18 Burst results for "Nancy Cartwright"

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"The president is talking about you and saying, you know the the first the United States is saying, you know, we need the American families to be a little like the Simpsons and more like the Waltons the wall. And then I love that you're you're line was, well, you know, we're, we're a lot like the Waltons. We're praying for an end of the depression as well, like exact. What did it feel like they have all that attention on? What does it feel like to be in the either hurricane. Well, it's kind of funny because I still don't have nine spikes on the top of my head. My skin is the tends to be a little bit more pink than yellow, and I got this built in anonymity that I definitely take advantage of and it's the best. It's kind of the best of both worlds, like the idea that at one point, you know, Bard is every merchandises every on Bill man's on the radio, and you can walk down the street completely on recognized. Now that was a moment for me because I was in my car and I was driving a convertible. And next to me, I pulled up to a was on Highland avenue and I was sitting at a light and the guy next to me, his radio was playing do the Bartman and I'd never heard it played on the radio before, and I'm like, oh my God. What station is that? He told me I turned it on, like that's me. Right? Yeah. Thought I was crazy. That was like, well, my song played on. That was more impactful to me than seeing it on a Sunday night because I watched the show and I don't look like him. If so fascinated me like the the idea of being voice actor at the level that you are and especially at the level that the Simpsons is and the Simpsons wasn't Susan's always will be like you, you guys room early. I'm not gonna make blow it. I'm not gonna make you do this, but like you know, you guys rumor has it did an episode with Michael Jackson, you did an episode with with Paul McCartney like I, I can't imagine what it's like to to, again, have this sort of entity and to work with these people. What does that like? True the people that we've worked with and I've only worked with a handful because mostly their schedules are. So there's special, you know, they don't. They're not usually not working at the time that we are. They're off doing something else, and so we accommodate them not many of them calm, but Elon Musk came. That was that was quite a table read and my heart went out to him because I felt so bad. He's kind of. Shy, you know, and he didn't wanna make a big deal out of it. But he launch fricken musk is sitting across from me. Tell me your dreams. What do you? What do you want to do for planet earth? Next week? I love how I'm getting about Michael Jackson, Paul McCartney and you're getting at about Alon Mon, do I love that very much. Well, I can talk about Michael Jackson. He did his own voice. There's there's nothing wrong with that. He actually totally did his own voice, but he couldn't sing. There was some contractual thing. I, I don't know, but he couldn't do the singing. Another guy did his voice who's very good Kipp Lennon ended up doing sound alike, but working with Michael, he produced which is the same as directing, do the Bartman. I got to work with him on do the Bartman. And that was like, how was so cool. He was such a huge fan of the Simpson. You do the bar. You could do the bar bad like Michael Jackson that was just tossed in there, boom, boom, he loved that. No, there's one more thing. I remember like he wanted me to just rift. He wanted me to just improv 'cause I'm listening to the chorusing backfoot sides. I bite man. You can do, you do and so cannot, and I'm going Michael aid your heart out. Michael did something like that. If you listen to it now it's you'll, you'll understand..

Michael Jackson Bartman Elon Musk Simpsons Paul McCartney United States president Bill man Kipp Lennon Alon Mon Bard Susan Michael Simpson
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"The reason you do what you do has to come from somewhere deeper than just wanting people's approval. Do you know what I mean? Like you need to once you do the same job for. Thirty years when you make a film like this, you start thinking about where your allegation comes from. This is a conversation I have with a lot of artists right now. They're trying to figure out where there where they're validation comes from. You know, I think it's a bit of a trap actually what you're saying. Because if I'm doing something to get the validation, I think it's, I think it's wrong on. So you can't. I think an artists that that opens up the artists to being attacked, and really, you shouldn't expect any acknowledgement or any validation because it's an opinion, it's somebody's opinion, and you're going to get as many opinions as you have people do you. You have to do it for your own integrity. And for me, it's like, like I said, I had reached a point where inside I felt like something was not that I had more that I could do more, but I didn't feel that doing. I don't know theater in Los Angeles. It's not exactly we're not really known for doing theater, and yet I wanted to challenge myself, you know, and tickled. News if you will. So that's what I came up of of all things that ended up being a one woman show that is theater, but it. But it solved the problem for me and try to think when I did that play, I know that Matt came to see it and Dan and Yardley and Julie and some of the writers came to see it. So to have twenty more years go by. And now it's a film and have them see again, it's just that in itself is it's it's self validation. It's me accomplishing a goal that I wanted to accomplish, and that's really what we should be focusing. That's what that's what I was getting. I was getting at the idea that ultimately the validation you have in order to do something like thirty years to make this play that you did to make this film that you did. It takes sense of self worth. Takes that self you. Thanks. Yeah, thanks. Yeah, I think I didn't understand that, but nobody you. You made the point that I was that was kind of getting getting at? Yeah, it really sounds like the Simpsons. A real family behind you. Sounds guys really support one another. How will definitely is a family, no doubt about it. And we are a nice normal family. I might add. Tongue-in-cheek. Well, we're all you know, it's not quite like it was at the beginning when we first started doing the Simpsons. It was in the basement of this theater and down there and it sort of smelled like moldy, and it had a distinctive smell to it and think we were there ten years before they moved us to where we are now and where we've been. But we used to sit in there were these tables and these God awful ugly look in orange lamps. There was a ping pong. The room was huge. It was a ping pong table in inbetween takes we. We would play ping pong and I went through two pregnancies. I would lay down because it was there several couches and I'd lay down couch in absolutely totally pass out and it'd be like, all right. We're going to see number three, Dan, Nancy, I'm up. I'm ready. I'm alive. Okay. I'm not asleep. I would try to. I would deny that I had phone. But everybody was there at that time. It was a full cast and we all showed up for the table read, and then that was on a Thursday and come out Monday, we'd get the rewritten script over the weekend and we'd be there from like nine o'clock in the morning till about, gosh, I swear must be nine o'clock at night. It was. It was. They were long days and they got the whole thing done, and it was amazing into saved every script, Tom. Go to six hundred of these things. I had to build a room onto my house to store, do still haven't? I do. How do you do you remember the moment where it got a little got a little crazy like you're on the air for a while. And then all of a sudden about a year into this thing. I mean, you have music videos on TV..

