17 Burst results for "Nancy Kenny"

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"They include an opinion piece on the art world response by Margaret. A story on the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis is decision to stop working with the city's police on their security by Nancy Kenny and Gabriella Angeletti story about protested attacks on confederate statues. Of course continue following the world response to the aftermath of George Floyd's killing. In a moment, we'll look at William hogarth portrait of Thomas Corum but I hear a few of the top stories on the newspaper's website this week. The German government has amount one billion euros for arts and culture and one hundred thirty billion stimulus package announced on Wednesday by Chancellor Angela Merkel. Catherine Hickory writes the initiative counter what she described as the severest economic crisis in the history of the Federal Republic caused by the coronavirus pandemic. The funds for art and culture equivalent to half the annual federal budget as it to be released this year and next under a program called new start for culture. Tate modern and take Britain into to reopen in August. According to the tastes director Maria bow show. He spoke to the newspaper smart in Bailey. Bausch added that. If there's an increase in the coronavirus infection levels that would necessarily have to change these plans of other national museums had the same data mind she responded. Each museum is in a different situation. We are coordinating our schedules. She said and she added that the reopenings would likely be staggered from July until the end of August. And finally, while Amsterdam's major museums were closed in lockdown, privately funded startup museum dedicated to new media has spent the past two months, preparing to open in the city, had given right that the next museum located in two thousand one hundred square meter, former recording studio in Amsterdam, nor the post industrial creative district will open on the twenty ninth of August and we'll show immersive installations by Dutch and international artists, designers, technologists scientists is billed as Netherlands I new Media Art Museum. You.

Bausch Walker Art Center Media Art Museum Tate Chancellor Angela Merkel Amsterdam Gabriella Angeletti Catherine Hickory George Floyd Margaret Minneapolis Nancy Kenny William hogarth German government Federal Republic Maria bow Thomas Corum director
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:37 min | 6 months ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Dot Com and give us your feedback. Now as I mentioned the exhibition at the Museum of not may have closed on the twelfth of March but next week the museum opens a special online presentation exploring the exhibition before the show opened our senior editor in New York. Nancy Kenny went to my mom to meet. Its curator and Timken. Does Moma's exhibition have a thesis or argument to make about Donald Judd and his career. We have a lot of arguments I think. And they're a bit embedded in what is actually a very straightforward presentation. We've joked at its judd one. Oh one at a certain level it takes a biographical or not really biographical but chronological course. So you meet him as a painter in his early thirties. Trying to figure out if he doesn't paint what does he do next not wanting to remain a painter because he's convinced that he is not going to be that great a painter and then we take you through the next thirty years up until the time of his death in one thousand nine hundred ninety. Four refuting in a sense. The misconceptions that Judd's work is all alike that it's very simple that there's not much variety that there's not particularly development because boxes of boxes a box and I think one of our our convictions. Is that showing that. In fact there's a lot of unpredictability and a lot of breadth in his career. That's often been summarized much to simply. Can you describe the journey that led him from paintings to works? That were fully three dimensional in the early sixties. Or did he have a Eureka moment? It was not at all a Eureka moment. It was definitely a bit of a steady plotting persistent very thoughtful few year period. So he's still making two-dimensional paintings in one thousand nine hundred sixty one and then by nineteen sixty two after making certain things that seem more like reliefs. He's come to make works that. Sit on the floor. So it's this nineteen sixty one sixty two moment where it changes but then it's really over the course of sixty three and sixty four that he continues to figure out what's going on with this work doing a lot of sketching and sketchbooks doing a lot of trial and error of making pieces. That thinking back. I can imagine he didn't quite know where they were going but he knew he was trying to figure out how to make something that didn't already exist as an artwork was painting exhausted. For whom after? What had before painting was not so much exhausted I think although he used rhetoric like that painting being finished for example I think it has something to do with that and something to do with realizing so putting in the positive way actually that the way to extend the incredible leaps isn't even enough of a word of that prior generation of artists like Pawlak or new men are still a Rothko that the way to extend what they did was to go into. Three dimensions did others in his generation. Feel the same way that painting was in the sense over. Certainly. That's that's true and then I think maybe even more of a parallel is of the painters of his generation and the easiest one to talk about is more whole you know at the exact same time as judd is turning from painting to sculpture. Warhol is turning painting into something that can address every day topics so instead of being grand metaphysical abstraction you can have a painting of a soup can and in a very similar way. Warhol is saying I have to go in a different direction than this. Prior generation and judd going from two dimensions to three. Doing the same thing you're exhibition catalogue starts out with a snippet of an interview with Donald Judd in which he pretty much firmly resist describing his work as sculpture. What was his objection? Well his objection. Was THAT SCULPTURE. In one thousand nine hundred sixty whatever it was eight conjured up an extremely specific thing in people's mind still which had more to do with what we might today call a statue that was a massive thing that probably made some sort of reference to a human body that was heavy like bronze or marble and he just didn't want his work identified by a term with that kind of work with which he felt had absolutely nothing in common. He also disliked the term minimalist. Didn't he yes? Artists are famous for hating the terms that are applied to them as an ISM or movement and I agree with his distaste for it and I think fifty years later. It's easy to understand that taste. Because it confuses lack of lots of parts and details and so forth with lack of anything and in fact his works are full of meaning and structure and color and texture and so forth but because they didn't seem busy they were called minimal and in fact that label has caused a lot of misunderstanding. Because people having that label look at them as if they're empty of meaning or feeling or sensuousness and they're full of all of those things for you what are some of the highlights or the turning points in the show. Well we were very methodical in the show so there are actually three thirds of the show for three decades the sixties seventies and eighties. And I think one thing that I love about the career as we set it out. Is that with judge? You realize that changes in his life mirror changes in the work and the work is at the surface so impersonal. But this makes you realize that there is actually a personal logic to his own evolution. So you see for example from room one to room to how he goes from hand making his own work in room one with the assistance of his father who is a better carpenter than he in fact to in room to deciding in a very very major for the history of modern sculpture decision to delegate the fabrication to sheet metal workers who worked at a shop nearby and then in that? Second Room. You see all of this work not made by Judd physically made by Judd conceptually intellectually artistically but with the hands of these sheet metal workers who he partnered with very closely. Then when you go from the second room to the third room you see when he moved to Marfa and the scale expands the types of materials expands literally as his property and end the sky and landscape around him expanded so did his vision of the work and then in the final room you see in the nineteen eighties when minimalism was no longer the hot new thing how he responded in part by reinventing himself altogether and what for me is Very surprising and I think for most people surprising sort of Exuberance in the mood of the work so when he shifts to using metal and other fabricators to create his works did he see that fabrication stages part of his artistic process or is that process really over when he completes his design on paper. Oh definitely the whole thing is part of the process and in fact he never knew he always insisted on he never knew what one of his sketches or one of his specifications for say materials and colors would really turn out to be till he saw the work with his two is years before he began to make objects he established himself as a reviewer of art exhibitions for magazines. How did his writing influences work? As an artist and his reputation he was very opinionated. Wasn't he definitely opinionated? Definitely pulling no punches in those reviews he wrote hundreds of reviews in the early sixties for art magazines and that exactly is the time when he was finding his own voice. And for me. They are really intertwined activities. Because he's trekking up and down the streets of Manhattan looking at dozens and dozens of shows by his peers at the exact same time. He's deciding he's GonNa put aside painting and invent this new thing not quote sculpture but made with three dimensional objects and materials and yes he absolutely was known more as a critic when he made his first debut sculpture show. He apparently labored to make up teen iterations of his work. While making these minute distinctions between each one What was thinking there and does the show help you to see these little minute distinctions. That was part of our goal to show that by changing the material in a given form like say a stack. It completely changes the work into an entirely different animal. I think that way. In which the reiteration of these basic forms occupied judd can be thought of in terms of an artist like bring cousy. Who made many many birds in space? You could look at one. Burdens based by brand cousy. And Say I know what burdens base looks like but then if you have the opportunity to see others that are in marble rather than in bronze or that are slightly taller or slightly bigger belly slightly different sheen of polished. Bronze polished brass. All of those things make unique sculptures. And I think judd isn't that same camp in a way where for him he never would have gotten bored of making stacks because each one truly is unique because of its specifications and that's why he loved that term. He coins specific objects. He was very opposed to titling his works wasn't he? He did not title his works. That's right and I think that is because he wanted to get away from the idea of narrative of reference of some kind of imposed interpretation and instead wanted to them to be absolutely free for a viewer to read in whatever way he or she wanted to so he relocates in the Mid Seventies to Marfa Texas where he developed properties as spaces for living and working as well as for the display of art. What drove him to undertake that move. And how is his vision affected by being under those wide open skies? He needed more space to think to make his art to look at his art. Once it was made and in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight. He had bought and moved into renovating after a great deal of renovation. A big cast iron building on Spring Street in Soho and I think it was the experience of being in that five story very large-scale building that in a way liberated him to understand how much the architectural space environmental space that he occupied prompted new ways of thinking in new ideas and he realized that even that wasn't enough are works for Martha represented in the show. We have borrowed works for Martha. Yes the works that are installed permanently in Marfa cannot be lend elsewhere but there are certain works that are in storage at Marfa and we did borrow from those things to the exhibition feature much of his famous furniture or discuss his thoughts about furniture design was was he serious when he said that furniture is not art Yes and for that reason. The furniture that is in the show is not displayed among the sculpture in the galleries. But we have a reading room before you walk in or at the end of the show. Either way it's a full circle where there are benches and day bed and chairs tables where you can sit and read our catalogue books of Judd's writings other books on the artist. Relax and I think we wanted to convey that. The life work thing mattered to him but they were distinct so we have the gallery area the reading room area and they're complementary as those two practices where for him furniture and art objects overall. He seems to give as much importance to placing his art in a given. Space as actually making the art was he highly focused on exactly whereas designs would be displayed. Not so much on. We're but wherever it would be that it would be done in such a way that that piece was living. It's best life in a sense so it might be in a commercial gallery. It might be in a museum it might be on his own property and might be some collectors home but in any of those cases it needed to have enough space around it. The.

