up? And he actually falls in the category that is equally as important that we need to advocate for a person who isn't a Dhaka recipient, but who happens to be undocumented, and obviously we're looking for permanent protections, not just for Dr Recipients because everyone. Coming to this country is dreaming. No one's coming to this country to be a nightmare. Faces are looking at the Supreme Court decision. I also happen to be an attorney of twenty six years. Doing movement work is it's a temporary relief. It is not the permanent protection that we want our people to have and that our people need to have in order to thrive, basically what the Supreme Court said is that the way that the administration got rid of Dhaka? Had No basis. They got rid of it that they have to have a reason. They have to show that they've thought about everything before. They come to that conclusion and they did not. And so, what does that mean? It means that just like the Muslim ban if you remember, the court ruled against the Supreme Court ruled against the administration on the Muslim ban, and said he pointed out what was wrong and. And so they just instituted a new Muslim bad adjusting themselves to what the court had pointed out, and that Muslim ban remains not struck down,

Black Alliance Dhaka Supreme Court Executive Director Nana Xanthi United States Daca Mexico Attorney Founder Transform Justice Center Community Legal Clinic Tijuana Caribbean Africa New York DC
People come to America for a dream

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:35 min | 5 months ago

People come to America for a dream

"Today we had the honor to talk to Nana Xanthi. She is an attorney and the executive director of the Black Alliance for justice immigration or. She's also the founder of the Community Legal Clinic and Transform Justice Center in legal these workshops as well as the founder of Justice Warriors Black Lives I. Hope you enjoy this conversation. Nana how are you today? I am well well, as can be expected in during these times and hoping you're well as well you know I am well despite everything, but one of the reasons that I'm grateful is because of the great work that women like you do in this country so excited to talk about the Black Alliance for just immigration, which is one of the organizations that the BG and wonder me a network which produces the BG podcast has been encouraging our audiences to support, so thank you. These organizations are critical in times like this. Thank you so very much? We appreciate that support and the support that we've gotten from black folks all over the globe. Appreciate it. Tell us a little bit more about the Black Alliance for just immigration, and what brought you to the organization? So the black lines for just immigration is a national black lead Immigration Rights Human Rights Racial Justice Organization. We are the largest of our kind in the United States. We educate we advocate. We organized on behalf of the. The roughly ten million Black Refugee and immigrant families in this country as well as black folks who are trying to come into the country, whether it be permanently or temporarily, and those who are seeking asylum. We have our headquarters in New York, but we also have offices in DC. Miami Atlanta Los Angeles and Oakland and we have staff in Houston, and in Minneapolis, so we pretty much are all over the place as well as doing work on the. Episode of the border in Mexico, at the northern border with Tijuana, and also we've been doing some work the southern border of Mexico in Chula where you have black asylum seekers coming to the United States through Mexico. In that way and the work that we do is national in many cases in terms of policy, and you know we've been very busy in that regard, especially in with this administration, we also do national work with respect to racial justice our. Former executive director open committee was one of the big three that started black lives matter, and so by has been involved in black lives matter since the beginning and we do that work, and then we also do local work regional work. I'm both on the policy side, but as well as more, and with even more vigor on the organizing side to make sure that we are pushing for racial. Economic and social justice with an right alongside our multigenerational African American siblings. So much work, such powerful work. As. You said you've been very busy with this administration echo, they're just keeping everyone busy with their foolishness, but I definitely do a suit top about Daca so for our listeners, who may not be familiar Dhaka's stands for deferred action for childhood arrivals and the Supreme. Court decision around Dhaka now allows immigrants who ever see Daca status sometimes referred to as dreamers so if you seen the Hashtag is sandwiched dreamers. That's what that means. It allows them. them to stay in the country safely without a threat of deportation, but one the things that we've been really seeing missing from mainstream conversation over Daca was that it also impacts not Hispanic and Latino communities that there are black and brown communities impacted by this as well other black communities that are impacted by this as well. So, what was your reaction when you hurt the decision? And what are our next steps in the Dreamer, movement so? It is really important in think I really WanNa, thank you for lifting up the fact that yes, there are dreamers who are not Brown folks. That are not Latin next folks. That are not black right that we have black Latino next folks as well as black dreamers from the continent of Africa from the Caribbean from Europe right we think about. Twenty, one savage right and how this came up? And he actually falls in the category that is equally as important that we need to advocate for a person who isn't a Dhaka recipient, but who happens to be undocumented, and obviously we're looking for permanent protections, not just for Dr Recipients because everyone. Coming to this country is dreaming. No one's coming to this country to be a nightmare. Faces are looking at the Supreme Court decision. I also happen to be an attorney of twenty six years. Doing movement work is it's a temporary relief. It is not the permanent protection that we want our people to have and that our people need to have in order to thrive,

Black Alliance Attorney Dhaka Nana Xanthi Executive Director United States Daca Transform Justice Center Mexico Supreme Court Community Legal Clinic Tijuana Caribbean New York Africa DC Europe
Oh, Baby! Monitor Maker Nanit Lands $21 Million Investment and Finds a New Market

Business Wars Daily

03:48 min | 5 months ago

Oh, Baby! Monitor Maker Nanit Lands $21 Million Investment and Finds a New Market

