28 Burst results for "Nakajima"

"nakajima" Discussed on SPORTS GOOFS

SPORTS GOOFS

03:57 min | 3 months ago

"nakajima" Discussed on SPORTS GOOFS

"May i listened to please. Oh wow ace blooper which is the land. The blue jays. Yeah bloopers appraised because For reasons why they used to have chief nakajima but there's literally nothing dinger slider which cleveland indians slugger which can't see royal southpaw which doesn't even on accounting and it's the white sauce swinging friar. That's it so you have you. Can't you don't even have to make it baseball. Related when baron in milwaukee baxter the bobcat in the diamondbacks bernie brewer billy. The marlin dandy. Who's yankees people right there. Yeah junior which is the other you know. Blue jays mascot lucille sam orbit for the astros issue. The trash other issues oscar ground because they want trash the orioles green. He is green. You know but he had she though. Oscar has martin morals. You have the perot knees empire eric. Yeah the racing resins nationals rosy rosie reds so this whole logic of you need it to be. you know. Try sarah's hops in of itself you just have to call at like you know the colorado You know colorado. Charlie's but i you know i would get my name sagan their stop out swinging friar. Wow thirty one years. I've been alive have been baseball. Fan for about twenty five of them. And i just realized padres and friar and padres. Bashford you really. You really did get that until now. You wanna why. I don't care for the bhadra. They've been trashed. Majority my life in sports and now it's all kind of donnie. I'm like and they still guys. I looked up and looked up a block. A glossary of terms Tater cater the triceratops cater. Waiter like yeah. Tater pay triceratops fine. Yeah that's it's it. Sounds like you know the kid who pays in class but okay or tag tag tag Taghi tagging now. Because i think that just opened up some mean middle school or kids. Yeah i league replace the to you for certain word is your mascots same. Dj kitty and tampa is out our official on like a one year thing. Because i i felt like an owner fans. Kinda know their mascots. Raymond of a nondescript. Saying i don't follow a team that can get move next year. Oh well ups aren't taken. He's in montreal. Still yet the cool thing you'd be was the mascot for all the montreal teams in. That's that's pretty cool. I can dig it now. That leaves me a question would. Up pull double duty if the expos went back and like if a team of a team any team doesn't matter if it's relocated or it was the brand new expansion franchise would you be pulled double duty and be the mascot for both the haves and the new expos every match would this is basically who gets the kids in the divorce and because well it wasn't that he was orphaned more than anything he wasn't he was orphaned. The expos led for dc and they left them up in montreal. This new. it's more kintu is honey. I'm not the robot he's little. Oh boy all right. let's see ads. Cow francisco's like andrew problem. Like this was literally what we did when you were gone. Yeah this is exactly they on the show..

Blue jays bernie brewer billy lucille sam orbit martin morals rosie reds dinger padres nakajima Bashford cleveland indians baseball colorado diamondbacks astros baron orioles milwaukee sagan yankees oscar
"nakajima" Discussed on Gugacast

Gugacast

04:09 min | 4 months ago

"nakajima" Discussed on Gugacast

"Foam is no santa. Jim is this office. Ihop she started to use failure. She says he started. Pgn she's you produce. Your i kill office. Started carotene what she owns. Venture wish villa on five abstract pretty medical strat signal quite abstract quadrino yukata fell asleep cabinet. Lauch the poodle as she had. Yeah in order to be issue bizarre. Who had a senior nightmares of the buffalo new premier. The come as federal shamba throughout the cheating. He's as he be sees. Eileen started talking to help me being. I jinked stories. Guzzi spots started. Atlantis storage dossier. The studies made maids. Start is the kick conversa- van der inch started new. Sports spits out during this. I said it going into sports. Nakajima you so i think he probably probably double competent gordon and a key thing being stop on funnies. You get me started this. Lucia started napoleon icus. Sports had sausage. He's starting to shop only mona. I simply don't pick started go is Starting near the job put a compact program attorney. Tom won't like simone. i'm i've to see as each boy g. Lose your will to be thawed bizarre jet that cafeteria halfaya for some prophetic affiliate orcas characters to into cafeteria of dodgy for to his juries. Gersh options are. There's nothing digest our pillow saruman audience. Cafes pilon cafeteria keeping quality dodger. cafe- cafeteria socking for to the circus. Obama has set if our civic affairs book podcast. She cafes sambas quizzes being nowadays mice ukio mice costner cafeteria. The scully body are things that she was are quite dot com so the phone sauce quiz as we said pilon cafeteria edge quality video alathea dosage. Quite video abic association brasilia doesn't use rica stay marculescu. Worst such he'll say. Even if i think three points the we spread sue you italian required cafaro much cool szabo malkovich we spread some fortu- cuando mean things you italian. Oh caffeine copepod. The major things does not survive on poor for a dot capita shah than what i mentioned cafe couple chain or on my all somali tricia cafe cash kilkeel fuss literature fail mice capri shannon orange competency. Mississippi mcadoo's mice process comma saint-pierre mice visit borjas to the bay box fatigue year. He taught speak at genoa Of programs scott says so now belong to the bay. Hey sheen xinhua. Seeing gustavus stumbles revolt the cones yoga fishing. Shema we shogo kimmy studio where to view quantities uses sushi. Mace lego box elephants. Another former ovo chief fallon put it..