Dan Los Angeles Tom Matt Julie Yardley Nancy Thirty years thirty years ten years
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Industry, it can still blow your mind your own life story. Unfold onscreen. This movie is beautiful. It's called a search Fellini. What was it that really fascinated you at first about Fellini about this great filmmaker. Well, to be honest with you, it's like I wasn't that familiar with him, but my acting coach had given me the suggestion to take a look at philli's let's draw which I had never seen before. So he specifically wanted me to look at it with my attention on Julieta Messina's character. Gelson Meena who's this innocent little clown who you watch, kind of her kind of falling down the rabbit hole and into the say. Path. Allah g of Zampa domino, who's this brute in this travelling circus and I really connected somehow my heart connected with her and it was kinda devastating, but I thought, wow, I was so moved by it, and I cast a bunch of different actress to play opposite me. And I put up every seen in my class until I realized while I could maybe get the rights to do this as a full length play, but didn't know how to do that. And I didn't ask anybody. I just thought, well, I'll go to AFI and the American Film Institute, and you know, and get the actual script of it and see what's in the script. Because a lot of times there's information written air of who owns it and it had a lot of information available. So I started writing letters and at the time I was with an agency who represented Fellini so I had his address, they gave me his address and phone number. So I started writing Fellini and telling him what I wanted to do, and I didn't get any response. I must have written three or four letters. And Finally, I actually did hear back, but it was not good. It was. Like, well, you can't come. Don't come because he's busy. He's editing. And. Could've taken it like really offensively, but I didn't. I said what he's going to be there. Okay. I'm on my way and I just took off by myself to a country where I don't speak the language. I was in my mid twenties, and I ended up eating drinking falling in love and doing everything. A single woman inner twenty should do and probably shouldn't. Do you know when travelling to Italy visit? Did you ever find them. Aw, come on, Tom. That's not fair. Let me let me put it this way. Let me put it this way. By the time I finish the journey, I came back and I realized that my story was actually better than doing a remake of Estrada. It was such an incredible learning experience because a lot of the things that you see in that film about seventy to seventy five percent of what you see on screen actually did happen to me. And I thought, wow, I'm gonna do this. And couple years later, I was cast. I was cast on the Tracey Ullman show doing this quirky little ten year old boy, and then I got married and had kids right away and fairly quickly done years went by and come nineteen ninety five. I realized, wow, I still, I've got this dream to do this to tell the story and I haven't done it. So I'm going to do it now. So I pulled in a found this a writer. I met this writer and I told him what I wanted to do at a party and actually done a monologue and he just loved it and said, I'd love to work with you. So we started collaborating. What's that like for you to he say, the seventy to seventy five percent of of this character is is you you actually did sit down and watch the final version for the first time. What did you feel watching her? Did you go? Yeah, that's that's me. Yeah. The first and only time that it really impacted me that that's me in this. Young little gorgeous little actress named Cassini. Solo is playing me was when we were in Venice, and we were shooting the rape scene, and I was watching that and watching her her commitment and seeing how she was being treated. And that was a little tough. That was a little tough to watch. I can't imagine what it's like to have to watch that. Even though you say Nikki said it was a version of it, but to not only live on something like that, but then within two to have to watch, it must've been so painful..

Fellini philli Gelson Meena American Film Institute Tracey Ullman Zampa domino Julieta Messina Tom Italy writer Venice Nikki Estrada rape seventy five percent ten year
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"And I like the fact that affects his taking this chance on shows that feature marginalized people like Atlanta's another great. Sample. Now we've we're almost out of time, but we gotta get to the Buffy the vampire slayer review. So all we know. Just watching the ad on Twitter. I believe it or the weekend. So all we know so far is that joss Weeden the creator of the TV series will be involved and that a black actor will take over the lead role. Amanda is this good or bad idea, just create a new slayer guys like Buffy the vampire. Slayer was so pivotal and so important such incredible television show for its time. I still go back and we watch it. Just create a new slayer. Why do you need to retell this particular story? I get that you wanted to like it was so successful. Maybe just wanna reboot it, but it doesn't make any sense to me. I don't understand why they wouldn't just create a whole new slayer, a whole new character and give us a new world for us to plane. Yeah, it's not like just Weeden hasn't already done that with angel, for example. Like I mean, a spinoff show that is about a new slayer, like would make total sense. Kenya. You could tell the Baxter of Kenya, the lack layer that was in Buffy with terrible Jamaican accent. We can bring her back and give her a property. And then give her whole story. Anyway, wonder and dress weeded saying, you know, it's almost like what they do with marvel these, these kinds of reboots let people of color Toby stories to let them owner disown. I mean, I think to me, I feel like there's something that happens there that can be interesting, but I also think that you can get people of color the opportunity to tell a whole new story with a whole new slayer and not be bogged down by the weight in the baggage of the old one which has been held in such high esteem by has a cult following why even take the chance of ruin in. I agree with that. And I think that like in the world of Buffy, there are so many, there's cannon. There's like all these, like off shoots of stories and things like that. And I think in this day and age people would come and watch anything that has to do with Buffy doesn't have to be her phone. Well, that's interesting. We'll have to leave it there guys. Thank you so much for this think that's Titas Sanya. He's a regular contributor to the national post. Amanda Paris is the host of exhibitionists and Marvin's room on CBC..

