17 Burst results for "Nan Roman"

"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 3 months ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Now Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is pushing to spend a billion dollars to address homelessness marketplaces. Matt Levin has more At last count. There are about 580,000 people experiencing homelessness in the U. S. And it feels weird to say this, but a good chunk of them could end up with a home because of the pandemic. Nan Roman is the CEO of the National Alliance to end homelessness. I'm much more confident about our ability to reduce the number of homeless people, at least in the short run, Covert is turn on a fire hose of federal money under the Biden administration's rescue package, $10 billion will go to local governments for emergency housing vouchers and low income housing. Compared to trillions in relief. That may not sound like much, but Roman says it's a game changer we think would allow us probably to house about 150,000 people. And create about 30 30,000 units of affordable housing. Of course, money alone won't fix homelessness. You still need to find property for low income housing, and the pandemic has helped their to, for example, a lot of hotel and motel stock that's been losing money and is acquire a ble. They're also office buildings in downtown's that have been abandoned. Repurpose ng vacant space is part of a new San Francisco Bay area plan to house 75% of unsheltered residents in just three years. Tameka Moss is the chief executive of all home and nonprofit that's leading the effort. She says she knows the dustbin of history is littered with plans to end homelessness. That well didn't end homelessness. Well, look, I think it is fair that folks are skeptical. Take those empty hotels in offices. With the economy rebounding. They're more private developers ready to compete with governments and nonprofits. Many homeowners will still fight to keep homeless housing out of their neighborhoods. But at the very least, the pandemic maybe making the public more receptive to Mosses message. I have been doing this work for more than 20 years in the Bay Area, committing to Treating homelessness like a public health crisis. A deadly virus is a good reminder of that. I'm that Levin for marketplace. Our executive producer isn't a cold Childers. Our digital producers Alec.

Matt Levin $10 billion San Francisco Bay Nan Roman 75% Alec Tameka Moss National Alliance Bay Area Levin more than 20 years U. S. three years about 150,000 people about 580,000 people Los Angeles about 30 30,000 units Roman Eric Garcetti Mosses
"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:55 min | 4 months ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa chain. Tuesday's deadly shootings in Georgia come as hate crimes against Asian Americans surged by nearly 150% last year. According to the Center for the study of Hate and Extremism. But the history of anti Asian sentiment in the U. S begins way before the pandemic and way before former President Trump's racist remarks about the quote China virus. Here to talk with us about that history is Dale Minami. He is founder of the Asian Law Caucus and former professor of Asian American studies at the University of California. Berkeley. Welcome Hi, How are you? I'm good. I just want to start by asking you what's been going through your mind the last couple days. As you've seen this news in Georgia unfold, I see. There's so many adjectives disappointed. Destroyed, disgusted It's just appalling. What's been happening and what has happened throughout history, actually, But today was yesterday was a particularly bad day. Yeah, I agree. Well, I want to turn specifically now, too. Really this whole past year. Let's let's start there. The rise in anti Asian attacks both physical and verbal attacks. I'm including in there the way former President Trump framed the Corona virus as a thing that came from Chinese people. What parallels? Do you see between what's happening now in this country and what has happened in periods in the past when people in this country turned on Asian Americans? I think during periods of great tension in this country or insecurity, fears and anxieties rise and that undercurrent of racism that has gone through the United States history throughout its beginning. Consoled flow and that from the first immigration of Chinese to this country in the 18 fifties to the present, you've seen an Evan flow of such violence. 18 71, There's a massacre of 20 Chinese Americans in L. A. They were lynched. We've seen the incarceration of Japanese Americans, the murder of Vincent Chin and 8 1982. Humanization of Chinese during the McCarthy era and the aftermath of the Gulf War in September, 11th when Muslim and Indian Americans were very much subject, oh violence and discrimination. I also want to point out to people listening to this interview that you led the legal team that overturned the conviction of Fred Korematsu. He was A civil rights activist who was arrested for refusing to enter a Japanese internment camp in 1942. How do you think the legacy of war has played into this history? We're talking about the way Asian identity has been perceived in this country. The tensions rise exponentially during times of war. In the last three major wars the United States fought were against Asian countries Japan, Korea and Vietnam. And that leads not only to dehumanization of those people's simply to justify you know psychologically, the killing of the quote enemy. And those images remain. The antipathy remains and survives. And to dehumanize his people of color and bring that back to your own country. The United States leads to a justification for just terrible treatment of Asian people. Well as we're talking about this long history of anti Asian sentiment in this country, the ebb and flow of it, Aziz, you put it I mean, you personally have had a long career thinking litigating writing about anti Asian feeling in the U. S. Is it possible for you to picture at this moment? Where things might go from here. I mean, does now feel like a moment of change to you. It does. I think, partly when you see black lives matter being legitimized in that folks, including white folks are supporting that movement. There's hope that there's ally ship that can be created among all races, including Asian Americans and education of other groups to understand the Common humanity. We all have is really critical, but perhaps the hardest thing to do. I think we have to change this whole culture understand that reckoning of racism needs to be had in this country, and it includes Asian Americans. Dale Minami, founder of the Asian Law Caucus. Thank you very much for your time today. Thank you. Homelessness in the U. S. Grew last year for the fourth year in a row. More than 580,000. People were living outside or in shelters on a single night in January, 2020. That's according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The numbers do not reflect the impact of the pandemic, which forced many more people out of their homes and also prompted others to seek shelter in prayers, Pam Fessler reports. John Mendez and a colleague at the nonprofit Bethesda Cares are filling boxes with personal items to give people living on the streets in Montgomery County, Maryland, hand warmers, clean socks, bottled water, and then we have these little care kids like soap, shampoo, toothpaste. Yes, masks lots of masks, Mendez says. The pandemic has been especially hard on those who are homeless, but it's had at least one positive impact. Several clients refused help for more than a decade finally agreed to get off the streets and into permanent housing. When you're out there, you're in the hustle and bustle every day on the streets, and you see people getting on the metro by the thousands. Then all of a sudden, nobody's getting on the Metro. There's no foot traffic. There's nobody out there. It's a different world and that zoo scary thing for a lot of our people. They were suddenly alone and cut off from conveniences like store bathrooms. Linda says that's helped the county keep its homeless numbers down. Although new faces keep showing up, Becky Glee go of housing solutions. Tulsa says they've seen similar changes in Oklahoma. Her county was able to take advantage of unused hotel space and move more than 400 people off the streets this winter. But there are other troubling trends. Anecdotally, what we've seen is anywhere from 100 to 300 new people experiencing homelessness coming into our system every single month. Part of that is due to the fact that we're the 11th highest victor in the country, according to eviction lab, And so there's just a ton of inflow of people who are experiencing first time homelessness and the new HUD report based on numbers collected last year before the pandemic. Found that homelessness has been on the rise nationwide since 2016 HUD secretary Marsha Fudge called the numbers devastating family and veterans homelessness didn't improve. For the first time in years. A disproportionate share of those who are homeless were black 39% of the total and for the first time since 2007 more single adults. 209,000 were living outside rather than in shelters. Well, I think it's tragic. Nan Roman is president and CEO of the National Alliance to end homelessness. We know that Children. People have horrible health conditions. They have substance abuse and mental health and physical Disabilities and are more likely to die Young Roman says. While some communities moved people inside during the pandemic, the opposite happened elsewhere. Many shelters limited bed space due to health concerns, and some residents moved outside for fear of contracting the disease. Roman and others worry what happens next when emergency pandemic measures like conviction moratoriums and unemployment insurance end. The good news is that a $1.9.