"The. Pandemic may have slowed venture capital deals to crawl, but that didn't stop baby monitor maker Nat from raising twenty one million dollars in a new round of funding. The company produces high tech video. Baby monitors a subscription APP and a line of wearable breathing band swaddled in sleeping bags, baby monitors of long given parents, a sense of security, allowing them to hear and later see they're sleeping children from another room. A quick glance can. Can put a worried momber. Daddy's and Nana's monitor gives parents in HD quality bird's eye view of their babies in infrared night-vision. The mobile APP lets you access the monitor from your phone or tablet features include sound and motion sensors as well as two way audio that lets you sing or talk to your little one Nannette promises the device which tracks sleep patterns is like having a personal sleep coach in the palm of your hand. O. And it's compatible with Amazon's Alexa to. But like all technology, these smart devices have a dark side. Hackers have breached. Baby monitors the past few years using cameras to spy on family members and speak to children. PR reported an alarming case alleging that a hacker reposition to camera remotely to a point at where one mother breastfed her baby several times a day in another reported by NBC News the Hacker, told the Baby I love you through the audio function. In February a report by PC magazines, cybersecurity firm bit defender found that the I baby monitor m-6 camera had vulnerabilities that could possibly allow hackers to download recordings access personal. Using the cameras ID and even control the camera. Initially MAG said. It's attempts to contact i. baby went unanswered, but once the report became public. The Monitor Company reportedly issued fix within twenty four hours. But critics say that monitor manufacturers could do a better job protecting users. There's often a gap between knowing the best practices in correctly implementing them on devices, said northeastern. University Associate Professor David Softness in Rico report the National Cyber Security Alliance, says risks can be minimized by following the devices security instructions and using a strong password also turn off the monitor when it's not an use. Beyond. hacks critic say there are other concerns reliability for one. Last November the Alad Smart Sock, a wearable monitor that wraps around the baby's foot to detect sleep patterns, oxygen, levels and heart rate stopped communicating with a mobile APP for about three days, according to the New York Times some experts wonder if all of this monitoring is just needlessly increasing parents anxiety. Privacy concerns should give parents pause to says Jamie Williams Staff Attorney at digital rights group, the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Every company has different privacy and data retention standards, and parents may not know what happens to their babies liked us once it's recorded by the Monitor. She told the. Washington Post despite these concerns. It's unlikely that new parents are giving up baby monitors anytime soon, but global interactive baby monitor market is projected to grow thirteen percent per year through twenty twenty four. After all worried parents need reassurance and now cove nineteen has ushered in a new market of users tech crunch reports that social distancing requirements have left grandparents, aunts and uncles craving baby time extended. Family now makes up twenty percent of Nana's users. With all of those remote babysitters watching, they're weary bundles of joy. Maybe smart monitors can give parents the peace of mind. They need to find the get some sleep.

Monitor Company National Cyber Security Allian NAT New York Times Nbc News Daddy Amazon MAG Washington Jamie Williams Associate Professor David Softness Staff Attorney Rico
Dallas County Hits Single-Day High For New Coronavirus Cases With 285

Clark Howard

00:35 sec | 6 months ago

Dallas County Hits Single-Day High For New Coronavirus Cases With 285

"Continue a record number of coronavirus cases have been reported in Dallas County the county is reporting two hundred eighty five new cases and one death yesterday county judge clay Jenkins is urging protesters to stay safe and stay six feet apart please don't bring all home something that nana and maybe your parents can handle nothing is when you want to use these hand sanitizers don't save a we'll get you some more but I want you to use those a lot while you're out there he says the Dallas Mavericks have partnered with the county to get hand sanitizers and masks to help the

Dallas County Dallas Mavericks County Judge Clay Jenkins
AT&T CEO John Stankey on the launch of the HBO Max streaming service

Squawk Pod

07:51 min | 6 months ago

AT&T CEO John Stankey on the launch of the HBO Max streaming service

"Joe Kernan. Kicking things off with John. Thank you this morning on Squawk box. John Thanks for coming on today. It's great great to have you with us you me on. I know you have high hopes for. Hbo We all know HBO. Obviously it's synonymous with some of the greatest things ever on video. Obviously game of Thrones Sopranos etc. You WanNa take on Netflix. And I understand. I think that's interesting because I don't know whether it's true or not. But supposedly someone said maybe we should have some kind of alliance with Netflix's someone suggested that you and you said we want to crush Netflix's Adams John you want to replace net flicks or at least be a very potent competitor refrains US Navy. Some on what I would call not accurate reporting on the New York Times Are hellacious is going to multiple streaming services knowing forward in pretty consistent. I think if you look back over the last year of domain around my conversation that our goal frankly is not to be. Netflix's our goal is to be something different and there are other senior services are starting to show up on the market that clearly different ease for the customer. Hbo Mass is going to have a unique focus in a unique position with the customer in play our game. Our goal is at crush flights. Our goal is to make sure that we meet customer needs engaged every day household. Find something worthwhile in time with us. And that's what we're GONNA see foes I guess they didn't so that was in the New York Times but that was that was not accurate according to so that. That's not a quote from you that that's interesting Anyway but I I guess the reason I led with that John is that I think about net flicks and everything. That's there and from documentaries to movies to programming that they generate themselves. That is a big universe of things that they have how will HBO? Max and I just said you're not going to strive to be everything to all people but you probably do need to add some things to the offering to make it so attractive that people have it in addition to the other streaming services absolutely a clearly customer Nanna. What's current as from kind of traditional media through the pay TV bundle and general entertainment content coming into the streaming world has credible number of choices of what to do with their time and then he going all dynamics in the digital environment about France capabilities to good use generating content? Like there's no question. There's more choice after today than there ever has been in paradise choices. Feel Max Niece resolve needs on the customers. Says you know I'm looking for something? That is this particular need of where I stand right now at my mood or my family situation that it's the first thing you think about that. I can go and no one wanted to find something. That's curious down. Who in meaningful selection of high-quality is Gonna? Hit the mark for me in the consistency. That happening time and time again clearly. The a hallmark more for the bran and for the service. And that's what we believe where you will focus on a more carried. Orderly got such a talented team. It warned me be do dat curate in that fashion just doing it for the demo outstanding the entire family. And you point out that that it's it's not much difference in price from what people are paying for now with with. Hbo So you have done some surveys. And what you saw one out of five people might decide not not to go with with Max. But it's not not much of a difference between just converting what they have now into HBO. Max Oh you don't you. Don't see any churn in that respect a difference were selling at that price day with just the HBO product which is a product that has half as much content is what HBO. Max New Offering Margaret. So you twice content same price and I think if we're seeing all of us everybody who's in the streaming business utility matter fact increasing during these unfortunate moments going through right now at this pandemic that's increasing dramatically so the performance of house value arrive actually increasing as a result. So you know our job is to make sure. The customer finds the equation to be done that for over thirty million customers with a long period of time in our goal is to extend that out beyond the family. I think we've got a really strong probability Andrew John. It's great to see you this morning. And congratulations and good luck on the on. This launched the question. I have two questions. The biggest I think is a distribution question. Which is and. Maybe you can explain what's happened with the likes of comcast parent company of this network. Amazon and Roku which a stoically with been strong distribution partners for the HBO product but are not on board at least from what I understand at the moment with HBO. Max and what that does to your reach a Bra List and distributors who are working with us the traditional and the market is the pay TV. Marcus actually signed on going to carry four. They're going to be successful years with. Hp Amax just like they were HBO along the providers doing that. Frankly you mentioned your parent company I'm optimistic still opportunity for something to be on there. I suspect that there's an opportunity that need other pay. Tv providers are given the vast majority. The ECO system is a likely become interview just useful. Come her moving forward. I think the interesting dynamic you're alluding to is Roma who Amazon at this point elected mocked distributors. I got and I didn't expect first of all have distribution across the entire race. I think must be doing something rightist. Somebody believes now to be more in conflict with your business so I don't necessarily take a bad sign but I do find it a bit ironic when I think banning litigation heard prior to the Time Warner eighteen transaction closing the concern was about withholding content from traditional distributors. And what we have now. We actually have dynamic where we have. New Technology viewers individual H. Who are likely not student and I think that dynamic is an important one understanding shows fast. The market's moving how we got to respond to those changes. I just to follow up with one other question which relates to this which is speak to the marketing challenge which. I think there may be one in terms of getting people to download the APP because some of these cable operators aren't going to necessarily be carrying it as an on demand on the box if you will so so what has to happen given that you do have these multiple brands and getting people to understand that they need to actually go get this. Get this particular product. It's a good question this