Amanda Paris joss Weeden Buffy Kenya Titas Sanya Twitter Atlanta national post Toby CBC Marvin
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Say the movies, terrible, which is what my gut feeling says. It's going to be. I don't feel like that's going to affect the legacy of cats as as a production. Overall, I think it may dampen some studios desire to explore this adaptation of musicals into movies, but I also feel like, you know, we're just in a moment of experimentation there, seeing what can we do what can happen. And I kinda like that I missed moving musicals when they weren't that popular. And so I'm really excited about this period right now in general, it does seem like a real risk even looking at who's in the cast and who's directing its emit Kelly. What were you thinking. Who did the king's speech. I who's to say, who knows? Maybe this'll work out and we'll look somewhat Fehmi Les Miserables. Right? Yeah, that's right. I mean with Taylor swift, I'm like, I know she that she loves cats. She has a couple of her son. You know, there's now there's that I'm Chris dilatory filling in for Tom power today. I'm here with their screen panel, Tina has Sanya and Amanda pairs up. Next we will talk about show that's all about the drag ballroom scene in nineteen eighties, New York. Talented as you. One of the whole bunch of junky to be a stop to consider joining the house pretty me well, the house of the family, you get two big dreams, reforming some ball, that's a clip from the trailer of the FX show pose Amanda. Can you tell us more about it share? So this is the latest TV show from Ryan Murphy who's possibly the most successful man in television in partnership with Brad foul shook and Stephen canals, rhymer. If you don't know, he's the guy behind glee American horror story and the people I is OJ Simpson. So poses a period piece that takes place in New York. It's the late eighties. So this is the time of the aids crisis. It's the rise of Donald Trump in that whole corporate culture of excess. It's the midst of the crack Edmonton epidemic. And we've seen all of these stories on screen before, but we haven't seen in what posed brings for the first time ever is the vantage point is the perspective of trans women of color embedded in this underground ballroom scene, and it is so exciting to see this history from their perspective..

Taylor swift Amanda Donald Trump OJ Simpson New York Ryan Murphy Edmonton Chris dilatory Tom power Tina Stephen canals Sanya Brad
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"That voice sore, and there needs to be something in that realizes when people just break out into song in the middle of conversation that we're not taking it seriously, this fact is happening. There's something there's something comforting of that in that it. It takes us back to time when popular entertainment did that, and it was okay. Right? Like in the thirties. That was a real heyday for movie musicals and they've also been real moneymakers now, I mean, look at the greatest showman LaLa land. So so why do you think they're having a moment? Right. Our appear to be when you look back at what was happening in the nineteen thirties, it was like the midst of the great depression. It was the midst of the Jim crow laws it like the whispers of World War Two were starting. So people kind of were in a, you know, maybe a despondent place in wanted something to escape to you. They wanted a place of escape. They wanted to skip the dreary and devastating reality of their everyday and musicals like we were just saying, bring joy. They paint the world with more vivid colors. And I feel like right now that same need for hope and optimism is here. People want to escape a little bit of the jury everyday headlines that we're getting in the sense that something doom is impending already in it. So it is that what's happening. I completely agree. And I and I like the idea of musicals that are not based around stage musicals like I like the fact that LaLa land exists even Ryan Gosling. Emma stone are in the gray. Latest singers and dancers. I really love that movie because it paid to that particular Hollywood era as well as the French musicals of the sixties. Right? So so I like these and this is another reason why I'm not for cats, but I think that most people would agree with me. We gotta talk about cats as you said. We gotta talk about it. This was a huge deal. Of course, the eighties, right? It was a huge leap popular vehicle back then. And and this this, this movie we should. I guess we should say it's about a tribe of cats who have to decide which one of them will get reborn into life and we have Jennifer Hudson. We have Taylor swift in McKellen. They're going to be part of this cast. So Tina I sort of sense how you feel about this already, but how do you think is you sit here texting. Well, we're talking this case alike. Anyone who knows me knows that I love cats a lot like as as the animal in the pet. So it's funny that there is a musical that is so grotesque and awful that I despise named after my favorite animal of all time. But I just think that it's a product of its era. It's a product of the eighties. You know, the the, the makeup, the costumes, only something from that era could have come out. And I really hope that whatever they do for this new one doesn't doesn't go back to that to that eighties look like I, I just I don't know about you, but I hate that aesthetic. The songs themselves are fine. Like speaking of campy or silliness, like you can't get much more silly than a bunch of songs about cats costumes. Really scary when I was a kid really, really freaked me out. So what do you think if Amanda, if this really is a product of its time, if it's the eighties, what does that mean for this movie? What's on. The line? Well, I mean, I you have to also mention like catch is one of the longest running musical. So clearly there's an audience that still loves the story. This ascetic, this music. I have to confess I haven't seen it. I feel like the legacy of cats. The musical as a stage production is cemented like, I don't think the movie will damage it, or it might introduce new people to it and say, all I wanna go see it, but just.

