21 Burst results for "Nancy Solomon"

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 months ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Large armoire had fallen over and blocked the entrance. They found John Sheridan's body under the armoire. He was stabbed and badly burned. The door blocked by the armoire would become a crucial detail for the detectives because if there was an intruder, how did that person get out? We're gonna need our rehabbing. Then they removed the body of Joyce Sheridan, who was lying on the floor by the bed. The firefighter who carried her out was covered in blood. We still working on the bar. From WNYC in New York, this is on the media. I'm Brooke gladstone. This week, how the efforts of a gumshoe reporter sometimes can maybe lead to change. Nancy Solomon is a longtime colleague in a reporter for OTM producing station WNYC in her new podcast dead end, a New Jersey political murder mystery. She tells the story of the death of a prominent couple in New Jersey, so it's a true crime cold case investigation. It's also a deep dive into the inner workings of how local politics work and don't. In the garden state. Nancy will take it from here. I live in New Jersey. And cover the state for WNYC. And that's almost a full-time political corruption beat. John Sheridan was connected to some of the most powerful politicians and movers and shakers in the state. And that was enough to make me follow every detail of this story. I was one of the first from the crime scene unit

John Sheridan Joyce Sheridan WNYC Nancy Solomon Brooke gladstone New Jersey New York Nancy
"nancy solomon" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

07:39 min | 2 months ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on On The Media

"Yeah. You know, this is not the way that most journalists talk about their stories. I mean, it's a very weird thing to feel like you want the element of suspense and surprise for listeners to stick through to the very end. At the same time, I'm doing interviews and being asked about it and it's weird for me to hold back information. I'm used to just laying out like here's the story and even doing it in what us reporters call an inverted pyramid, giving people the most important stuff first. You noted in one episode of dead end that you've covered a lot of bad guys in your career. But you never tried to actually solve a murder. You said that quote, the stories like a Russian doll, every question I ask leads to another, but you actually did think you could crack this one, right? Yeah, I guess, you know, I do maybe watch a little too much TV, but I just thought if somebody really spent the time to look at everything and dig into it, maybe I would be able to crack it open. Yet another amateur sleuth, so to speak? Yes, exactly. But when you read those amateur sleuth stories or watch the series, you never see the brick walls that they come up against, like the fact that they don't have subpoena power, that they can't get the investigative files from the detectives. These are things that don't come up when you're watching those shows. But I certainly came up against them and at a certain point realized that there was only so much I could do. What ultimately happened was is that I became increasingly frustrated with the fact that the attorney general's office, which does have subpoena power, wasn't doing these things. Like I started to realize, like, wait a minute, why am I trying to solve this murder? They should be trying to solve this murder. So you did uncover a web of corruption connected to the killings. You say, quote, my north star is not just about individuals, the good ones or the bad ones. It's the systems and the laws that got us here that we pay attention to. What did the Sheridan's deaths signify for you? A real collapse in the function of the state that is so critical, which is to investigate and get to the bottom of suspicious behavior and activity that appears to be riddled with at the very least conflicts of interest, if not fraud and extortion. I mean, I love being a reporter in New Jersey because it is so kind of crazy and wild and there is so much corruption, but you got to wonder at a certain point, like why? Why does New Jersey have more problems than other places? And to me, this was a big answer to that question that we, the state of New Jersey, had a division of criminal justice at the attorney general's office, which had been set up to take on the biggest and most important cases, whether that was a murder of a prominent citizen that was quite suspicious or whether that's a fraud case or whether that's mob activity or extortion. Whatever it is, the big, big problems in the state are supposed to be taken on by the division of criminal justice. And it isn't doing that job. That a prominent politically connected family in New Jersey couldn't get the attorney general's office to intervene and investigate a case that was clearly mishandled by the local detectives. That was like a huge red flag. Like, what is going on here? And during the Republican administration of a governor, Chris Christie, a leading Republican is murdered and the attorney general's office doesn't intervene. That to me is just a gaping hole and a big question that needed to be answered. So even though you shrink from saying it, I will say that it's certainly seems clear that you're investigation did prompt the state attorney general to take over the case and open an investigation. So now, given your experience with dead end, and the fact that your theory that the true crime format could get more people to care about political corruption really does work has your approach to reporting changed at all. I was working with two masters of the craft, Karen frill, and Emily boutin. And I feel like I really did learn a lot about how to craft a stronger narrative. You know, I've been a news person, my entire career, and that sort of like short and sweet and get to the point. And deals with the facts generally, whereas I think with something long form like this, the place where I was sort of coming up against my habits and my skills was that I would tend not to ask people how they felt about something. You know, I ask what happened, what do you know? Where were you? When did this happen? But I didn't ever say and how did you feel about that? Which makes me feel like I'm a therapist or something whenever I ask that question. And maybe it just makes you feel like you're intruding. Yeah, that too. You know, that was one of the big lessons was to dig in a little more with people and push them to bear their souls a little more. So, you know, there was a lot more of sort of putting me into the story that I'm comfortable with. I think it really paid off. I think people really liked it. But you know one reason why they really liked it, Nancy. I think they really liked it because a listener, I mean, myself is a listener, could tell that you didn't love that part. That you did not want to make this about you, that you're fundamentally kind of shy. And I have to say that when there's somebody leading you through a radio piece, you don't want them to be this big character. There was nothing in your demeanor that suggested you wanted anything, but to get to the truth of the situation. And I think how you are, how you were, made it so much more compelling. Well, thank you. That's nice to hear. Here I am in the waning years of my career. And it was a huge lesson. I'm never comfortable calling attention to myself in that way. And I think I see now that it really helped tell the story. It really helped listeners attach to me as their narrator. You know, and it's interesting because, you know, as you and I know, there is a real generational divide around putting yourself into the story. And having a perspective and letting the audience know your perspective. And I'm quite steeped in the old school, and this was a real, you know, a real leap for me into this newer kind of journalism. And so you can

New Jersey division of criminal justice Republican administration Karen frill Emily boutin Sheridan Chris Christie Nancy
"nancy solomon" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

08:06 min | 2 months ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on On The Media