HBO Andrew John Netflix MAX New York Times Amazon Joe Kernan Time Warner General Entertainment United States Comcast France HP Marcus
Hashimotos Disease Improves by Eradicating Blastocystis Hominis

The Dr. Hedberg Show

06:16 min | 6 months ago

Hashimotos Disease Improves by Eradicating Blastocystis Hominis

"Welcome everyone to punctual. Medicine Research on Dr Hedberg and today I'm going to be reporting on a new study on how she motos disease. And the intestinal parasite blastocyst ominous. There's a new paper very very good. Paper just came out and it's a stronger study than what we had previously on blastocyst. This ominous Hashi motos disease which was really just a case. Study and case studies are fairly weak when it comes to their scientific rigor and How much we can really put our faith in a study. That's just a case study because it's just a single individual but this paper is really well done not as many subjects as we would like but still a strong start. And so the paper is called improving. Hashimoto's thyroiditis by radic aiding blastocyst this Hamas in relation to I l seventeen. This was published in the Journal. Therapeutic advances and etto chronology metabolism by L. Zawawi we at all out of Egypt so the authors begin talking about a very important fact that Hashi motos thyroiditis was once thought to be a T. H. One mediated disease but now we know it's a t h seventeen mediated Z's and so t h one just means t helper one cells anti-age seventeen or t helper seventeen cells in until we had discovered t h seventeen cells. We thought that autumn unity was regulated by t h one or t h two cells. And now we know that's not true actually known that for quite a while but for a long time there. It was taught that a autoimmune disease could be t h one or t h to illness But that's just not true. So t h seventeen cells are the cells that drive auto immunity and they produce interleukin seventeen. Or I'll seventeen and that's what this paper is is investigating so quick review of blastocyst. This hominids it is the most common intestinal parasite and humans but most people never get any symptoms but it is an opportunistic parasite so if your gut immune system becomes compromised it can multiply and cause got symptoms like Constipation Diarrhea Year. Double Bowel like symptoms joint pain. Of course it will drive auto immunity and a lot of other health issues and so blastocyst hominids. We don't know exactly the prevalence of somewhere around one point six to sixteen percent in developed countries. But it's up to sixty percent in developing countries and that's because we get it from contaminated food or water and so in developing countries the water. The food is much more likely to be contaminated. So let's break down. The study was sixty patients age. Nineteen to fifty seven and there were nineteen females and one male in each group so we at twenty patients in each group three groups group one twenty patients recently diagnosed with Hashi Motos and they did not have blastocyst as Hamas infection group to twenty patients recently diagnosed with harshly motos. They had confirmed blastocyst. This ominous infection and group. Three were twenty healthy subjects without Hashi motos and were not infected with blastocyst as ominous so just remember group three Are the healthy people with no issues group. One had Hashimoto's with no parasite group to had Hashi motos with the parasite so all the subjects in group one in two had a history of fatigue nine patients in group one and seven patients in Group. Two had a history of constipation and six patients in group to had a history of diarrhea and so blasio sisters as is commonly causes diarrhea so interestingly everyone in group to. Who's infected with blastocyst? Us had higher blood pressure than the other two groups and so they ran a bunch of tests they did free t four free. T. Three T. S. H. Anti Peo-. Antibodies I'll seventeen. They did a stool analysis. Complete blood count liver enzymes. Albumin Billy Ruben. Cholesterol triglycerides blood urea nitrogen and created. And so they were looking at liver and kidney health lipids and the immune system so group to which was the group infected with blastocyst sisters ominous. They were treated with the medication. Nana's Oxyde for three days to eradicate the parasite and they were retested. Six weeks later to confirm that the parasite was gone and it was effective for everyone. So these are the study results. So T. S. H. levels were higher and groups one and two compared to the healthy group as expected

Hashi Motos Group United States Diarrhea Hashi Hashimoto Hamas Autoimmune Disease Dr Hedberg Thyroiditis Constipation L. Zawawi Nana Billy Ruben T. H. One The Journal T. S. H. Z
Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

The Big Story

10:54 min | 6 months ago

Will COVID-19 bring down Airbnb?