LaLa land Emma stone Jennifer Hudson Jim crow Ryan Gosling Hollywood Tina I Taylor Amanda
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"So I again, as you said yet, doesn't have to make sense, low expectation, right? So Amanda, what do you think makes a good movie musical? Yeah. I mean, I think there are a few ingredients, I think actually over the top melodrama is one of our our parts of ingredients for what makes a really good movie musical for those that are coming from the stage and being adapted for the screen actually needs to be an adaptation like needs to be altered for the new medium. Some of the worst movie musicals are the ones that remain way to loyalty what happened on the stage. You need to recognize you're in film. What are the new discoveries that you can make their? And then finally are not finally, but one of the last things I would mention is that it needs to. Like a perfect balance between Hollywood and Broadway. So you need names that can be recognizable in the Hollywood spectrum, but they actually need to have talent. So example of what that you know, went pretty well was like Julie Andrews sound of music, incredible voice, incredible talent when they didn't go so great Russell Crowe in Lima's rob, probably not the best person to play those testing. Those Rulli dramatic saw Pierce Brosnan and Brosnan. Yeah. Do you think that they need to be somewhat campy d think there has to be an element of not taking too seriously? I personally prefer the ones that don't take themselves too seriously. Like I love Hedwig angry inch. I love the ones that are just sort of they go for it. You know, like they really know how the thing too is that a lot of musicals are based around some serious emotions and storylines, but they just know how to make it fun at the same time. What do you think Amanda? I would agree. I think that there's a joy that is implicit within any musical even when you're seeing the most traumatic number, there's something in it that just kind of lifts the spirit while you're listening to.

Amanda Pierce Brosnan Hollywood Julie Andrews Russell Crowe Hedwig Lima
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Yeah, you might have heard a lot of that happen to hit up the movie theaters this weekend, mama. Mia. Here we go again, just open at the box office. This of course, is a sequel to the first film released ten years ago. Now it was based on the hit Broadway musical built around some of Abba's biggest hits. The key screen panel joins us to talk about what makes these movie musicals worth watching. And yes, if you've heard the news that cats will soon be made into a film, maybe I should be saying cats, you're about to hear plenty of that as well. Also, the FX TV show pose has just been renewed for second season. We're going to talk about why this series has been so groundbreaking for queer representation on screen. So sitting across from me now are Tina has Sonya and Amanda Paris, Tina writes about arts and entertainment, and Amanda is the host of exhibitionists and also Marvin's room on CBC. Hello deah both low banks for being here. So Tino will start with you for the uninitiated, other than the ABA hits. What is the actual story of mama? Mia. So mama, Mia is around sofi played by amid a safe read, and she wants to know who her father is, and there are three different people who might be her dad Meryl Streep, plays mom. So that was like basically the the basis of the first movie she's getting married in Mamma. Mia to we've basically given up on the side of ever finding out her over father is there's no paternity tests in the world. Music thing. And instead we find out that her mom is actually passed away. That's not a spoiler it's revealed at the very beginning says she wants to reopen the hotel that are made in Greece in her mom's name, and we also get these like these flashbacks to nineteen Seventy-nine basically before for its character was born and how her mom met her three lovers. And so it's kind of like a sequel and a prequel. Wow. So what so what stands out to you this new sequel flash prequel well, it's interesting when you look at the rotten tomatoes scores for both of these movies because in two thousand eight, I think got something like fifty something. And now it's like in the low eighties, I believe for mama, Mia, too. So it seems to me like we've come around to the side of musical, just maybe not making too much sense or I don't know if it's something that we just need in the movie theaters these days. But there seems to be more of a like acceptance of. You know musicals that just, yeah, they don't make a lot of sense. Quite frankly, there's there's a lot of things that don't up and the the greatest thing about the the sequel actually that I should definitely add is that share is in it. Okay. So she shows up in the last twenty minutes. She's apparently Meryl Streep's mother, which makes zero sense because their ages are very close to each other..

Mia Meryl Streep ABA Amanda Paris Tina Tino Greece Marvin Sonya twenty minutes ten years
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"So it was fifty years ago this year when the Beatles visited India for the first time, the band wanted to learn about transcendental meditation. So they spent a few weeks living in Austria, a spiritual retreat. They apparently wrote dozens of songs there there, and you can hear a lot of those songs on records the white album and Abbey Road that whole experience was especially significant for George Harrison the leak tires to the Beatles. He went on to devote himself to Hindu spiritual values, and he really dove into Indian classical music. One of the people who helped him on this journey was Hari Persad Sharara. He's a master of the Ben Serie A north Indian bamboo, flute and musicians from all over traveled to India, to learn from him just like your chairs and did Hari still teaches to this day and he performs at sold out shows. All around the world when he was last in Vancouver, he takes time to share a few memories about his friendship with George Harrison and explain just how powerful the bench he can be. Hello. This Howdy precise showed us, yeah, from India. I'm Ben move loop rare and I'm Indian classical music player. Are you listening, India, Radio, somebody was playing flute, and I was so much happy about the sound about the music. I thought my goodness. What kind of sound bamboo dude gives. I started my musical earlier when I was nine years or a used to hide myself in some places, not in my house and practice moving for my soul to make my soul happy. And I used to tell my father, I will studying in somebody's house. He used to feed very happy that my son's video Bedia, but which I was not and never was never liked it when I got a job as use. And you know, Linnea radio in Cuttack which was very far from my house. And when I grow by father, then he started crying my goodness, you leaving me behind believable, that was very emotional time. I never forget those time. Then I after furious, I lost my father. And since then I became university tougher about this that I will never leave this music..