"Listener supported WNYC studios. Earlier this year, the New Jersey attorney general opened up an investigation into the killings of John and Joyce Sheridan, a well-known couple with personal ties to three governors. In 2014, they were found stabbed to death, and their homes set on fire. This morning, the mystery deepens over the death of John and Joyce Sheridan, a prominent New Jersey couple with powerful connections and close friends of governor Chris Christie. The first responders who came into the door, the Sheridan home early the morning of September 28th, found what could only be described as a house of horror. Local police thought that John Sheridan murdered his wife and then killed himself. That was 8 years ago. So why is the attorney general revisiting the case now? Well, this year, our WNYC colleague Nancy Solomon released an investigation into their brutal deaths and found damning evidence of corruption at the highest levels in the garden state. The series is called dead end, a New Jersey, political murder mystery. I'm a big show out on Friday, you'll hear an hour of that spellbinding coverage. But in this midweek podcast, I wanted to hear why after 20 years of reporting on New Jersey politics, Nancy made the show at all. The idea first occurred to her in 2019. She was working on a project with ProPublica, and she found that a tax break program was being exploited by a powerful family in Camden, New Jersey. During that reporting, she realized there was more to the Sheridan killings than the public had been told. But that thought didn't make it into that story. Instead, she focused on the political corruption. I'd spend a whole year working on that reporting. And it never really broke through. It never had what we call legs. It didn't feel like it went anywhere. And that it got the kind of attention that I had hoped it would get. Those are hard stories to tell because they're very document driven and us radio people we love good tape. And I didn't have a lot of good tape. And so those stories were just a bit dry and long and complicated. And so it just left me kind of a little frustrated by the end of the year. You said it was a yearlong project. And you were looking into many party bosses. But you ended up focusing on the nor cross brothers, right? Yes. George norcross was often described by the press as quote one of the most powerful Democrats in New Jersey. Is that phrase straightforward? Or is that code for something? I don't think it's code necessarily. I think it's true, but it doesn't really tell you anything. And I think for many years, I wondered what exactly that meant. You know, okay, so he's powerful. I get that, but how? What kind of power does he have? What levers of power is he able to pull on? And how did he get to be so powerful? Okay, so that started out as a story of outrageous conflict of interest and corruption and a tax break program in the poorest city in America. Somehow you found yourself staring down an old double murder case. And that is what dead end is about. And in order to tell the old story and the murder story together, you landed on a new format true crime. And that was a conscious decision because you love true crime. That's right. I guess my very first experience with detective stories was Nancy Drew, who I adored when I was a kid, especially since my name is Nancy. That sort of thing matters a lot. I thought those books were written for me. And in more recent years, I'm just a complete Scandinavian noir nerd. And I like in a true crime podcast. So all that was rumbling around in my mind in terms of what I actually consume as a reader and a watcher and a listener. So I realized that if I could hook an audience with a compelling murder mystery, then maybe they would stay along for the ride to understand the political corruption at work behind and connected in some ways to the murder mystery. You know, this spring as we geared up and got ready to launch the podcast. I would lie awake in bed in the middle of the night. Worrying that the audience was going to drop off as soon as we left the murder mystery and tried to explain the political machine and the real estate deal and the tax breaks. I thought, oh, people are not just going to not listen, but they're going to be mad at me. That's what I was afraid of. But you made those inextricably intertwined. To me, they are inextricably intertwined, and that was one of the mind-blowing pieces of new information that no one had ever reported related to the Sheridan case. So, you had all this. You had the somewhat arcane story of taxes intertwined with a, let's face it, addictive mystery about terrible murder. Did this strategy of yours to apply the true crime format to a story you'd visited before? Did it work? Yeah, absolutely. I think we're thrilled with the audience numbers that we're seeing. How many listeners do you know that you've gotten? As far as I know we're up over 3 million in two months, you know, when I do a story that runs on the air, even if it runs on NPR on the national network, I'm excited if I hear from one or two people. Like, oh, I heard your story. It was so good. Blah, blah, blah. This has just been unreal. But here's the big question. This is a somewhat fraught genre. The gory details are what draw people in, but true crime can easily tilt closer to exploitation than justice. Also, the plot twists that keep people tuned in can feel manipulative and confusing, but hey, that's the price of admission, right? As long as it doesn't mislead. Now is really concerned about the Sheridan family and how they would feel about it and what it would be like for them. And so I was really super happy to hear from multiple members of that family about how pleased they were with the podcast after it came out. You know, and one of the other issues is, you know, we thought long and hard about whether we would insert the usual narrative tool that many mysteries engage in, which is the red herring. They present a solution to the crime that starting to look like, oh, that must be it. You get really drawn in like, that's the guy who did it. And it's looking like it's going that way. And, oh, I'm so smart because I'm figuring this out ahead of what they're telling me. And then of course it turns out not to be true. And that person, whatever has an alibi or didn't do it, and you move on to the next red herring. And I really did want it to unfold like a murder mystery, but I just couldn't, as a journalist, I couldn't put information into the podcast that I knew was not true. I just couldn't live with that. So there were, there were limits to how far we were willing to go. When our producer asked you, if there was anything about dead end that you didn't want to give away in this conversation, you mentioned feeling a little conflicted about that.

Joyce Sheridan New Jersey Sheridan WNYC studios Nancy Solomon George norcross John Sheridan Chris Christie WNYC Nancy John ProPublica Camden Nancy Drew America NPR
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:08 min | 4 months ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was so scared he would have taken his sister out of the house and left that day But he didn't He didn't like what his dad said And I agree He doesn't have to like what his dad said I don't like what his dad said Guy knows I don't like what he said But that's not the first time that I've had I have corrected guy a lot On his choice of words Nicole says you can not take guys words seriously Which is exactly what Jackson does I know Jackson hates the way guy speaks to me But like I said I know where guys coming from I did not want Jackson to be that harsh spoken As guy is And it's not guy's fault that that happened that he is a gruff speaker in that it was how he's brought up and industry that he was in But Jackson is not that way So I didn't allow a lot of harsh talk towards Jack His guy thinks that it's a man's world This is how we talk And I don't feel that way And the only way to change the next generation is by teaching them that that is not okay In that first conversation with Nicole it seemed like absolutely nothing could shake the way she saw a guy And then something happened that did Ilya will be back with the rest of the story in a minute You're listening to reveal A couple with powerful political connections was murdered in their bedroom The case was never solved They couldn't have done a worse job if they intended To mess up that investigation A botched investigation and New Jersey politics I'm Nancy Solomon Listen to dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery from WNYC studios available wherever you get podcasts.

