35 Burst results for "Naloxone"

Mysterious 'purple heroin’ linked to overdoses in Michigan

John McCulloch

00:22 sec | Last month

Mysterious 'purple heroin’ linked to overdoses in Michigan

"Poison Center at Wayne State University School of Medicine is warning about a drug that is causing overdoses. The drug Purple heroin is linked overdoses in the upper peninsula as well as one in Van Buren County. The Michigan State Police laboratory tested the drug and found fentanyl and morphine in the drug. Teachers. Researchers say that the drug should respond naloxone and an overdose situation, but research is limited.

Wayne State University School Van Buren County Michigan State Police Poison Center Heroin Fentanyl Morphine Naloxone
New Jersey residents will have access to opioid reversal drug, Thursday

KYW 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

New Jersey residents will have access to opioid reversal drug, Thursday

"Will be able to pick up the opioid overdose reversal. Drug naloxone beginning on Thursday. The drug, commonly known as Narcan, will be free to residents through Saturday and more than 300 pharmacies across the state. This is the second straight year that Democratic governor Phil Murphy's administration has hosted in the locks and give away. Last year's event was just one day instead of three this year. A number of participating pharmacies also nearly doubled from about 1 72 or 3 20 this year.

Phil Murphy Narcan Naloxone
Deal will let more companies make an overdose antidote spray

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

Deal will let more companies make an overdose antidote spray

"More companies can make a nasal version of the opioid overdose antidote naloxone under a deal struck between new York's Attorney General and the one company that sells it now the deal with emergent by solutions opens the market to you does not guarantee that more companies will offer the product but it allows them to do so the cost of nor can has been a complication in the nation's opioid crisis New York investigation finding that emergent had a deal with the nasal spray device makers that restricted its products from being used with naloxone made by other

Naloxone New York Attorney
Deal will let more companies make overdose antidote spray

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:15 sec | 11 months ago

Deal will let more companies make overdose antidote spray

"More companies could make a nasal version of the opioid overdose antidote naloxone under a deal struck between the New York Attorney General and the one company that sells it now the deal with the emergence of bio solutions opens the market but doesn't guarantee more companies will offer that

Naloxone New York Attorney
10 people died of overdoses within 26 hours in one Ohio county

Woody and Company

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

10 people died of overdoses within 26 hours in one Ohio county

"There was a huge surge in drug overdose deaths over the weekend the Franklin County coroner reported ten overdose deaths in just twenty six hours this weekend warning that they could be tied to a Sentinel police are urging family and friends who do have drug problems to contact them for naloxone the entire overdose drug as. well this training on how to administer it in an

Drug Overdose Franklin County Naloxone Twenty Six Hours
Post opioid-overdose interventions emerge in US

KCBS 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Post opioid-overdose interventions emerge in US

"I now opioids as we continue to see related deaths on the rise in Contra Costa county KCBS is Kerry who dissect tells us how health officials are now working to prevent and reduce overdoses nationwide more than eighty people died of an opioid overdose in twenty eighteen that's up for more than fifty the year before that hunter Costa county health officer Dr Chris fournis Hannah says that's because more people are misusing opioid such as heroin and prescription pain killers indications sitting in people's medicine cabinets are often the source of people to misuse medications they can be stolen or misuse by family members overdose deaths are widespread in Contra Costa but health officials fear it could get worse that's why local police fire and ambulance agencies have been carrying the opioid reversal drug naloxone which can save someone

Kerry Heroin Contra Costa Naloxone Hunter Costa County Officer Dr Chris Fournis Hannah
Boom in overdose-reversing drug is tied to fewer opioid deaths

The KDKA Radio Morning News with Larry Richert and John Shumway

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Boom in overdose-reversing drug is tied to fewer opioid deaths

"New numbers in the fight against opioid show promise here in Pennsylvania KDKA radio's Joe to ski has more Pennsylvania's prescription drug monitoring programs my doctor's writing fewer opioid prescriptions down twenty seven percent over the past year and a half in that time paramedics of administered more than twenty five thousand doses of naloxone to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose the Pennsylvania opioid command center reports an eighteen percent drop in drug overdose deaths last year but officials admit so Matix returning to cocaine and friends of all deaths from those drugs

JOE Pennsylvania Naloxone Matix Cocaine SKI Drug Overdose Twenty Seven Percent Eighteen Percent
US, Naloxone And Three Decades discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

US, Naloxone And Three Decades discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Prescriptions the rose rehearsing drug knocks alone are soaring and experts say that could be a reason that overdose deaths of stop rising for the first time in nearly three decades the number of naloxone prescriptions dispensed by US retail pharmacies doubled from twenty seventeen to

United States Naloxone Three Decades
CDC: Not enough doctors prescribing naloxone

Rob Pratte

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

CDC: Not enough doctors prescribing naloxone

"The CDC says the overdose reversing drug that saves lives is still not available where it's needed most reporter Sabrina Cupid well the number of election prescriptions doubled from twenty seventeen to eighteen there was still only one dispense for every seventy high dose opioid prescriptions and the problem was even worse in rural areas according to principal deputy director of the CDC Dr and shook at world counties for nearly three times more likely to be in the low dispensing group and more metropolitan counties Lawson has been highly effective but tens of thousands are still dying each year from opioid related overdoses Sabrina cubic for CBS

CDC Sabrina Cupid Principal Deputy Director Lawson CBS Reporter
FDA approves 1st generic nasal spray to treat opioid overdose

AP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

FDA approves 1st generic nasal spray to treat opioid overdose

"The FDA approved the first generic nasal spray version of Narcan a drug that reverses opioid overdoses the naloxone spray from Israel's Tiba pharmaceuticals got the okay Friday, Nelson has been sold as a nasal spray in the US since twenty sixteen under the brand name Narcan pharmacists, can dispense it without a prescription. It's sold as a generic or brand name drug in automatic injectors, pre filled syringes and vials a pack of two Narcan nasal sprays costs about one hundred thirty to one hundred fifty dollars without insurance tvos still has yet to release the products price, or when it will be

Narcan Tiba Pharmaceuticals FDA Nelson United States Israel Naloxone One Hundred Fifty Dollars
Narcan, Tiba Pharmaceuticals And NAR discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Narcan, Tiba Pharmaceuticals And NAR discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"The FDA approved the first generic nasal spray version of NAR can a drug that reverses opioid overdoses the naloxone spray from Israel's Tiba pharmaceuticals got the okay Friday now zone has been sold as a nasal spray in the US in two thousand sixteen under the brand name Narcan pharmacists, can dispense it without a prescription. It's sold as a generic or brand name drug in automatic injectors, pre filled syringes, and via a pack of two Narcan nasal sprays costs about one hundred thirty to one hundred fifty dollars without insurance tvos still has yet to release the product price or when it will be

Narcan Tiba Pharmaceuticals NAR FDA United States Israel Naloxone One Hundred Fifty Dollars
FDA approves 1st generic nasal spray to treat opioid overdose