"Ever since we launched this show almost two years ago. Now we've done episodes about the housing crisis in Canada comes up often and it comes up everywhere from Pi to Nana avert to big cities like Vancouver and Toronto and Montreal. And every time we cover it we start with. Why how did this situation come to be and there are of course some different reasons in different places but one thing one thing keeps coming up again and again and you get one? Guess as to what we'll city place here in the downtown core as one of the highest concentrations of airbnb rental units in Toronto and tonight some housing advocates are saying. That is booming. Business is driving up the prices for those who are actually looking for a permanent home. That was then though and this is now on a city known for its sky high pricing when it comes to housing and rentals is seeing a bit of a shift. According to experts since the Ontario government has banned airbnb there was actually a huge influx in rental apartments being available right now. Nobody is traveling not even within Canada. And as you might imagine that has had an impact on airbnb business model and Bhai impact. I mean it has basically obliterated so what happens to the rental markets Canada's biggest cities to thousands of airbnb landlords some of whom have staked their financial future on this platform to the company itself. Does it di- Does it? Evolve and what happens to the future of development in big urban centers because in order to understand? How much could change from here? You also have to understand how much AIRBNB has done to drive the direction of cities in the past decade. So that's where we'll start. Who knows where we'LL END UP Jordan Heath Rawlings and this is the big story. Matt Elliott is a columnist who writes about municipal policy. He writes in the Toronto Star. He writes for the CBC and several other publications. I mad. Hey we're gonNA talk about Airbnb today and It's decline. I guess in Toronto and in other cities around the world. But why don't you I kind of give me an explanation? As to how AIRBNB rose to such dominance in the rental markets of big cities. I mean the short answer is money. I mean. Imagine you're a landlord and you sort of have choices with the property. You Own the traditional way where you find. A long-term tenant You know you can make some money off of that. But there's some what landlords might describe as hurdles. You know the rules around addictions raising rent or whatever Whereas AIRBNB is way simpler. A bad tenants don't really last for longer than few days in most cases and then the money. I think the money is just the big thing I mean. Imagine you could rent a place for two hundred dollars a night for fifty nights a month. You're at three thousand dollars a month in income from that. That's more than the average rent in most Indian neighborhoods and Enough to carry a mortgage worth a million dollars or so so landlords are looking those two options they were increasingly going the RBM Dui. Because I know you cover Toronto. We'll just sort of use it as a proxy for some of the biggest Global cities which have some of the same problems with AIRBNB. Can you give me a sense of the size of AIRBNB IN TORONTO? Before the pandemic began like how dominant is it was it was very dominant and increasingly so a fair. Bnb which is an anti airbnb at secret supporting a note that but they did some number crunching and looked at the data from AIRBNB and they estimated there were about seventy three hundred Units on BNB that did not comply with the regulations passed by the city of Toronto. Those regulations are not enforced when they were doing this. But those were the rules. Saying you know you can't rent out an entire house that you don't live in you can only rent out your principal residence. So seventy three hundred units that would have been on the rental market but been consumed by AIRBNB. is hugely significant in rental market as tight as Toronto or vacancy rates over. The last few years have been around one percent so you know I think one of the reasons people got pretty fired up about AIRBNB. Is this idea that you know these are. This is a rental market. That is very very challenging. Very expensive very tight and airbnb comes along and suddenly another chunk of air. Rental market is no longer in the market. And we're going to get to the pandemic I promise in in one second but How much in the hallways at City Hall was this hot button issue in the months leading up to say February or early March? When things started happening I mean housing. In general is such a huge huge issue at City Hall There's increasingly concerns that you know we're looking at a city that is just unaffordable for anybody but the top of the economy. So if you're a service worker if you're a teacher you're a nurse if you're a police officer like all of these jobs some of which pay pretty darn well when you look at what housing was renting for in Toronto. It just wasn't really doable for a lot of these people especially if they're people that are looking at you know. I want to start a family. Have a couple of kids and the only one of the people in a couple goes to work in those situations. Those that arrangement used to be doable. In a city like Toronto increasingly. It was not so when you have that sort of greater backdrop of housing counselors and bureaucrats and policymakers and advocates are looking for levers. They can pull. That might improve the situation. How many looked at AIRBNB and said okay? This is a relatively new thing. It has taken units out of the rental market This is something that we can look at it as a way. You know for whatever difference. That'll make it would make some difference to to make things better. As far as housing goes but you mentioned that they weren't yet enforcing the regulations they were not and I mean that's that's an interesting story by itself because the regulations passed by council which I mean at a high level. The major changes that they wanted to impose. Were you know you can only rent out your principal residence so if you have a condo and you want rent it for a couple of weeks on AIRBNB in the summer while you're off on vacation or whatever that's totally fine but if you buy another condo with the plan to just rent it on airbnb making income off of it that was going to become a against the rules. There was also going to be a cap on the number of nights you could rent a a unit in Toronto. One hundred and eighty nine year was going to the CAP But when they passed those Suddenly there was a challenge by a landlord turned out. Airbnb was supporting this challenge. And while that was before the a tribunal they held things up for a two years pretty much but a year and a half to two years while they waited for a ruling on whether these regulations could actually go into effect that finally resolve itself in the fall. But then all of the sudden you have this pandemic happen and you know the has stuff stuff as ended up on pause result. What'S HAPPENED TO AIRBNB IN TORONTO? And other places since the pandemic began it all kind of blew up To be honest I'm AIRBNB. The renters are primarily travelers Whether international or domestic travellers they're people come in from one place to another and in mid March Traveling shutdown just is not happening so there goes the market for airbnb in most cities So all the sudden you have a situation where you have all the supply thousands of units that were on Airbnb and that's how landlords made their income Suddenly were empty a bookings being cancelled and going forward. There's not a lot of hope for our travel to resume in the near term so it was a major shock to the system as all these units suddenly no longer had people in them at all. How bad could this get for the company if it continues? And what have they sort of gun in an attempt to respond to they've done a few things Airbnb announced a fund support landlords. Who were facing cancellations? You know for bookings that came in before the Pandemic Aso I think there is a desire on airbnb. Parts to see this Just sorta sustain the urban economy. Obviously they want to make sure there's still people with airbnb listings after all. This happens That airbnb itself is facing major. Financial Distress They have laid off. I think a quarter of their workforce They are saying they are revenue for the year is about half what it was projected to be at the start of the year. So they're facing a multi billion dollar. Hit and resorting to layoffs. And it's a really tough situation for for the company and then for landlords. I think some of them are going to be able to whether this because they're looking at the situation where they know they bought a unit listed on Airbnb they can defer either mortgage right now at a lot of banks. So maybe there's a way that they can hold on and and keep going through this but you also have situations where landlords have hugely over leveraged themselves. You know really gambled on this as a way to make a quick buck. And you know they're looking at situations where okay. This was going to be my My Nest Egg is is how was going to get rich and that is is really starting to fall apart for a lot of them. When I wrote about this for the star a few weeks ago I got a lot of emails from Landlords with immunes who were just incredibly angry about what I had written Because I was not coming down on the side of the landlords talking about you know how much of their life savings tied up in this Airbnb Model and this their despair for what's going to happen in the future. Can you give me an example of what that looks like when you get severely over leveraged investing in Airbnb Imagine a situation where you come into Toronto and you buy a house for yourself for you know everything in Toronto as close to a million dollars these days. So so you buy a million dollar hosts to live in and then you think well you know to make some extra money. I will also by Condo for a half million dollars and