Donald Judd Marfa Timken Museum of not Nancy Kenny Moma senior editor Warhol New York Pawlak Martha Manhattan Soho Texas
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:39 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Story to tell about the history of modern not Nancy Kenny our senior editor in New York at least week with Sarah Suzuki the during prints curator who's in charge of the reopening and Rajendra Roy the museum's chief curator of film to talk about these major changes in the museum Nancy began by asking for the release new space means there's a lot more works on view it does Sarah you probably have those numbers memorized pretty close to memorize it does it allows us to show a fair amount more of the collection so we expanded by about forty seven thousand square feet that's the growth of about a third historically we've shown probably on average about fifteen hundred collection works at any given time that doesn't count what's happening in the temporary exhibition stories we're up to about twenty five hundred now so a growth of about a thousand objects in almost every gallery is devoted to the permanent collection isn't it at our reopened the moment it is so the entire building top to bottom in our temporary exhibition spaces and in our collection spaces they're all populated with works from our collection Okay well let's talk about the permanent collection for decades the Museum of Modern Art has presented this authoritative narrative on the history of modern art sort of decreeing what was important and what was not the museum's founding director Alfred Barr drew up a famous nineteen thirty. Six Diagram Mapping the origins and influences of modern art that seemed to endure for decades. really with an Arrow pointing from cubism to suprematism and from Dada to surrealism and so on so on knife reinstalled your permanent collection to tell a different story with some unexpected artis added in a more global view of modern and contemporary art did all of this arise out of a sense of the story of modern art presented by the museum was skewed in some way I'm not sure if it was skewed for me it just wasn't ever really the truth or it was a part of the truth and I think again I'm speaking for myself over the last twelve years is as a member of the leadership group I just wanted to make sure we got close research telling different stories that would lead us closer to the truth about the complexity of modernism I think bar was not it wasn't that he was off the market it's just his torpedo kind of went in a straight line and we're thinking of ourselves certainly not in any kind of mechanized militaristic mode anymore but maybe if we're still thinking about the ocean were were a larger net hoping to kind of capture a lot more of what's in that beautiful see of modern and Contemporary Art then we perhaps were kind of aiming for with that more kind of strategic direct line approach before there's one other thing I would add to that I love that metaphor by the way which is that Alfred Barr also said of the institution and I'm GonNa paraphrase because he said more elegantly than I will but he said essentially the Museum of Modern Art is a laboratory and the public is invited to participate in our experiments and I think the idea of getting back to that DNA in in a way something that's less codified that feels more flexible variable taking chances was something that also drove the thinking behind this project yeah I heard one curator remark during the press preview that bar would have approved we'd like to think so I mean I don't think he had any fixed idea of how that Labrador sorry could evolve other than it probably should and this is definitely an evolution in from our DNA I mean I think we like to think that this is very part of moments DNA is how we've decided to move forward and progress and that doesn't abandon our history certain if you come to the galleries you'll definitely feel like you're Moma you know and if you have a particular work that you associate with being at Moma chances are you'll see it it's just you will encounter other things along the way that hopefully will now become a part of your essential experience I understand that the arrangement the galleries now as chronological at least in part that's correct the spine chronology and in fact it has been for many years I mean you always move kind of chronologically with the earliest material from the collection on the fifth floor and down into the mid century moment on the fourth floor and picking up in the seventies or eighties biggest differences that chronology now includes two greater extent works beyond painting sculpture that has been an evolution if you visited Moma over the last ten years you will have noticed there are a mix of all of our departmental media in those galleries but now it's really kind of come together in a in a big way how to the idea of combining all the mediums come about artists for I I would say you know I think the artists have been working in ways that have made our system displaying our collection outdated did meaning it's really hard to find an artist who is so dedicated to one certain medium that they would say I am this and not that rather in Canada most artist why am this and that and that and that and so we've always had it as part of our structure as part of our inherent ways of things being all these different areas of specialization that will not go away so I'm the chief curator of film I will never be the chief curator of painting but the fact that we had all of these these assets these these strengths We just felt like why why are we isolating them from each other in the display and that's the big change so there was no resistance within the institution combining everything in one gallery well if you look back at what we've doing in doing both in the collection as Roswell saying also in our temporary exhibitions it actually has been the case if you came to see Picabo you would see painting and and work on paper and you'd see publications that he made here audio of the kinds of things that he was inspired and influenced by so it's actually something that's been happening it's really been kind of bubbling up over the last however many years and you know what we had was a physical architecture in this building in which there were galleries that were designated for painting and sculpture for film for Prince for drawings and so I think the the loosening of the architecture is one of the things that really helped us kind of bring together in the election galleries something that we've really been doing in the building for quite a while the museum has signaled that we'll be seeing more works by Women Latinos Asians African Americans and other overlooked artis winded the conversation about doing this start and how did support for it come together coalesce well oh this the real discussion about the expansion happened around the time I arrive so around two thousand eight let's say And that was kind of the kickstarter a new generation of chief curator is coming into their positions and in the intervening years it was it was never a question that the the re addresses focus let's say would be happening it wasn't one person it was definitely a kind of group acknowledgement that this is these are areas that moment look more deeply into and if need be really take action to fill voids that you know may have existed previous you know how that manifested certainly have been fascinating enriching and in some point heated discussions but the discussion was never should we are should we it was like how how should we do this and I think we've been in step with lots of other areas of study I mean certainly in in the academic realm ideas about kind of mining histories that we thought we knew well to better understand them in in all of their kind of robust facets which has brought to the surface the works of other artists that had been perhaps previously marginalized but are really feels central to the discussion now I think that's happening in parallel so really critical that the work we're doing here reflects that we were talking about this chronological spine of the permanent collection but there seemed to be some time travelers thrown in if you if you will one that struck me was a nineteen sixty seven painting by faith ringgold that's right near Picasso's Demoiselles d'Avignon why are those two paintings in the same gallery because and Tompkins Genius and Thompkin is cheered her painting and sculpture and and I have to say the moment she i kind of she there was no big moment actually I think I actually wandered into the room where we had all of the models for what we were planning and all the sudden I saw faith in that room and I was like Oh wow and been here and she's been doing some really intense thinking and and you know I think it will it will mean something different to each of us for me it it follows in a line of kind of this question learning of those histories that we'd always taken for granted if we learned modern history modern art history at Moma we we took for granted that that the the Moselle diving are was the work right it was the instigator of so much of what was to follow and I think faiths painting it doesn't attack that theory necessarily but it calls into question what the result have actually been that's my read on it and I just find that such a fascinating such three Ling exhilarating moment that that an brought us I think it also speaks to the through lines that we see across time and the things that artists are dealing with and I think critical to acknowledge the way that certain moments influenced subsequent generations artists so I think faith herself has talked about coming look at that picture and being really wrestling with it Michael Armitage who has a project show that's up with us right now it was organized by Thelma goals Oakland and Legacy Russell of the studio museum while they're buildings under construction that show has in a picture called Nyala Beach Boys which is also an exact reference and to Demoiselles it's five male figures each of them scaled exactly to its corresponding figure upstairs so I think it's a work with such a last resonance that so many artists have wrestled with and being able to acknowledge that not only in a textbook but also in space where you can see them together and really think about that is incredibly citing well beyond the cost and the ringgold when I attended the press preview I noticed some really surprising juxtaposition 's a starting with the opening galleries on the fifth floor can you tell us about that installation I definitely can't it's many years of my professional life here behind the scenes have been dedicated to figuring out what the opening sequence should feel like and with the full acknowledgement that it may not in reality be the beginning for anyone there's so many ways kind of approach the galleries that moment which are exciting but if someone does choose to start at the beginning of the chronology we wanted an explicit acknowledged meant for me my argument was that modernism didn't start poof out of painting right it really there were other factors in play and so when you walk into that first gallery in you see in front of you starry night there should be this moment I have this moment of relief oh right I mean the the modernism that I learned has totally gone away but then you take two steps in you turn your head and you see nineteenth century late nineteenth century photography and very early film and you realize hey something else was going non and in the film I chose to to be kind of front and center through that portal is from nineteen o five it's Interior New York subway and for me that film captured so many things first of all it captures New York which I thought was essential to get in the first breath the conversation here at a quintessential New Yorker institution and I always felt that was kind of missing at the beginning of Moma story is like New York was critical to to this place existing in this narrative emerging and it's also probably how most visitors got here right perhaps on that same line on Lexington Avenue and so probably a last looks very much the same over one hundred years later but that familiarity that that that kind of understanding that hey this is I know what that is I I recognize that I was actually just part of that that for me has also been really critical to my experience with modernism his it's a it's something that I can immediately identify with whether I appreciate through realm which is usually how I do it through photography or even through painting it's not something that you need to go to a palace or somewhere where you know only the the very very elite can go this is something that was made by people who probably travelled on that system and were mesmerized by this new technology this new urbanism At nineteen o five and I think that that it remains really critical to to what this institution stands for income support I noticed also that there's this gnarled pottery in the middle of the first gallery by someone from Mississippi apparently was contemporaneous with the post impressionist right so that's George or who I believe was this a self nickname the mad.