Lauch van der inch Ihop Gersh Nakajima Eileen villa buffalo Jim marculescu Lucia mona napoleon simone szabo malkovich gordon Tom brasilia capri shannon Obama
"nakajima" Discussed on Virtually Amazing

Virtually Amazing

05:00 min | 4 months ago

"nakajima" Discussed on Virtually Amazing

"That what you're selling is what. I absolutely can't do that right now. Yes one elemental fit the other elements of it is. It's not really. What i need is just switched on needed but when i looked into it it will i needed on. The other thing is is Is not right for me right now. He writes me next month. Yeah and in this particular upset. She talked about the things that you can snap back to people who say to your too expensive. Because they're bringing them money story to that compensation nothing is actually nothing to do with you mayo. Pricing thought was a really interesting perspective. Yeah it is. An is one of those things that you and i know. I been myself where i felt so that really am i a new. Do second. guess yourself when somebody says back your way too expensive etcetera etcetera etcetera and it is. It's very difficult when somebody says that. Now one of the ways. I am dealt with that in the past said to somebody okay. What's your budget. And we see what i can deliver within nakajima on what we can phase you budget one way of doing it But the other thing is that somebody says you say the expensive a they don't see or understand value all it's not right now the other thing that people don't think about is if you're getting that statement quite a lot thank your marching because it may be that you are offering your services to the wrong the wrong place at the wrong times. It's not that your message is wrong. So if you find yourself coming up against that will the top. Just reface it. Those things where networking who. You're talking to and all you talking to the people that have the money or other decision makers because in some businesses about the people who have could decision say yes. I'm gonna buy. Yeah absolutely and the not so..

nakajima
"nakajima" Discussed on The Mini-Break

The Mini-Break

02:23 min | 5 months ago

"nakajima" Discussed on The Mini-Break

"I just think really high floor as a player. Great litmus test. I think she can do damage. It's just really tough to beat her of late. So those are my top ten on the women's side. We'll go through the men's side. I suppose a little bit faster number. Ten sharon roussev ole-ry shoutout to the tennis hipsters number nine nishikori p- operan big serves big forehands of popper and plus early round matches for nishikori always seemed to get funky at grand slams number eight. The go azlan. Carrots have taken on jeremy. Shar de number seven cass. Arba grinders paradise that matches prime door. If you've got four hours at some point during the day you're going to you know if you turn on tennis at some point between whenever this match starts and four hours after you can have the opportunity to watch part of this because it's going to be a physical grind. Fritz nakajima go american. Tennis is ner nishioka if you have twelve feet and seven inches of height and one of the players as a seven footer and the others five seven. You have that disparity it's inherently in aesthetically pleasing match. So i'm in on it query. Pcb those are two guys under the right. Circumstances can make deep runs tee off. Oh pospisil how does he off. Oh follow up the win oversee poss- that's fun. Matchup harris rube love. Lloyd harris has big serve big power. That could provide big problems to andre rube love but i expect route left to advance and then i'm surprised by nine number one but i didn't want a lot you listeners. I'm going jovovich anderson just because jovic pursuit of grand slam number twenty his pursuit of all five of the big titles this year the four slams and the olympics. That's on top of all fans of men's tennis right now. Let's just be honest that pursuit of history to do that at age thirty four all conversations can end at that point and he's got a legitimate shot to do it and you know again. Anderson is just a roadblock in the way after the final they played in wimbledon a few years ago certainly anderson did not perform well in that match and he gets another shot at jovic which is why he continues to play big. Serve this surface. Maybe provides problems. Probably not. But i'm locked in on that match. I'm sure you will be as well. That's day number three of wimbledon. And of course we will be back tomorrow to recap all those matches. We will have a gas on tomorrow's mini break and we should have guests moving forward throughout the course of the fortnight. Of course we will also have. Gsp ace the day. Picks will have match of the day segments for our.