Jackson Nicole Guy Jack Ilya Nancy Solomon New Jersey WNYC studios
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 5 months ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition on WNYC and Michael hill a prominent New Jersey couple with powerful political connections were killed in their bedroom in 2014 The case has never been solved now a new podcast tells the story of John and Joyce Sheridan the failure to solve the case and incompetence and corruption that might have led to that failure The podcast is called dead end a New Jersey political murder mystery and it's reported and hosted by WNYC's Nancy Solomon who joins us now Nancy good morning Good morning Michael I remember when the news first broke about the Sheraton deaths it was such a strange story and as details began to come out in only got stranger remind all of us who John Sheridan was please Right John Sheridan wasn't a household name But he had been the transportation commissioner under governor Tom Cain and continued to work as an adviser to governors and a lobbyist for much of his career He was so well known in New Jersey's political and legal world that when he died the current governor Chris Christie and three former governors and almost the entire state legislature attended the couple's memorial I remember that The county prosecutor investigating their deaths eventually ruled it a murder suicide that John Sheridan killed his wife and then himself but your reporting has uncovered questions about that determination What did you find There were serious flaws in the investigation into their deaths From the fact that the wounds that John suffered in the incident weren't consistent with suicide to the fact that at the time of his death there was a significant there was significant evidence that was ignored And there's a paper trail that offers some tantalizing clues about what John Sheridan was worried about at the time of his death All of which point to the possibility that both John enjoys were murdered and that political corruption could have had something to do with it Nancy you brought us a sample of the podcast which really starts to lay out the mystery here This is a few minutes from dead end on New Jersey political murder mystery Let's listen 9-1-1 where is your emergency Yes.

John Sheridan WNYC Joyce Sheridan New Jersey Nancy Solomon Michael hill Tom Cain John Nancy Chris Christie Michael legislature
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Creative equitable and sustainable future and the estate of some year nagib who is bequest helps ensure access for all to quality public radio reporting and stories that encourage lifelong learning Coming up on 8 37 this morning edition on WNYC and Michael hill and with me today is reporter and editor Nancy Solomon Tomorrow's the last day of the fall pledge drive here with raising money that keeps WNYC coming to you We have some sense of how important how valuable this station is to use So we're asking you this morning to support us Support WNY say with a small ongoing monthly contribution or a large one We call it sustaining membership give now by calling 8 8 8 three 7 6 9 6 9 two or go to WNYC dot org and look for the red donate button Nancy we're asking people to support what they rely on which is WNY say And you know with all the barrage of bad news and concerning things and scary things going on I love listening to something like that feature we just heard from Amy pearl It's just it's like Saab for the wounded heart and it's and that is public radio It's trying to bring you the breadth of human experience not just all the problems although you know one could argue maybe we get a little bit of a heavy dose of that But also the joy in life And radio is such a great way to hear those stories because with those voices and the sounds of the birds that was the best two minute listen of my morning So thank you Amy pearl and thanks to all of you who are donating we really need your support It's been a tough year for WNYC and we need you to make that call 8 8 8 three 7 6 9 6 9 two We have Brooklyn roasting company fair trade coffee freshly roasted for you for any pledge amount.

nagib Nancy Solomon Amy pearl Michael hill WNYC Saab Brooklyn
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thistles. Ask Governor Murphy, WB Geo news production in collaboration with WH Y Y and W N Y C. I'm Nancy Solomon Vaccinations have begun New Jersey. But not without delays. We have set the infrastructure we need to do this job and we are now ready to begin to ramp up our vaccination efforts. Exponentially. They're punching under their weight, particularly Walgreens on that's where most of that the yet to be used doses are. The president has talked about female Setting up 100 locations around the country. We welcome that, but please was said please bring doses with the sub. Just more locations right now is not that's not art. Constraint. This is your chance to speak directly with the governor. Call us with your questions at 6464357280 listeners. What are your questions about Getting a vaccine or sending your kids to school will also be taking your questions via social media using the hashtag Ask of Murphy. Number again is 6464357280. We have Governor Phil Murphy on the line. Good evening, Governor. Good evening, Nancy. Good to be back with you, Are you Governor. Yeah. Can you hear me? All right. Yeah, I lost you there for a second. Okay, So how are you doing? I'm doing Well, I mean, in the context of you know what continues to be a challenging year for so many of New Jerseyans and Americans and their feels to be you know, I don't want to jinx this and I'm not gonna would, but it feels like a combination of a number of things are about to get us to a better.

Governor Murphy Nancy Solomon Walgreens New Jersey president
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Like all things during the pandemic, this one is different. Murphy is pre recording it and streaming it online. W. On my CI's Nancy Solomon takes a look at where the governor stands as he begins his re election year. The last time a Democratic governor ran for re election in New Jersey. Well, let's just say it didn't go too. Well. You minutes ago, I called Mr Christie and congratulated him on becoming New Jersey's next governor. It was 2009. The country was in a devastating recession, and Jon Corzine had spent much of his first term fighting with Democrats in the Legislature. That sounds a lot like Murphy but might do him of Mercury Public affairs, a Republican strategist behind Christie's too successful campaigns says there's one obvious difference, I think Pandemic really defined him and gave him a chance to show leadership skills in a way that people hadn't seen prior to that to him, says the pandemic is the defining issue of Governor Phil Murphy's first term. And it considerably raised his public profile. Some 60% of New Jersey voters approve of the governor's job performance. Patrick Murray of the Monmouth University Polling Institute says If that holds, he's easily reelected if his job approval rating starts to dip below 50%, then voters will need to take a look at what the alternative is and if the alternative ends up being too far to the right Probably stick with Phil Murphy Murphy has been called the most progressive governor in America, and he wears that title is a badge of honor. But lately he's made some moves to shore up the political center. Moderate Democrats, independents and the business community, and that has angered progressive.