Airbnb Toronto Canada City Hall Ontario Government Principal Matt Elliott CBC Jordan Heath Rawlings Montreal Vancouver Airbnb. Officer
Just like in a monologue when he would blow a joke and it would get a laugh

Nick Digilio

03:29 min | 7 months ago

Just like in a monologue when he would blow a joke and it would get a laugh

"One one of of course course okay okay now try to get spring time okay springtime when it's springtime when spring well oh man so there you go Pancho yeah it's really funny you know anytime Johnny had animals on and the segment turned out to be a wash out it was always hilarious because of Johnny just like in a monologue when he would blow a joke and it would get a laugh it was almost funnier than if it was a good joke and it got a laugh so god that's funny wonder what ponchos doing today now he said he could believe he could live to be seventy or eighty in the in the clip he said enough lived to be seventy right now I'm just like that guy probably dead center that was thirty is thirty nine years ago well I hope we can still be around probably you know just play in the clubs yeah on the kilometer gaze touring yeah Pancho the signal well now he's doing virtual tours yeah he's he's in his state of recording the rituals in its cage according virtual sorrow for the internet oh boy all right poncho all right every every morning at two thirty with a morning at two thirty you get to hear some lovely comedy from the classic Johnny Carson again Johnny Carson Assad's showed every night on antenna TV must see television right there okay we're back to Samoa slang terms that don't get used as much anymore how about can you dig it Cyrus user from the warriors a car near older grant don't worry nobody's asking you to grab a shovel and dig a hole digging something means that you understand what's being said I get the I get the last piece of pizza can you dig it the lady I always thought this one was ridiculous it may sound like a pet name for your grandma but old ladies actually term of endearment for your girlfriend or wife example now I can't hit the clubs tonight my old lady is waiting for me at home how is it a term of endearment that sound like a term of endearment nana particularly yeah I know the old ladies waiting for me at home why just color ball and chain the old ball and chain all right freak flag people still use this one don't say what like let your freak flag yeah hi yeah I guess so that's a that's a phrase when Jimi Hendrix declared the song in the song if six was nine yeah he was gonna wave going to wave my freak flag high read a whole new way of announcing that you're the weirdest one in the room example it's great to get wild tonight I'm gonna let my freak flag fly all right how bout dah how about

Johnny Pancho Johnny Carson Jimi Hendrix Johnny Carson Assad
"nanna" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"nanna" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia. Were Manteca this month. We're talking about beautiful minds. Intellectual powerhouses whose work had an extraordinary impact on the world. Our story today takes us back to nineteenth century Nigeria Syria to discuss princess poet and teacher who helped to shape the values of the Sokoto Caliphate. Let's talk about Nana Nana Esma Mos- born around seventeen ninety three. Her childhood was riddled with conflict. When she was about eleven years old she was a close witness to the Fulani war between her father's forces and his former students per father was victorious and was elected commander of the faithful by his followers? He became the founder and Sultan of the Sokoto Caliphate. An independent Islamic suny state in West Africa the so caliphate was one of the most significant empires in nineteenth eighteenth century Africa. It eventually grew to encompass more than thirty and ten million people non as father placed a high value on universal universal education and on Teaching Nana studied the Koran the classics at the Arab World and learn four languages as part of the state's leading and family. She had great insight into what was happening politically in eighteen. o Seven Nana got married and six years later she had her first child in eighteen nineteen. She wrote what's known as her first work of poetry over the course for Life Nana authored huge number of poems including accounts of historical events elegies and lessons about the founding principles of the Caliphate Nana earned the reputation of being a leading scholar in the religion when her half brother Mohammed Bello became the second Sultan of the Caliphate Nana served as his counselor in that role. She wrote instructions from the Salton Alton to governors of the Caliphate and she corresponded with foreign scholars in a letter scholar. Sheikh Saad wrote to Nana greetings readings. Ching you a woman of excellence and find traits in every century there appears one who excels the proof of her merit has become well known east and West I near and far. She's marked by wisdom and kind deeds. Her knowledge is like the wide SI sincere greetings benefactions and felicitations solicitations from one. Who loves your family restless from traveling desserts? I long to meet you and your good traits again now. No surviving written works show. The Caliphate was founded with an emphasis on women's leadership inclusion and rights. They also illustrate Nana's devotion to education around eighteen thirty. She organized a group of women teachers to travel around the Caliphate and educate women in their homes. Each teacher received a hat called MALFA UH tied with a red turban. The teachers use non as poems and those of other Sufi scholars to teach conquered populations about Islam Nana wrote wrote her poems with a specific rhyme and meter that made them easier to memorize for example. She wrote a thirty verse poem that teaches the names and order of the one hundred and fourteen chapters of the Koran newly educated students formed cohort of learned. Women called the Yon- Taro or the sisterhood. The crew of teachers called Dagi's became a symbol of the Sokoto State. None of us knows like see is significant in her region to this day. Many schools meeting halls and women's organizations are named after her in northern Nigeria. Nana died in eighteen sixty four more than sixty of her written works have survived tune in tomorrow for the story of another beautiful mind special. Thanks to my favorite sister and Co Creator. Liz Caplan Talk to you.