tennis nishikori Shar de Fritz nakajima ner nishioka jovic pospisil harris rube Lloyd harris Arba andre rube jovovich anderson jeremy olympics Anderson anderson
"nakajima" Discussed on VOICE Global 2021

VOICE Global 2021

03:23 min | 6 months ago

"nakajima" Discussed on VOICE Global 2021

"So <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> mentioned <Speech_Female> the area <Speech_Female> but are on <Speech_Female> the other hand the younger <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> they already got <Speech_Female> use to voice <Speech_Female> technology. I'm <Speech_Female> very impressed. <Speech_Female> That the <Speech_Female> When when <Speech_Female> i when. I see <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> teenager. <Speech_Female> Chinese <Speech_Female> in japan's <Speech_Female> they already use <Speech_Female> that voicing <Speech_Music_Female> bird and <Speech_Music_Female> like <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> they <Speech_Female> like cram half <Speech_Female> a new type of both <Speech_Female> media <Speech_Female> so <Speech_Female> Also we <Speech_Female> have. We <Speech_Female> have an aging <Speech_Female> society but the <Speech_Female> younger the <Speech_Female> potential <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> yet they <Speech_Female> get they <Speech_Female> have another <Speech_Female> other. Prospective <Speech_Female> dasu <Speech_Female> voice technology <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> more official <Speech_Female> them and <Speech_Female> yes absolutely <Speech_Female> Pandemic <Speech_Female> boosted <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> were stick nosy. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And so <Speech_Female> i have <Speech_Female> to agree <Speech_Female> box. <Speech_Female> Yeah the <Speech_Female> adoption of <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> not always must be. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> you're spot on. I've <Speech_Male> watched my kids. <Speech_Male> Who are nine and ten <Speech_Male> they <Speech_Male> are. They <Speech_Male> are part <SpeakerChange> of the voice. <Speech_Male> I industry <Speech_Male> they <Speech_Male> they <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> a growth <Speech_Male> on the yes <Speech_Male> even Voice <Silence> natives they <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> you know when they search <Speech_Male> on a desktop. <Speech_Male> They use the voice <Speech_Male> interface in. That's not <Speech_Male> something that you <Speech_Male> know that. I even think <Speech_Male> about doing. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> they text <Silence> message only with their voice. <Speech_Male> The <Speech_Male> there's just so <Speech_Male> many things there's <Speech_Male> so many things that they <Speech_Male> do. But i think you're right. <Speech_Male> I think that so <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> one of the <Speech_Male> predictions. I here is <Speech_Male> is Is <Speech_Male> an increased in <Speech_Male> rapid adoption <Speech_Male> of voice first technologies. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And it's interesting that you mentioned <Speech_Male> the younger <Speech_Male> the younger set <Speech_Male> and then the the elderly <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> gonna be the to <Speech_Male> probably fast <Silence> adopters <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Silence> to. <Speech_Female> Yeah <Speech_Female> i think this is attracted <Speech_Female> point. <Speech_Female> Voice <Speech_Female> technology <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> essential <Speech_Female> for all ages. <Speech_Female> But especially <Speech_Female> the kid <Speech_Female> ramp teenager <Speech_Female> after this <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to different <Silence> types of us <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> us. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> well. <Speech_Male> it's an exciting market. <Speech_Male> It is so wonderful <Speech_Male> to speak with you. <Speech_Male> Think he for <Speech_Male> taking some time <Speech_Male> and thank you again <Speech_Male> for coming all the way from <Speech_Male> japan to voice <Speech_Male> summit and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> since then we've had <Speech_Male> a major <Speech_Male> Global catastrophe <Silence> in pandemic <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But it sounds like the work <Speech_Male> has not slowed down <Speech_Male> for you. I want to commend <Speech_Male> you for what you're building <Speech_Male> there and i look forward <Silence> to. We come back <Speech_Male> when you can <Speech_Male> share more about <Silence> the Yeah <Speech_Female> of course. <Speech_Female> Yeah i <Speech_Female> go to the <Speech_Female> united such a gay <Speech_Female> and fearing <Speech_Female> person. <SpeakerChange> But <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> we're going to be able <Speech_Male> to talk about and that's very <Silence> exciting <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And i look forward <Speech_Male> to continuing <Speech_Male> the conversation. <Speech_Male> Amy thank you so much <Speech_Male> for joining us here at <Speech_Male> voice global <Speech_Male> sharing with us more <Speech_Male> about the japanese <Speech_Male> market. The work <Speech_Male> that you're doing <Speech_Male> and for being a part <Speech_Male> of the voice tech community <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> thanks again and <Speech_Male> have a <SpeakerChange> great day. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> All thanks for having <Speech_Female> me here and <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> contact <SpeakerChange> me <Speech_Female> anything on jeffers <Speech_Male> while some <Speech_Male> welcoming <Speech_Male> knowledgeable <Speech_Male> and and we <Speech_Male> really appreciate <Speech_Male> it and we look <SpeakerChange> forward to continuing <Silence> the conversation. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> You're welcome <Speech_Male> amy. We've been speaking <Speech_Male> with emi nakajima <Speech_Male> From boy sale in japan. Thank you amy.