Phil Murphy Murphy New Jersey Mr Christie Patrick Murray Jon Corzine Monmouth University Polling In Mercury Public affairs Nancy Solomon Legislature America
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Governor Phil Murphy support for a $14 billion corporate tax break program. Bill blitz through the Legislature and landed on the governor's desk in a matter of days, But W What my CI's Nancy Solomon reports. The bill is also facing backlash from another group usually aligned with Murphy's agenda. Environmentalists. You're good to go this week alongside a cold, blustery Delaware River Governor Phil Murphy stepped up to a green podium that red 100% clean energy future for years or economy was fed a steady diet. Of polluting fossil fuels refined and stored right here. Murphy was announcing the state would spend $250 million to create a port and manufacturing plant for wind energy that he says will become a supplier for the entire East Coast, but is now from this point where New Jersey and the nation's transformation from an economy reliant. Only upon fossil fuels to one that runs on clean, renewable energy begins. It's the kind of project that environmentalists had hoped for when Murphy replaced Chris Christie, who cut the state's program on wind and solar and left the regional climate change agreement. But environmentalists are frustrated with recent moves from the governor. Just last week, the state approved a liquid natural gas facility a few miles to the north on the Delaware River. Angering opponents of fracking. And the day before the governor's bill announcement on the Delaware, the Legislature rushed through a $14 billion corporate tax break bill in just two days. Eric Benson of Clean Water Action was one of several environmentalists who called on legislators not to pass the bill. We should be fixing, girly drinking water systems and identifying and replacing lead pipes. Instead, this legislation will continue to start New Jersey's budget very much needed revenue. It really is. I think one of the most shameful pieces of legislation I've seen. Jeff Tittel, director of the New Jersey Sierra Club, says the bill will allow the state to give money to developers for projects in the two most environmentally sensitive and protected parts of the state. Pine Linds in South Jersey. And the Highlands in the Northwest is the biggest subsidy bill we've ever seen. And as you know the ability to spend it almost anywhere they try to hide behind, you know, smart growth, but this is really dumb growth because it justifies building almost anywhere in New Jersey. Governor says In spite of the controversy surrounding the tax break bill, there's a lot to like, including for environmentalists. It has support for electric cars, clean energy and the redevelopment of polluted sites. But that might not be enough to win his old friends back. Nancy Solomon w N. Y C news Support for NPR comes from member stations and from Procter and Gamble, maker.

Phil Murphy Bill New Jersey Legislature Nancy Solomon Delaware River New Jersey Sierra Club Delaware Nancy Solomon w South Jersey Eric Benson Chris Christie Jeff Tittel NPR
New York - N.J. Should Be More Aggressive In Stopping COVID-19 Spread, Epidemiologists Say

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:27 min | 2 years ago

New York - N.J. Should Be More Aggressive In Stopping COVID-19 Spread, Epidemiologists Say

"Jersey Governor Phil Murphy, Along with New York Governor Cuomo and four other governors from neighboring states are holding an emergency covert 19 summit this weekend. To consider possible coordinated actions. It's happening as epidemiologists are concerned about the spike in covert cases in New Jersey, where more than 3000 new cases are being reported each day WN Y sees Nancy Solomon reports. Jersey hasn't seen consistently high numbers like this since last April, And when cases first started surging last month. Officials like Health Commissioner Judy Person, Kelly pointed to private gatherings is the primary culprit. Recent gatherings, many of which were a Halloween parties. Have led to nearly 70 cases in union plaster. Somerset Essex in Cumberland County's now new data from the Health Department that looked at the cause of infections in October, found that a third of cases were traced to team sports. Another large source was the workplace. Yet Governor Phil Murphy says he's reluctant to shut down non essential businesses or sports that don't involve out of state travel. Three New Jersey based epidemiologists contacted by W. N Y. C. Say the state is that a dangerous point, particularly with hospitalizations also spiking upward. They say that in order to keep schools and essential businesses open the state should be restricting indoor dining bars and social gatherings. I'm also surprised that We haven't seen more action taken on in terms of restrictions. Stephanie Silveira is a professor at Montclair State University. She says she's particularly concerned about food service workers who earn low wages and often don't have health insurance. Another looming problem is Thanksgiving, says Rutgers University epidemiologist Henry Raymond. I think it's really going to be hard to imagine that everyone is gonna Stay home with their own Todd or bubble and not want to get together with cousin Harry or Uncle Fred Raymond work for a city public Health Department before becoming a professor. So he says he understands how difficult it is to balance public policy with science. In spite of numbers increasing statewide, the governor has said his team would take what he called a surgical approach to combating the second wave. To that end, he announced this week that individual towns and cities can order non essential businesses to close by 8 P.m..