AP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

FDA approves 1st generic nasal spray to treat opioid overdose

"The FDA's approved the first generic nasal spray version of NAR can drug that reverses opioid overdoses the naloxone spray from Israel's TV pharmaceuticals got the okay Friday, Nelson has been sold as a nasal spray in the US in twenty sixteen under the brand. Name NAR can pharmacists can dispense it without a prescription. It's sold as generic or brand name drug in automatic injectors, prefigured syringes and vials APAC of two Narcan nasal sprays costs about one hundred thirty to one hundred fifty dollars without insurance tvos still has yet to release the products price, or when it will be

NAR Apac FDA Nelson United States Israel Naloxone One Hundred Fifty Dollars
Tiba Pharmaceuticals, Naltrexone And NAR discussed on AP 24 Hour News

AP 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Tiba Pharmaceuticals, Naltrexone And NAR discussed on AP 24 Hour News

"The FDA approved the first generic nasal spray version of NAR can a drug that reverses opioid overdoses the naloxone spray from Israel's Tiba pharmaceuticals got the okay Friday naltrexone has been sold as a nasal spray in the US since two thousand sixteen under the brand name Narcan. Pharmacists, can dispense it without a prescription. It's sold as a generic or brand name drug in automatic injectors, pre filled syringes and vile 's a pack of two Narcan nasal sprays costs about one hundred thirty to one hundred fifty dollars without insurance tvos still has yet to release the product price or when it will be

Tiba Pharmaceuticals Naltrexone NAR FDA United States Israel Naloxone One Hundred Fifty Dollars
FDA, New York And Naloxone discussed on KNX Programming

KNX Programming

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

FDA, New York And Naloxone discussed on KNX Programming

"New York. The FDA has approved a generic version of a drug that used as a fast-acting antidote for opioid overdoses the generic naloxone nasal spray can be used by anyone to help with an overdose regardless of his or her medical training than the lock zone has been off. Off patent ever since the nineteen eighties. This nasal version is the first that anyone can use its lower prices going to make it more available to law enforcement, agencies and community

FDA New York Naloxone
A Generic Version of Opioid Overdose Antidote Naloxone Just Landed FDA Approval

KRLD Programming

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

A Generic Version of Opioid Overdose Antidote Naloxone Just Landed FDA Approval

"US regulators have approved the first generic nasal spray version of Narcan. That's a drug that reverses opioid overdoses the food and Drug administration today okayed now no lock zone spray for Israel's Tia from Israel's TV pharmaceuticals naloxone has been sold as a nasal spray in the US since twenty sixteen hundred the Braun brand name Narcan pharmacists, can dispense it without a

Narcan Food And Drug Administration United States Israel Braun Naloxone
"naloxone" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"naloxone" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"House Judiciary chair Jerrold Nadler has issued a subpoena for the full Muller report. A lot actually was revealed and the report, but there were reductions and beyond the fact of the reductions, there was all sorts of underlying material things like interviews that were referenced but not made public and Jerry Nadler would like to see a fuller picture of what's out there. Meanwhile, President Trump lashed out on Twitter Friday, saying the findings of the report contained statements that were quote fabricated and totally untrue. This is what's news from the Wall Street Journal. I'm Ameri for totally New York before we get to our main story on Democrats subpoena of the full Muller report. Here are some other top stories. We're following former vice president Joe Biden is expected to announce his twenty twenty bid for the White House as early as next week. The Wall Street Journal reports that Biden is putting the finishing touches on his campaign, which is expected to launch with video followed. By a tour of early voting states, Biden would join a crowded field for the democratic nomination. Which currently includes eighteen candidates in recent weeks. He's also been confronted by allegations from women who said he inappropriately touched them or invaded their personal space. He's found to be more mindful and respectful Teva pharmaceuticals has been granted approval. From US regulators to market a generic version of naloxone. The nasal spray used to treat opioid overdoses the food and Drug administration says it's the first approval of generic naloxone nasal spray for use by individuals without medical training almost four hundred thousand people died from opioid overdoses between nineteen ninety nine and twenty seventeen according to data from.

Joe Biden Jerrold Nadler The Wall Street Journal Muller Teva pharmaceuticals food and Drug administration naloxone vice president President Twitter US New York White House Trump
FDA And Naloxone discussed on Tom Sullivan

Tom Sullivan

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

FDA And Naloxone discussed on Tom Sullivan

"Approval to the first generic nasal spray to treat opioid overdoses naloxone nasal spray with the brand name of Narcan is a medicine used to help stop and reverse the effects of an opioid overdose. Nor now primarily used by police and EMS workers the FDA also announced plans to review applications for similar generic products as well as plans to help create an over the counter

FDA Naloxone
The Opioid Crisis

Joey Hudson

04:43 min | 1 year ago

The Opioid Crisis

"Kim Miller came to Greenville in the fall of two thousand and fourteen to become Greenville's twenty-six police chief he came via Charlotte Mecklenburg in Greensboro, North Carolina, and is really known for community policing. He believes that the community should be Imbaba. He was quoted in the Greenwood news that first week on the job is saying my role in managing the police department is making sure we're meeting the needs of the community were part of a community not apart from them. And chief welcome in your truly. I believe that you blew that believe that that your men and women need to be out on the streets and becoming a part of the community in which they serve it will. Thank you Joey for having me on your program. I I do believe that. And I believe also that the safest communities are the ones where police and community are working together to ensure that everybody is safe that we're all taking our part in ensuring that we're not gonna be victimized. And that our neighbors won't be victimized. So working you have to work in collaboration with the community and an number of service providers and businesses throughout our community do that. I'm glad to say in the coming weeks. We're going to be visited by the teeth. We're calling it. We're gonna call it a minute with Miller. But then we realized that there's not a such thing as just a minute with Miller. It's going to be minutes with a Meller because we we have lots to talk about chief. And we we got a little intro here for you. I'm police chief can. You'll be checking in weekly with chief Miller. So let's just jump in here. Like so many areas. One of the things that we're seeing here in the upstate and, unfortunately, it's one of the things at the upstate lease estate in as I understand is the impact of Opio at the opioid crisis. We hear a lot about this. But give us a thirty thousand foot view of what the opioid crisis looks like here in in Greenville. And what that means. Yeah. So Jerry, we we struggle between our county and the coastal counties with with the opioid crisis mostly for South Carolina and here in the upstate. We have a dubious distinction of actually having the most opiate overdose reversals in the state. We are the most populous county, and we have the most reversals and not the highest overdose fatal rate or. Metality rate for the state because we are quipped EMS fire personnel and police and sheriff's personnel are quipped with a life saving drug naloxone. And so we've administered that seven hundred ten times actually, more than seven hundred ten times between the three first responders to to really reverse the effects and safe people. And we have in fact, saved many many people from from dying from overdose here in in Greenville county now that seven hundred plus over what period of time is that's just that's just twenty eighteen while. Yeah. Well, his twenty eighteen when you look at this and just at the national level in two thousand sixteen there were sixty two thousand four hundred ninety seven fatal overdose related to opioids heroin and fennel and largely fennel in two thousand seventeen that increased to seventy thousand two hundred thirty seven so we're still on the upswing with his. Pedantic? And if you put that in comparison anything put it an all Vietnam, they were fifty eight thousand two hundred twenty casualties. And so in two years alone. We've more than doubled. The casualty rate the ten plus years of Vietnam war. So so what what's the answer? So there are you know, there are a lot of there are a lot of things we can do. But I will tell you that we need to change behavior. And that behavior begins from the far pharmaceutical companies through our physicians that are prescribing how we manage prescriptions, but we have to focus and this what we do in policing. When we look at problems that are affecting our community. We we look at prevention intervention and enforcement a lot of folks, you know, enforcement is kind of our lane, but we find ourselves in in into the prevention and intervention partnerships because they're so important to to our communities because if all we do is enforcement, we basically criminalize most behavior and and criminalize our