Amy emi nakajima ten nine Chinese japanese Speech_Male japan amy both jeffers first
VOICE ALE Founder Aimi Nakajima on the Future of Voice Technology in Japan

VOICE Global 2021

01:27 min | 6 months ago

VOICE ALE Founder Aimi Nakajima on the Future of Voice Technology in Japan

"Both aol we. We are in has voice. Finale amboise market a lot so editor. We are on the pioneer of the japanese market. But still Yeah it's immature Da watt boasting mundi independent. But i am sure that there are fewer potential avoidable The healthcare for dairy Digital jessica you may know that we have our aching operation Percent of appropriation of my country is over. Six years old and more and many of them live along edition. The fatigue overcome caregivers become So i think this is quite typical program. Games have been. I've showed at boys. Technology should be arabia setbacks. Both mentor in physically. But still you know. There are so many issues to solve for example the air diary health discarded to set the smartphone app in the smart speaker. Nick multiple app to control right anyhow phase. so i think it's not relevant Voicing must control revia boyce different idea.

Da Watt AOL Jessica Arabia Nick Revia Boyce
"nakajima" Discussed on VOICE Global 2021

VOICE Global 2021

03:02 min | 6 months ago

"nakajima" Discussed on VOICE Global 2021

"Ending for multiple devices at the same time. Some end the four deputies customers motto scare fourth. I i started making it. It was very initial phase for for japan's customer. So we we have released data if japanese customer is able to do in house it or not so we have to Like eat the rate right. Yea not it. Certainly. i think that it is There are lots of layers and lots of layers which you're talking about is probably multiple. Api's working with multiple devices on the back end and controlling those devices. Certainly certainly very challenging. I think i think that's one thing about the voice. Tech industry is it. It is very very deep. The layers go very deep with regards to interface. It's very different from a smartphone or an internet a website where you got one interface in you can can really control the interface with voice can't see that interface it's not it's it's out there. And then and then being older then distill that down and control. All these devices is super challenging Tell us a little go ahead. I wanted to say that the Still it's charring on user to remember that the prompt yeah i think voice you i must be must not force the user what to say but current voice assistant in this. This is issued at The assistant need like particular prompt. Or not though this program so i hope I know that in the united states the alexa competition. the more. Like other bast types of competencies off japan. We re can't use it yet so you It's it's sometimes it's challenging. So what's happening. I think in english For the smart devices machine learning on the back end is learning all the time The intense that us and so the devices are getting smarter over time. And that's that then has to be recreated In each in each language So what you're saying is Your version of smart speakers might be a little behind where Where maybe english speaking smart speakers are today's correct so let's talk a little bit about the future. What where would you like to see voice voicemail. Go in terms of a company. What are your goals for the company and will we see you assume that we get a post pandemic what we see back at a voice summit in the united states yeah.

today Api one thing each one interface united states japan each language fourth english four deputies lots of layers japanese alexa
"nakajima" Discussed on VOICE Global 2021