Governor Phil Murphy Governor Cuomo Nancy Solomon Health Commissioner Judy Perso Somerset Essex Jersey Phil Murphy W. N Y. C. New Jersey Cumberland County Stephanie Silveira Health Department Kelly New York Henry Raymond Montclair State University Cousin Harry Uncle Fred Raymond Rutgers University Todd
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"646435 70 to 86 46435 70 to 80 for Anita Kumar, White House correspondent for Politico and New Jersey Public Radio's Nancy Solomon ah, editor of that reporting group. That's part of the New York New Jersey public Radio Family. John in Lumberton. You're on W N. Y. C. Hi, John. Thanks for calling in Libra. Lips. Johns lined just dropped off. John, you could call us back. Ah, Gary in Queens. Trump supporter. You're on WN my C Hi guy. No, I didn't. Thanks. I told you The screen. I was a little Washed, so thank you. Look, I'm 68. I never saw we've seen communicable diseases before some of them killing 250,000 ones. One million 68. It was We never had this stuff We never had mask wearing Social distancing. Shutting down the entire economy Children today. Have a higher death rate. Something like 20 times more of seasonal flu. Think over it. I could go on people of people being diagnosed with Kofi. If they have a positive test. When we have only had the PCR it was 80% false positives. Very 700 people a day are dying. Right now. From Cove it, according to the official statistics. You're shorting out off. Good. If you think of any other disease, but positive for covert. I'm talking about. That's right. I'm O k. I'm going to go. But I'm talking about the deaths. Anita Kumar. Is there any Miss information that needs to be fact check from that call. Regardless of his opinions. Well, I mean, I think you hurt scene, the public health experts and that's what we should look at to talk about. How many people's lives Khun be saved. If people do stay home, they don't mingle in these big groups. And they do wear masks. Masks, you know, are really huge Focus, and I can tell you from You know my time at the White House in these White House event mean there are White House staffers until until very recently that that aren't they haven't been wearing masks And you know, I just I'm really struck by there was congressional testimony a few weeks ago. That said, Ah, you know, mass wearing is so so important. And you know, the United States would be an entirely different place. If everybody could wear a mask for six weeks. I don't know if you remember that. I just was really struck by that. Here We are in our what? 7th 8th 9th month of this and I was really struck by how we could. You know the country could be beating this. If people would boil masks is your impression. Reporting, as you do on the national level that what we heard from Gary. There is typical of Trump supporters around the country that because A lot of people have died in previous pandemics or epidemics or whatever, and we didn't engage in national mask wearing ah and selective economic shutdowns. To control those epidemics that we shouldn't do it now. I mean, that's sort of what I'm here. I guess the main argument I would say that I'm hearing from people that don't want to shut down, including the president, is that There are consequences and this is this is true. Of course, there are consequences to shutting down. You can see them in people's mental health. You can see them in how Children are trying to learn virtually in school, which has been really tough on a lot. You can see it in the economy. So of course, there are consequences to shutting down and And all those things. It's a balancing out, of course, and they're basically saying, um, you know it's going to be more harmful if we do shut down. Spencer in Berkley Heights. You're on WN My C Hi, Spencer. Good morning, Brian. How are you? Good. Thanks for calling. I see you worked at the Bedminster facility. Is that correct? Well, no, I A lifetime ago, I worked for Verizon Wireless, which has a location in Berkeley in Bedminster. Excuse me, Andi. It's on ly about three miles away as the crow flies. The thing about Bedminster. There's not a lot of commercial areas of it. You've got a few strip malls and the like, which means that there's gonna be lots of places that would be cross vectoring. So I can only imagine that a number of my former co workers could very well be interacting with people who attended that event. I find the behavior of our current commander in chief, to be Idiotic at best and criminally negligent at worst, And unfortunately, this scenario is effectively a perfect storm, including behavior of just trying to win at all costs, whether it be for his own ego or for the benefits of the Republican Party. And it unfortunately reminds me far too much of the incident that occurred in the Pennsylvania State Legislature. Not too long ago when Republic a Republican legislator, possibly even more than one was diagnosed with covert 19. And said parties notified the rest of the Republicans in the legislature, but not the Democrats. And it led to its own internal fire storm, which apparently, the G decided it was not of sufficient threshold to file charges against But it certainly also have made the concept of party unification and that legislative body even that much more tenuous. This sort of stuff has to stop. And it's got to stop more so from the president on top to trickle down to other Republicans and to all of his followers, so that maybe we could go ahead and have that Now almost mystical concept of civil discourse..

Bedminster Anita Kumar John White House Trump Gary president New York New Jersey public Rad White House correspondent Johns Politico Spencer Lumberton Pennsylvania State Legislature United States Nancy Solomon Queens New Jersey
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Largest tax breaks in new Jersey's history has provided the first official documentation that the company is under criminal investigation WNYC's Nancy Solomon reports Holtec international obtained a two hundred and sixty million dollar tax break in twenty fourteen to build a new headquarters in Camden it was one of several subsidies tied the Democratic Party boss George Norcross who pushed for new law the cave Camden advantages from the state corporate tax break program but reporting from W. NYC and ProPublica last year revealed that a whole ticket failed to disclose a bribery case to regulators that had resulted in the company briefly being barred from contracting with the federal government since that disclosure the New Jersey economic development authority has frozen whole text tax break the company's sued earlier this year and in the response to that suit the EDA says it's withholding the tax break because Holtec is under criminal investigation for falsifying its application will take says it borrowed against the tax break and now owns twenty six million dollars a year it can't pay back community activist Amir Khan says many Camden residents wouldn't be upset to see the company leave town you can't have big business commit crimes and get a smack on the wrist and then we the small minority owned businesses in the city of Camden has a minor crime it has a major penalty can happen this is long overdue Holtec makes highly specialized storage casks for spent nuclear fuel the company ran afoul of community activists in twenty eighteen when its owner said he couldn't hire more Camden workers because they're often unprepared and don't show up on time that resulted in protests from Khan and other community activists who went on to find only twenty eight Camden residents were hired to work on construction projects generated by the city's tax break fueled building boom twenty eight job your job yeah all candidates seventy thousand plus residents you can't write people that's why the remarks that the C. E. O. of hold Jack said two years ago now has put a bitter taste in the mouth of residents throughout king of that lawyers for the EDA have filed a motion to have the lawsuit dismissed Nancy Solomon W. NYC news a spokesman for Holtec says the company is unaware of a criminal investigation New York city and state both have been ramping up contact tracing programs to combat the transmission of the coronavirus both involve thousands of newly hired workers calling up people who test positive for the illness and discussing possible exposures with them W. N. Y. C.'s Fred mogul joins us now with an update on those efforts Hey Fred either Kerry for give us a quick overview of what contact tracing entails well each time someone tests positive for the corona virus their name and contact info goes to the state this by the way is not unique or new to cover nineteen it's true for tuberculosis measles several sexually transmitted diseases the state and then give that information to county health departments or the New York City health department that's where a bank of callers reach out to all those people they ask who they've been in contact with they asked for the contact information for those contacts then they call the next group tell them someone who tested positive has been in your presence the callers don't provide that name they protect the privacy they ask if this next group of people are feeling sick have they been tested and if nothing curse them to get tested it had it all happens mainly by phone but it can involve sometimes a little shoe leather people going out literally knocking on people's doors which is why sometimes these creatures are called disease detectives so the state and New York City each running their own contact tracing programs how is the city doing the city has about three thousand new workers and the first few weeks of operation they made about six thousand calls to people who tested positive they didn't reach most of them about eighty five percent but then things dropped off pretty quickly for the secondary contacts once those first people mentioned possibly exposing the C. reached only about a third of those most people either didn't have or they wouldn't show the phone numbers now that proportion has been increasing steadily and in the most recent week almost nine out of ten people have shared additional contact information they also say they're finding hundreds of people who appear to have active cove it they're they're getting people to isolate they're telling these people all the city can help them getting food they're even offering them hotel rooms relatively few people are taking them up on that overall health officials say it's a good sign that reaching the people they need to reach and hopefully they're stopping further transmission of corona virus and has the state doing with contact tracing what state mainly does contact tracing via county health department and has been some tension between the counties in Albany some are saying the state's database is in transferring information efficiently the state's gone out and got a new program called com care that appears to have some bugs I ask almost point person on contact tracing about this Larry Schwartz he said you know these are issues you'd expect from ramping up any big software program very quickly it's always a couple of problems of glitches many of them have been resolved and the remaining few are being tested what does solutions sources tell me some account is so I rate they're threatening to opt out of working with the state entirely Schwartz says that's not what they're telling him and that frankly they'd be forced to do that there's just too much money from the federal government at stake both for contact tracing for other programs and I do have to mention that the county is not withstanding the Gripen will probably fall into line one thing our listeners might have heard about our smartphone apps being developed by Google and apple to track people's whereabouts as part of contact tracing so we can find out of someone who tests positive was that this or that work place a restaurant of the city and state asking people to download these apps the answer at the moment carries pretty quick no neither city nor state or tracking people through their smartphones yet it's not clear whether they'll deploy such a system in the future I had a hard time getting anyone in power even give me a straight answer if smartphone tracking is on the table for discussion at the moment all I can say is it it doesn't seem to be so Fred if the goal of contact tracing is really to pounce on coronavirus cases as they happen and prevent another outbreak do we know how well the city and state a position to do that well one of the genealogist I talked to he's a veteran of the.