Museum of Modern Art Sarah Suzuki chief curator museum Nancy New York Alfred Barr Nancy Kenny Rajendra Roy senior editor Dada founding director one hundred years twelve years ten years
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Back the highlights from the two hundred interviews that we've done over the past two years on the art newspaper podcast this week. We're looking at two conversations about Andy Warhol. The huge warhol retrospective effective from A to B and back again which began at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York last November is now at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and later travels to the art institute of Chicago across to podcasts last year we looked in detail at the show itself and it will host Legacy Z. of it later you hear from Jeremy Della. The British artist who as a young man spent a few weeks Warhol's let studio the factory in New York but I is an interview from October last year. We've done a desalvo the curator the touring retrospective Donna was to come to our senior editor in New York Nancy Kenny in a catalog essay for the exhibition. You write that you met with Warhol in the eighties. When you were curator the Dea Art Foundation I'd love to hear about those interactions sure well <hes> <hes> you know when I met Warhol in eighty five eighty six? I A little fuzzy myself about the time but I believe it was late eighty five early eighty six it was <hes> during a time when I was taking forward some exhibitions from the museum's collection election and the had this incredible retrospective collection of Warhol's work and so really that's sort of was the framework if you will the context for it all and you know at first he was not very forthcoming. <hes> there was an exhibition of the disaster paintings that organized and he was not really that involved but then I had this idea to do something that really examined his pre silkscreen work work he'd made from sixty to sixty two Enron. I reached out to him. He was very intrigued by the idea quite interested in it and it was at a time when he himself was revisiting hand painting in his collaborations with Basquiat and <hes> Keith haring. I found him a very open been shy interested artists well and course when you're young curator sort of overwhelmed by the mythic status of someone such as Warhol so I was <hes> you know in my own for me. I was a bit take it back about how to approach him but then the conversations became really quite straightforward and very <hes> he was very forthcoming with information. I asked him a lot about the period of time he'd worked in the fifties in particular are interested in that and then you know how it was that he came to make these decisions between the more gesture abstraction and the move toward you know something that really appeared printed the last warhol retrospective organized by American Museum was at the Museum of Modern Art in Nineteen eighty-nine just two years after his death <hes> that's almost three decades ago. What new perspectives have you gained since then sure I mean it's it's sort of amazing easing to imagine that you know it's been that long since a U._S.? Institution took on <hes> a major retrospective of Warhol. I think in many ways that you know there's an entirely new generation many of them were not even on born in nineteen eighty nine and so you know I think that <hes> there's a generation that's been grappling with both rethinking painting what painting can be engagements with abstraction but also I think a fluidity <hes> pity or a comfort zone with looking and working with new technologies media-driven things <hes> digital technologies so that's something that's really struck me immensely in all these years later is to see a new generation for whom warhol makes total sense and it made me see I really felt that Warhol was very ahead of his times and that they're the perception of his work in the sixties of course you know was for the most part he had his detractors tractors and still does but for the most part it was an incredibly radical move to make a silkscreen <hes> to use silkscreen to make a painting but you know in the seventies and eighties Warhol's work wasn't quite as popular and I I think that you know his use of technology photography <hes> ideas about image making and of course in an age of instagram and so many other social media platforms you know Warhol's famous statement you know everyone we'll be famous for fifteen minutes which is probably fifteen seconds <hes> rings incredibly true so on some level. I'm particularly interested in a generation of artists that <hes> came a couple of decades several decades after Warhol and a new audience <hes> of people who will becoming too or halls work in many ways in many instances. I think not necessarily for the first time but to see this level of depth in the work will be for many people a a A. I hope an eye opening experience just the show cast the nineteen sixties as his biggest moment. No it really <hes> you know felt very it was very important to really look through at the trajectory of Warhol's worked to consider his career as a whole and I think there's been so much attention paid to the sixties. Both you know in critic particularly at a critical level <hes> and the later work suffered a bit and it's there are those people and critics and <hes> and Norma scholarship after Warhol died of course when he died in eighty seven and a lot of work also came out that you know would had not been shown in his lifetime really changed perceptions. I think about warhol world's a gay man especially the early worker the fifties where you see an aspect of Warhol that you isn't as evident in the later work but I think that seventies and eighties period <hes> was misunderstood stood. It didn't really look even though the technique had similarities with sixties. The subject matter was completely different. <hes> yes hammer-and-sickle <hes> which you know he was inspired by graffiti going to Italy during the time of the Red Guard but then here's an artist who makes skull paintings or paintings of shadows <hes> this subject matter is quite distinct from the more quote unquote iconic imagery of the sixties so what I've tried to do which I think that you do at any Ortis case is to really show how those ideas have evolved over time and I would say if almost half maybe slightly half the exhibition is also devoted to the work that he made post nineteen sixties well. Let's dive into his early career. In nineteen forty nine more than a decade before the Campbell soup cans or the Mao or the Maryland images were also familiar with warhol started out as an illustrator and commercial advertising and he became quite a successful one. How did that influences later work well? What are the arguments of the exhibition is that that fifties period was foundational for Warhol because to a large extent he was already a talent an an extraordinary draftsman <hes> and I think that in coming to New York and he didn't set out to be a commercial artists he came with his college friend Philip Perlstein and they were roommates together and you know they were wanting to be artists but they had to support themselves warhol very readily God the job at Glamour magazine because he had this great proficiency a drawing <hes>? I think that throughout the fifties what he was able to do was to also see very firsthand the mechanics of visual visual communication how images are put together. How desire is created in a product whether it's a shoe <hes> you know or pharmaceutical and so to be part of that and to see and work with art directors you know many extremely sophisticated and really well trained themselves some in the bow house you know he had a firsthand for front row seat and engagement with that process as what you how you work with an art director how the art director transmits their idea of how it needs to change and also he had this he was immersed in the technology of the period technologies the periods such as photostats machines opaque projectors all the things that you use in to create these images that are fundamentally their final? <hes> you know the final their final <hes> location is in print so he's working in a world in which print and particularly increasingly more photography is the language of popular culture. You write that early in his career. He seems to have run into censorship when he tried to show at art galleries. What were they objecting to well? You know it was hit. Many of his early paintings <hes> were the subject matter you know would was mostly figurative although they did he would use different patterns to obscure the image or he would mimic the brush strokes of you know some I argue one some restaurants at Rhinehart <hes> ornate off Gottlieb <hes> he there's a particular incident that led me to that conclusion and it's really one that was rebounded to me by Philip Perlstein Warhol had made a series as of paintings in round the late fifties that he asks Pearlstine to take to the Tanger- Gallery which was a cooperative gallery. Many of the IBEX painters were involved. The subject was of two boys kissing and of course they took he dutifully took the to the gallery and they laughed so it wasn't I dunno censorship's the right word but it's certainly was not at all in sync with the kind of subject matter at that time <hes> that's not to say there weren't artists this such as Larry rivers in particular who warhol credits as an influence who were playing with that kind of figurative subject matter I also that had this you know kind of coded Campy Coy <hes> aspect to it but it it was not. I'm not what they were GONNA. Show at those galleries back then the art will was dominated by Macho abstract expressionist wasn't it absolutely I mean you know I it's the women the great women of that period from Grace Oregon and and you know Joan Mitchell show. Are you know got there do but much later on in a lot of ways so yes it was a very male male defined although a number of women who were working at that time and you know you have early Johns and Rauschenberg working at that time so you know Warhol's part of a group of artists who <hes> for whom that subject matter would would not have appealed or that Bravura you know <hes> was just out of sync and he's also younger. He's a younger generation so <hes> this is extremely difficult time and <hes> but he keeps you know peas persistent in making his work like any any driven artist well. The show has examples of his early handpainted work. There's the Coca Cola bottle for example which not apparently painted in a drippy abstract expressionist style but he also painted it in a way that resembles a commercially printed image. Now I mean this is really seen as kind of breakthrough moment for him because much of the work that he was making you know and many any other artists by the way we looked in sign <hes> James Rosenquist there were many artists who were still in that late fifties period you know were making we're interested in subject matter but still feeling that they had to in some way tip their hat to abstract expressionism so wore homemade two versions of the painting and one was a giant coke bottle that had drips on it and he invited is a very famous story invited for Friends Irving Plum Ivan Carp M._e._d...