John Mendez Fred Korematsu Pam Fessler Mary Louise Kelly Georgia Nan Roman $1.9 Mendez Linda 1942 Becky Glee yesterday Gulf War 39% Dale Minami Vincent Chin Department of Housing and Urba Oklahoma January, 2020 HUD
"nan roman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:58 min | 4 months ago

"nan roman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang. Tuesday's deadly shootings in Georgia come as hate crimes against Asian Americans surged by nearly 150% last year. According to the Center for the study of Hate and Extremism. But the history of anti Asian sentiment in the U. S begins way before the pandemic and way before former President Trump's racist remarks about the quote China virus. Here to talk with us about that history is Dale Minami. He is founder of the Asian Law Caucus and former professor of Asian American studies at the University of California. Berkeley. Welcome I How are you? I'm good. I just want to start by asking you what's been going through your mind the last couple days. As you've seen this news in Georgia unfold, I see. There's so many adjectives disappointed. Destroyed, disgusted. It's just appalling. What's been happening and what has happened throughout history, actually. But today was yesterday was a particularly bad day. Yeah, I agree. Well, I want to turn specifically now To really this whole past year. Let's let's start there. The rise in anti Asian attacks both physical and verbal attacks. I'm including in there the way former President Trump framed the Corona virus as a thing that came from Chinese people. What parallels? Do you see between what's happening now in this country and what has happened in periods in the past when people in this country turned on Asian Americans? I think during periods of great tension in this country or insecurity, fears and anxieties rise and that undercurrent of racism that has gone through the United States history throughout its beginning. Hence old flow and that from the first immigration of Chinese to this country in the 18 fifties to the present you seen in Evan flow of such violence. 18 71, There's a massacre of 20 Chinese Americans in L. A. They were lynched. We've seen the incarceration of Japanese Americans, the murder of Vincent Chin and 8 1982. Humanization of Chinese during the McCarthy era. In the aftermath of the Gulf War in September, 11th when Muslim and Indian Americans were very much subject, oh violence and discrimination. I also want to point out to people listening to this interview that you led the legal team that overturned the conviction of Fred Korematsu. He was A civil rights activist who was arrested for refusing to enter a Japanese internment camp in 1942. How do you think the legacy of war has played into This history we're talking about the way Asian identity has been perceived in this country. The tensions rise exponentially during times of war in the last three major wars the United States fought were against Asian countries. Japan, Korea and Vietnam. And that leads not only to dehumanization of those people's simply to justify you know, psychologically, the killing of the quote enemy. And those images remain. The antipathy remains and survive. And to dehumanize his people of color and bring that back to your own country. The United States leads to a justification for just terrible treatment of Asian people. Well as we're talking about this long history of anti Asian sentiment in this country, the ebb and flow of it, Aziz, you put it I mean, you personally have had a long career thinking litigating writing about anti Asian feeling in the U. S. Is it possible for you to picture at this moment? Where things might go from here. I mean, does now feel like a moment of change to you. It does. I think, partly when you see black life matter being legitimized, and that folks, including white folks are supporting that movement. There's hope that there's ally ship that can be created among all races, including Asian Americans and education of other groups to understand the Common humanity. We all have is really critical, but perhaps the hardest thing to do. I think we have to change this whole culture understand that reckoning of racism needs to be had in this country, and it includes Asian Americans. Dale Minami, founder of the Asian Law Caucus. Thank you very much for your time today. Thank you. Homelessness in the U. S. Grew last year for the fourth year in a row. More than 580,000. People were living outside or in shelters on a single night in January, 2020. That's according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The numbers do not reflect the impact of the pandemic, which forced many more people out of their homes. And also prompted others to seek shelter. NPR's Pam Fessler reports. John Mendez and a colleague at the nonprofit with us to Cares are filling boxes with personal items to give people living on the streets and Montgomery County, Maryland, hand warmers, clean socks, bottled water, and then we have these little care kids like soap shampoo. To peace masks masks lots of masks, Mendez says. The pandemic has been especially hard on those who are homeless, but it's haven't least one positive impact. Several clients refused help for more than a decade finally agreed to get off the streets and into permanent housing. When you're out there, you're in the hustle and bustle every day on the streets, and you see people getting on the metro by the thousands. Then all of a sudden nobody's getting on the Metro. There's no foot traffic. There's nobody out there. It's a different world, and that zah scary thing For a lot of our people there were suddenly alone and cut off from conveniences like store bathrooms, Mendez says. That's helped the county keep its homeless numbers down. Although new faces keep showing up. Becky Glee go of housing solutions. Tulsa says they've seen similar changes in Oklahoma, her county was able to take advantage of unused hotel space and move more than 400 people off the streets this winter. But there are other troubling trends. Anecdotally, what we've seen is anywhere from 100 to 300 new people experiencing homelessness coming into our system every single month. Part of that is due to the fact that we're the 11th highest victor in the country, according to eviction lab. And so there's just a ton of inflow of people who are experiencing first time homelessness and the new HUD report, based on numbers collected last year before the pandemic found that homelessness has been on the rise nationwide since 2016 HUD secretary Marsha Fudge called the numbers devastating. Family and veterans. Homelessness didn't improve for the first time in years. A disproportionate share of those who are homeless were black 39% of the total, and for the first time since 2007 more single adults, 209,000 were living outside rather than in shelters. Well, I think it's tragic. Nan Roman is president and CEO of the National Alliance to end homelessness. We know that Children. People have horrible health conditions. They have substance abuse and mental health and physical disabilities and are more likely to die Young Roman says. While some communities moved people inside, you're in the pandemic. The opposite happened elsewhere, many shelters limited bed space due to health concerns, and some residents moved outside for fear of contracting the disease. Woman and others worry what happens next when emergency pandemic measures like conviction moratoriums and unemployment insurance end. The good news is that a $1.9 trillion covert relief package.