new Jersey Nancy Solomon Holtec international official
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Course it's called ask governor Murphy you can submit questions still at ask of Murphy dot org and of course tune in college just a moment starting at seven here on W. and Y. C. rain for tonight mostly after eight o'clock otherwise we'll have a lot of about forty seven tonight more rain through the day tomorrow we'll see how about fifty in the daytime the rain will Peter off tomorrow night mostly before eight it'll clear up overnight tomorrow the low of about forty three it's seven PM he's W. NYC FAM H. T. N. A. M. New York this is ask governor Murphy WBGO news production in collaboration with W. H. Y. Y. and W. NYC I'm Nancy Solomon New Jersey is facing a health and economic crisis and now senator Mitch McConnell is suggesting it's better for the state to go bankrupt rather than get fed relate come on man that is completely utterly you're responsible we will just cough cough cough and cough we will go bankrupt senator but we will leave our citizens in the large so anybody out there who thinks that let's just open the place up will lead to lower infections lower hospitalizations and lower fatalities is being completely utterly irresponsible.

FAM H. T. N. A. M. New York W. H. Y. Y. New Jersey senator Mitch McConnell senator governor Murphy Murphy WBGO Nancy Solomon
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Else at the at the channel that into their art the founders hope to give ten thousand dollars each to one hundred twenty performing artists indeed we do expect partly sunny skies in New York City today highs near fifty two degrees this is WNYC support for NPR comes from Marcus by Goldman Sachs committed to helping make money work hard online savings account and more products at markets dot com you can money New Jersey governor Phil Murphy is holding daily briefings on the corona virus the steps we're taking main lead to short term change for thirty nine million of us living in a different sort of lifestyle we all have questions at this critical moment I'm Nancy Solomon join me for our life monthly call in show as governor Murphy tonight at seven on W. NYC it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm no well king good morning the number of coronavirus cases in this country is rising it's now more than forty six thousand health experts say social distancing is key and president trump has said the same thing but last night the president spoke and he had another message with an eye on the economy the president said he's eager to see businesses reopen America will again and soon be open for business and very soon a lot sooner than three or four months of somebody was suggesting luxturna we cannot let the cure being worse than the problem itself we're not gonna let the cure be worse than the problem NPR White House reporter I Usha Roscoe's of online with me Haitian good morning.

New York City NPR Marcus Goldman Sachs Nancy Solomon governor Murphy W. NYC Steve Inskeep president trump America reporter Usha Roscoe WNYC New Jersey
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Touring and live shows to make their living tune in for that story on ninety three point nine FM a may twenty or ask your smart speaker to play W. NYC tonight we can expect rain mostly overnight we'll have a low around forty two degrees and tomorrow Thursday rain as well in the morning mainly before two o'clock we'll have a high near fifty one degrees on Friday we've got a good chance of showers and thunderstorms too because it's gonna be really warmer on Friday highs in the upper sixties may even hit seventy degrees so those thunderstorms could bring bring heavy rain with them as well we're looking at a pretty nice weekend sunshine both days with highs in the upper forties currently it's fifty two degrees partly cloudy in Central Park at five twenty support for NPR comes from member stations and from ancestry helping people discover their story through family history and supporting women's history month which commemorates one hundred years of women's right to vote more at ancestry dot com slash and PR and progressive insurance comparing car insurance rates from multiple insurers so shoppers can evaluate options in one place now that's progressive comparisons available at progressive dot com or one eight hundred progressive we have a news from our two correspondents have been covering covert nineteen from New York and New Jersey the number of covert nineteen cases is doubling up by the day in both states and both states are very focused on expanding hospital capacity to prepare for the expected surge or even onslaught in cases we'll go now first you W. M. Y. C.'s Fred mogul Fred is on Staten Island fret hello hi there Danny and Nancy Solomon who is at St Barnabas hospital in Livingston New Jersey.

NYC Central Park NPR New York New Jersey W. M. Y. C. Danny St Barnabas hospital Livingston New Jersey Staten Island Nancy Solomon
New York - Newark Airport lines are almost non-existent amid growing fears of air travel due to coronavirus

The Takeaway

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

New York - Newark Airport lines are almost non-existent amid growing fears of air travel due to coronavirus

"Newark liberty International Airport is seeing a big drop off in travelers W. my sis and Nancy Solomon is there I'm at the international terminal and what people who work here tell me is this is crazy crazy empty it seems kind of empty to me but they say it's never like this and especially not in the middle of the day on a Friday I've spoken to many travelers who have gotten off from international flights they say they've never been whisked through customs as quickly before no questions about their health no questions about where they've been every single person said I was shocked