Andy Warhol warhol world Philip Perlstein Warhol warhol Whitney Museum of American Art San Francisco Museum of Modern New York the art newspaper art institute of Chicago Dea Art Foundation Museum of Modern Art Donna Keith haring James Rosenquist Maryland Jeremy Della Nancy Kenny senior editor Joan Mitchell
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:35 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Welcome back now the exhibition Kemp notes on fashion opened with much fanfare at the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York costume institute earlier this month with more than two hundred fifty objects dating from the court of Louis the fourteenth to the present. The explores the manifestations of camp in popular culture, particularly as it's reflected in fashion. The show takes the late writer, Susan santarpio's notes on camp as a departure point Sonntag talk wrote, quote camp is a vision of the world in terms of style, but a particular kind of style it is the love of the exaggerated. The off of things being what they're not. She added camps sees everything in quotation, marks effects on top provides fifty eight different definitions of the term uh senior editor in New York Nancy, Kenny, discuss them at show with Valerie Steele, the director and chief curator of the museum at the fashion institute of technology or IT. She began by asking federally what given Sonntag fifty eight different nations camp means to her, who is the concept completely Morphos. Well, the concept is certainly complicated. And his son tag implied camp involves more of an attitude away viewing the world. It's not so much something which is actually embedded in the objects themselves. So it's not that say a Tiffany, lamp or nineteen twenties. Sequin frock is if so facto camp. It's that it has been viewed particularly by some gay men in some periods as being cap that is exaggerated, verging on bad taste so bad. It's good. I mean, there are many, many layers to the meaning of camp throughout its history, campus also had a strong association with queer culture of the metro books. Oscar Wilde's affinity for camp. For example, and cross dressers on the Victorian period at FIT you organized a show titled aquar- history of fashion from the closet to the catwalk. How did can't play into your presentation? We did have certain Cam. Amp objects in queer history of fashion. For example, we had a liberal cheap pink fell fit Cape with rhinestones, and we had a rupaul drag outfit with red corset at cetera. We had John Paulk though, ta pink, sailor suit and a wonderful, Johnny. They're such. She glittering woman suit with images of Marilyn Monroe and James Steen on it. So all of those were camp, but we wanted to make it very clear in the exhibition that there's was no one queer style that in fact LGBTQ people have developed a variety of different styles. And the camp is only one element him at the metro depicts, the court of Louis the fourteenth their size being an epicenter of camp. The king's younger brother Felipe, for example, notice, Masuku was fond of crossdressing. It even traits the word camp back to that era. When Sukarno bay meant to flaunt, or to posture, have you dumped into this period in your own research? Yes. And I, I do believe that in the eighteenth century, there were definitely camps. So culture, such as the Molly and macaroni subcultures in seventeen hundreds, London. But I do not think that the court of Louis the fourteenth was a center of camp. I think that it's only been seem that way in retrospect by some gay men. And so this is is kind of looking back on it, it seems camp. But I think there was, for example, utterly no irony in the what was going on. If the court of Louis, the fourteenth that was a deeply repressive far -tarian. They're highly religious culture of very different even the endangered, but free-spirited macaroni culture. Molly. In london. So we're seeing it through twenty first century is through twentieth. Century is anyway. Yes. And I think that the whole idea of sitcoms, it's the I had problems with their, their definition, and the way they even the way they translated that the exaggerated, it, you know, sort of drama, king, for example. Really? They were saying a king of a theater and succumbed pay really the literal, meaning was just to, to pick up your camp tents, and maybe in the sense to plant yourself in front of someone. So okay, there might be some faint connection, but very, very faint. And the fact that in modern French there is no word for camp. Makes it again, a little bit more difficult to, to say that there's a direct connection between the seventeenth century French term after sections exploring the meaning and history of camp, the show culminates in a two story display of stack between the dummies. Of oak, or cortra-, costumes, did you find the Occlusive any of the costumes intriguing or surprising in any way? Is there anything you felt that they left out? Well, I felt that the first part of show where they were trying to give an argument about camp in different. Periods. One could argue with aspects of it. Like, I think it was eighteenth century, not seventeenth century. But I do think you can find clear elements of camp by Oscar Wilde's, period. I found that part very intriguing and interesting and grappling more with ideas. Sante ideas by the end, it was kind of in a way everything, but the kitchen sink thrown together and a million different definitions of camp, being read this somewhat irritating way through the loudspeaker system. Nevertheless, for all the wonderful array of outfits. I felt that, that last room shared some of the same problems as the previous customers to, to show on punk that is to say. It was all about the manifestations of a style in contemporary, high fashion and not within the subculture from which it originated. So, for example, conspicuous conspicuously missing where anything's warm by black or let thi no queer denizens of queer culture, the role of black and Latino gay men in the development of camp as a style is really crucial. And that was kind of missing from that big room, also missing some of outrageous, things like divine, like where was what divine war, and pink flamingos? For example, I think there could have been more of those kinds of aspects of the way clothes were used and feud within genuinely camp, clear culture, rather than its appropriation by hyper sophisticated and somewhat in authen. -tic aspects of modern fashion. So that I think was missing, and it would have been cool to have more of more of this sort of Joan Crawford imagery of why this kind of thing becomes so important element. There were many fabulous things to look at. And I love the show. I enjoyed it. In fact, much more than I thought I would I disagreed with elements of it, and I thought that were certainly lots of things missing from it. But I think that for those who are interested in the history of LGBTQ culture, it was nevertheless, a really interesting and significant show at the press briefing for the show, the curator Andrew Bolton suggested that camp tends to come to the fore, at times of social and political instability, or was is deeply polarized. For example, in the sixties in the eighties and certainly today. Do you see that reflected in today's fashion world? Are we currently living in the camp moment? Well, I noticed that Andrew said that, that camp keeps coming back at these deeply polarized moments but he doesn't actually provide any evidence to support that. And many other theorists of camp have suggested that in fact, as LGBTQ people have achieved more social and economic rights. In fact, camp has diminished in significance that it was really a product of a very closeted in some respects world. Nineteen fifties early sixties and became less important later. It could be played with certainly by designers like, oh ta but it was no longer such a clear way of viewing the world. I don't see it as being associated with particular fraught moments politically, or economically. I think this is the kind of question that journalists always ask this sort. Thing you know why is it relevant now. And it's very easy to say, oh, it's relevant now because but I remember when I did my gothic show people said, well, this gothic moment, and I'm like, well, you know, you had it under the Clinton administration when the economy is booming. You have one economy is down, it has more to do with elements in the culture itself, for example, trends in using trends, and fashion trends in pop culture, rather than in big political economic movements. That's what you see in the return of elements of this. So perhaps, there's been more discussion of a previous elements of gay culture, previous decades in gay culture met, then has an influence on gay designers who are looking at that and being inspired to create new looks, I think that's far more likely than than some visceral reaction to the horror of the Trump years. The exhibition also seems to suggest that can't began with the invention of contra post, no pose. In Greek sculpture with one hip, thrust out, and the elbow cocked, isn't that critic central fashion pose? What does it signify for you? Well, again, this the idea that camp began with the contra to pose is an example of projecting backwards in time. This was never seen by the Greeks being remotely camp to put it mildly. And it's only much later that it seemed that way in part because camp developed out of a particular kind of gay culture. So I have problems with this kind of it looks like and therefore it's connected. We've seen that often in fashion shows, and I think it's more important to try and track. What of actual connections, historically, rather than what are things that look similar, which in fact, may have completely different meanings days before the show opened the met held its annual costume institute gala, where celebrities like lady Gaga and selene dune. Ascended, the Mets front steps in completely over the top, costumes. We interviewed people who camped out on the sidewalk. The hope catching sight of the stars and what they were wearing as a scholar, how you dissect the custom gala ritual. Well, I think the fact is that people like to see celebrities and they like to see celebrities dressing up the Oscars have become to a styled. And so there's no more of the bad taste that used to make the Oscar such a funny production, but now for the customer institute party, everybody is encouraged to dress to theme whether or not they understand that FEMA and they often don't and they're stylus don't. So it becomes one of those hilarious things that we see. So seldom now at the real Oskar. So it's, it's doubly fun. It's celebrities. And it's kind of celebrities looking ridiculous. Sometimes fabulous. But on that, edge where fabulousness ridiculousness meet kind of a perfect camp edge. You're currently organizing your own exhibition schedule for the. Fall Paris, capital, fashion, does the show, advance argument in particular. Yes. The show attempts to explain how and why Paris became and continues to be regarded as the international capital fashion. Even in a globalized world where they're multiple fashion. Capitals. Paris is still seen as the most glamorous and competitive, so the show tries to explain historically, y and their many layers to that. But it's partly from precedents. It was the first one in western Europe to be labeled as the fashion capital and then also the rise of the tour the connection between the court and the city and the more recently, the fact that big luxury conglomerates are based in Paris, all those together helped build a consistent aura of fashion, nece and high fashion around the whole city of Paris, Paris. Branded in a way as fashion city in a way that no other city is, so I'm interested not only in the real historical aspects, but also in the cultural construction of Paris as the capital of fashion. And what that what that means, what does it mean to be capital to the center of power? We'll think you've Ellery. Thank you..

Paris Louis fashion institute of technolog Oscar Wilde London Metropolitan Museum of art New York Valerie Steele rupaul John Paulk Sonntag writer Kemp Sukarno bay Susan santarpio Oscar senior editor Andrew Bolton Joan Crawford
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Love an angst is at the British Museum until the twenty first of July. We'll be back on our way to the shed after this. When the American off William Morris study driving trucks for the Pilcher glass school in Washington state. He could not have imagined that years later he would be running his own glass studio with these work on display at the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York, his reputation for revolutionizing the art form is perfectly captured in medicine jar cricket which is being offered bombs design designer not sale in Los Angeles on the twenty fourth of April as director of modern design in LA, Jason Stein explained. Quote, the peace reflects that the artist greatest inspirations come from ancient civilizations such as gyp Shen, Asian and native American and the relationship between human and animal to find out more. Visit Bonhams dot com. Welcome back. Now, one of the most significant new additions to New York's cultural landscape in recent years has its doors on the west side of Manhattan. The shed aims to be the city's most flexible cultural institution both in commissioning and presenting work in the performing arts visual arts and a range of pop culture and in building designed by the art world current favorite architects dealers cathedral and Renfro can actually move along rails. Linda Jablonski a contemporary art correspondent for the newspaper. Join Nancy Kenny or senior editor in New York after sampling some of the opening events. Linda, this shut is part of the bass of Hudson yards development, which some critics have labeled a mall for the mega wealthy. Do. You think the shed has a piece with that? Or that it distinguishes. The toughest more welcoming place. Well, it's the one element of Hudson yards, which is not just a retail mall, but residential and commercial development exceedingly banal in every way. So the Shange is the one non commercial element, and although humongous in terms of its interior spaces. It's a somewhat smaller scale than the mega towers around in. It's eight stories. With a retractable shelve which actually makes it smaller while exposing it to the outdoor space, but only four floors are acceptable to the public the even numbered floors. There aren't even there's no way to get to the other floors. I don't know what's in there. The engineering of the building I guess so you go from one to two to four to six to eight. So is it more amenable than Hudson yards? There's no getting away from his environment. Once you're inside in the extended building, which it is right now. You have absolutely no awareness of the outside world exception. The lobby off of the thirtieth street entrance. There's another entrance from the plaza. So call closet, which is dominated by the Thomas, Heather ick. Has to take a call of sculpture metalwork, which is all you see when you go out. I mean, you see the Neiman Marcus sign, and you see some buildings, but it really takes kind of soaks up all the air in visual interest outs on that side of the shan't. Inside your in a different world, the lobby. I have to say is the smallest space in it or missile really, the small space has low ceilings, and they are kind of retreated acoustically, and it feels somehow more intimate than a lot of the other spaces. It's weird that it has escalators. But

Manhattan Hudson Linda Jablonski Metropolitan Museum of art British Museum Pilcher glass school Neiman Marcus gyp Shen Los Angeles William Morris Jason Stein Washington Renfro Heather ick Nancy Kenny director senior editor
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