John Mendez Fred Korematsu Mary Louise Kelly Elsa Chang Georgia Pam Fessler Nan Roman 1942 Dale Minami Gulf War $1.9 trillion Mendez January, 2020 Becky Glee 39% yesterday Oklahoma Tuesday Marsha Fudge Department of Housing and Urba
"nan roman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:18 min | 4 months ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KCRW

"And in Bell Gardens, the 17 north bound at Firestone Boulevard crash in the two left lanes there. Traffic slow from Rosecrans Avenue. This is all things considered from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang. Tuesday's deadly shootings in Georgia come as hate crimes against Asian Americans surged by nearly 150% last year. According to the Center for the study of Hate and Extremism. But the history of anti Asian sentiment in the U. S begins way before the pandemic and way before former President Trump's racist remarks about the quote China virus here to talk with us about that history is Dale Minami. He is founder of the Asian Law Caucus and former professor of Asian American studies. At the University of California, Berkeley. Welcome I How are you? I'm good. I just want to start by asking you what's been going through your mind the last couple days as you've seen this news in Georgia unfold. Steve. There's so many adjectives disappointed, destroyed, disgusted It's just appalling. What's been happening and what has happened throughout history, actually. But today was yesterday was a particularly bad day. Yeah, I agree. Well, I want to turn specifically now, too. Really this whole past year. Let's let's start there. The rise in anti Asian attacks both physical and verbal attacks. I'm including in there the way former President Trump framed the Corona virus as a thing that came from Chinese people. What parallels? Do you see between what's happening now in this country and what has happened in periods in the past when people in this country turned on Asian Americans? I think during periods of great tension in this country or insecurity, fears and anxieties rise and that undercurrent of racism that has gone through the United States history throughout its beginning. Tensed overflow and that from the first immigration of Chinese to this country in the 18 fifties to the present you seen in Evan flow of such violence 18 71, There's a massacre of 20 Chinese Americans in L. A. They were lynched. We've seen the incarceration of Japanese Americans, the murder of Vincent Chin and 8 1982. Demonization of Chinese during the McCarthy era. In the aftermath of the Gulf War in September, 11th when Muslim and Indian Americans were very much subject, oh violence and discrimination. I also want to point out to people listening to this interview that you led the legal team that overturned the conviction of Fred Korematsu. He was A civil rights activist who was arrested for refusing to enter a Japanese internment camp in 1942. How do you think the legacy of war has played into This history we're talking about the way Asian identity has been perceived in this country. The tensions rise exponentially during times of war in the last three major wars the United States fought were against Asian countries. Japan, Korea and Vietnam. And that leads not only to dehumanization of those people's simply to justify you know, psychologically, the killing of the quote enemy. And those images remain. The antipathy remains and survive. And to dehumanize his people of color and bring that back to your own country, the United States. Leads to a justification for just terrible treatment of Asian people. Well as we're talking about this long history of anti Asian sentiment in this country, the ebb and flow of it, Aziz you put it I mean, you personally have had a long career thinking litigating writing about anti Asian feeling in the U. S. Is it possible for you to picture at this moment? Where things might go from here. I mean, does now feel like a moment of change to you. It does. I think, partly when you see black lives matter being legitimized, and that folks, including white folks are supporting that movement. There's hope that there's ally ship that can be created among all races, including Asian Americans. And education of other groups to understand the Common humanity. We all have is really critical, but perhaps the hardest thing to do. I think we have to change this whole culture to understand that reckoning of racism needs to be had in this country, and it includes Asian Americans. Dale Minami, founder of the Asian Law Caucus. Thank you very much for your time today. Thank you. Homelessness in the U. S. Grew last year for the fourth year in a row. More than 580,000. People were living outside or in shelters on a single night in January, 2020. That's according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The numbers do not reflect the impact of the pandemic, which forced many more people out of their homes. And also prompted others to seek shelter. NPR's Pam Fessler reports, John Mendez and a colleague at the nonprofit Protested Cares are filling boxes with personal items to give people living on the streets in Montgomery County, Maryland, hand warmers, clean socks, bottled water, and then we have these little care kids like soap shampoo. Toothpaste. Masks masks lots of masks. Mendez says. The pandemic has been especially hard on those who are homeless but has had at least one positive impact. Several clients refused help for more than a decade finally agreed to get off the streets and into permanent housing when you're out there, and you're in the hustle and bustle every day on the streets, and you see people getting on the metro by the thousands Then all of a sudden, nobody's getting on the Metro. There's no foot traffic. There's nobody out there. It's a different world and that zoo scary thing for a lot of our people. They were suddenly alone and cut off from conveniences like store bathrooms. Benda says that's helped the county keep its homeless numbers down. Although new faces keep showing up, Becky Glee go of housing solutions. Tulsa says they've seen similar changes in Oklahoma. Her county was able to take advantage of unused hotel space and move more than 400 people off the streets this winter. But there are other troubling trends. Anecdotally, what we've seen is anywhere from 100 to 300 new People experiencing homelessness coming into our system every single month. Part of that is due to the fact that we're the 11th highest victor in the country, according to eviction lab. And so there's just a ton of inflow of people who are experiencing first time homelessness and a new HUD report, based on numbers collected last year before the pandemic found that homelessness has been on the rise nationwide since 2016 HUD secretary, Marsha Fudge called the numbers devastating. Family and veterans. Homelessness didn't improve for the first time in years. A disproportionate share of those who are homeless were black 39% of the total, and for the first time since 2007 more single adults, 209,000 were living outside rather than in shelters. Well, I think it's tragic. Nan Roman is president and CEO of the National Alliance to end homelessness. We know that Children, people have horrible health concern. Since they have substance abuse and mental health and physical disabilities and are more likely to die Young Roman says. While some communities moved people inside, you're in the pandemic, the opposite happened elsewhere, many shelters limited bed space due to health concerns, and some residents moved outside for fear of contracting the disease. Woman and others worry what happens next when emergency pandemic measures like conviction moratoriums and unemployment insurance end. The good news is that a $1.9 trillion covert relief package includes tens of billions of dollars in new housing aid. It really is just such a huge opportunity at the moment. The question is there we're going to be able to seize it. She says..