Chief Miller Imbaba Greenville Greenville County North Carolina Greensboro Greenwood Joey Charlotte Mecklenburg Vietnam South Carolina Opio EMS Heroin Jerry
RI health officials urge residents to carry naloxone amid opioid overdoses

Ron St. Pierre

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

RI health officials urge residents to carry naloxone amid opioid overdoses

"The Rhode Island department of health wants people to start carrying the overdose reversal medication the lock zone. Health officials say that about thirty four percent of the opioid overdoses that EMS responded to in two thousand eighteen happened in public places, including parking lot restaurants stores and beaches DO h director, Dr Nicole Alexander Scott says with so many overdoses in plain sight, everyone can play a part

Dr Nicole Alexander Scott Department Of Health Rhode Island Director Thirty Four Percent
"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:02 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Noon support for NPR this morning comes from L, D, entertainment and roadside attractions with is back. Starring Julia Roberts says a mother whose son unexpectedly returns home at Christmas also with Lucas hedges. Now in select theaters expands December fourteenth by atlassian collaboration software company. Powering teams around the world committed to providing the tools and practices to help teams plan track. Build and work better together, more at atlassian dot com, and by the listeners of member supported Q public radio more of our program now at thirty four minutes past five it's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. In washington. And I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. We're gonna turn now to China where there several storylines. We have been following this morning. It appears that China has detained to Canadians in possible. Retaliation for Canada's arrest of a Chinese tech exec, and as for the U S, China trade class China. Now seems to be making some big changes that could please the Trump administration to help roll through all of this returned NPR's. Rob Schmitz who is in Shanghai. The rob good morning. So it's been quite a Newsweek in the relationship between the United States and China, can you give us like a quick timeline of what exactly's happening get up to speed on. It's been a little crazy. Let's start with Monday on Monday. There's a bail hearing for Walli CFO Marwan Joe in Canada on that day. Meanwhile in China on Monday police detain a former Canadian diplomat, and what appears to be retaliation for monks detention in Vancouver. As we've reported monk faces extradition to the US Tuesday. The judge in Vancouver. Let's got him bail and that same day. President Trump says he might scrap US charges against Mong. If China would agree to a trade deal that satisfies him Wednesday. They Wall Street Journal reports China's playing scrap it's made in China twenty twenty-five program, that's their plan to dominate a range of tech sectors. That has angered the Trump administration. And today Chinese authorities detained or announced that they've detained a second Canadian citizens, so more retaliation from amongst attention. But on the other hand, we also learned that China has again started buying US soybeans. Okay have lot there. Let's start with long as your shoot. She's from this one of the biggest companies in China. Beijing was furious that she was detained in Canada. Now, President Trump is saying that he might intervene. What what kind of message is he trying to send Beijing here? Yeah. Of all the news at broke this week, this comment from President Trump, signaling to the Chinese that he's prepared to interfere in the US Justice system in order to make a trade deal may have the farthest reaching implications. I spoke to Scott Kennedy about this today. He's with the center for strategic and international studies. And he said Trump's comments break with US policy mixing issues of national security and commercial relationships in a way that makes everything to go. I think at the end of the day. It's. In US interest to keep these as distinguishable as possible. One is a national security issue. One is about the commercial relationship where you're going to need to negotiate give and take protecting American national security should not be something that's negotiable. But it seems robbed the China might be thinking that things are negotiable. If they've detained to Canadians in China looks like it could be some kind of tit for tat. What do we know about the the two people who are detained there? Monday night, Beijing's ministry of state security apprehended a former Canadian diplomat Michael Connery today, we learned that police in Dandong on the border with North Korea detained another Canadian named Michael before on the same day. He runs a nonprofit organizing cultural exchanges with North Korean. Authorities say they're investigating both of them for harming China's national security, but they haven't given out details yet. Okay. Whether or not either or both of these countries is mixing national security and trade it does sound like China's beginning to soften its line in the trade wars that is that fair to say, yeah. Despite all this ratcheting up of political tensions on the on the trade front, China, and the US seem to be making a lot of progress. China reportedly may scrap its made in China twenty twenty-five campaign to please the Trump administration. This was China's plan to dominate tack in AI globally by using Chinese companies in Beijing just resumed purchases of your soybeans. So these are all things that President Trump has asked for. So the rollercoaster just keeps on going NPR's rob Schmitz covering that roller coaster for us in Shanghai. Rob, thanks as always, thank you. Be prepared getting the lock zone. Save a life that summarizes a campaign launched by US surgeon general Jerome Adams to tackle the opioid epidemic. But one woman who heeded that call and got the overdose reversal drug found that it was a liability when applying for life insurance from WBZ in Boston, Martha beating reports bloodwork was supposed to be the last step in zealous application for life insurance. But when she arrived at the lab, the receptionist said her appointment had been cancelled that was my first morning. I guess and I talk to they each of the made this appointment, then she came to my home and said you were denied because it looks like you have something you medalist that you're using drugs is Ella who works at Boston medical center, Skander med list. It showed a prescription for no lock zone. I'm a nurse. I use it to help people. Just in case if there is an overdose that could save their life. Primerica is the insurer is sell says turned her down the company says it can't discuss individ-. Cases. But spokesman Keith Hancock in a prepared. Statement says primerica like many life insurance considers prescription drug use when reviewing applicants now if a life insurance applicant has a prescription for naloxone we request more information about its intended use as part of our underwriting process primerica is very supportive of efforts to help turn the tide on the national opioid epidemic is selling asked that we just use her first name because she's been turned down by two separate companies, but is still pursuing life insurance a second insurance that it might be considered. If she got a letter from her doctor, but here's the thing is Saleh's doctor didn't prescribe the drug. She just walked into a pharmacy when the opioid epidemic hit Massachusetts and many other states created a standing order for naloxone one prescription that works for everybody. So I had to find the Dr Who signed that statewide naloxone prescription just by chance he works in the same hospital. Meet Dr Alex Walley, I am the standing order. A writer, and we want them to be available to a wide group of people. So while he is troubled by the handful of denied life and disability insurance applications. He's heard about my biggest concern is that people will be discouraged by this from going to get on rescue kit at the pharmacy. So this has been frustrating Sela says she and some of her fellow nurses have stopped carrying on the lock zone kit outside the hospital. They don't want it to show up on their active medication list until this life insurance. Problem is sorted out. So if something were to happen.