11:39 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"You can read more about the sector story and the ethics of museum funding in the April issue of the newspaper, which is out now. And of course, you can find out online at the art newspaper dot com. We'll be back to visit a figures after this. The Californian painter seldom Gail believed in combining greater with good company was the driving force behind a group of color. Start is known as society of six he said the group's aesthetic direction and sparred its members many of whom shared his house with the force of his personality and warm hospitality. The aim of their work was to convey spontaneity and their objective was to communicate joy girls, quite cove Belvedere that leads Bonham's, California and western paintings and sculpture sale held in Los Angeles on the sixteenth of April is a perfect example of groups approach. It is in the words of bombs to retro, California and western paintings, Scott Levitt, desolate embodiment of Gyles mastery of color and texture to find out more visit bombs dot com. Welcome back. Now, the April issue of the newspaper, always comes with our annual attendance survey an exhaustive list of visit officials at museums and galleries across the world in a few moments. We'll explore some of the big numbers of this year survey, but the most notable statistic is that the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York has captured the top two spots in the world's most popular exhibitions of twenty eighteen heavenly bodies fashion in the Catholic imagination which featured couture, inspired by Roman Catholic religious imagery, along with people robes from the Sistine Chapel. Sacristy received around ten thousand nine hundred visitors a day and the museums Michelangelo show which had more than two hundred works through seven thousand nine hundred visitors. A day are senior editor in New York. Nancy Kenny went to the met to talk to max align the museum's director about those extrordinary figures. Lisera camper. Heavily bodies was the highest since the mid put on its king Tut show in nineteen seventy eight and the galleries were mobbed. Can you explain the show's popularity for us? It was agreed woman, of course, of celebration of a particular exhibition extra also how an exhibition of theme can inhabit an entire building. So I think the audience really reflected way, positively first of all on the subject on thematic approach to work towards a costume exhibition. So hit the certain of, but it was also the opportunity of exploring the met as a building. And it's different collections including McCoy's actually through an exhibition. So it was to set new we. The costume institute show on anybody's a conduit of understanding the met as a whole in all its different diverse offerings. Well, you mentioned the cloisters this show was held at both. The main museum in the cloisters medieval themed outpost town around three hundred fifty thousand shows visitors went to the cloisters, which is an attendance record for that branch of the museum. Do you think you could create in the future? We're for us. Of course, audience mix -sition is not the prime goal. But I think it certainly said a standard of attention and all of again discovery for the met cloisters that they want to continue and find other programming that has similar effects from time to time. I think heavily bought it Medco's something really special because to certain extend heavily partisan exhibition. Head a beautiful Sinaga fy itself. Of course, the cloisters. Almost a perfect place to show heavily bodies to show costumes fashion designed inspired by Christian your J Deums. So in a sense. I think we've found the perfect fit there. And of course, on the other hand something unusual for the choices. So that's part of the of the chemistry. Andy attraction would be doing this. Now, every four months, I think would lose some of the some of its effect. But I think you will you will see programming that were activate also the close in a different way more. The future than we've seen already in the past. Are there any shows in particularly like to mention that are in the world. I don't want to announce anything yet. But I think you you've seen the success of Hanley bars. I can also remember coming as visitor to the crisis and seeing that wonderful installation of Cardiff the. Saudis initiative. Embrace the entire space. So from time to time, I think also the cloisters can have a contemporary few point contemporary perspective on what this institution is also about what the cloisters percent the outset. The ways to amplify that attic could've wishes or with particular dometic exhibitions that busy for together. But is that particular point will you show us another crowd-pleaser with people jammed into the galleries? Also there were Instagram moments like Sistine Chapel ceiling that was reproduced. How do you explain the appeal for a general audience, we can lounge was of course, very special because what happened there was you had an audience that was completely miseries by exhibition. But in essence, it was an exhibition that required you to look bay carefully and deeply. Like to remind you that these these were really delicate drawings works on paper. So it was a show, of course, with Michelangelo an artist whose whose name resonates with the border audience, but an audience, you don't see that many works by Michelangelo. If you're not in Rome. So I think it was a discovery from any and away focused exhibition in the sense that it's really. Call it old media. It was of course focused on Michelangelo drawings. An audience at a moment to understand this is probably a once in a lifetime opportunity to see these masterpieces these these drawn way way precious loans all assembled in one place. It took us, of course, about ten years to put the show together. And that's not too much the work on. I don't know the concept or the insulation. It's obviously ten years of work convincing the lenders to share some of these really precious and bay delicate works with with a broad audience and certain extend we feel these exhibitions that were. Something only the Mets can do. And if we do them, we have we have we have an obligation into them right to share it with as many people as we can you curator told us that guards at the met were eager to take part in the show to staff it. I would see is enormous pride for everyone works at the met for what this institution does. And especially when exhibitions that saw the over thick said people's imagination on fire that pride miss. Strong. So I am pleased to hear that. And I think common Bamberg security is someone who is can be very convincing excited about. So I think the enthusiasm those she shows for for her work is something that really resonates. So well that the whole way of how we all work here in this institution. And that kind of is from the gods to the director's office introduced a new policy on admission fees, charging adults from outside New York state a full twenty five dollars rather than allowing them to pay what they wished. I'm how's that affected visitor numbers for the museum overall? We haven't seen any negative effect on it quite the opposite. Was best attended year ever. So I visit ship is actually a continues to increase, and it's something clearly the institution has an enormous offering for for ticket price on other level for for people coming to visit New York the two shows we be talking about alangelo and heavily bought his of the overlapping. It's experiencing these expeditions as well as the whole met with it's different collections. I would see that audience numbers. And also the diversity of audience shows that the Mets program is being embraced wholeheartedly and odor that the pricing. System is something that we feel comfortable with. But it's something that audience fully accepts and also a really great way offer forward. We have we percent hit. To an extent do potential visitor numbers. Figure into the museum's decision. Making on future shows. I will see the met has a diverse program, and we do about forty exhibitions. None of these shows are being driven by. The reason why they come into existence is not audience projections or trying to make sure that we get as many people into into. Into the museum. But on the other hand, you know that. Exhibitions next edition ideas. Context that will resonate more with a broader audience where some some will have almost like more specialized audience, it's one of the strings of the Mets that we have this. We can produce this diversity of offerings. But on the other hand did not really dependent on the audience numbers of our special exhibitions in we got to total attendance. So your goal isn't to surpass this coup that you had last year. No. I think our continues cool is being the meant and being a great institution. It care so much about all the foods collections. It's corley approach and owes its narratives, and it storytelling, and that will continue to materialize itself in many different inclinations, many different programs projects exhibitions performances publications cetera. So I as director, I don't see. As of via mission driven institution in our mission is to best serve our audience serving audience means actually doing it in multiple in very different ways. And it's not geared towards audience Maximus Asian at any time. Well, thank you. Thank you. Decade

Mets New York director Sistine Chapel Metropolitan Museum of art California Sacristy Gail Scott Levitt Bonham Instagram Los Angeles Rome McCoy Medco senior editor Nancy Kenny J Deums Hanley
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"The Richard Lynn exhibition is bombs gallery at one Pacific place, Hong Kong until thirty March and the Documenta painting. One three sixty four painting relief will be auctioned in bones modern and contemporary sale. In Hong Kong on the twenty seventh of may. We'll be back and heading to New York after this. To the end of the twentieth century dole. Ramal was best remembered as the music Pablo Picasso who became a recluse when the painter ended their tempestuous nine year fan, but next Bishen in Paris in nineteen ninety nine we introduced to the world as a major rivers painter and photographer villa owned? A photo montage from nine hundred fifty six the issue met cast and abandoned photography career appears in Bonham's photograph sale in new in April as bombs retro photographs Laura Patterson points out quote miles association with because dragged out voices just in her. Right. But this wonderfully inventive monta demonstrates numerous contribution to the history surrealist photography villa. Von will be included in before coming respective of MAs work to be shown in Paris, London. Analysts Angeles over the next two years to find out. More about villa. Avante? Visit bombs dot com. Welcome back now, the Metropolitan Museum of art exhibition the world between empires examines appeared from the first century BC through to the feds century AD when the Middle East was the meeting point between two powerful empires. The path EM and the Roman it takes a close look at art and architecture in cities along the trade routes that criss cross the region. There's an unavoidable cloud over the exhibition, many of these places of Suffolk great destruction and looting in recent years. I'll senior editor New York Nancy Kenny went to the met to meet Michael CMO. And Blair folks, Charles the curator of the exhibition. I tell me about yourselves. My field of research is the art religions of the Roman empire. Specifically, I'm working on a book on the cults of the gods of Syria and Phoenicia that spread to Rome and across the Roman world. And so my interests bridge, the disciplines of art history of archaeology of classics of religious studies into puffy and so in working on the world between empires. It's been incredible opportunity to bring my research to a wider public and to work on an exhibition that draws on it and also enhances it, so for example, the art of palmyra and of Heliopolis Baugh ball BAC is of particular importance to my larger questions of research. And in this case to look at them within the context of a larger exhibition has been a fascinating opportunity. I specialize in ancient massive Petya, ancient Iraq, and especially the city of Babylon, and I work on some of its ancient art history. But also on the history of archaeology Babylon and on the ways it's being sort of received and reimagined in culture, down the centuries, which is a wonderfully sort of rich and. Fun topic in the period where covering in the world between empires. It's a fascinating moment Babylon because you're looking at the last phases at the end of some of these great temples that have been functioning, you know, rebuilt and reuse continuously, you know, over the better part of two thousand years, and maybe the greater 'lustration. If that is that at the moment are exhibition begins in the first century BC. They're still scribe. Ooh. Schools and people working in the Keeney foam script and copying Sumerian into Kadian texts in the Tempus at Babylon by the end of our period in the third century that has come to an end the last dated cuneiform texts. We have come from the fifth century eight. Eighty and probably by the third century. There was was no one left to to read or texts. So can you tell me how do they exhibition come about? Well, there have been a series of exhibitions in our department of covered different time periods and stories in the ancient Middle East the third and second early first millennia B C. So in some ways, this is was an opportunity to look at the region in a later period. And we realized there was a really powerful story to tell about art and local identity during the age of the Roman and Partha empires in some ways finding this exhibition and finding the narrative of the show was very much about discovering the right framing, this is one of those cases where the coach. Cultural artistic religious story. We wanted to tell didn't line up with the the big ancient political boundaries of the day. And so for us in a lot of ways it was an exploration working towards finding the right lens for the story. Well, we learn at the outset of the show that three major international trade routes define

Middle East Babylon Hong Kong Paris Laura Patterson Metropolitan Museum of art Richard Lynn New York Pablo Picasso Avante palmyra monta Syria Suffolk Iraq Ramal Bonham senior editor Rome Michael CMO
"nancy kenny" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on Mickstape: The Barstool Basketball Podcast

"So yeah, we're done in Charlotte for the all star game. We're at the hotel with all of the players not like the players playing in the game. But everyone else because it used to play. We saw a close personal friend. Rick Barry who wanted nothing to do with us to new don't blame him hard too blam. We saw quite quickly rising up the ranks as one of my favorite people in the world. Can again, I'm Kinney Nancy's not really rising because she's already there. Right. But yet. No, there's definitely like a good cop bad cop. Nancy, Kenny Kenny sitcom to be here or like me and Kenny because listen or anybody candy can't always the good cop. It just doesn't matter. The funniest the Kennedy conversation was just said the exact same stuff. You did the first as like the first time we met him direct because he was drunk this time drunk drunk last time drunker. Yeah. Well, we walked into the hotel to check in. I looked over to the bar. And I noticed Kenny was just slumped just this was four hours ago. We just talked maybe twenty minutes ago, even more. Slumped having himself a night, you know, he's very much. So it's last call for Kinney. What like may may saying like I used to like dole out hard fouls when I when I might high school. He's like, yeah. That's because you're fat and slow. I think you should just be like the inhouse roaster just keeps everybody on their toes. Nice to everyone else. I love them anymore. That is like you. You definitely couldn't handle moonshine Kenny baby. I'm sarah. She's like not in the south. You're not. They would Lynch you. Not wrong. Kinney there. Yeah. Listen, I've been to western Massachusetts. I know. And it's like it was a jarring statement. He said he did say we'll have a news for you on a news for me. Like, we're both heavy we could probably break the branch left. We're head. Yeah. By all. But while we met Bill Russell again Tyler leaned in. I because I was a soon as he walked in the room close personal affront, Scott shell who have we have time. We should definitely have back on this weekend. But are close personal friends show? Head of the NBA players. We saw spendy. But we thought we were big time and him, buddy. You you've got to dance. The storm flaws in your ass off. We don't want to break the momentum. But yeah, it was we were just we pal Scott. And then he just turns to me, and he goes there's Bill, and I just turned around and instructs Bill Russell and his lovely wife straight as a little extreme Dev's, basically dead sprint it in basically hop skip and jump to the bar. Jolly old time. Also like of just turning because I could see like y'all pointing at somebody. But at this it could be anybody literally anybody so turn around its Bill Russell, he's not six nine not anymore. Was he ever is shrinking rapidly? He wasn't six nine that. I'm even putting him higher. My six five told you think is. I don't he really like 'cause I got on before he set down. I don't doesn't away six nine even with the order, the older crouch. I like six he just didn't seem six nine to you. He had it leaves arouse you weren't paying. He had the grace, and charisma of someone seven to as what I would say, I think it was the hat because he wears the hat tilted like TI. I don't who knows. How tall you that four to six inches? Who knows how the guy that was shack. I was clearly shack. But yeah, I shook his hand. He right like when we walked over. He was I don't know if I like the looks of these two young jets 'cause everyone's wearing suits me dollar wearing like jumpsuits, fitted hats and Tyler walked up first. And he couldn't hear us at all his hearing. That's when he gave like the dirty. Look, I was like I can't tell you didn't fuck with us. Then again, I was like, oh he just can't here right now. He doesn't hate us yet. He just can't hear direct..