Mary Louise Kelly John Mendez Elsa Chang Fred Korematsu Steve Nan Roman Pam Fessler Georgia yesterday Mendez Marsha Fudge Department of Housing and Urba Rosecrans Avenue Tuesday $1.9 trillion Dale Minami Bell Gardens Oklahoma Gulf War 1942
"nan roman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:56 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"That you find an apartment it takes the section eight that is not filled with mildew and everything so how can you live in any of those. Two States or Indian goes to situations nations Jennifer. We got it and I WANNA put your concern. Let me start. Let me bring you back into the conversation Nan Roman wh what are you here in Jennifer's call. They're talking about her brother and his friend in South Carolina. I hear that the problem is not just a problem in California. I would point out that California's is is the biggest state and it has has the most homeless or has more homeless people as a consequence. It actually does not have the highest rate of homelessness of any state. I think it's the fifth highest in terms of rate so that's a little bit on the bright side for California. I mean affordable. Housing is an issue everywhere in cities and towns and rural areas people's income ships have not kept kept up with the rent if you get if you're trying to live on disability income usually you can only pay your US thirty percent of your income for rent. Usually we can only pay a few hundred dollars for rent. They're just not apartments or houses anywhere that you can rent for a few hundred dollars a month so she's she's making a good point so mayor Steinberg if I have that correct me if I'm wrong here Sacramento your city experience in one thousand nine percent increase in homelessness from just two years ago. Why are you doing such such a rise in homelessness in your city? I think it's a variety of things I think it is. it is the cost of housing Sacramento is becoming the very popular destination city is especially as affordability becomes even more prominent in the bay area just ninety miles does to the West. We're also seeing increases in in in opioid and methamphetamine addiction and of course severe mental health. I've spent a lot of my career trying to bring increase mental health services to to California and certainly we could use a national mental mental health policy that was about more than just speaking up whenever there's a terrible a gun tragedy mental health I think is the unaddressed issue of our time in our country and it's a significant source of our chronic unsheltered homelessness but look we're fighting this fiercely fiercely. We're building low barrier triage shelters to get people off the streets. We're establishing our own affordable. Housing Trust Fund to increase the supply of affordable affordable housing and we are committed to getting thousands of people off the streets. I I do think we could use a real partnership partnership with the federal government that not only increased investment but also made it clear that that housing affordability and homelessness is a genuine national priority and so far that isn't the case. Let's go to KARL WHO's calling from Denver Colorado Carl. Go ahead. Thanks thanks so much for the call. Yeah absolutely thanks for taking my call. yeah and I just wanted to say I know earlier. You were mentioning that any people who were formerly homeless almost one point who had opinions on what lawmakers should do not addressing homelessness yeah I was homeless for just Kinda served on couches of have friends and family for a good four month really didn't have a permanent address but one thing that I did notice for chronic homelessness people who are just sleeping on the streets every night night Utah was able to actually really successfully addressed chronic homelessness by simply giving people homes and that was a program that they had tried out I in Salt Lake City and then as I understand the rest of the state did it as well and they were able to substantially almost I think eliminate their chronic homelessness population by providing people phones now. Some people might say you know you should I address you know drug treatment programs your job programs and those are important but the actually found that the people who have have a permanent residents are more likely to cure their addiction and to be employed once they have a permanent residents I and so a lot of sense is Karl night. Yeah and I really appreciate the Call Nan Roman Carl. They're talking about his experience as a formerly homeless person or at least a couch surfer you. I'm not talking there about this sort of principle of housing first and why it's important. Why is it so important it's important because it just works better and when we required people to try to solve their problems while they're living on a street on the street and in shelter simply didn't work getting them into housing and then connecting them with services and helping them solve their problems works better? He's right about Utah Utah Drastically Reduced Chronic homelessness by providing people with with permanent supportive housing so that's subsidized housing services attached. That's happened all over the countries to have two hundred two hundred and fifty thousand chronically homeless is people now. We have about eighty thousand mayors time because there's something you want to add to that idea the housing first well yes. I mean the thing about homelessness. Is We actually know what works first of all. We've got to prevent people who are fragile and house from becoming fradulent agile and homeless and public policy here matters in California we just passed significant rent stabilization of bill and just cause eviction action which I think is gonNA keep many more people in their homes but for people who are unsheltered homeless we knew what works it's intensive outreach each case management it is temporary triage housing for those who need it so that they can get stable. It's permanent housing and it's mental health and Substance Abuse Services for the people who who suffer with with those illnesses and we practice that we actually get the people off the streets. We just have not built what we call the continuum of care in the systems of care to scale in a way that allows us to to to translate thousands to tens of thousands so I guess that brings us full circle back to what kind of partnership you would ideally like with the federal government because it sounds like you're saying I mean you just said it. We know what works but the problem is scaling it up to such a level that we really get at the kind of crisis that California's dealing with that's exactly right and it's again I again the last thing anyone doing this in this particular area particularly to politicize it but in March the administration proposed eliminating. CDBG it's called the Clean Development Block grant program which is our primary source of funding for are affordable housing agencies. the policy needs to back up whatever the rhetoric is and we need a robust partnership if housing is really a human right as as a former great president one said then we need to treat it as such and we we need to create a sense of urgency which we're creating in California but nationally to say that homelessness homelessness does not have to be hopelessness that people living outdoors in these conditions is just un-american it isn't right and that we can do better well mayor Sacramento Darrell Steinberg. Thanks so much for joining us today. We're really really grateful for your input on this important subject you Antony and and to be with you and non-roman President and CEO of the National Alliance to end homelessness. Thank you very much for joining us as well Sharon. Thanks for having me and my thanks to Secretary Ben Carson who joined us earlier in the hour. That's it you can.