VOICE Global 2021

03:11 min | 6 months ago

"nakajima" Discussed on VOICE Global 2021

"The only bit issue we have our Moisture if during could be have you. You're still not sure. Yeah well we don't need. We don't need to go in that controversy about our people starting to get back to is the vaccine widely distributed. You know are people getting access to the vaccine Of the area bucknell rated very low end every day. The jeopardize bedier argued a large. The possibility of wouldn't be does not yet or Be had because. I was born writing guilt. So it's wants me to have you might from time in october and working the project Pick Which is the google action against that there for now about. Yeah it will be revealed coming soon. So if what i'm doing right now yes and i thought that I'm so glad that you brought that up. Because i know that there's You know their sensitivities around that we can't discuss we can't disclose who exactly the customer is but The fact that you are developing a google action round The olympics is really exciting And you know commend you for that. And i and i'm excited for when it's available will be able to to share it with others. Yeah the unfortunately oriented agree. We don't have any foreign audience am. We're not sure. If japanese audiences weren't do participate but the action i work. I'm working to support like that. The communication there is no odiaun but maybe that that was african will encourage after a while. Okay i yeah. This is really interesting. I i d look forward to and we will certainly probably have you back to to talk about once we once we can share more about what it is but it certainly exciting. So you're saying it's around the opportunity for athletes to be able to communicate with With folks yes. Yes so that. The i can thought could be. I wanna share with you. Check at red river. Admissions something more box the another time working here and now yeah now. We always working for income with assistant. Yeah which is also the unbear- project so may be coming year so In cowboys assistant is It's not alex. Arnold who also that region one and it's very challenging beginning yet. Yeah it's the.

Arnold october olympics google red river bucknell alex african japanese
"nakajima" Discussed on VOICE Global 2021

VOICE Global 2021

01:53 min | 6 months ago

"nakajima" Discussed on VOICE Global 2021

"And and commend you for jumping out on your own and taking it on <hes>. Let's talk a little bit about <hes>. The uniqueness what y. Is japan a unique market when it comes to voice verse technologies and we know that voice. We know that you know the two major organizations are very committed to the market. But what are some of the things. It make japan a unique market for voice in boys. Verse technologies yes. I think that you'd make a nestle japanese market. Some of them are the same with <unk>. Take but the uniqueness of japanese is yeah. We have so many confidant later to get by cultures jess anime characters. And i think they as yet the uniqueness in potential objects <unk>. Market and cartridge up reviews youth smart speaker voice assistant. Not that the different way reich. The smart home scores are very popular and also yet at the on the reason to do your smart home scales. Many people by smart speakers after today. <hes> start exploring new and crime trade. Yet under the pandemic icing. They are has been some changes to how do you. Smart speakers <hes> for them all <hes>. The alexa related to like entertainment at home become popular <hes>. I think it's the same as other country that people more than at home so remote working or a home office so spending at home if you know <hes>. Chance a lot so defiant long.

Pete erickson amazon japan Aol Amy voice global Mcnichols newark aol first conversation each market Voice summit twenty nineteen each first google south hand First Tokyo japanese voice i
V2_Copy_of_VG_Aimi_Nakajima_v1 - burst 1

VOICE Global 2021

01:53 min | 6 months ago

V2_Copy_of_VG_Aimi_Nakajima_v1 - burst 1

"And and commend you for jumping out on your own and taking it on Let's talk a little bit about The uniqueness what y. Is japan a unique market when it comes to voice verse technologies and we know that voice. We know that you know the two major organizations are very committed to the market. But what are some of the things. It make japan a unique market for voice in boys. Verse technologies yes. I think that you'd make a nestle japanese market. Some of them are the same with Take but the uniqueness of japanese is yeah. We have so many confidant later to get by cultures jess anime characters. And i think they as yet the uniqueness in potential objects Market and cartridge up reviews youth smart speaker voice assistant. Not that the different way reich. The smart home scores are very popular and also yet at the on the reason to do your smart home scales. Many people by smart speakers after today. start exploring new and crime trade. Yet under the pandemic icing. They are has been some changes to how do you. Smart speakers for them all The alexa related to like entertainment at home become popular I think it's the same as other country that people more than at home so remote working or a home office so spending at home if you know Chance a lot so defiant long.