Nana Nana Esma Mos Nana Nigeria Jenny Kaplan Manteca Wonder Media Network Dagi West Africa Salton Alton Yon- Taro Liz Caplan Sheikh Saad Mohammed Bello Syria Arab World Africa Sokoto State
"nanna" Discussed on Mogul: The Life and Death of Chris Lighty

Mogul: The Life and Death of Chris Lighty

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"nanna" Discussed on Mogul: The Life and Death of Chris Lighty

"<SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <SpeakerChange> All right <Speech_Male> before I get into <Advertisement> the credit <Speech_Music_Male> so WANNA do quick. PSA <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> spotify <Speech_Music_Male> is the best <Speech_Music_Male> place. Listen <Advertisement> to mobile. <Speech_Music_Male> Go there for early <Speech_Male> access to new episodes <Speech_Music_Male> in here <Speech_Music_Male> all <Advertisement> bonus content. <Speech_Music_Male> You've got <Speech_Music_Male> exclusive <Advertisement> interviews with Denzel <Speech_Music_Male> Curry <Speech_Music_Male> flow rider <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> extended scenes from <Speech_Music_Male> the DJ rob. <Advertisement> So <Speech_Music_Male> so <Speech_Music_Male> all you gotta take <Advertisement> your <Speech_Music_Male> phone download <Speech_Music_Male> spotify <Advertisement> at the <Speech_Music_Male> follow button. <Speech_Music_Male> It's easy <Advertisement> it's one <Speech_Music_Male> two three <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> mobilised <Speech_Music_Male> production induction <Advertisement> of <Speech_Music_Male> spotify Kinley media <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this episodes <Speech_Music_Male> produced by wall <Speech_Music_Male> smack. <Advertisement> and Say <Speech_Music_Male> T- Sean Thomas <Speech_Music_Male> with help <Advertisement> from Schumer <Speech_Music_Male> say our <Speech_Music_Male> senior producers Matthew <Speech_Music_Male> Nelson our <Speech_Music_Male> editors Dylan <Advertisement> Levy <Speech_Music_Male> Ceylan Kenny <Speech_Music_Male> and Chris Morrow <Speech_Music_Male> Sound <Speech_Music_Male> Design and mixing by Haley <Speech_Music_Male> Shaw <Speech_Music_Male> Music Supervision <Advertisement> by Matthew <Speech_Music_Male> Bowl anlysts Fulton <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and this <Speech_Music_Male> episode scored <Advertisement> by <Speech_Music_Male> the one <Speech_Music_Male> the only <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> non <Speech_Music_Male> equipment. <Advertisement>

"nanna" Discussed on Mogul: The Life and Death of Chris Lighty

Mogul: The Life and Death of Chris Lighty

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"nanna" Discussed on Mogul: The Life and Death of Chris Lighty