California Sacramento Housing Trust Fund Darrell Steinberg federal government Utah Nan Roman US South Carolina Jennifer Nan Roman Carl methamphetamine Karl night Salt Lake City Ben Carson KARL WHO Denver Sharon Secretary
"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There's no question that the loss of a lot of these units is a major contributor to homelessness in places where they existed that's nan Roman the head of the National Alliance to end homelessness she says as a rose once seen as blight are now viewed as one solution homelessness several cities Chicago New York San Francisco and Portland Oregon or trying to preserve S. arose before owners convert them to hire and housing back in Massachusetts Richard has lived in this tiny SRO room for three years surviving on a seven hundred dollar a month disability check his hands trembled as he shows me the ceiling fan dangling from thin wires he and three other tenants share bathrooms cracked floor tiles indicate caulking around the tub as bad as it is here Richard wants to stay put one of the big problems for most people in the building is where are we going to go we can't afford the rent anymore and you're talking about elderly disabled people he's not alone in San Diego city officials last spring we're helping nearly two hundred people relocate after a large S. R. O. closed Boston housing advocates see a similar pattern hi Louise Lawrence is an attorney at Harvard law school's legal clinic defending S. R. O. tenants against eviction people are being thrown out that's happening quick across the city because these properties now are so value what was considered sort of housing at the last resort is now seen as desirable and profitable but developers say running rooming houses is hard and when the economy is booming like it is now there may be easier options like converting to condos Ellen hope ran to rooming houses north.

nan Roman National Alliance New York San Francisco Oregon Richard S. R. O. Louise Lawrence attorney Harvard law school Ellen Chicago Portland Massachusetts San Diego Boston seven hundred dollar three years
"nan roman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KCRW

"Seven percent increase from five hundred fifty dollars to seven hundred dollars a month nationally housing advocates say S. arose are vital unsubsidized shelter for the poor low wage workers the elderly and people with mental illness or drug addiction S. arose don't have a great reputation considered substandard housing cities in the last fifty years eliminated hundreds of thousands of rooms in the name of urban renewal there's no question that the loss of a lot of these units is a major contributor to homelessness in places where they existed that's nan Roman the head of the National Alliance to end homelessness she says as arose once seen as blight are now viewed as one solution homelessness several cities Chicago New York San Francisco and Portland Oregon are trying to preserve S. arose before owners convert them to hire and housing back in Massachusetts Richard has lived in this tiny espero room for three years surviving on a seven hundred dollar a month disability check his hands trembled as he shows me the ceiling fan dangling from thin wires he and three other tenants share bathrooms cracked floor tiles indicate caulking around the tub as bad as it is here Richard wants to stay put one of the big problems for most people in the building is where are we going to go we can't afford the rent anymore in your talking about elderly disabled people he's not alone in San Diego city officials last spring we're helping nearly two hundred people relocate after a large S. R. O. closed Boston housing advocates see a similar pattern Louise Lawrence is an attorney at Harvard law school's legal clinic defending SRO tenants against eviction people are being thrown out that's happening quick across the city because these properties now are still value what was considered sort of housing at the last resort is now seen as desirable and profitable but developers say running rooming houses is hard and when the economy is booming like it is now there may be easier options like converting to condos Ellen hope ran to rooming houses north of Boston it's very difficult I think if you're not a professional and maintaining a rooming house to.