China United States President Trump NPR Canada Beijing Rob Schmitz atlassian Steve Inskeep naloxone Shanghai Julia Roberts washington David Greene Culver City Primerica California
"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR and WB, you are and Peter O'Dowd. This is here. Now this country is in the midst of an opioid crisis, but many people still aren't trained to administer the overdose. Reversal drug naloxone, including some frontline pharmacists. There is an effort to change that fashions reported with our partners at staff the health and medicine publication, led welcome back. Thank you. So even pharmacists aren't fully trained to administer this drug. It's a surprise to me because they're the ones that are going to have to show a customer how to use it. Sure. And I should say that regulations vary about who has to have what training before they're permitted to dispense naloxone. But yeah. Last week. I went to a training that really attempted to address this gap that not only should pharmacists know, how to administer naloxone themselves, but they should know how to train the people who come into their pharmacy to get the overdose reversal drug to use it. Whether it's on a neighbor or a family member who they're concerned about or just just to have in their home or walking around so in a country with such a staggering overdose rate when they encounter someone experiencing an overdose. They're they're ready. What kind of training are these pharmacists going through because there's different ways to administer the drugs you can injected. There are also nays nasal sprays. Yeah. The the good news about naloxone is that it's easy to use the most common version Narcan, which is a liquid that you inject measly. And as you say, there's also a much more expensive auto injector version, which is essentially epi pen, but for opioid overdose reversal and that one is much easier to use you really just take off a tab. You have an automated voice talking to you walking through the processing you're supposed to just really stab this needle into someone's thi-. The voice counts to five and you can take it out. And you're you're done, and you should see. Results. You should see someone come to within thirty to forty five seconds. Okay. So if you're going to do that, you definitely want someone to teach you how to do it ahead of time. Which is what we've been talking about this gap and training, but there's also a gap in access to the drug in general. And in one of the big reasons, I understand is cost. How much of an obstacle has happened. Yeah. So we should bear in mind that there are two versions like I said a nasal nasal version and an auto injector version the nasal.

naloxone Peter O'Dowd NPR forty five seconds
"naloxone" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"Doesn't fix the addiction. Right. This is merely giving someone to chance. Louis fillet Cisco in this case they got to the man too late. Okay. Let's let's terminate resuscitation efforts to this time since speed is essential. Nearly all states have now made it legal for anyone to carry. And administering the lock zone like these two good Samaritans injecting stranger. By the time emergency responders show up. The woman has already come to. Dr Plum runs a program called Utah. No lock zone to hand out these emergency kits to anyone with two vials of naloxone and two syringes you go into the worst parts of town tear sometimes into sex houses, you should've went to homeless shelters. Yeah. Absolutely. Excuse me. What lock zone Patrick Rezaq? A former drug addict is part of a network that has helped Dr Plum handout, more than thirty six thousand kids for free some on the roughest streets of Salt Lake City in an area called Rio. Ground money. We have no awesome Laakso you guys need to lock zone. Argot of you to have everybody have one of these. And so we just ask people have heard of naloxone if they need to lock zone six top off day put the needle into liquid. Yes. You pull it back. All right and put a straightness. I. Boom right there right shoulder through the clothes. Doesn't matter. Doctor plows brothers Sam co-founded Utah moloch zone got two doses. And you got two syringes just put them right in a big muscle. No Pulp Fiction, not in the heart. What if you come upon someone and there are on the ground yet? And you think it's an overdose. But it's really hard attack and give them this you won't help them. But you won't hurt them. Same thing for diabetes. Same thing for head injuries saying things for strokes. How did you get interested in this European Trich? Dr a homework in the ER. Yeah. You know, unfortunately, my family went through dealing with addiction in our family, citing Ninety-six, we lost my brother Andy to a heroin overdose in his situation. If no lock zone had been there. Right. Would he have been saved? I do think at least in that one night when we lost him if locks on somewhat have been there. I do think he would have had another chance that night, and that's was a big motivator. And you give it up free absolutely free. Absolutely for always will be. So how do you get with purchase? It. We we get grant money, and we have grant money. I we get grant funds people on the street, and I'm including law enforcement think why do we have to expend money an extra energy when you're just doing it to yourself?.

Dr Plum Utah naloxone Andy Cisco Salt Lake City Louis diabetes Patrick Rezaq heroin
"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the labyrinth that confronts anyone who finds themselves in this world, the growing interest in public clash to broaden access to naloxone was has been really interesting to me for a while. This again is Texas an economics. Professor, Jennifer, Jennifer, and a colleague economist Anita Mukherjee from the university of Wisconsin knew that naloxone was affective. But there are always trade-offs. That's something we we we think about all the time is economists what are the trade offs involved? The biggest off Jennifer and Anita were interested in was moral hazard. So when it's less risky to consume opioids because no and provides a safety net. We might see opioid abuse increase. In other words, could having the safety net of naloxone prompt drug users to take more risks like injecting, bigger doses of heroin or. Stronger drugs like Fantino answering such a question scientifically is very very difficult. The ideal experiment would be to randomly assign. No oxygen access to some states, but not others, obviously, that's not happening here. But it's helpful to think about that ideal experiment because it gives you a treatment and control group since the ideal data were not available. Jennifer and Anita came up with an indirect way to measure with an alarm show. News was affecting opioid use some states were passing laws making it easier to get naloxone the research has decided to use these new laws as a proxy for people actually using the lock zone, and then combat states that had broadened access with those that had not they were then test. If there was any difference between these two groups in terms of opioid overdoses and mortality. It was an imperfect experiment, but this was data. They had lent. Even that, you know, it's not random, and so we need to we need to be really careful about making sure we're controlling for everything else that might be going on in those states that we think might have an impact control for pre existing trends control for just pre existing differences across across state and Oprah in levels of opioid use and other policies. They might have implemented to address the crisis with all those controls in place. They thought they may be able to answer the question. What effect was no locks on having on the heroine epidemic on net. Was it saving lives? It seems reasonable that drug that saves lives would weighed on average have beneficial effects. When you look at more talented rates. I think when we first got into the paper, we really expected to see a big drop in opiate related mortality as a result of these laws. But that is not what they found. In fact, what we found was that on net. We're not seeing any decline in mortality and in some places. We actually see an increase in more. Tally. It was a stunning result to be fair. Jennifer and Anita found that some states did see a decline in mortality when they broadened access to lock zone, but on average nationwide mortality did not decline and places. Like the midwest. We're we're finding that then locks.