Kinney Nancy Bill Russell Kenny Kenny Tyler Scott shell Rick Barry Charlotte Massachusetts NBA Kennedy Lynch twenty minutes four hours six inches
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Bill Olympic landlord life death. Rebirth is at the Royal Academy from the twenty sixth of January to the thirty first of March, you can read an interview with both Martin Clayton and repair of in the January printing of the newspaper or at the newspaper dot com. We'll be back to about Robert Mapplethorpe at the Guggenheim after this. The images taken by the photographer. Herbert Ponting June captions got ill-fated exhibition to the south pole in nineteen ten to nineteen thirteen the Terranova at the ice. Kate Evans is probably the most celebrated the huge slab of ice which dominates the four grams of the composition appears to loom over the fragile ship serving as a metaphor for the unequal contest between man and nature wonderful printed the photograph originally, so by the finances appears in Bonham's travel, and it's beret sewn in early February Ponting's adventure supposed to photography combined with his meticulous attention to detail in fruits the generation of Tokyo's, his work. When the exhibition has never lost its capacity to excite and leave us to find out more. Visit Bonhams dot com. Welcome back. Now, the good high museum in New York is organized a year long exhibition of photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe, one of the most acclaimed yet controversial artists of the late twentieth century, titled implicit tensions Mapplethorpe now. The show's conceived in two parts starting with the one opening on Friday, which focuses on the entire length of Mapplethorpe photography career from nineteen seventy two nine hundred ninety eight the artist died in one thousand nine hundred nine from aids related complications, a senior editor New York. Nancy Kenny went to the Guggenheim this week to walk through the show with Lauren Hinxton, one of the show's, creators. Tell us Lauren how did this exhibition come about? So twenty nineteen marks the thirtieth anniversary of Mapplethorpe's, death and with this exhibition. We're hoping to show the full range of his extraordinary artistic contributions and the impact that the Robert Mapplethorpe foundation gift has had on the Guggenheim's photography exhibition program. So my co curator's than I Susan Thompson associate curator here at the Guggenheim and our curatorial assistant Levy prom. We're hoping to represent the kind of nuance and complexity of Mapplethorpe's art, and we're hoping to engage audiences who may only know me before the person and not actually his production and bring them in to see kind of the wide ranging career and subject matter that he addressed with his practice. And for those that know his work. Well, we think that they're going to be quite a few discoveries to be made in the show, especially the early works that we have in our collection, everything on view is drawn from the Guggenheim's collection. As I said is from the Robert Mapplethorpe foundation gift which came to us in nineteen Ninety-three. We received some two hundred works at that time, and it really catalyzed are photography collecting practices here at the museum. So the themes that you'll see in the exhibition. Ranging from expiration of identity through self portraiture to race and gender and the kind of censorship of sexually explicit imagery. All of these kind of complex topics are are looked at within our broader collection Mapplethorpe has really had a profound impact on the field of contemporary photography. And so in the second part of this exhibition program, we're going to be highlighting that impact and looking at the complex conversations that have arisen around his work. Several of these kind of threads in the practice from exploring identity through self portraiture to his representations of race and gender are reflected in works that have been acquired by the museum through our photography council. And so we really view this moment as an important one to tease out some of these conversations and critical. Silence's that contemporary artists have brought to Mapplethorpe. So we'll have a selection of contemporary artists on view from our permanent collection starting in July. And the title implicit tensions. What's

Robert Mapplethorpe Guggenheim Lauren Hinxton Herbert Ponting Bill Olympic Royal Academy Kate Evans Martin Clayton Susan Thompson associate curator Terranova New York Nancy Kenny Bonham senior editor Tokyo four grams
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Yeah. East people Tostes brought to you in association with Bonhams auctioneers since seventeen ninety three with expertise in more than sixty categories of collecting it specialists will connect you with your passion. Find what defines you at Bonhams dot com. Hello. Newspaper podcast. Thanks for joining us. I'm Ben Luke this week major exhibitions in London, New York. Looking to American artists who merged in the nineteen seventies later in the past our senior editor in New York. Nancy Kenny takes walk around the new Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition at the Guggenheim in New York with a curator Lorne Hinxton Mapplethorpe famously said that if he had been born two hundred years ago, he may have been a sculptor, but he used the tiger fee as a very quickly to make sculpture. And you see that in the way that he stages environments for his sitters, but I to special collaboration between the Royal Academy and the Royal collection in London. Cries just heard those of a woman about to give birth in Bill Viola's, non triptych, a video installation from nineteen Ninety-two that many regard as muster piece. It features three screens on the left the woman in labor on the right Bill viola zone mother in hospital on her deathbed. And in the middle of clothes sub acquiesce figure in the state of limbo this work from the Tate's collection is now at the Royal Academy directly opposite for works by the renascent smarter Michelangelo. He's great Ted Tondo in the RA's collection, featuring the virgin and child and John the Baptist and three drawings to more depictions of the virgin and child and a remarkable lamentation over the dead Christ. This is perhaps the most emblematic pairing in the role academies, huge exhibition Bill viola Michelangelo life, death, rebirth. One of the big questions when they exhibition was announced whether the curator's, including Martyn Clayton, who's head of Princeton during Britain's Royal collection with data show Michelangelo and viola together, in fact. The gallery. I described one of three rooms in which these artists separated by five hundred years, and by the most ancient and the most modern media shown directly in comparison Clayton's king to stress that this is not a frankly, I'm wise attempt to suggest that viola is an artist on a par with Michelangelo. Instead it aims to eliminate their common themes, and particularly the purity and intensity of the spirituality in their work. Boo is I'm well not able to travel, but he's wife and collaborator forty years. A repair of is in London. And I went to the RA to speak to her. I began by asking here to take us back to two thousand and six and her viola visit to Windsor Castle to see the Michelangelo drawings grim southern who is we've known since for quite a number of years now is good friends with mutton Clayton. And he thought that maybe we would like to go and visit the Royal collection the print room and the print and joins much say, and so we we arrived with L. Two children two boys. And we're treated to the most amazing experience that it's still a highlight of lives. Martin had pulled some Leonardo drawings that were trying to express chaos the chaos of tempest, and because we work a lot with water, and it was very kind of him to think of that. But then he pulls Michelangelo drawings as some of which are actually here in the exhibition. The crucifix is especially that he created towards the end of his life when he was dealing with issues of mortality, and there were very personal drawings. You know, Martin says that he they won't made for anybody whereas other pieces here that you'll see, you know, they're finished drawings, and the we're at very often gifted to friends or or maybe a patrons. But these were you know to see them six inches away. Without any glass was extraorde. Inari you could see every little shading real little pencil or charcoal Mark and the emotion that was pouring out of these just major cry and to immediately from the idea that you might either eat the make work in response to these drawings or make a show where you might be showing alongside them. Not no not immediately mountain actually thought of that. We never would have suggested something like that. But in fact, not that long afterwards center a letter and said peps, we might be able to do a project together with a launch those drawings. And we just about died, you know, but it it. It's taken this long to get it together. You know, Martin's very busy, and we were very busy. But now it's and then we were offered these galleries. So we had to bring the show is actually going to be next year in the secondary. And but now we have these galleries, and it's just spectacular. I must say that the space. Bases in this building are absolutely perfect for to cradle exhibition. Pretty interesting because you think to these these are old galleries, they would generated before anybody even conceive of the moving image and