nan Roman National Alliance New York San Francisco Oregon Richard S. R. O. Louise Lawrence attorney Harvard law school Ellen Boston Chicago Portland Massachusetts San Diego five hundred fifty dollars seven hundred dollars seven hundred dollar Seven percent fifty years
"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"There's no question that the loss of a lot of these units is a major contributor to homelessness in places where they existed that's nan Roman the head of the National Alliance to end homelessness she says as arose once seen as blight are now viewed as one solution homelessness several cities Chicago New York San Francisco and Portland Oregon are trying to preserve S. arose before owners convert them to hire and housing back in Massachusetts Richard has lived in this tiny SRO room for three years surviving on a seven hundred dollar a month disability check his hands trembled as he shows me the ceiling fan dangling from thin wires he and three other tenants share bathrooms cracked floor tiles indicate caulking around the tub as bad as it is here Richard wants to stay put one of the big problems for most people in the building is where are we going to go we can't afford the rent anymore and you're talking about elderly disabled people he's not alone in San Diego city officials last spring we're helping nearly two hundred people relocate after a large S. R. O. closed Boston housing advocates see a similar pattern Louise Lawrence is an attorney at Harvard law school's legal clinic defending SRO tenants against eviction people are being thrown out that's happening quick across the city because these properties now are so value what was considered sort of housing at the last resort is now seen as desirable and profitable but developers say running rooming houses is hard and when the economy is booming like it is now there may be easier options like converting to condos Ellen hope ran to rooming houses north of Boston it's.

nan Roman National Alliance New York San Francisco Oregon Richard S. R. O. Louise Lawrence attorney Harvard law school Ellen Boston Chicago Portland Massachusetts San Diego seven hundred dollar three years
"nan roman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KCRW

"Yesterday's sharp drop? The Dow up one percent two hundred thirty two points, the s&p five hundred is up eight tenths percent. Nasdaq up one percent where does this where does that leave us for the month? So far down seven point six percent on the SNP at the moment. Eighteen days into December amid the trade war rising interest rates and despite the big tax overhaul. The federal reserves two day meeting ends tomorrow, probably with a hike in interest rates, and we may get some hints about the year ahead. President Trump today warned the fed to quote feel the market and not just go by what he characterized as meaningless numbers the economics of shelter. Now. The US department of housing and urban development has just released its twenty eighteen report on homelessness despite very low unemployment in greater efforts by cities to offer shelter. The number of people without a place to live continued to climb this year. Here's marketplace's Eric embarrass nationwide. The gain was slight. Just three tenths of a percent over last year. But any gain is significant says Heidi shall ties with the center for American progress a rise in homelessness really shows us who the economy is working for and who it's not working for who. It's not working for lower wage workers in high rents cities, like New York and Seattle which both saw increases NAN Roman is with the National Alliance to end homelessness. She says not being able to afford housing has two dimensions. One is the rent side and one is the income side. So sometimes go together that is places where people's incomes are lower. The housing is also less expensive, sometimes the matchup doesn't work. So well, the report found that in thirty one states and the district of Columbia, the homeless population declined Roman says more people are being moved into housing than ever before. But the demand is greater too. I'm Eric bears for marketplace. We also talk today about economic insecurity, despite what appears in the headlines is very low joblessness some of this may have. To do with an ongoing drop in what's called the labor force participation rate. That's not happening in Canada. And experts argue this is because US policies often don't support women in the workforce at the same levels as Canada, check out the marketplace morning report podcast.

NAN Roman US department of housing Canada Trump US Eric bears President Heidi Columbia National Alliance New York Seattle one percent Eighteen days six percent two day
"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Dow up one percent two hundred thirty two points, the s&p five hundred is up eight tenths percent. Nasdaq up one percent where does this where does that leave us for the month? So far on down seven point six percent on the SNP at the moment. Eighteen days into December amid the trade war rising interest rates and despite the big tax overhaul. The federal reserves two day meeting ends tomorrow, probably with a hike in interest rates, and we may get some hints about the year ahead. President Trump today warned the fed to quote feel the market and not just go by what he characterized as meaningless numbers. The economics of shelter. Now. The US department of housing and urban development is just released its twenty eighteen report on homelessness despite very low unemployment and greater efforts by cities to offer shelter. The number of people without a place to live continued to climb this year. Here's marketplace's Eric embarrass nationwide. The game was slight just three tenths of a percent over last year. But any gain is significant says Heidi shell ties with the center for American progress a rise in homelessness really shows us who the economy is working for and who it's not working for who. It's not working for lower wage workers in high rent cities, like New York and Seattle which both saw increases NAN Roman is with the National Alliance to end homelessness. She says not being able to afford housing has two dimensions. One is the rent side and one is the income side. So sometimes as go together that is places where people's incomes are lower. The housing is also less expensive, sometimes the matchup doesn't work. So well, the hard report. Found that in thirty one states and the district of Columbia, the homeless population declined Roman says more people are being moved into housing than ever before. But the demand is greater too. I'm Eric bears for marketplace. We also talked today about economic, insecurity, despite what appears in the headlines is very low joblessness some of this may have to do with an ongoing drop in what's called the labor force participation rate. That's not happening in Canada. And experts argue this is because US policies often don't support women in the workforce at the same levels as Canada, check out the marketplace morning report podcast.