Jennifer Anita Mukherjee naloxone opioid abuse university of Wisconsin Texas Professor Fantino heroin
"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reflects the mind-boggling complexities of the opioid epidemic. And the labyrinth that confronts anyone who finds themselves in this world, the growing interest in public push to broaden access to naloxone was has been really interesting to me for a while. This again is Texas an economics. Professor, jennifer. Jennifer and a colleague economist Anita Mukherjee from the university of Wisconsin knew that naloxone was affective. But there are always trade-offs. That's something we we we think about all the time is economists what are the trade offs involved? The biggest tradeoff Jennifer and Anita were interested in was moral hazard. So when it's less risky to consume opioids because no oxygen provides a safety net. We might see opioid abuse increase. In other words, could having the safety net of naloxone prompt drug users to take more risks like injecting bigger doses of heroin or stronger drugs like Fantino answering such a question scientifically is very very difficult. The ideal experiment would randomly assign naloxone access to some states, but not others, obviously, that's not happening here. But it's helpful to think about that ideal experiment because it gives you a a treatment and control since the ideal data were not available. Jennifer and Anita came up with an indirect way to measure with an unlock show. News was affecting opioid use some states were passing laws making it easier to get a lock zone. The research has decided to use these new laws as a proxy for people actually using the lock zone, and then compact states that had broadened access with those that had not they were then test. If there was any difference between these two groups in terms of opioid overdoses and mortality, it was an imperfect experiment. But this was the data they had lent. Even that, you know, it's not random, and so we need to we need to be really careful about making sure we're controlling for everything else that might be going on in those states that we think might have an impact control for pre existing trends control for just pre existing differences across across states and Oprah in levels of opioid use and other policies. They might have implemented to address the crisis with all those controls in place. They thought they may be able to answer the question. What effect was no locks on having on the heroine epidemic on net. Was it saving lives? It seems reasonable that drug that saves lives would would on average have benef-. Official effects when you look at mortality rates. I think when we first got into the safer we really expected to see a big drop in opiate related mortality as a result of these laws. But that is not what they found. In fact, what we found was that on net. We're not seeing any decline in mortality and in some places. We actually see an increase in mortality. It was a stunning result to be fair. Jennifer and Anita found that some states did see a decline in mortality when they broadened access to the lock zone. But on average nationwide mortality did not decline. And places like the midwest. We're we're finding that then Laaksonen access laws caused a fourteen percent increase in opioid related mortality relative to what would have happened without the law. And and also a big increase in fat not related mortality again. Relative to the counterfactual. What would have happened without the law? Jennifer and Anita have a theory about what is going on. Our interpretation is that the the risk of death associated with with a a unit use of of heroin or or prescription pills has fallen now due to naloxone, but the number of uses and the potency of uses has gone up so much that it actually it doesn't just reduce the mortality benefits, but it completely counteracts them in the in the midwest in particular, and so so what seems to be happening is that opioid use. Is going up so much as a result of broader access in a lock zone that that we're actually seeing an increase in mortality rather than a decrease. Shortly after Jennifer and Anita disseminated, a.

jennifer Anita Mukherjee naloxone opioid abuse heroin university of Wisconsin Texas Professor Oprah Fantino Official fourteen percent
"naloxone" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

12:04 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Back in April, the US surgeon general issued an advisory recommending that more Americans carry the opioid overdose reversing drug naloxone. That's more of a statement than you might think because such advisories are rare. In fact, the last one was issued thirteen years ago. So the surgeon general considers the advice extremely important. That's because every day more than one hundred fifteen people in the United States die after overdosing on opioid. According to the National Institute on drug abuse, and many experts believe increasing access to naloxone could help solve the national opioid crisis. But what exactly does no oxen do now lock zone is a medication? That's designed to rapidly refers an opioid overdose. And of course, opioids can be the medications. The prescription medications that are often prescribed to treat. Pain. That's Ducker Patrice Harris chair of the AMA opioid task force and president elect of the American Medical Association. There are two forms. There's one form of naloxone that comes in an auto injectable pen much like folks may be epi pen the epinephrine pen. And in case there is a severe peanut allergy or be sting allergy. And it also comes in as little spray. So those are relatively easy to use something that's easy to use and can reverse an overdose can truly be a lifesaver, and we need all the help. We can get Harris says the nation has had a hard time keeping pace with the growing opioid epidemic, especially since the introduction of synthetic sentinel. We are seeing a sharp increase in the number of overdoses that are related to those illicit drugs. You mentioned now there's also. A stronger drug if you will carpet now that is used actually appropriately by veterinarians for large animals, but unfortunately, these drugs are being manufactured and are now available in these drugs. The now and particularly their car fit. Now are so much more potent. And so it could take more than one dose of the Laaksonen to reverse the overdose. Too rapidly treat overdoses first responders routinely carry no lock zone, but the AMA opioid task force has encouraged states and physicians to make no lock zone. More readily available for all Americans all states now have increased their access to naloxone and actually many of those states base their legislation on an AMA model. Bill. So every state in this country has recognized the importance of access to moloch zone in every state has worked on their own legislation to make sure that lock zone is available. So that we can save lives some safes have laws where the the state health officer. And of course, that varies in each state has the ability to authorize a blanket are used that in quotations prescription some states has encouraged their pharmacies to offer naloxone at their pharmacies. And of course, at the end of the day, the AMA opioid task force has encouraged physicians to consider co prescribing no Laaksonen to their patients that they believe are at higher risk of an overdose yet, it's almost impossible to self administer the medication. According to Dr Karl lead can professor of health behavior and society at the Johns Hopkins. Gins Bloomberg school of public health. So he conducted a study showing who should carry naloxone to use on others. What we found is that certainly active users active heroin and other form of opioid users are very likely to observe and overdose. Individuals going to needle exchange or very likely surfing, and then people who tend to frequent places were drug users interact and use drugs for example, a shooting gallery is a place where people use drugs to be protected from police and being off the street people who go to those sorts of places are also much more likely to witness overdoses, but trying to get more drug users other potential bystanders and even additional first responders to carry naloxone could be a challenge. One reason is the cost if you have insure. Sometimes the copays are higher and that can present a barrier. But if you don't have insurance, certainly the costs are barriers to some folks. And also, I've heard from our local governments are cities, you know, those who are responsible for funding our first responders. They also have raised concerns with me about the cost a decade or fifteen years ago, when I first got into this even probably longer than that, it was a dollar, a vile. And now, it's thirty forty dollars for two very small vial. And it's certainly drug that shouldn't cost that much because there's no new research being done on him. There's one other hitches well despite the life saving power of zone. Some experts say the medication may do more harm than good. That's according to a study conducted by Dr. Jennifer dole EAC an associate professor of economics at Texas. Am university. We found a number of indicators that broadening access to the lock zone has increased the abuse of opioid. So it does seem like reducing the expected cost of of using opioids does increase use as has been found in a lot of other public health areas, and sort of, you know, very predicted by of number theory, and a lot of internal evidence something that surprised us was that the net impact on mortality that broadening knock snatchers had no net impact on mortality overall. And in some regions. Most importantly the midwest. There was actually a big increase in mortality after access. No oxygen was expanded. So in the midwest, we found that broadening access to lock zone increased mortality rates by fourteen percent, which is a lot and certainly suggests that is policy that we'd hoped would buy us some time to figure out a more permanent solution is not buying. Time and time's up. We need to really focus on finding some more effective strategies essence dole EAC says win the lock zone is available to counteract overdoses users. No, they can be a little less careful, but Harris's skeptical of Dolly X findings and latte Guinea's to he says it may not account for all opioid users. Or why many of them keep using first of all people who are drug dependent primarily used because they're afraid of excruciating pain of withdrawal symptoms. I've heard people say it's a thousand times worse than having the flu. So they're almost all drug users, I've interact with are using to reduce withdrawal symptoms. So you have a group who are sort of trying to avoid the pain in dysfunctionality of withdraw. So it's really something that they don't relish at all. The symptoms are so strong. So tempting knowing that the lock Sam can save you. I don't think is the reason people would continue to use however, totally access her study found that in some places greater naloxone availability is a -ffective in preventing deaths and those findings raise concerns about the availability of drug treatment in the US. We did find that the effects of broadening access to naloxone were more beneficial. Or at least the unintended consequences seem to be mitigated in places where there was more drug treatment available. So it really seems that that's more of suggestive finding it's a less clean, natural experiment in social science parlance. But it certainly suggestive that suggestive evidence that if we're going to broaden access to naloxone that we should make sure we're also investing heavily in broadening access to drug treatment in a community and more treatment is something everyone can agree with unfortunately, only two in ten people. People who desire treatment medication assisted treatment have access to that treatment. That is a statistic that we have to address only two Inten. So the AMA is really highlighting this year a push for expanded access to treatment. It has to be available, and it has to be equitably available. There should be no barriers such as prior authorisation barriers to get someone to treatment. So we have a long way to go. Experts hope to walk zone can keep users alive to get treatment. If it's available the drug is the necessary first step in reducing opioid related deaths. And let Kim says there are really very few reasons not to make it much more widely available. Why not provide, you know, a lot of people with a drug that there's really no no risk involved. In administering it, except I think I mentioned before people may be shaken up. And because they're disoriented from quickly waking out from from being unconscious and the only other risk is people going afterwards having withdrawal symptoms, but it's something that. Basically, I would say anybody could and minister, and certainly the more people can talk about their drug use with family and friends and provide them the lockdown it will both help get people treated within the lockdown if needed and also try to de stigmatize drug use. So that people can get the help they needed to to treat drug dependence stigma is one of the biggest barriers to a solution. So Harris says one thing everyone can do is change the way they talk about and think about opioid misuse and addiction. We would not and we do not talk about medications or insulin for for diabetes. As maybe they will just go back out and eat another piece of cake. In the blood sugar will get high. So really our folks to really examine the language and how we talk about folks are substance use disorders in ways that are so much more different than how we talk about our patients with diabetes and high blood pressure. It is not the same. They may be engaging in illegal activity in that way. So I'm not really minimizing that aspect of it. But I want us to have a very common language and the same care and compassion that we have for those other health disorders as for those who have substance use disorders. But while that's something that everyone everywhere can do Hera says some of the best most tailored solutions to the nationwide opioid epidemic happened at the local level one town at a time. Some of those efforts may even have the power to prevent people from using opioids in the first place and even better alternative than stopping the effects of an overdose. After it's already occurred. All right or this week is Hannah's warming..