George Harrison India Beatles Hari Hari Persad Sharara Austria Cuttack Vancouver fifty years nine years
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"And then all of a sudden about a year into this thing. I mean, you have music videos on TV. The president is talking about you and saying, you know the. So the first lady the United States saying, they know we need the American families to be a little like the Simpsons and more like the Waltons the wall, and then I love that you're you're line was low. You know, we're, we're a lot like the Waltons. We're praying for an end of the depression as well. Like exactly what. What, what are the feel like they have all that attention on? What does it feel to be in the either hurricane. Well, it's kind of funny because I still don't have nine spikes on the top of my head. My skin is the tends to be a little bit more pink than yellow, and I got this built in anonymity that I definitely take advantage of and it's the best. It's kind of the best of both worlds, like the idea that at one point, you know, is everywhere burnt merchandises every reports Bill on the radio, and you can walk down the street completely on unrecognised. Now that was a moment for me because I was in my car and I was driving a convertible. And next to me, I pulled up to a was on Highland avenue and I was sitting at a light and the guy next to me, his radio was playing do the Bartman and I'd never heard it played on the radio before, and I'm like, oh my God. What station is that? He told me and I turned it on. And like that's me. Right? Yeah. Right, right. He thought I was crazy. That was like, well, my song played on radio that was more impactful to me than seeing it on a Sunday night because I watched the show and I don't look like him. So fascinated me the the idea of being voice actor at the level that you are, and especially at the level that the Simpsons is and the Simpsons wasn't Susan's always will be like you guys room early. I'm not gonna make it blow it. I'm not gonna make you do this, but like you guys. Rumor has it didn't episode with Michael Jackson, you did an episode with with Paul McCartney like I, I can't imagine what it's like to to, again, have this sort of anonymity and to work with these people. What does that like? No. True. The people that we've worked with and I've only worked with a handful because mostly their schedules are. So there's special, you know, they don't do not usually not working at the time that we are. They're off doing something else, and so we accommodate them not. Many of them come, but Elon Musk came. That was that was quite a table read and my heart went out to him because I felt so bad. He's kind of shy, you know, and he didn't wanna make a big deal out of it. But he launch frigate. Musk is sitting across from me. Like to tell me your dreams, what do you? What do you wanna do for planet earth next week? I love how I'm getting said about Michael Jackson and McCartney and you're getting cited about he'll on Mon, I do. I love that very well. I can talk about Michael Jackson. He did his own voice. There's there's nothing wrong with that. He actually totally did his own voice, but he couldn't sing. There was some contractual thing. I don't know, but he couldn't do the singing. Another guy did his voice who's very good Kipp Lennon ended up doing a sound alike, but working with Michael, he produced which is the same as directing, do the Bartman. I got to work with him on do the Bartman. And that was like, how was so cool. He was such huge fan of the Simpson. You do the bar. You can do the Bart, your bad, like Michael Jackson, that was just tossed in their boom boom-boom. He loved that. No, there's one more thing. I remember like he wanted me to just riff. He wanted me to just improv because I'm listening to the chorusing backflip sides side. The Bartman. You can do you do it, and so can I and I'm Michael each your heart out Michael. I said something like that. If you listen to it now it's good, you'll you'll understand..

Michael Jackson Bartman Elon Musk Paul McCartney Simpsons United States president Bill Kipp Lennon Susan Simpson
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"The reason you do what you do has to come from somewhere deeper than just wanting people's approval. Do you know what I mean? Like you need to once you do the same job for thirty years when you make a film like this, you start thinking about where your validation comes from. This is a conversation I have with a lot of artists right now. They're trying to figure out where they're where they're validation, comes around. You know, I think it's a bit of a trap actually what you're saying. Because if I'm doing something to get the validation, I think I think it's wrong. Honestly, you can't. I think an artist that that opens up the artists to being attacked and really, you shouldn't expect any acknowledgement or any validation because it's an opinion, it's somebody's opinion, and you're going to get as many opinions as you have people. Do you know what I mean? You have to do it for your own integrity. And for me, it's like, like I said, I had reached a point where inside I felt like something was not that I had more that I could do more, but I didn't feel that doing. I don't know theater in Los Angeles. It's not exactly we're not really known for doing theater, and yet I wanted to challenge myself, you know, and tickled amuse if you will. So that's what I came up. Voter of all things that ended up being a one woman show that is theater, but it. But it solved the problem for me and try to think when I did that play, I know that Matt came to see it and Dan and Yardley Tooley and some of the writers came to see it. So to have twenty more years go by. And now it's a film and have them see it again. It's just that in itself is itself validation. It's me accomplishing a goal that I wanted to accomplish in. That's really what we should be focusing. That's what that's what I was getting. I was getting at the idea that ultimately the validation you have in order to do something like this for thirty years to make this play that you did to make this film that you did. It takes sense of self worth. It takes that self few. Thanks. Yeah, thanks. Yeah, I think I didn't understand that, but nobody you you. You made the point that I was that I was kind of getting getting it. Yeah. Really sounds like the Simpsons is a real family behind. You sounds like you guys really support one another. How will it definitely is a family, no doubt about it. And we are a nice normal family. I might add. His tongue in cheek. I can tell. Well, we're all you know, it's it's not quite like it was at the beginning when we first started doing the Simpsons it was in the basement of this theater and down there and it's sorta smelled like moldy, and it had a distinctive smell to it and think we were there ten years before they moved us to where we are now and where we've been. But we used to sit in there was these tables in these God, awful ugly, look and orange lamps. There was a ping pong. The room was huge. It was a ping pong table in inbetween takes we. We would play ping pong and I went through two pregnancies. I would lay down because he was there several couches and I'd lay down on the couch and absolutely only pass out and then it'd be like, all right, we're going to see number three, Dan, Nancy, I'm up. I'm ready. I'm alive. Okay. I'm not asleep. I would try to. I would deny that I had fault phones. But everybody was there at that time. It was a full cast and we all showed up for the table read, and then that was on a Thursday and come out Monday. We get the rewritten script over the weekend and we'd be there from like nine o'clock in the morning till about, gosh, I swear must be nine o'clock at night. It was. They were long days and they got the whole thing done, and it was amazing to saved every script, Tom. Go to six hundred of these things. I had to build a room onto my house to store into still, I do. How do you do you remember the moment where it got a little got a little crazy like. You're on the air for a while..