NAN Roman US department of housing Canada Trump Eric bears US Heidi shell President National Alliance Columbia New York Seattle one percent Eighteen days six percent two day
"nan roman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David Brancaccio in New York. The W P is calling for a boycott of Facebook today. Some other organizations are also calling for a change of leadership at the social media company. It's in response to a congressional report that says Russia used Facebook and other companies to target African Americans with the end of discouraging people from voting in the last presidential election. Marketplace's Nancy Marshall genzer explains. The N double ACP says it's concerned about data breaches other organizations including including the national LGBTQ task force. And in group. Muslim advocates have signed a letter asking that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg stepped down as chairman of the board and chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg. Leave the Facebook board entirely. Scott Simpson is with Muslim advocates. When news continues to break about a new scandal about some cultural or racial or religious bigotry thriving on platforms. We really lost faith. Facebook issued a statement today on a civil rights audit. It's conducting in the statement Sheryl Sandberg says Facebook updated its policy to ban misrepresentations on how to vote San ads. She knows Facebook needs to do more, Nancy. Thank you very much. Facebook stock fell two point seven percent yesterday. Twitter stock fell nearly. Seven percent. Amid concerns about political manipulation in an unrelated admission that it's investigating signs that hackers may have used Witter to steal personal data. Check markets yesterday. The Dow and NASDAQ each finished down more than two percent, minus five hundred seven points for the Dow the s&p is down five and a half percent year to date amid the trade war rising interest rates and despite the big tax overhaul. This morning stock index futures are pointing to a higher opening on Wall Street, but the S and P future up six tenths of a percent. The Federal Reserve's two day meeting ends tomorrow, probably with a hike in interest rates and hints about the year ahead. The footsie index in London is down four tenths percent now to the economics of shelter. The US department of housing and urban development has just released its twenty eighteen report on homelessness despite very low unemployment and greater efforts by cities to offer shelter. The number of people without a place to live continued to climb this year. Marketplace's Erica barris reports nationwide. The gain was slight just three times. Of a percents over last year. But any gain a significant says Heidi shell ties with the center for American progress a rise in homelessness really shows us who the economy is working for and who it's not working for who? It's not working for lower wage workers in high rent cities, like New York and Seattle which both saw increases NAN Roman is with the National Alliance to end homelessness. She says not being able to afford housing has two dimensions one is threat side, and one is the income side. So sometimes those go together that is places where people's incomes are lower. The housing is also less expensive, sometimes the matchup doesn't work. So well, the report found that in thirty one states and the district of Columbia, the homeless population declined Roman says more people are being moved into housing than ever before. But the demand is greater too. I'm Eric embarrass for marketplace. We also talked today about economic, insecurity, despite what appears in the headlines has very low joblessness some of this may have to do with an ongoing drop in what's called the labor force participation rate. People who stopped looking for jobs, especially women now that's not happening in Canada, an expert's argue this is because US policies often don't support women in the workforce at the same levels as Canada, check out the marketplace morning report podcast feed. If you miss our discussion on the air..

Facebook Sheryl Sandberg Nancy Marshall genzer NAN Roman David Brancaccio New York US department of housing Twitter Canada Russia Federal Reserve Eric embarrass Scott Simpson Mark Zuckerberg Erica barris Witter
"nan roman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KCRW

"Rise in homelessness really shows us who the economy is working for and who it's not working for who. It's not working for lower wage workers in high rent cities, like New York and Seattle which both saw increases NAN Roman is with the National Alliance to end homelessness. She says not being able to afford housing has two dimensions. One is the rent side and one is the income side. So sometimes go together that is places where people's incomes are lower the housing also less expensive, sometimes the matchup doesn't work. So well, the report found that in thirty one states and the district of Columbia, the homeless population declined Roman says more people are being moved into housing than ever before. But the demand is greater too. I'm Eric bears for marketplace. We also talked today about economic, insecurity, despite what appears in the headlines has very low joblessness some of this may have to do with an aunt. Going drop in what's called the labor force participation rate. People who stopped looking for jobs, especially women now that's not happening in Canada. An experts argue this is because US policies often don't support women in the workforce at the same levels as Canada check out the marketplace morning report podcast feed. If you miss our discussion on the air. Marketplace morning report is supported by progressive insurance, offering snapshot a device that adjusts insurance rates based on safe driving habits now that's progressive. Learn more progressive dot com or one eight.

NAN Roman Canada National Alliance Eric bears Columbia Seattle New York US
"nan roman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Dow s&p NASDAQ all finished down more than two percent, minus five hundred seven points for the Dow it's the eighteenth year and for the month. So far the s&p is down. Just did the math eight point four percent. The s&p is down five and a half percent year to date amid the trade war rising interest rates, and despite the big tax overhaul this morning stock index futures in the US or pointing to a higher opening on Wall Street with Dow and s&p futures each up four tenths of a percent at the moment. Many moved into bonds yesterday with the benchmark ten year interest rate down to two point eight two percent. The footsie in London is down five tenths percent. Now the Federal Reserve's two day meeting. Ends tomorrow probably with a hike in interest rates and hints about the year ahead. The economics of shelter. Now. The US department of housing and urban development has just released its twenty eighteen report on homelessness despite very low unemployment and greater efforts by cities to offer shelter. The number of people without a place to live continued to climb this year. Marketplace's Erica barris reports nationwide. The gain was slight just three tenths of a percent over last year. But any gain is significant says Heidi show ties with the center for American progress a rise in homelessness really shows us who the economy is working for and it's not working for who. It's not working for lower wage workers in high rent cities, like New York and Seattle which both saw increases NAN Roman is with the National Alliance to end homelessness. She says not being able to afford housing has two dimensions. One is the rent side and one is the income side. So sometimes go together that is places where people's incomes are lower. The housing is also less expensive, sometimes the matchup doesn't work. So well. The report found that in thirty one states and the district of Columbia, the homeless population declined Roman says more people are being moved into housing than ever before. But the demand is greater too. I'm Eric embarrass for marketplace. We also talked today about economic, insecurity, despite what appears in the headlines as very low joblessness, some of this may have to do with the ongoing drop in what's called labor force participation people who stopped looking for jobs, especially women in America. That's not happening in Canada. And experts argue this is because US policies often don't support women in the workforce at the same levels as say Canada. Check out the marketplace podcast feed the morning report one.