"Okay so I've actually got the brief that was given not for this cute Our senior producer Matt Nelson wrote. You know that music in the social network that Trent Reznor did to show the building action. Something like that but Miami Miami and it builds to a climax so reading that how did you work offer that brief to create what we just heard it goes back to the idea of like the partying purpose idea right. I mean you literally have you literally have a local government that is trying to suppress a a cultural movement using the powers of litigation in the course right I mean that that that. That's that's the on this part. That is a super political part. Yeah that is the part I mean like thinking about just thinking I like this is just boggles my mind because it's all about like I think like literally thing of thinking about that. Same exact case in two thousand nineteen right now. You can't even fathom now you can't you can't even fathoming like what light in an and it shows you that like these. Were the fights this these. This is the blood sweat tears and fears fears like when he's getting up on Donahue show and he's talking about like and he and he and it really hits them. My Yoda's could go really bad. Actually saying that's a real. That was a real. That's a sacrifice that whole career. That genre of music was a sacrifice. You know what I'm saying. 'cause if that didn't happen we want named me talking about none of this right now. You know what I mean like things will look drastically different. Okay so when you think about the two crews battle to stop the music from being banned and and their fight for freedom of speech How important is it to you that all these years later you have the freedom to express yourself the way you WanNa do? Yeah I mean it's it's important as waters to human life camp. You know it's like it's like I mean if you take that for people what what what else does is there. Any what I'm saying especially as you know from our people saying in times where they took everything when time they took everything from us right and and and it don't matter the context it was like and that's from the beginning of time when people are taking land to to modern day right now where people are taking lengthy gentrification. What I'm saying and the war the war might not necessarily be physically trying to take the land from you right? It's economically strong. Take the land from me right when they're trying to take your land or trying China. Take your job. They're trying to say they're taking people saying that taking your like they're they're taking so much for me the one thing they'll never ever be able to strip is the the spirit of music in your soul. Never when someone tries to take that from you. It's like you don't talk. Cook everything else Bro. You don't already took everything else. You already took everything else and you're trying to take this. How dare you? How dare you and and so I think for for black people are large like that? The idea of sounding music has been a part of our our our not only just celebration but survival viral life for me like you know just to give context like I. I'm a I'm Ashanti right my family's from Ghana and Ghana. You know the way the tries workers you belong to your mother's tribe. My Mom's Ashanti were from Kumasi region m saying in Ghana right an Asante means of war right and so out of all the tribes in Ghana. We were known as a warrior tribe right and when I think about that one of the one of the key elements for us as warriors when people were coming to take hours one of the king weapons in warfare us is the talking drum. Let me people are GONNA ask. Why is it why is it drumline? How's it a weapon right so the concept of the talking drum right is that we have these drums and you find these throughout West Africa where it's not just you hitting some sort of skin that's on the head of of a drum there's also these strings that are attached to it and so the strings determine the tension of that skin on the on the drumhead and so what happens is you now can control? How much tension? That skin has on his drumhead. So if I squeeze it really tight and I hit the drum it has a really high pitch and then if I loose my grip on the drums than it has really bright and so the masters of his drum got to a point. Where did they could use this trump because now the drum the same exact drum changes issues and so the masters of his drum got really good at it so that they can actually actually mimic the human voice with this drum? The advantage of that plays in war. Right is that now can actually use this drum. Now that I can get this drum to have different pitches I can actually create a language right if I hit vis note three times at this high register this medium note go back up once it's like Morse course code. Now you're it's like now I can actually create a language based off of this drum. And that's exactly what they did. They created the language off of the drum off. And that's why eventually eventually got the name the talking drum 'cause you could actually make sentences from his drum and the reason that this is a weapon in war is that besides light right right. The only thing that travels faster than a physical any physical object on earth is sound sound travels faster rice off vomit men if me and you were at war right. You're an opposing army. You know you got your horses. You got your mental horses. I got I got my drum right I know that that Messenger. That's on a horse. He's not gonNA reach His his way trying to deliver faster astor. Then my drums sound will messes the nearby battalions of these guys are coming their flanking left boom. I hit that offer drum sound that message spreads spreads faster than the men on a horse. That was literally that drum is not just music for us. That was a weapon for our survival in my tribe where I come from right. How perfect metaphor is that bad? The drum was attached to people. Try to kill us. Take our land saying in. Take everything the one thing that we could use against them was our drone was our music. That's not and so for me. That's that's that's the power of music so so if someone's trying to take your drum and someone's trying to take they're trying to take your soul they're trying to take your spirit and and what else do after that. Then there's nothing left so when music is used in that conway and someone feels that threatened to remove your voice. They're trying to remove your soul bro. You know what I'm saying. So that's why I respected like. That's why when I when I when I'm seeing these guys in there fighting like that's the level of a fight that I'm seeing. I'm like they're trying to take. They're trying to rip the soul from these people. Yeah saying how dare they. How did that's heavy man man We gotta find. I don't care for you Changing gears from all the fast and heartbeats you also score just this really beautiful moment at the end of the episode that we may eight for Degel We want you to take a listen.

Ghana Trent Reznor Miami Matt Nelson China Donahue Kumasi West Africa conway
"nanna" Discussed on Mogul: The Life and Death of Chris Lighty

Mogul: The Life and Death of Chris Lighty

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"nanna" Discussed on Mogul: The Life and Death of Chris Lighty

"So this season was all about the two live crew and the rise Miami Bass it was super important to us that all the original music composed for the series. Did two things I. It had the capture the time eighties early nineties and second get it to capture the place Miami liberty city teen discos tricked out with stacks of speakers So we turn to a composer named on Bennett. That's one of his speech right. They're not as producer Sunni's worked with artists like Kanye West name Kadena John Legend and Rick Rose. He also made a lot of the music for the first season of mobile. Another thing that nobody Nana is true. Hip Hop Scout. He loves thinking about the history of hip hop now. The genre's sound has changed over the years. I started a conversation by asking him why he wanted to come back to work on another season mobile. I'm just like a big history buff right and I and I love being able to study the pass and study you. The people that came before me In Ghana we have cold single right. The symbol of that is It's a bird flying forward with his head backwards right and the it basically means that you can't really know where you're going into you see where you came from right and so. I think that that shows like mobile. That really speak to you know Different generations that led up to what helped pioneer this genre. That's the biggest genre's arguably globally in and I mean Is is is. It's an important show and I think also for generations to come to I kind of know and have access to these stories You know so for me. That's just ultra important. And so anything I can do to Kinda help. That mission is something that I'm completely down for so in season one clearly It was a very New York hip hop story. What for season two We traveled down to Miami. I'm curious what your thoughts were on Miami Bass like like did you come up listening to that type of music I I studied for for time in college actually College was kind of I grew up on. You know listen. It's a lot of African music. You Know My dad playing you know different records in the crib. From the marlies of the world to the fellas shunned as someone and so forth. You know obviously coming up it was a teenager as everything is just hip hop right. So it's like listening the listening tonight listening to to buster right and then I remember going to college and being like okay okay. Great colleges when I really started focusing on becoming a DJ. So I was just trying to collect mad different samples in different sounds and all about different different genres in different places on and so forth so there was a time where I studied Miami based because I was just like man like if felt like if I like a lot of ways it felt not like funk kind of like essentially lent itself to Miami based in a certain kind of way right it was like New York was about boom bat and breaks right and then dope. You know like wraps over top of that. But I felt like the idea of groove and the idea of rhythm and the idea of getting people's bodies to move was something that Miami based understood in a whole different kind of way you know and so me as a DJ as a producer this as a fan wanted to understand that word Actually WanNa play a piece of music that you wrote for the show Right now for us to Q.. Is just super important because it appears the start of episode one when we first setting the story up and for me it just feels like exciting and Mike. Something's about to happen here. let's play This is Music Nana Rope. And here's a taste. How we hear show? This is a moment when trick daddy and Trina breakdown with campus fight for freedom of speech meant for hip hop negative Supreme Court. He went into and he represented he dressed the part. He spoke to par act part. He went in for something that paved the way for all of us to be able the comments at his platform the dual redoing. Like you'll be none of us here without that you know bigoted impact that. Put Miami on the map..