Newark Liberty International A Nancy Solomon
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:44 min | 3 years ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Bosses of New Jersey with Nancy Solomon after news headlines live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jax beer on Capitol Hill today the tables were turned in the impeachment proceedings against president trump over his dealings with Ukraine lawyers for Republicans and Democrats west witnesses questions over weeks of hearings answered questions of their own about the evidence they collected here's NPR's miles parks Democrats laid out what they see as impeachable offenses by the president they say trump abused his power by pressuring the foreign country Ukraine to help himself politically Republicans say Democrats have been struggling for three years to find a reason to impeach president trump and now they're desperately latching on to the president's actions related to Ukraine Republican ranking member Doug Collins the economy's good job creation is that military strong our country safe and the Judiciary Committee he's been relegated to this Democrats same pitchman is necessary before the election in November because trump has shown a willingness to use his presidential powers to sway the results in its favor miles parks NPR news the capitol a Kentucky law requiring women who seek abortions to receive an all true sound is set to take effect after the U. S. Supreme Court refused to take up a challenge to the law Sir McCammon as more the law requires women seeking abortions in Kentucky to view an ultrasound and listen to the fetal heart tones if they're audible the American civil liberties union challenged the law arguing that it interferes with the doctor patient relationship abortion rights opponents say the ultrasound requirement ensures that women are making informed decisions before choosing to have an abortion and pay our Surma Kaman a watchdog report on the justice department's investigation into Russian election interference finds no evidence of political bias it does however say some mistakes were made Denver's Amy held reports the criticism is being welcomed by allies of president trump in the four hundred plus page report inspector general Michael Horowitz finds seventeen significant errors and omissions in the F. B. I.'s application for surveillance of the trump campaign adviser Carter page was believed to have been targeted by the Kremlin for recruitment Harwood said investigators failed to ensure that the applications work scrupulously accurate findings Attorney General William Barr quickly seized on insisting ratio the basis for the FBI's investigation was faulty but the report finds in the broad scope the justice department acted without political bias or intentional misconduct FBI director Christopher ray says the bureau accepts the findings and he has ordered corrective steps to address the shortcomings Amy held and hear news Washington court house Democrats may have reached a tentative agreement with labor leaders in the White House over a re write of the U. S. Mexico Canada trade deal that's according to a democratic aide not authorized to speak on the arrangement details will still need to be finalized but simply Max who would be willing to accept US requests for greater region content on steel over a five year period the Dow was down a hundred and five points this is NPR and you're listening to WNYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd New Jersey senator Cory Booker says Russia remains a threat to US elections the democratic candidate for president saying that president trump's attorney Rudy guiliani continues to paddle Russian disinformation while he's in Ukraine representing the president's interests the fact that we can't get to the truth this matter because guiliani is not willing to testify in the president's state is holding back witnesses that can give the American people insights into the true breath and depth of this corruption is just should be frustrating to everyone that's Booker speaking on ABC's this week the house Judiciary Committee heard evidence today that lawmakers have collected in the impeachment inquiry into the president complete coverage after news headlines and there will be a familiar face leading at the New York Giants tonight quarterback Eli manning returning to the field for the first time since September the change is just temporary manning is filling in for starter Daniel Jones who is out because of an injury manning a two time Super Bowl MVP was benched after losing the first two games of the season the giants currently hold a record of two wins and ten losses they'll take on their division rivals the eagles tonight starting at eight fifteen and the man who gave it Big Bird his warmth and Oscar the grouch is growl for nearly fifty years on Sesame Street has died the legendary puppeteer Carroll Spinney died at his home in Connecticut yesterday sesame workshop said in a statement so many had been living for some time with dystonia it causes involuntary muscle contractions many once told the AP that the show seems special from the very start I wasn't.

New Jersey Nancy Solomon Washington NPR fifty years three years five year
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Corporate tax break program more than a billion dollars in tax credits were awarded to businesses in Camden connected to Democratic Party bosses George Norcross now would W. NYC pro public investigation has found the Norcross and his business associates also acquired land on the Camden waterfront land that became more attractive because of the tax breaks W. when my sis Nancy Solomon has the latest installment in the year long series the real bosses of New Jersey today this seven hundred million dollar camp in order for project in September of twenty fifteen governor Chris Christie announced a seven hundred million dollar project that would remake the Camden waterfront and propelled the entire city to success Christie said the project was possible because of his alliance with George more cross the unelected party boss when you work with Democrats the press one to know what's going on why are they working together there must be some backroom ugly deal that's going on at the actually work with each other in fact there was a back room deal in twenty thirteen Christy worked with the three Norcross brothers George the political boss Philip the lawyer and lobbyist and Donald the state senator at the time to create a massive tax break program for Camden those incentives because the land values to rise on the Camden waterfront just a stone's throw from Philadelphia as we previously reported Georgian Philip Norcross then pressured a community development group the hand over the right to buy a water front office complex to a company of Norcross is choosing here it is a year later and Christy was announcing that yet another friend of George Norcross was taking over development of the rest of the waterfront the company was liberty property trust and the CEO was a friend of Norcross is dating back to the nineteen seventies Norcross told NJ TV he was investing fifty the million dollars in the project.

Camden George Norcross Nancy Solomon New Jersey Chris Christie Christy Philip Philadelphia CEO Democratic Party NYC Donald senator seven hundred million dollar billion dollars million dollars
"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"nancy solomon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of flooded the city for almost a week at the Venice train station a loudspeaker announcement warns visitors that they can't move around the city without the high rubber boots because in many of the elevated walkways are submerged by water the high water is expected to last for several hours due to the strong southerly Chirakkal winds blowing large amounts of sea water into the lagoon last Tuesday Venice suffered its worst flooding since nineteen sixty six when the high water mark hit six feet one inch tennis is at the top of the world's most endangered cities list you to rising sea levels caused by climate change it's also overwhelmed by mass tourism three million annually visit this unique renaissance jewel build some thirteen hundred years ago on lagoon islands so people Julie NPR news that is this is NPR and this is WNYC in New York I'm David first a man wounded during the shooting at a high school football game in New Jersey is now facing charges himself Pleasantville police say the twenty seven year old man is facing weapons charges they say a weapon was found on him when emergency responders went to help him after the shooting Friday night during a game in Pleasantville the man is in stable condition and will be undergoing surgery in addition a ten year old boy is in critical condition and a fifteen year old boy was treated for a wound after the shooting Democratic Party boss George Norcross plans to testify before a New Jersey Senate committee tomorrow about a tax break program that benefited him W. N. Y. C.'s Nancy Solomon reports the governor's task force investigating the program has sent a letter to the senators with twenty six questions for Norcross Norcross declined to testify before the task force and even sued governor Phil Murphy in a losing effort to stop the investigation instead he'll testify in the state Senate where his party machine wields influence the list of questions sent by the task force focus on whether Norcross is insurance company was actually planning to move out of state that's a requirement for the two hundred and forty million dollar tax break that he and his business partners received the bill the headquarters in Camden the jets are one of the team's scouting former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick about six team representatives attended a work out in Georgia yesterday were camper Nick threw passes for about forty minutes the thirty two year old quarterback has not played since twenty sixteen season with the San Francisco forty Niners he helped start a wave of protests about social and racial injustice that season by kneeling during the national anthem at games this is W. NYC it's eleven oh six support for NPR comes from roadside attractions presenting the warrior queen of John C. based on the true story of India's Rani of Jhansi lead an army against the British Empire and became a feminist symbol of resistance now playing in theaters studio.