Simpsons Yardley Tooley Dan Los Angeles Tom Matt Nancy thirty years ten years
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Career in the entertainment industry. It can still blow your mind to see your own life story unfold onscreen. This movie is beautiful. It's called search Fellini. What was it that really fascinated you at first about Fellini about this great filmmaker. Well, to be honest with you, it's like I wasn't that familiar with him, but my acting coach had given me the suggestion to take a look at Fellini's LA Strada, which I had never seen before. So he specifically wanted me to look at it with my attention on Julieta Messina's character. Gelson Meena who's this innocent little clown who you watch, kind of her kind of falling down the rabbit hole and into the. Path. Allah g of Zanu who's this brute in this travelling circus and I really connected somehow my heart connected with her and it was kinda devastating, but I thought, wow, I was so moved by it, and I cast a bunch of different actress to play opposite me. And I think I put up every seen in my class until I realized while I could maybe get the rights to do this as a full length play, but didn't know how to do that. And I didn't ask anybody. I just thought, well, I'll go to a f-i and the American Film Institute, and you know, and get the actual script of it and see what's in the script. 'cause a lot of times there's information written there of who owns it and it had a lot of information available. So I started writing letters in at the time. I was with an agency who represented Fellini so I had his address. They gave me his address and phone number. So I started writing Fellini telling him what I wanted to do, and I didn't get any response. I must have written three or four letters. And Finally, I actually did hear back, but. It was not good. It was like, well, you can't come, don't come because he's busy. He's editing. And. Could've taken it like really offensively, but I didn't. I said what he's going to be there. Okay. I'm on my way and I just took off by myself to a country where I don't speak the language. I was in my mid twenties. I ended up eating drinking falling in love and doing everything. A single woman inner twenty should do and probably shouldn't. Do you know when travelling to Italy, did you? Did you ever find them. Aw, come on, Tom. That's not fair. Let me let me put it this way. Let me put it this way. By the time I finish the journey, I came back and I realized that my story was actually better than doing a remake of Estrada. It was such an incredible learning experience because a lot of the things that you see in that film about seventy seventy five percent of what you see on screen actually did happen to me. And I thought, wow, I'm gonna do this. And couple years later, I was cast. I was cast on the Tracey Ullman show doing this quirky little ten year old boy, and then I got married and had kids right away and fairly quickly done years went by and come nineteen ninety five. I realized, wow, I still, I've got this dream to do this to tell the story and I haven't done it. So I'm going to do it now. So I pulled in a found this a writer. I met this writer and I told him what I wanted to do at a party and actually done a monologue and he just loved it and said, I'd love to work with you. So we started collaborating like for you, he say, the seventy to seventy five percent of of this character is is you you actually did sit down and watch the final version for the first time. What did you feel watching her? Did you go? Yeah, that's that's me. Yeah. The first and only time that it really impacted me that that's me in this. Young little gorgeous little actress named Cassini. Solo is playing me was when we were in Venice, and we were shooting the rape scene, and I was watching that and watching her her commitment and seeing how she was being treated. And that was a little tough. That was a little tough to watch. I can't imagine what it's like to have to watch that. Even though you say Nikki said it was a version of it, but to not only live something like that, but then within to have to have to watch, it must've been so painful..