naloxone American Medical Association Ducker Patrice Harris United States EAC diabetes National Institute Dr Karl Gins Bloomberg AMA overdoses flu officer heroin epinephrine Am university Dr. Jennifer dole
"naloxone" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

08:41 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Back in April, the US surgeon general issued an advisory recommending that more Americans carry the opioid overdose reversing drug naloxone. That's more of a statement than you might think because such advisories are rare. In fact, the last one was issued thirteen years ago. So the surgeon general considers the advice extremely important. That's because every day more than one hundred fifteen people in the United States die after overdosing on opioid. According to the National Institute on drug abuse, and many experts believe increasing access to naloxone could help solve the national opioid crisis. But what exactly does no oxen? Do a lock sound is a medication that's designed to rapidly reverse an opioid overdose. And of course, opioids can be the medications that prescription medications that are often prescribed to treat pain. Hey, that's Dr Patrice Harris chair of the AMA opioid task force and president elect of the American Medical Association. There are two forms. There's one arm of naloxone that comes in an auto injectable pen much. Like folks may be familiar with the epi pen, the epinephrine pen in case there is a severe peanut allergy or be staying allergy. And it also comes in a nasal spray. So those are relatively easy to use something that's easy to use and can reverse an overdose can truly be a lifesaver, and we need all the help. We can get Harris says the nation has had a hard time keeping pace with the growing opioid epidemic, especially since the introduction of synthetic Fenton. Oh, we are seeing a sharp increase in the number of overdoses that are related to those illicit drugs. You mentioned fit now there's also a strong. Longer drug if you will carpet now that is used actually appropriately by veterinarians for large animals, but unfortunately, these drugs are being manufactured and are now available and these drugs the now, and particularly their car now are so much more potent. And so it could take more than one dose of naloxone to reverse the overdose. Too rapidly treat overdoses first responders routinely carry Nevada kso, but the AMA opioid task force has encouraged states and physicians to make no lock zone. More readily available for all Americans all states now have increased their access to naloxone and actually minium those states base their legislation on an AMA model Bill so every state. In this country has recognized the importance of access to naloxone in every state has worked on their own legislation to make sure that lock zone is available. So that we can save lives some states have laws where the state health officer. And of course, that varies in each state has the ability to authorize a blanket are used that in quotations prescription some states have encouraged their pharmacies to offer naloxone at their pharmacies. And of course, at the end of the day, the AMA opioid task force has encouraged physicians to consider co prescribing no locks on to their patients that they believe are at higher risk of an overdose yet, it's almost impossible to self administer the medication. According to Dr Carl let can professor of health behavior and society at the Johns Hopkins, Bloomberg school of public health. So he conducted a study showing who should carrying the locks on to us on others. What we found is that certainly active users active heroin and other form of opioid users are very likely to observe an overdose. Individuals going to needle exchange or very likely answer. And then people who tend to frequent places were drug users interact and use drugs for example, a shooting gallery is a place where people use drugs to be protected from police and being off the street people who go to those sorts of places are also much more likely to witness overdoses, but trying to get more drug users other potential bystanders and even additional first responders to carry naloxone could be a challenge. One reason is the cost if you have insurance sometimes the co pays. Are higher and that can present a barrier. But if you don't have insurance, certainly the costs are barriers to some folks. And also I've heard from our local governments are cities those who are responsible for funding our first responders. They also have raised concerns with me about the cost a decade or fifteen years ago, when I first got into this even probably a little longer than that, it was a dollar, vile. And now, it's thirty forty dollars for two very small vial, and it's certainly a drag that shouldn't cost that much because there's no new research being done on it. And there's one other hitches well despite the life saving power of Nevada. Arizona some experts say the medication may do more harm than good. That's according to a study conducted by Dr Jennifer dole yet an associate professor. Economics at Texas. Am university. We found a number of indicators that broadening access to lock zone has increased the abuse of opioid. So it does seem like reducing the the expected cost of of using opioids does increase use as has been found in a lot of other public health areas sort of very predicted by theory, and a lot of empirical evidence something that surprised us was that the net impact on mortality broadening Knox. And after had no net impact on mortality overall. And in some regions, most importantly the mid west. There was actually a big increase in mortality after access to oxygen was expanded. So in the midwest, we found that broadening lock zone increase mortality rates by fourteen percent, which is a lot and certainly suggests that is policy that we'd hoped would buy us some time to figure out a more permanent solution is not buying time and time's up we need to really. Focus on tidings are more effective strategies. Essence dole EAC says when the lock zone is available to counteract overdoses users. No, they can be a little less careful, but Harris's skeptical of Dolly X findings and latte Guinea's to he says it may not account for all opioid users. Or why many of them keep using first of all people who are Greg dependent primarily used because they're afraid of excruciating pain of withdrawal symptoms. I've heard people say it's a thousand times worse than having the flu. So they're almost all drug users, I interact with are using to reduce withdrawal symptom. So you have a group who are sort of trying to avoid the pain in dysfunctionality of withdraw. So it's really something that they don't relish at all at the symptoms are so strong. So tempting knowing that. No, lock Sam can save. You. I don't think is a reason people would continue to use. However, dole EAC says her study found that in some places greater naloxone availability is affected in preventing deaths and those findings raise concerns about the availability of drug treatment in the US. We did find that the effects of broadening access to know Loxton were more beneficial, or at least the unintended consequences seemed to be mitigated in places where there was more drug treatment available. So it really seems that that's more of suggested finding it's a less clean, natural experiment in social science parlance. But it certainly suggestive that suggested evidence that if we're going to broaden access to Norwalk stone that we should make sure we're also investing heavily in broadening access to.