Miami Miami Bass Rick Rose New York Ghana Kanye West Trina Bennett Kadena John Legend Sunni Supreme Court Mike
"nanna" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"nanna" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"He he already came up. Wow. I didn't even know honestly. And it'd maybe this sound bad. I didn't know at eighty they like without a tremendous amount of assistance that you could still really like get moving they do. But her I mean, it it is a hot mess. Like, literally. It's my nana's nieces ex wife, so she also in our family. It's. It's. So nanna Nonni were married and he cheated with her Nanas. Cousin's ex wife. And this would be a woman. So she's a lesbian. Nephew nephew. So it's kind of like family. Yeah. Okay. So this is my eight five five five nine one zero three five call eight five five five nine one one zero three five at the family reunion at the family barbecue, there's always that one person that one person that you're trying to avoid I got one. I got one of my. Many recipes out that they're gone. Got one. No more. Invited to nothing. But well, she's out. Trust me is stories worse than that. But who is it who is it who is at person who you're like all God. I gotta go to the family thing. And I got to see this person Paulina who is drunk aunt kind of stumbled when she feels like it drunk end. Always the answer. The uncle the one that asked me what I'm getting married and all these things out my life. And I'm like can you get a job firstly? I don't know. I wonder if. Like the drunk at that they drag showing your life together. And you're not judgmental. I'm not judgmental. Detailer just. Taylor. Meet paulina. I'm.

nanna Nonni Paulina Taylor
"nanna" Discussed on UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"nanna" Discussed on UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra

"Yes. So worth it watch cringe. When I watch Nana. Nana, comedy. I get like. Get nervous for that. But anyway, I'm looking forward to that fucking movie Mr. glass. We were talking about the featherweights and your favorite picks. So you took pollyanna Matt by second round submission Phoenix JJ by decision. Jim took pollyanna by decision and I'm gonna take pollyanna also had second round submission. Follow me, then removing to cops. Monson not on my Khanna. Did you say McConnell? I did. Yeah. Macondo she's I, I sorry, blanked out. I'd like that. I'm thinking. No, I'm not. Was just it's hard to go against cub. Not tell me right now. I'll stop He doesn't singing. sing. We should sing finale after we're done. Listen, this is the deal people might look at is not. Oh, man. Yeah, I love. Hey, he's has his last name. Okay. I'll just get his Meccano. I'm only. I know he's the favourite. I get it cub cub, you know, it takes couple of steps phone, maybe a step back to fight and then goes back though. It I'll go, we'll come. I'm going calms comes to rise to the occasion. He's gonna win a decision. I think decision TJ an really cool fi camp like new focus, new, maybe vigor because adult it's going to be about. Yeah, I go with Cobb. I'm going. The decision I'm going. Phoenix decision decision? Yeah. So Jim Norton has gone Waikato by decision. I wrote down outta my condo by decision, but I want to take because I'm rooting I'm cub Swanson fan. I'd like to see. Stew wing. Does he means putting on a good hat he's making like he's not picking both guys, but he really is what's listen. Can I say to the untrained. The right now, somebody saying that Christopher too is a lot of nice guy. He was picking the guy. Get a win, but he feels bad. He lays Cup Cup calls, and he's gonna go a come. So he's a flip flop or that's one and two, if not the wins, and he picks cub while you know guys, I really, I exactly. Yeah. So can I just do this for you this Abe's for the everybody's behind me. Nobody likes to flip make a decision. Okay, fine. I'm taking it out of my count by decision, but I'm rooting for all right..

pollyanna Matt Jim Norton McConnell Phoenix JJ Mr. glass Monson Phoenix Stew wing Abe TJ Cobb Christopher Swanson Waikato
"nanna" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"nanna" Discussed on The Big 98

"Nanna you got this whole dot then when you start off decide asked me how interesting song are you no move back you'll meet the decide asked me how the.

Nanna
"nanna" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"nanna" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"The first people who were in the area now known as britain right yeah so people's particle to roll to come the european population of huntergatherers and we knew already that these people had a dark skin and eyes and uh what we found out that cheddar man north that's the brits at that time we're actually part of this larger european population so they they really were europeans and uh had the look of europeans off the time so they depopulated europe and britain as we know now and now no after the last ice age and so we'll just like he is that these people and modern me lethem this have some kind of common and sisters that uh off the ice we tweets and uh repopulate it uh western europe and we should point out he's called saturnin because he comes from an area cutting the place contender gorge and not necessary because he's he a cheese eater but what else what what was previously thought about cheddar now what was the previous assumptions about in that this now completely changes your show there has to be herb prior were because construction chronic spectrum and and i think people initially big no way at all with what kind of a human you all he there was talk of you may have been our kyw could not even live there then pumping modern human but without the the actual dna work there was no real way to get to the level of detail so the best guess the people previously had is he he lived in britain so he may look like people in britain today and it's only really with the advent of dna technology was the incredible advances that have been made in in ancient dna research in the last five ten years that it's not possible to look at these eight genomes that old has been depicted as a uh.

huntergatherers britain europe five ten years