Fellini writer Tom American Film Institute Gelson Meena Tracey Ullman Italy Zanu Julieta Messina Venice Nikki rape Estrada seventy seventy five percent seventy five percent ten year
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Now you may have okay to news about yet. Another tragic incident of gun violence. This time here in Toronto. Linwood Barclay know something about violence, but but as an author of fiction, he also knows unless Toronto in for years. He wrote a beloved column for the Toronto Star. Of course, when we scheduled this interview, we didn't know we'd be waking up to real-life violence. But luckily Linwood Barclay is a writer who gives a lot of thought to the stories he tells about violence. And before we get into the conversation, we have planned Lynnwood first of all, welcome. Thanks for being here. Thanks, Chris. Nice to be here. Now I just wanna know how you're feeling right now. I mean last night when reports started rolling in about the shooting on fourth avenue and what goes through your mind? I got home late last night from from London, England, and it was. I got an Email from someone in London this morning saying what's happened on the Danforth. I had no idea. What she was talking to, and then they put on the news and and you know, we think often that, well, this isn't the kind of thing that happens here, but more and more it is. I mean, I I think, is of course we think about the people to impact those who've lost someone and those who've been injured. And the next thing about is this kind of spillover. We're getting from south of the border and how the access to guns there is so is so easy and thus week, one of the things I was I was on stage chatting with the US crime writer, Laura Lippman, and we talking about the shooting in the newsroom in Annapolis about a month ago and Laura Lawson very close to her in that event. And she said it's becoming. It seems like it's getting to the point where we will all know someone who has who has perished in a mass shooting, you know used to be well, that's something that happened that what happened in San Diego or there's one happened in Seattle ever, but it's getting to the point where we'll all know somebody and. And and how do we stop this? How do we sort of stop turn this tide and not having never happening, which seems to difficult typically when you have these ideas that we'll everybody should be able to have gun. Let's arm teachers and so forth. So it's I, I, it's a real. I think we're all looking for answers. I mean, given the kind of of work that you do and given the fact as you just said, it could be true that these kinds of incidents are just hitting closer and closer to home. Do you feel it's more and more important to explore human nature in the work that you do? Oh, yeah. I mean, I I hope I do too to somebody. I write books very much entertain, but I but there's a lotta times looks what regardless what the issue, maybe where I have something I wanna say often books. It's been about about those papers and how they're imperilled and how they're losing them and so forth. And who's going to give us local news coverage who's going to keep watch on everybody. That's one issue. But this another important w-. And and I think I mean, you look somebody like a great writer, Jorge Pellicano. I mean, he's he's addressed one of his earlier books where one of his couple of his characters actually go in, they set fire to a gun shop because they've just had it. And so all of these things are going to start, I think, finding their way in one way or another. Let's start talking about this book annoys downstairs, which of course it. It's, it's another example of you're left thinking, why? Why do people do what they do? I mean, this follows in English professor, he discovered his older colleague. So when he really admires maybe a murderer and the stakes deep into that dilemma, figuring out what it means when someone you look up to someone, you believe is a good person. Does something unthinkable. So why? Why did you want explore that? Well, it and that it's, it's that exploration to that. It's kind of what came later. I mean, what for me would always begins a book project is kind of what if and the, what if that got this started annoys downstairs..

Linwood Barclay Toronto writer Laura Lawson Jorge Pellicano London Laura Lippman Lynnwood San Diego Chris US Seattle Annapolis England professor
Yeardley Smith talks to Matt Gourley about the Simpsons

I Was There Too

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Yeardley Smith talks to Matt Gourley about the Simpsons

"A little bit now i can only imagine you've been asked a lot of these questions a million times so you have every right to pass or deflect it to something rather talk about but i always try to pride myself in finding questions that are different in some way but i don't know about this line it is a tough one just all been ass i can imagine and how many years is it now it's just started recording season thirty good lower no years we literally have writers who grew up watching the show who thought might dream job will be to ride on the simpsons but they won't still be on by the time i'm old enough and like oh yes do you have any that were born after it debuted yeah i believe so yes i mean there are people in that room who work on the show who have no recollection of a world without simpson that's extrordinary zand i mean thirty years thirty two relief you count the tracey ullman show that's old enough to have been born when the simpsons started or even slightly after a now to have your own children who are walking and talking and watching the simpsons that's that's bananas it is an institution like saturday night live where a long involved would have been raised on it completely absolutely yeah god so you if this is true additionally originally read for the role of bart that's true and nancy cartwright read for lisa is that right yes interesting i think it was never well two things happened so i did a play here in los angeles at the fountain theatre called living on salvation street that was directed by dorothy lyman who used to be on mama's family do you remember mama in fact i see that this kiki she was a juvenile delinquent i did i three episodes and because of doing that tv show when this play came around dorothy lyman cast me as the lead and i played this girl named wilma who wanted to join the army and saying l was presley songs so nothing likely simpson and about i would say like seventeen people saw that play and one of those people are year later was casting the simpsons and she says that she when the role of lisa simpson came up she said i know exactly who should play lisa simpson and it was me it wasn't nancy so the fact that i did read for bart and nancy read for lisa i think it was more of a well let's they always have women do the voices of young boys because their voices don't change obviously right so i don't think it was so specific as we're just gonna throw a lot of spaghetti at the wall and whoever is better for one and then for another and then of course i'm sure they had editions with tons of other people that's who we will cast but i did read for bar but i don't even think it lasted a whole scene interesting yeah 'cause i just sound so much like a girl always and over the years do you struggle to keep it fresh for yourself do you find that the voice of all because i look back at the tracey ullman versions in the early seasons especially with homer i mean it's it's started with oh yeah okay a lot of people think actually that whoever did home or on the tracey ullman show it was then a different actor who did it when we went to half hour but it's the same as dan castellaneta and dan orig when we drew in the bumpers as we call them on the tracey ullman show agree told the whole story in one minute right three twenty seconds segments something to that effect before the commercial break and dan fashioned homers voice after walter matthau and when we went to half hour he couldn't sustain it technically like vocally he couldn't sustain it so he had to alter it and that's why homer sounds so different yeah and i think when i first started doing lisa simpson i really didn't do anything i mean i sound a sound i i think probably now about now i probably like him about fourteen but back then i think i probably started let goes eleven