naloxone Dr Patrice Harris United States American Medical Association EAC Nevada Dr Jennifer dole National Institute Dr Carl epinephrine AMA Arizona overdoses Texas flu Loxton officer heroin
"naloxone" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Ability to reintroduce Net neutrality here in California is heading to the governor's desk for signature despite stiff opposition from. Internet service providers the state Senate approved the measure by San Francisco democrat, Scott Weiner yesterday they fight hard they are effective and. We're confident that they are going to pose this strongly until the end But southern California Republican Melissa Melendez says. She thinks the Bill is more. About Democrats playing politics I think it has become abundantly clear that. This is a resistance effort because President Trump didn't ruin the internet President Trump didn't change the internet nobody in. Congress did that this you're waiting into an area, that, you have no business being and. This is a federal issue the Bill seeks to revive regulations scrapped by the Federal Communications Commission Berkeley police soon we'll carry naloxone a drug used by many law enforcement agencies, to treat opioid overdoses every day more than one hundred people across the country Odeon die according to the centers for, disease control we seen. A number of fatal overdoses decline in communities where police are equipped with. Naloxone which also is known as Narcan Berkeley police officers currently are being trained on how to use Narcan but. There is no word yet on. When the first police officer will start to carry it out on the street a Berkeley man's. Planning to prepare one hundred pizzas. For the homeless in Oakland tomorrow more from KCBS askari who sack That's the. Sound of silverware being rolled into napkins just one? Of the many steps. Mark Schecter is taking before cooking one hundred pizzas, for, a homeless encampment this, Sunday, in east Oakland I just want to give back. And make sure that people can get a good meal Scheckter says. He used to live near the Berkeley homeless action center office when he became inspired to prep pies, for the less fortunate I had bought this mobile portable oven basically I just always wanted to do and I knew that the organization was right there need obviously people are in need as. You together he had no idea he'd soon become the pizza man so what kinds of, pies can these people expect their. Basically Neopolitan.

Berkeley Scheckter California Narcan Berkeley Federal Communications Commiss Oakland naloxone Melissa Melendez Mark Schecter Trump Narcan President Senate Scott Weiner San Francisco Congress KCBS officer
"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In a new story as saying that california's opioid problem is episodic compared to the east coast would you call the killing field given this rise infant deaths where do you think it's headed here so i talked with a lot of people around the country i'm attend conferences and and and other national forums and i would say the mood among public health public policy folks doctors is more pessimistic than optimistic of the synthetic wave as i call it is likely to take over the country it's just been much slower on the west coast and has been the east coast is there anything that can be learned from other parts of the country that have been dealing with this so intensely for a longer period of time in the midwest and northeast it's all hands on deck everyone is heightened state of awareness and involved there have been impressive rollouts drug treatment impressive rollouts of the antidote naloxone there have been increases in harm reduction efforts at the same time there's some disheartening net it's not working as well as like is there anything california can do that other states haven't tried yet and we can do that in much more real time then we can while waiting for karnal reports which are a year or so behind.

california naloxone karnal
"naloxone" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

"The origins of the opioid epidemic can be traced to over prescription of narcotic analgesics but in recent years deaths due to illicit synthetic opioids have outstripped deaths due to heroin and prescription painkillers as the united states faces this unprecedented epidemic there are lessons to be learned from canada which has taken bold action on a number of fronts with the aim of reducing deaths related to feno fenton hill analogs and other opioids for instance in march two thousand sixteen the canadian government made the overdose reversal drug naloxone available without a prescription the canadian government has also passed legislation aimed at facilitating the development of medically supervised injection facilities within canada british columbia has been at the forefront of enacting strategies for preventing overdose deaths suicide asylum contributor to opioid overdose deaths up perspective article by maria oh kendo from the university of pennsylvania philadelphia as the toll of opioid overdose deaths in the united states rises we face an urgent need for prevention but preventing such deaths will require a better understanding of the diverse trajectories by which overdoses occur including the distinction between intentional suicide and unintentional accidental deaths be they in patients with chronic pain who overdose on their opioid analgesics or in those with the primary opioid use disorder interventions to prevent overdose deaths in suicidal people will differ from interventions targeted at accidental overdoses yet most strategies for reducing opioid overdose deaths do not include screening for suicide risk nor do they address the need to tailor interventions for suicide.

painkillers united states canada canadian government naloxone philadelphia heroin university of pennsylvania
"naloxone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Oh so i was thinking philly that's right philadelphia's one of the cities that where this is impossible to ignore has a crisis but that's that's the case everywhere including in in new york so the first step for for for public health officials they've seen naloxone distribution as the first step in a much larger plan to try to try to really address this issue so that means distributing the lock zone at this point every police officer in new york city carries naloxone you can find it at hospitals at harm reduction organizations at clinics the city has focused on the free on the distribution of free naloxone and making sure that people get can get trained to use it and use it if they have a loved one who is likely to overdose or is using opioids i know that it's and it's not just loved ones i know that there was an issue in philadelphia at the philadelphia library where people were coming into the library and overdosing so they actually well i actually re wrote a story earlier this year about how that that isn't just in philadelphia actually public libraries because they have public bathrooms are a very frequent sighting of overdoses it's something that librarians in new york state and around the country are actually considering carrying naloxone sort of systematically behind the reference desk because it's become that much of an issue so for people who like how does it work just to let her hat works so overdoses have become much more common i you want someone overdoses there are certain symptoms that can indicate that that's what's happening shortness of breath discoloration sort of gasping unresponsiveness they won't wake up and the lock zone is it's available now isn't nasal spray which is the most common form if you if you get a kit an a a muscular injection so it interrupts that overdose and really is kind of a miracle drug and it brings people back almost immediately almost immediately well sometimes it takes more than one dose and of course it can be very scary to have to do that if you aren't a trained emergency responder and probably even if you are but it's a very simple drug to administer which is part of the reason that the surgeon general came out last week and encouraged more americans to carry naloxone and and to learn to use it.