Michelangelo Lorne Hinxton Mapplethorpe Martyn Clayton Bill Viola Martin London RA Ted Tondo Royal Academy New York Robert Mapplethorpe Tostes Windsor Castle senior editor Boo Ben Luke Nancy Kenny Tate Britain
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Yeah. Each people house brought to you in association with Bonhams auctioneers since seventeen ninety three with experts more than sixty categories of collecting it specialists will connect you with your passion. Find what defines you at Bonhams dot com. Hello and welcome to the art newspaper put cost. I'm Ben, Luke. It's our last podcast of twenty eight teen as we did last year. We're going to look at the top art world stories of the last twelve months later in the podcast also to Nancy Kenny and Margaret Carrigan from anew York team about the big issues in the US and the Americas. But I I'm joined in our London studio by Martin Bailey. Melanie girlies Martin's long-term correspondent for the newspaper based in London. He's also the author of a number of books. The most recent being starry night fangled at the asylum. Must also has a blog all about van Gulf on the newspaper website melanie's, not market columnist of the financial times and at the newspaper, and she's the author of artisan investment survey comparative assets, we're going to begin by talking about the story of the year from last year as well, which is the Leonardo sale last year. Christie's New York for four hundred fifty million of Salvator of the Salvator Mundi. You might one might have imagined that after the gavel went down, and we. Learnt who had acquired the work that the story would dim down. And it would just be up to the public to look at it. But Martin as you know from the story that you've written in December issue of the newspaper. There are still lots of questions abound about this work. Yes. And particularly on the provenance, and obviously we want to trace back as far as we can. Ideally to Leonardus studio. And when Christie's sold the painting, the produced a very large insubstantial special catalog with chapter or section on the provenance, and they argued that the pitcher had belonged to Charles I of England now that gave it a wonderful British Royal provenance, and it got back not quite Leonardo time. But quite a long way what we did in the newspaper in the December issue with to reveal that it may not have been in the British Royal collection because there is another painting in Moscow in the Pushkin museum of the similar subject. The Salvator Mundi, and it's no longer believed to be by Leonardo. But it was believed to be by Leonardo in the nineteenth century and on the back of it. There is the on the back it so wouldn't panel this the stamp or emblem of Charles I and therefore the references in the Royal inventories may. They refer to the Moscow pitcher and not to what we now. Call the ABA Darby pitcher. That's why because there's this reference to a piece of Christ isn't there in the in the role inventories which were made when chose the I was executing. There was the come. We'll say exactly Christie's obviously seized upon that say that's Archer which was selling. And obviously the cashier that being a role collection added to its value. So what what are the implications of this information? Well, I think the experts of fairly universally. Agreed. It is indeed a Leonardo. I mean, the Ressam question about the exam proportion of the work. That's by the masters handle the studio. So I don't think there's very much serious question about the tribunal. But the is serious questions all the are serious questions about the provenance and where it came from. And it is interesting and important to establish that and all sorts of theories flying around as to exactly how it ended up. In the nineteenth century in collection. And then, of course, we know little bit more about disappearing to America and turn up in an auction in New Orleans where it sold for a pittance. There's this other question, which is that is now in the collection of a museum. The Louvre Debbie soom. So what we assume? And yet it has not gone on display, and there have been announcements made which I think it was in September said it. It's been delayed its appearance. So there was speculation that it might be put on view on the anniversary of the opening date of the leave every Dahbi, but that doesn't seem to have happened. What's going on? Well, I think this is one of the mysteries essentially going to take over next year rather than the past year that we're reviewing, but it is most bizarre that the picture was virtually mcquaid by Darby, and then not put on display and they've made no announcement as to what is happening or or or when it will go on show. I mean, we can speculate speculation isn't very useful. But there's obviously possibly a legal problem over ownership possibly possibly some problem over payment. But there's no indication of either of those things some people have suggested that. The painting might need further conservation work on it. But if so you'd expect them to be quite open and to say, you know, we're doing conservation work doing x and y to it, and it will go on display in the spring order and the final question is is you know, other questions of attribution about it. And they haven't really been seriously raised, but it is most mysterious, and I think we'll just have to wait and see what happens or else, maybe the art newspaper do some digging. You're in touch with auction houses time, what Christie said anything about it. Then not saying I think official, but I my understanding is the sale has gone through Christie's has been paid which when it sold for four hundred fifty point three million dollars is quite an important thing to have happened. But I can't prove that other people in the market say could, you know, the the issue could simply be that these things take time, but I agree with Martin. If that is the case, then why not be open about it. We're not even sure where it is. That's the big question. I mean, the being rumors that might be in Switzerland. And we're hoping that it was being kept in the proper environmental conditions next year is going to be something of a loner though extravaganza because it's the five hundred anniversary of his death. Martin. Do you think some occasion will be found in twenty nineteen on which we will finally see this tool Mundi in? Space whether a lot of exhibitions organized for the anniversary. But the most important will be that organized by the Louvre. Which of course, ends the Mona Lisa among other pitches. And it's known that they want to borrow the Salvator Mundi. And there's no reason why they shouldn't have access to it as it supposedly live Abreu Dombi. So they're going to want the pitcher. And if they show the painting, it will actually give more status to it. It will show that it's been accepted by the French experts. If it doesn't show up in Paris, and I think the show is next autumn. There will be even more questions than we're all skiing. Now watch this space there mainly oversee that was an extraordinary price. How has the market responded in two thousand eighteen and we seeing similar extraordinary process rather things we haven't seen anything like

Martin Bailey Christie Salvator Mundi the art newspaper Leonardo London Charles I Americas Moscow melanie Luke York Louvre Debbie soom US skiing Pushkin museum Leonardus studio Nancy Kenny
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"And then there was that famous program the loud family, I think in nineteen seventy where they track the family, California family with cameras in the home, and you know, all manner of things divorces son coming out gay. They all come out before camera and on camera. And you know, it's not you know, to go from that to our reality. TV obsessed culture, which has been the case now for at least ten years, or so is is you know, it's a very frightening idea because it starts to raise this question of what is true. True. What are we looking at what can be manufactured? And so, you know, I think it's a very interesting moment to look at Warhol in particular because you know, when you plan an exhibition, you never know what was going to world is going to be. And I think many of us didn't expect we would be where we are now. So I'm very interested to see there may be some who see Warhol as the Cho's of audit. People who've said that to me, I don't think anyone ortis could claim such a power in the world. But I think that he like most artists into separate something and has that on ten I, and I do think that there's something within Warhol's work, which has a dark side. And and also, you know, says something about aspects of the United States are love capitalism. Our love of consumerism, you know, we'll we are as a society of consumers were in a very sad place. So and you could be consuming kinds of things have to be products. It can also be. You know information that's fed to us. So it's it's a very potent time. I think to raise many of these issues, and I hope that some of this, you know, comes into the conversation in terms of the exhibition, you, you know, you want a work of either the work remains extremely relevant. And now we'll test out. What that relevance really means? Thank you for joining us, Donna, my pleasure. Thank you. Andy will from eight to be and back again is Whitney museum New York from the twelfth November until the thirty first of March next year, the shadow paintings DEA that don't salvo referred to will be one of the topics we discussed it the next will hope coast, which will be here from Tuesday to November. And we'll also the Jeremy della about meeting, we'll and injuring relevance. You can join us. Then if you haven't already please subscribe to the puck cost, and if you're on Twitter, follow us at ten old at TI Odio, you photo a main Twitter account 'em Facebook at the newspaper, an Instagram is the newspaper until sufficient for the moment. Thanks, Nancy, Kenny, especially to to salvo and thanks to you for listening. Z podcast is brought to you in association with find defines you Bonhams dot com.

Warhol Twitter Instagram Cho California United States TI Odio Jeremy della Whitney museum New York Donna Nancy Andy Facebook Kenny ten years
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"We're doing things differently this week with to poke us all about Andy Warhol one today and the next in a few days time, the occasion is the vast respective of Warhol's work opening on the twelfth of November the Whitney museum of American art in New York. The Whitney's pulling out all the stops. The show includes three hundred fifty works. Tracking development from the late nineteen forties to his death in one thousand nine hundred seven it also has some intriguing you arguments to make this first book cost is all about that show taking a comprehensive Warhol's life work senior editor Nancy Kenny went to the Whitney to talk to Donna desalvo. The museum's deputy director and senior curator who organized the exhibition. In a catalog essay for the exhibition. You write that you met with Warhol in the eighties. When you were curator the DR foundation. I'd love to hear about those interactions. Sure. Well, you know, when I met Warhol in eighty five eighty six a little fuzzy myself about the time that I believe it was late eighty five early eighty six it was during a time when I was taking forward to exhibitions from the museum's collection and had this incredible retrospective collection of Warhol's work. And so really that's sort of was the framework if you will the context for it all and at first he was not very forthcoming. There was an exhibition of the disaster paintings that organized, and he was not really that involved. But then I had this idea to do something that really examined his pre silkscreen work that work had made from sixty to sixty two and when I reached out to him. He was very intrigued by the idea. Quite interested in it. And it, you know, it was at a time when he himself was revisiting hand painting in his collaborations with boss Kiat and Keith haring. I found him very open shy interested artists, and course, when you're young Curators sort of overwhelmed by the mythic status of someone such as Warhol. So I was you know in my own for me. I was a bit. Taken aback about how to approach him. But then the conversations became really quite straightforward and very very forthcoming with information. I asked him a lot about the period of time. He had worked in the fifties. In particular are interested in that. And then, you know, how it was that he came to make these decisions between the more gesture obstruction and the move toward, you know, something that really appeared printed. Did you stay in touch with them until his death in eighty seven? I did. And you know, I was very interested in once the show opened of the hand painted work. You know, we started having some conversations it was quite interested in the work that he'd done in the fifties. He was somewhat reluctant about the idea of doing an exhibition such as that. But I went up to the factory and thirty third street and had some conversations with him and Vince Fremont at the time because they were working on Andy Warhol's TV..

Andy Warhol Whitney museum of American art Whitney New York senior editor senior curator DR foundation Nancy Kenny Donna desalvo deputy director Keith haring Kiat Vince Fremont
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