Paul Scheer Amy Nicholson Kane Hollywood
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"Okay and i said okay so what would you do differently if it were repaired if there be and he said nothing it's the same it's really just a naming thing oku so you are doing their laws what around the law right right okay i'm sorry i keep interrupting you what are you gonna man splaine now or off well i was thinking about audio entertainment in general oh that's interesting i was just thinking about audio entertaining in general yeah maybe it's not a man thing maybe it's just a human thing i'm glad we can share that and that it can bring us together as humans do you know someplace i could go for more quality audio entertainment maybe something i could learn from like you want more culturing your life yeah i mean comedy and and culture it's funny you say that because that immediately makes me think of the perfect podcasting network max fun maximum fun yeah comedy and culture is their tagline and they have so many good shows hi i'm elliot and i'm julia prescott and we're the host of everything's coming up we are simpson's podcast brand new to the maximum fund network and every episode we cover a different episode of the simpsons that is a favourite of our special guests we've had guests that are show runners and writers and voice actors like nancy cartwright all people that have worked in listens and also had guessing weird how and people that are on the maximum network already and each week we will talk to very cool guest about their favorite episode and it is so much fun so if you like the simpsons come listen to everything's coming up simpson's all right smell you later.

julia prescott simpson nancy cartwright elliot
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Well it's kind of funny because i i still don't have nine spikes on the top of my head and my skin is likely you tends to be a little bit more pink and yellow here and i i i've got this built in anonymity that i don't we take advantage of and i been it's the best it's kind of the best of both worlds the idea that at one point parties have rebuffed merchandisers have regrets and build yeah man's on the radio and you can walk down the street completely on unrecognised now that was a moment for me because i was in my car and i was driving a convertible in next to me i pulled up to a was on highland avenue and i was sitting at a light and the guy next to me his radio was playing do the bart man and i never heard it played on the radio before i'm like oh my god what station is that and he told me i turn it on a like that's me all right he ever paid within beat thought i was crazy even that was like well waste song inflatable oh that was more impactful to me then seeing it on his sunday night because i watch the show and i don't look like him i if it's so fast named me like the at the idea of being a voice actor at the at the level that you are and especially at a level that the simpson's is and the simpson's was in simpson's always will be like maybe you guys room early i'm not gonna make a blow it i'm not gonna make you do this but like you guys rumor has it didn't episode with michael jackson you didn't episode with with paul mccartney like i can't imagine what a now two two again have this sort of anonymity and to work with these people what what what does that lake knows true the people that we've worked with and i've only worked with a handful because mostly their schedules are so there's a special unit they don't do not usually not working at the time that we are there off doing something else and so we accommodate them not many of them com but ilan must came that was.

simpson michael jackson paul mccartney ilan
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Kind of being control my emotions in the in in the middle of the interview she starts talking like bar and you just gonna hear me freak out going to go like hold on hold on us to stop it's just opera second as you'll also here nancy cartwright is finding her own voice these days you'll hear us talk about her very first screen play in search of fellini which is a new movie that's loosely based on her own experienced trying to track down the italian director federico fellini a rare interview obedient have a lesson eddie carre welcomed to q thank you also led to be here agassi so much talk to you about it's it's actually kind of freaking me out the talk to yield a tiny bit but before we get an all that part of this movie is beautiful it's called a search a fellini what was it that really fascinated you at first about fellini about this great filmmaker well to be honest with you it's like a wasn't that familiar with him but might acting coach had given me the suggestion to take a look at fellini's la strada which i never seen before so he specifically wanted me to look at it with my attention on julieta messina's character jelcz amina who's this innocent little clown who you watch kind of her kind of falling down the rabbit holen into the night he said a path allah g of sampono who's this brutal in this travelling circus and i really connected somehow my heart connected with her and it was kind of devastating but i thought wow i was so moved by it and i cast a bunch of different actress to play opposite me and i think i put up every seen in my class until i realized wow i could maybe get the rights to do this as a fulllength play but didn't know how to do that and i didn't ask anybody i just thought well i'll go to a afi and the american film institute and you know in get the actual script of it and see what's in the script because a lot of times there's information written there of who owns it and it had a lot of.

nancy cartwright director eddie carre julieta messina amina federico fellini agassi american film institute
"nancy cartwright" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"nancy cartwright" Discussed on KTRH

"Ready is seventy six today actress nancy kirk right is sixty from the symptoms simpson's you know what i don't know how live chad loaded this thing it's a pretty interesting nancy cartwright does a lot of the voices on simpson's bunny the czech a should check to see how long it is i don't know if i have time to do it here or not but let's see oh it's only thirty and thirty four seconds here is nancy cartwright doing seven simpson voices that she does in under forty seconds your attention please your attention please i have an announcement to make on boulevard you think you're bored what about also is poor is out there in the audience i just be praying that they're category is next well as long as they are praying and wow rat i get joint their feet you keep your ears off me a little tweet rollcall the cops set cap yes breast smells like cat food we ask and that my france is how i make a living the nancy cartwright and number of the voices on the simpsons drummer chad smith of the red hot chili peppers and of chicken foot is 56 oh we just booktobill in in january russel's paid for it's a fundraiser for care pope their call the red not chili peppers and they do the entire body of red hot chili peppers work and we're figuring out the pricing and all that but the the might is going to be a fundraiser for uh for camp hope too kick off two thousand eighteen fundraising for great organization give tourist ed robertson of the bear naked ladies is 47 there's both the in bear naked.

simpson nancy cartwright france russel nancy kirk simpsons chad smith ed robertson thirty four seconds forty seconds