philadelphia new york officer naloxone unresponsiveness philly
"naloxone" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Take your claim on some cash to get all the details go to www dot freedom checks one two six dot com before the may first deadline that's www dot freedom checks one two six dot com aircraft engine builder pratt and whitney a division of united technologies has closed a major contract with jetblue airways to supply engines for its entire fleet of eighty five airbus planes financial details were not disclosed mabel wadsworth is the new publisher of usa today the second woman to hold that post at the national newspaper economic reports will be following today include the is jobless claims and update on international trade and the latest consumer confidence index us surgeon general dr jerome adam says he's focused on bringing down the cost of the drug naloxone the antidote to opioid overdoses currently that drug costs eighty dollars a dose and the surgeon general says more americans must have access to it please join us for lou dobbs tonight at seven and eleven eastern on the fox business network i'm keith peters for the lou dobbs financial report retirement questions you can bet rick barnett probably has the answered join him every saturday morning at seven thirty for the barnet financial our with nearly three decades of experience rick and help take the guesswork out of your retirement planning the barnett financial hour is your source for all things retirement from how current events could affect your savings to strategies to maximize your retirement income and everything in between join us the barnett financial our with rick barnett saturday mornings at seven thirty welcome back america it's hugh hewitt thank you for listening i have to explain to my new affiliates w q t k ninety two point seven fm north country's news and talk a thirty and ogdensburg new york w i t n twelve forty a m north counties news and talk leader in watertown new york wwl z a twenty am and one zero one point three fm the talk station in l myra new york and wwf c fourteen fifty am new york and the tri counties talk in glen falls new york that every hour at this time.

hugh hewitt new york watertown fox lou dobbs airbus jetblue whitney l myra new york pratt rick barnett keith peters naloxone dr jerome adam publisher mabel wadsworth united technologies eighty dollars three decades
"naloxone" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on KCBS All News

"The partnership with the pentagon surgeon general wants more of us ready to act if there's an opioid overdose bind stand bunk i'm seasonally taylor cbs news update we must do more surgeon general jerome atoms calling on more people to carry naloxone an antidote to treat opioid overdose victims no mother should ever have to bury her child and especially not when they're the life saving medication virtually anyone can access it's the first public health advisory issued by a surgeon general and thirteen years you see someone with a known or suspected overdose know what to do number one call nine one one and then administering a through and if you haven't had with abuse and death rates on the rise there's a new look at the cost of the crisis cynthia cox of the kaiser family foundation says large corporation spent two point six billion dollars in two thousand sixteen to cover treatment for workers and their dependents more than a nine fold increase since about twelve years ago when zero point three billion dollars was spent cbs news update i'm steve kathan kcbs news time nine thirty two thousands of google employees are demanding that the company ends its partnership with the pecan pentagon as we told you just earlier this hour google has been working with the pentagon to develop an artificial intelligence system that would analyze drone footage for more we're joined live on the kcbs ringcentral news line by paul shari director of the technological technology and national security program at the center for a new american security and author of the forthcoming book army of none autonomous weapons and the future of war thanks for joining us this morning can you think of any other time in history where we've had an entire country while not an entire company but many people in a company sign a petition saying we believe google should not be in the business of war no i can't it is shocking a picture when you think about the history of american industry and their connections with protecting the nation and national security it's hard to imagine for example in the twentieth century seeing someone like four motor corporation stand up and say they're not going to partner with united states to do something to protect the nation it is certainly surprising it was kind of moved into a different world where what.

naloxone cynthia cox kaiser family foundation pentagon google director united states cbs steve kathan paul shari partner three billion dollars six billion dollars thirteen years twelve years
"naloxone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For monitoring the border for npr news i'm rachel oser lindley the number of people dying from opioid related drug overdoses continues to rise around the country today the surgeon general is urging more people to carry the overdose antidote medication lot the locks on which is also known as narcan drome adam says he hopes those are at risk along with their family and friends keep the antidote handy and learn how to use it one of the things that we're doing is working with pharmacies working with providers working with the american medical association and the nursing associations to increase training on how to administer naloxone in homes but overall and i'm an anesthesiologist who's administered in the lock so many times myself it is easy to use and he says they are working with insurance companies to try to keep the costs down british foreign minister boris johnson says he's pleased the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons has turned down russia's request for a joint investigation into last month's poisoning of a former double agent and his daughter in southern england npr's joanna kakissis reports russia called the emergency meeting of the chemical weapons watchdog to challenge britain's insistence that moscow used a nerve agent in the attack speaking to german broadcaster does not valla johnson claimed that those in charge of porton down the uk's defense laboratory say the nova chuck came from russia they were absolutely categorical i asked guy myself i said are you sure and he said there's no don let porton down chief executive gary aitken head told britain's sky news that the lab had not identified the source of the novacek but we've provided the scientific information to the government who have dan used the number of other sources to piece together the conclusions that they've come to russia strongly denies any involvement in the poisoning joanna kakissis npr news birmingham world financial markets asian markets were mixed by the closing bell the nikkei gaining one and a half percent the hang sang down two point two percent was futures contracts are trading higher this morning you're listening to npr news from washington this is wnyc from.

nerve agent dan gary aitken chief executive valla johnson rachel oser npr washington uk adam moscow britain joanna kakissis russia boris johnson naloxone
"naloxone" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Yeah so the main thing they're doing is they're doing what a communist do which is trying to take advantage of what they call natural experiment different states are rolling out these naloxone laws at different moments and so they are trying to look at the immediate aftermath of these laws and see what happens in the state now one big criticism of the paper is that they are rolling together three kinds of laws one kind of law provides legal munity to prescribers of naloxone which there's not any evidence that anybody has ever been to my knowledge of prosecutor prescribing alex it's not clear why that would have a big effect on anything another is providing legal unity to lay persons who administer naloxone another is allowing third party prescriptions for naloxone right like in baltimore i can go in and get a prescription for naloxone that then i can use vic somebody od on a street corner so that's their main treatment variable did a state roll out some kind of law any kind of law that in any way can be seen increasing access or cultural permission to use allison they also assume that these laws once rolled out having immediate impact which is not how lost like this tend to work that's another big piece of criticism that will will get to a little bit later so then they begin trying to look at what is the cultural of these laws and here's things on us to get a little dicey so they say that using data on google searches we find that in the lock zone access laws increased internet searches for naloxone by seven percent they then find that after the access law takes effect.

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"naloxone" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"naloxone" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Becoming their addiction broaden the lacson access is more beneficial and it's facts increasing access to drug treatment then might be a necessary complement to the laaksonen accessing curbing the opioid overdose epidemic now if you had taken me a side before any of this came out and you said as a is a drug that takes people who've overdosed and are about to die and makes it so they don't die enough to stop the opioid epidemic stupid and if you'd said well if we're going to roll out that drug should also be rolling out a comprehensive drug treatment strategy i would say of course that is common sense and so that is conclusion of this paper and so for all the controversy over some of the individual findings and i think the controversy has called into question some of the findings in a serious way i actually think that both the paper's authors and the people who they are in a dispute with largely agree on where things should go which is one we should not outlaw naloxone too that in order to treat something as complex and difficult as the opioid epidemic you need a comprehensive treatment strategy look if you are looking at heart disease and you said well when people are having a cardiac event we can do an emergency bypass and you said to me what's going to happen if the only thing we will out is free cardiac emergency bypasses all across the country with nothing else and i would say well you're not gonna fix the heart disease problem you're going to keep some people from dying during acute event but they're gonna die later from heart disease i mean you need to help them with their their diet and their health and their exercise and knowing that the signals of one to go to a doctor and all kinds of different things that are important for people who are suffering from from this kind of element and i just wanna know that's also the conclusion here so there's a lot to again to here but but i also want to turn down the temperature on the debate because i think those a an end point here that is more consensus oriented than one the writing in the rest of.

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