10:24 min | 2 years ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Dorsey attending behind the door. Another invisible. Do is the rain is so fear in Madrid until the seventh of January and it tools to take mutton where opens on the twenty seventh of February next year. Lando Fini theater. Desire is at the museum of sex in New York until the fourth of March. We'll be back to Clinton Sheila after this. Winton remove visited the Trocadero's museum in Paris in nineteen twenty two. He was bowled over burned ninth century sculpture being counter had an immediate impact on his work. Most clearly in the mosque series, the twelve smooth carvings with the same title that Moore completed in the mid to late twenties. One of these is a highlight of bottoms modern British and Irish aren't sale on the fourteenth of November. According to two British up. Matthew, bradberry is the most visually appealing and beautiful carving the series and the only one made from an investor once owned by Felix salmon of the lions corn house St. mosques being for sale for the first time in more than eighty years fund more visit bottoms dot com. Welcome back on the fourth of November. The Royal Academy in London opens it six Bishen Clint Sheila touring from the Albertina museum Vienna. If each is around one hundred works on paper by the Australian artists both died a hundred years ago, the Curators and art dealer. Jane Kelly wrote a catalogue essay for the Royal Academy show as well as for the Sheila exhibitions now on the Belvedere in Vienna. And the Fundacion Louis retold in Paris. Our senior editor Nancy Kenny went to Kelly's New York space gallery center in to talk to her about the two autists. This here is the centenary of both Clinton sheila's deaths. And there seems to be quite a flurry of activity surrounding. It both artists are certainly a big draw. How do you explain their popularity today? Well, I think you have to separate the two the popularity of Sheila in many ways relates to a different tense ability than Clint popularity clipped at least in his paintings is far more decorative artist. And I think he appeals to a taste for beauty and luxury and the kind of lost glamour whereas Sheila throws into the abyss. He's he's confronting the more. Frightening more negative aspects of human existence. That said they do have certain commonalities, particularly in their interest in sexual subject matter, and they're very forthright treatment of that topic. So both Clinton Sheila died in nineteen eighteen in Vienna. Clip from the after effects of a stroke and Sheila in the Spanish flu pandemic, so Sheila was almost thirty years younger than Clint. So when exactly do we find them overlapping artistically Hilo was really a kind of a prodigy. So even though he was only twenty eight when he died. He was exactly half clipped age. He was was fifty six and he was twenty eight. But because Sheila was so exceptional he had met. Clint probably. Around nineteen somewhere between nineteen seventy and nineteen. Oh, nine is the best guesstimate and Clint was the first and greatest influence on Sheila artistically above and beyond their personal interactions. By that time clip was no longer part of the Vienna. Secession was he what was the status? Vienna. Art world claimed head left the Vienna. Secession with a group of like minded colleagues in nineteen o five and she left I came to Vienna. As an art student in nineteen six so Clint by the time their paths crossed would have been working more or less independently taking on commissions from various wealthy patrons within Vienna society. In your catalogue essay for the show, you right that clip was role model and mentor for Sheila defined Hewlett imitating Clint early on and how she let while they're two ways in which the the function of mentor role model impact on Sheila one is artistic and in nineteen oh nine when Sheila made his debut in Vienna. He actually was running around town calling himself the silver clip. He was doing these paintings that look very much like clipped portrait's except he couldn't afford gold leaf. So he did them in silver paint. But by nineteen ten you are seeing less direct influence of clamped on feelers art, but a lingering influence in terms of the way, she live you'd his artistic mission as someone who. Whose primary goal. It was to deliver an existential statement about the human condition that something that he had learned from Clinton that remained important to him to the end of his days. So it wasn't an enduring hero worshipped for Sheila. No, I think if it it was a great deal of admiration and respect for Clint. But very early on recognition on feelers part that he was his own guy and and going his own way. And how did clue feel about sheila's early work? It's that's very hard to say. Because there is this myth that surrounds the personal relationship between Clinton Sheila. And it was something that Sheila played up, and it was something then that his biographer Archer roaster played up in everybody wanted to say. Say that Sheila was someone special to clamped or that Sheila was at special to clipped as clipped was to Sheila. It's hard to know how much truth there was in that because Clinton was a really nice guy. And if you look at Clinton's relationship to all of the young artists of sheila's generation, you find that he was very very generous encouraging too many of them. So I don't know how special Sheila was within that context. When you look at the drawings as a whole clips female, subjects seem more, passive, maybe delicate and somehow sealed off from us, whereas Sheila seem to jump out at you. I think that's absolutely accurate. And I think that the confrontational aspect of sheila's female news is what makes his work so radical and. So shocking even to audiences today. There is this tradition goes back centuries in western art of taming. The news may may making the female. Subject into an object passive object for male enjoyment, and you very much see that kind of passive voyeurism in clint's drawings where as with Sheila, it's not that Sheila is feminist. He was a typical male of that time. But I think because he was so young he was actually able to ecology his own fear of of this mysterious female creature and in doing that to free her and grant her full autonomy over her sexuality in a way that older male artists didn't do will. They both seem to embrace the rata schism in their drawings in the same period. And many of those drugs were probably controversial at the time. Where they they were controversial at the time. But what you have to understand is that. First of all, they the drawings warrant exhibited that often either clipped or sheila's when they were. Yeah. There were problems, but drawing was considered a more private art farm. And so you could. Make erotic drawing then you kind of sell them not exactly on the sly. But you could you could sell them to your your clients, and it wouldn't create a stir so long as they weren't out in the public domain. So they didn't circulate widely there. I mean, there certainly are incidents both with Clinton Sheila where the works were exhibited and caused trouble. Both Clinton Sheila focused in their public exhibitions on the paintings on their paintings. And and Sheila did consider his paintings his more important vehicle for creating you know, sort of the the grand artistic statement that he wanted to present to the public drawings were more for his own use in the same goes with Clint so strong. We were like studies for the Peyton. That's right and sheila's seemed to stand almost as a Thomas works. Avar sheila's do stand as autonomous works of art and were always collected as

Clinton Sheila Clint Sheila Sheila Vienna museum of sex Albertina museum Vienna Paris Lando Fini Jane Kelly New York Dorsey Vienna society Madrid Winton Moore Hilo Felix salmon Fundacion Louis senior editor Royal Academy
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Yeah. East coast to you in this OC with Bonhams auctioneers since seventeen ninety three with expertise in more than sixty categories of collecting, it specialists will connect you with your passion. Find what defines you at Bonhams dot com. Hello. It's the art newspaper podcast. I'm Ben Luke this week great institutions on either side of it landed later in the podcast discussed the British Museum's displays of Islam cart with Dr Jane, Jake men. Everything was really a bit dull and slightly dusty who king fool. But now, you really get the glitter and the shine and the absolutely heavenly arrays of blues tech was through the peacock colors. But first this week, we're in New York where the museum of modern art MoMA PS, one jointly staging of vast Bruce Nauman retrospective disappearing acts the extrordinary breadth of now work over six decades with no less than one hundred sixty five works fifty that dot the entire sick floor of MoMA and another one hundred fifteen filling the whole of MoMA PS. One senior editor Nancy Kenny spoke to the exhibitions co curator Kathy Halbreich about the show. The Bruce Nauman retrospective at the museum of modern art and MoMA PS one has a staggering range of mediums. It's also fairly intense with the artists pursuing disturbing, psychological themes. We're joined today at MoMA by Kathy Halbreich, the curator of the show which was organized in collaboration with the shell logger in Basel, the subtitle of your retrospective is disappearing acts. Can you tell us why you chose that? Will there are many reasons? But let's start from the simplest which was in nineteen seventy nine Reuss decided to abandon either coast where art is most made debated and certainly sold for places very hard to get to New Mexico, gallstone Mexico, and essentially he's been there since then which is a pretty radical thing for a very ambitious artist to do especially one that's already had success in New York while living in California Bruce was twenty five when he had his first exhibition. Focus stellian thirty he had his first retrospective, which must be a misnomer somehow. But so to abandon where art is underscored I think it was quite a courageous act. Of course, there are also sculptures that have holes in them that purportedly or the size of one of BRUCE'S body parts there are sculptures in which you disappear. The view of yourself as you approach monitor's destabilized new Sears in fact, coming from the back, but also Bruce has since the beginning of his career been very skeptical of any adamant truth. So for example, in a work such as seven vices virtues engravings on stone one over the other. It's very hard to decode one from the other. And so in a way truth has also disappeared and in its place is our own. Abilities to see and understand and give meaning and be in the world. Well, his retreat from both coasts, do you think it had a benefit for his first work overall? Well, led to a half year life for him. So I suspect. Yes, it did. But there are again works that deal. Exactly with. The space that Bob Raozan Berg called between Arden life. Bruce has road right through in works such as green horses a work that by the way, when I did the last retrospect of twenty five years ago, I totally didn't understand. So the nice thing about doing something twice as you get to make your mistakes both clear and perhaps a race them bit. Green horses is Bruce on one of the horses. He has trained he had a side business as a horse trainer. And he's doing the same thing. He himself did in his studio in the sixties in ways. Bruce didn't know what it meant to be an artist. So he just did something like pacing or walking around the corner and in green horses. He is training his horse by going through. Repetitive performances. If you will. So that very much part of his life on the ranch. He lives on a ranch. He also made a. Another video that I'm not try fully understood twenty five years ago, setting a good corner. Bruce's doing exactly that he's making a corner for a fence on his ranch and the video takes just as long as it takes him to do the job. Well, and at the end of the video, you see the comments of his neighbor critiquing what he's done this. In fact, is a wonderful example of disappearances, well because BRUCE'S constantly walking out of the frame to pick up a tool and come back. And yeah, I think he's lived the life of a rancher in a very expansive studio animals seem to become a preoccupation for him after moves to New Mexico. For example, you have effigies of animals hang from the ceiling and one gallery. Well, what they are actually

Bruce Nauman MoMA BRUCE Kathy Halbreich New York New Mexico the art newspaper museum of modern Ben Luke British Museum Dr Jane senior editor Basel Bob Raozan Berg Reuss Nancy Kenny Sears twenty five years six decades
"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"nancy kenny" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Tiki impressionist is at the National Gallery in London until the twentieth of January. We're up to our menia at the Metropolitan Museum of this. The Victorian near classicist painter, John God would suffered his fair share tragedy. He ran of Italy with one of his models and was forced to live abroad after being disowned by his parents. Finally returning home in nineteen twenty one. His what was seen by critics is out of touch, but go puts Myers which they were many fan. The painters soft cheek girls in Roman togas, a winning combination. And so the we says, bombs to nineteenth century Charles, I Brian next week sale in London, which is got with exquisite dot chiffon Yantai an idealized version of a kinder, gentler. Let's complicated world which is now enjoying renewed claim. Welcome back and now over to New York when Nancy, Kenny, the senior editor of the newspaper has been to hear about a new exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum. I'm joined here at the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York by Helen Evans curator at the exhibition simply titled Armenia with an exclamation point. The Mets exhibition on our media in the medieval period draws together an extraordinary range of objects from around the world. Sumptuous manuscripts carvings reliquary while also investigating the complex web of Armenia's interactions. We learn of cross-currents with a multitude of different cultures. What prompted you to undertake this ambitious show? I did my dissertation on our million art of the medieval period manuscripts all eliminated in their kingdom of Cilicia, which is like kingdom of several by Armenians on the Mediterranean and the exploration of all sources drawn together. They're in a way what this exhibition is about how many years was it in the making? I wrote my dissertation longer. Onto admit. So in a sense I've been wanting to do this exhibition for decades. This particular exhibition is about five years in the making. I see many, the objects on view are exceedingly fragile and had never traveled to the United States until now some hadn't even traveled for centuries. How did you persuade institutions in our menia and elsewhere to part with them? The most difficult part was working with institutions armenio because not lent to the met before we had the great good fortune that there was an interest on part of the ministry of culture in Armenia and having an exhibition in America, and we met with Armenians are menia in American Armenians about a show. And then our department head Griff man. And I went and talked with the institutions in Armenia about the exhibition plan. What we would like to borrow and we build. A belief that lending to. Place that seem so very distant because you have to cross so much water would be something that would be a safe thing to do for these works, which matter so much to the Armenians. I mean is described as the first nation to convert to Christianity as far back as eighty three, oh one. How did this play out in our media and art and culture in that period Armenians by their conversion to Christianity at the very beginning of the fourth century, and by over the next several centuries, developing their faith into a uniquely Armenian selfless Christian church. Began the development of visual and the electrical relive culture tied to their Christian identity. And in the beginning, it of course, is their Christianity is opposed to the church of Constantinople, the larger universal church, but then when their territories become increasingly occupied by the Slavic world,

Armenia Metropolitan Museum John God London National Gallery Mets Roman togas Constantinople Yantai Italy New York United States Myers Charles Helen Evans Mediterranean department head senior editor Nancy America