NAN Roman Dow US US department of housing Canada Erica barris Federal Reserve Eric embarrass Heidi America London Columbia National Alliance New York Seattle eight two percent four percent
"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dow SNP and NASDAQ all finished down more than two percent, minus five hundred seven points for the Dow it's the eighteenth year and for the month. So far the s&p is down. And just did the math eight point four percent. The s&p is down five and a half percent year to date amid the trade war rising interest rates, and despite the big tax overhaul this morning stock index futures in the US or pointing to a higher opening on Wall Street with Dow futures up four tenths of a percent at the moment. Many moved into bonds yesterday with the benchmark ten year interest rate down to two point eight two percent. The footsie in London is down five tenths percent. Now the Federal Reserve's two day meeting. Ends tomorrow probably with a hike in interest rates and hints about the year ahead. The economics of shelter. Now. The US department of housing and urban development has just released its twenty eighteen report on homelessness despite very low unemployment and greater efforts by cities to offer shelter. The number of people without a place to live continued to climb this year. Marketplace's Erica barris reports nationwide. The gain was slight just three tenths of a percent over last year. But any gain is significant says Heidi shell ties with the center for American progress a rise in homelessness really shows us who the economy is working for and who it's not working for who. It's not working for lower wage workers in high rents cities, like New York and Seattle which both saw increases NAN Roman is with the National Alliance to end homelessness. She says not being able to afford housing has two dimensions. One is the rent side and one is the income side. So sometimes as go together that is places where people's incomes are lower. The housing is also less expensive, sometimes the matchup doesn't work. So well. The report found that in thirty one states and the district of Columbia, the homeless population declined Roman says more people are being moved into housing than ever before. But the demand is greater too. I'm Eric embarrass for marketplace. We also talked today about economic, insecurity, despite what appears in the headlines has very low joblessness some of this may have to do with the ongoing drop in what's called labor force participation people who stopped looking for jobs, especially women in America. That's not happening in Canada. And experts argue this is because US policies often don't support women in the workforce at the same levels as say Canada. Check out the marketplace podcast feed the morning report one.

NAN Roman US Dow US department of housing Canada Erica barris Federal Reserve Heidi shell Eric embarrass America London Columbia National Alliance New York Seattle eight two percent four percent two percent
"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Confident that that kind of thinking will catch on kaiser plans to focus not only on providing supportive housing for the homeless but also on preventing the displacement of lower and middle income households nan roman is president of the national alliance to end homelessness she says rising rents have forced families to spend a larger share of their incomes on housing over half of poor households pay more than half their income for rent that leaves very little for everything else people can't get healthy food they can't access healthcare is readily they're stressed and all those result in poor health just building more affordable units isn't enough says nathan thomas appear recovery specialist at healthcare for the homeless the majority of the work i believe is keeping someone else because is one thing that just takes a moderate dorm in a box and say hey your box thank you have a nice day many homeless people have mental health issues or disabilities that make it hard to live independently he says thomas helps navigate those challenges sometimes this isn't budgets you know 'cause a lotta times on our clients don't have anybody with us today he's talking with sydney bond about bonds upcoming move to a nicer building there's a small shopping centre restaurants is there the subways right there it's a long way from the crowded shelters and soup kitchens he left behind several studies have shown the economic payoff of supportive housing program in los angeles saved the county twenty percent on medical and social service.

nan roman president nathan thomas los angeles sydney twenty percent
"nan roman" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Running down speed almost tripped face you know because i was so heavy the call was from healthcare for the homeless at its downtown baltimore clinic it provides medical care to homeless people and also connects them with what's called permanent supportive housing subsidize place to live plus counseling and other social services when bond was on the street he says his chronic asthma high blood pressure would flare up he also suffered from exile in depression homeless put a strain on the prison mine because it was constantly worried about harm get out what i'm gonna do there was constantly wearing now at fifty four after more than two years and his own place in our key drachma medication goes to my doctor's appointments see my psychiatrist see my therapist it host be to take care myself that better more health care organizations are making that connection between housing and health hospitals subsidized apartments for the homeless in chicago orlando and portland insurer united healthcare has invested millions of dollars in affordable housing projects in michigan and wisconsin kevin linda mood is ceo of healthcare for the homeless in maryland he says kaiser's two hundred million dollar investment is a big step forward the real significance as you've got a major corporation saying it's within our business interests to recognize this relationship and increase the stock of affordable housing we are confident that kind of thinking will catch on kaiser plans to focus not only on providing supportive housing for the homeless but also on preventing the displacement of lower and middle income households nan roman is president of the national alliance to end homelessness she says rising rents forced.

president ceo of healthcare kevin linda wisconsin michigan united healthcare portland depression baltimore nan roman kaiser maryland orlando chicago bond two hundred million dollar two years
"nan roman" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"nan roman" Discussed on Here & Now

"So how did the homeless fair during the recent frigid weather in parts of the country the department of housing and urban development says the number of homeless people in the us is up for the first time since 2010 in a few minutes will meet in illinois man who decided to help at least some of them but first nan roman president and ceo of the national lines to end homelessness nn what did you see nationwide which generally speaking i think people that provide services homeless people that run the shelters and so forth as well as most cities really struggled to make sure that they have a place for people to come in that they're doing outreach on the streets to find people who may not know that it's going to get so called that they have call in emergency numbers uh so that citizens can alert the police or helpers to make sure that people get in but we do have a lot of people who are unsheltered in our country a thirty five percent of people who are homeless are not sheltered we have about five hundred and fifty thousand homeless people but only about two hundred in 75000 emergency beds so this is something that causes issues when we have these kind of serious cold snap what percentage of that is the homeless who don't want to come inside they have some mental issues or real fear of a shelter and what is families with single moms meaty who can't find rooms it's generally much more single individuals uh not so much families and i think it's not very many people who really don't want to come inside the issue tense more often to be that there are barriers to their coming inside so they have to have forms of i d or they have to meet certain criteria teather get into shelters were stay in shelters this is often because the show truce deng aren't resource don't have staff that can really provide services well we'll this is something we're about to hear about from our next guest that the idea that shelters have to screen for legal issues but also for what they're capable.

us president and ceo deng illinois nan roman thirty five percent