Venice thirteen hundred years forty million dollar twenty seven year thirty two year forty minutes fifteen year one inch six feet ten year
WNYC, President Trump And Senator Chuck Schumer discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:11 sec | 4 years ago

WNYC, President Trump And Senator Chuck Schumer discussed on Morning Edition

"Campaign. The US military says it's air strikes in Somalia have killed more than sixty Al Shabaab extremists in recent days. Six airstrikes were launched in a coastal areas south of Mogadishu in India. Rescue teams are trying to locate thirteen coal miners who've been missing for four days. NPR's Laura Freyer has more only three of their helmets have been found a survivor who escaped described the mineshaft filling with water. This is a so called rat hole. Mine a deep vertical hole was side tunnels, which is illegal in that part of India. The minds owner has been arrested a national disaster response force is on the scene. This is NPR news from Washington. This is WNYC in New York. Good morning. I'm Richard Hake. It's six thirty one with the government shutdown looming at the end of this week. Senator Chuck Schumer says President Trump is being irresponsible for insisting on five billion dollars for the construction of a border wall Schumer spoke yesterday on NBC, but he shouldn't use innocent workers as hostage for his temper tantrum to sort of throw a bone to his base. Humor said Republicans don't have the votes for five billion dollars for a border wall in either the house or the Senate. In Oval Office meeting last week with Schumer and House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, President Trump said he would be proud to shut down the government for border security a complicated plan to redraw. New Jersey's legislative districts died this past weekend. WNYC's MAC cat says that connects back to President Trump progressive activists furious about Trump's election pushed out four Republican New Jersey congressman this year. Now, they've turned their attention to state democratic leaders who they say have grown too powerful activists opposition helped to defeat Democrats plan to redraw the legislative map and make it less competitive and less. Progressive says Dina Matola Jabbour ska of the group New Jersey citizen action something has shifted with the emergence of so many new grassroots activists and leaders. It's not going to be okay to just like Democrats that you know, sometimes support democratic values and sometimes don't next up. Her group is pushing Democrats to the left on a plan to raise the minimum wage a complicated plan to redraw new. Jerseys legislative districts died this past weekend. And we just heard from that cats. We will hear more about this from WNYC's Nancy Solomon, coming up immigration courts are increasingly relying on video technology. WNYC's Beth Fertig reports that nine percent of all hearings are now done by video WNYC obtained government statistics showing more than one hundred twenty five thousand immigration court hearings were done by video in fiscal twenty eighteen that's an increase of more than fourteen percent over the previous year. Even though the total number of hearings increased by just seven percent. Video hearings are primarily used for immigrants in detention to save time and travel expenses to court, but New York City's varick street courtroom switched completely to video hearings in June, immigration and customs enforcement said they started after a protest disrupted the facility, but immigration lawyers say it's harder to communicate with their clients by video and claim. There have been a lot of technical problems. We do have a slight chance of showers later on this afternoon. Otherwise. Partly sunny with a high near forty five degrees.

Wnyc President Trump Senator Chuck Schumer New Jersey New York City NPR India Mogadishu Somalia United States Al Shabaab Laura Freyer Richard Hake Nancy Pelosi Dina Matola Jabbour Washington Nancy Solomon Beth Fertig Oval Office
Thousands attend vigil for Pittsburgh synagogue shooting victims

Morning Edition

00:43 sec | 4 years ago

Thousands attend vigil for Pittsburgh synagogue shooting victims

"Federal court is expected to be a brief one to transfer the prosecution case to the southern district of New York, which is where five of the bombs were discovered. David Schaper, NPR news Fort Lauderdale in baseball. The Boston Red Sox are this year's World Series champions. They beat the Los Angeles Dodgers five to one last night in Los Angeles, Boston Steve Pearce was declared the series most valuable player. He was thrilled by the honor filling my life. And this is what you. Are gonna wishing that you could be something like this. And with the special group of guys out there to celebrate with them that was awesome Pierce had three home runs in the last two games, including two last night. The Red Sox have now won four titles in fifteen seasons. The dodgers haven't won a championship in thirty years. This is NPR news from Washington. This is WNYC from New York. Good morning. I'm Richard Hake. Seven four fifty one degrees. Clouds right now, we could see some showers this morning, but then clearing up to partly sunny skies today with a high near fifty five degrees Jewish community. Members are mourning the victims of last weekend's shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue, a group gathered outside of a family service center in flatbush for a vigil where Jewish leaders assured residents that their safety is a top priority. Several elected officials also joined congresswoman Yvette Clark called on Brooklyn residents to find strength in the community. It is up to us here in Brooklyn to set the example of how we pulled together during times of tragedy to raise up one another's Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams who helped organize the gathering called on off duty officers to carry their firearms into houses of worship also more than a thousand people attended a service in a call to action out of New Jersey synagogue in response to the shooting WNYC. Nancy Solomon reports the crowd erupted in applause when governor Phil Murphy called for more gun control. But the biggest reaction came. When rabbi Clifford Cohen help President Trump responsible for the rise in antisemitic violence. It

Boston Red Sox Los Angeles Dodgers Brooklyn New York NPR Steve Pearce David Schaper Fort Lauderdale Rabbi Clifford Cohen President Trump Los Angeles Yvette Clark Baseball Pittsburgh Synagogue Richard Hake Nancy Solomon Wnyc New Jersey Synagogue Phil Murphy Pierce