Japan Jess
Hideki Matsuyama wins Masters to become first Japanese man to claim major title

CBS Sports Radio

02:07 min | 8 months ago

Hideki Matsuyama wins Masters to become first Japanese man to claim major title

"Every year we have a new story to tell. At Augusta National, and this time the story is told. Had decade. Matsuyama, the first Masters and major champion from Japan. He wins the green jacket in the 85th Masters at 10 under par for the tournament, one shot clear. American Will's Allah Taurus and Charlie Reimer under a bright blue sky at the end of the day, today hit Deck E Matsuyama as his countrymen. Woke up on a Monday morning in Japan provided them with a moment they'll never forget. Moment he'll remember for the rest of his life. Well, he played with so much pressure on his shoulders today, and when you when you look at the great players that have come out of Japan Going back to Jumbo Ozaki, who got to be a high as number five in the world. Three top tens and majors a sellout. Okey 1980. He finished second to Jack Nicklaus in the U. S Open five top tens and majors who was the first Japanese male toe went on the PGA Tour 1983 the hole out in Honolulu. Jack Renner was on the losing side of that. Hole out Tommy Nakajima six top tens and major. Some of the other great Japanese players. Shingo Katayama, Joe Ozaki. Yo Ishikawa, she gave keep Mariama Um, this victory is is on the back of the hard work that those players did. They sort of laid down the path for four, um, a decade and Coming into this. His accomplishments in the gang had already exceeded every one of the great players that I mentioned with the five wins on the PGA Tour Ah player that has been as high as number two in the world. But to carry all of that on his shoulders that the nation of Japan and an Olympic year And that If you start getting to the finances, there was speculation that if he were to win today, it might be worth a billion dollars to him and to go out and pull it off. Really, really Special day. It's

Augusta National Matsuyama Charlie Reimer Japan Jumbo Ozaki Jack Renner Tommy Nakajima Shingo Katayama Joe Ozaki Yo Ishikawa Mariama Um Okey PGA Jack Nicklaus Honolulu Olympic
Racial Justice and Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Racial Justice and Medicare for All

"I am benjamin day. I'm stephanie nakajima and this is medicare for all the podcast for everybody who needs healthcare so today. We're gonna discuss a topic that is central to our success in winning medicare for all when we as a movement talk about what it's going to take to win often when you hear issues like fundraising publication electing the right. Legislators there's other things that usually come up. But i think there's something that maybe even more important than any of those things putting us on the path to victory and that is of course confronting the deeply ingrained racism and our structures and cells. When you look at where. The united states is in compared in comparison to its pure countries. It's impossible to explain why we are so much more of an unequal and capitalist society than everywhere else that looking at the role of racism through our history Its impact on our safety net and the neglect and vilification of our public programs. So this is like a big conversation and we could probably have several podcasts on it but today we want to talk about racism specifically in the healthcare system and how medicare for all would and wouldn't address in a racism at the doctor's office and and then a little bit about the interrelated nature of our movements a movement with the larger fight for racial justice. And why and how. They are interconnected so ben. Do you want to introduce our guest absolutely so it is my great pleasure to introduce the wonderful person on the screen with us Dr beata amani. Who is an associate professor for. The charles r drew university of medicine and science and This is a timely is a lead co chair of the covid nineteen taskforce on racism and equity which is housed at the ucla center for study of racism social justice and health. Welcome dr money. I'm so excited to be here. It is great to have you so before we dive into this deep topic Can you tell us a little bit about your background. And why did you choose to become an epidemiologist with a focus on racism and what is epidemiology. So i mean that's a that's a wonderful question. Just what is an epidemiologist. Because i think for so many people. My friend circle in my family This current moment had them Here in the word and being like Isn't one of those. So epidemiology is essentially like the science and the studying of the disease distribution pattern the the distribution patterns of disease and anything associated with z's And it's not only about studying the the distribution and the pattern of disease and its related outcomes but it's also about studying the things that go into effect right the things that are in place the policies and practices that we have what are the effects of those things on the distribution of disease disease-related outcomes. So what that meant for me I think growing up was. I always loved Health and i loved politics And i was always thinking about the relationship between these two things And so when. I know you're thinking about how to have some sort of impact especially as a young person And you hear about like institutions. Like the cdc or the who right You really can you know. Start to give a sense of like. What does it mean to be able to like. Go out and steady and to collect information that can be so useful that it can actually save. Lives like on a larger level. These are to me that young person you know who was really drawn to like the field of setting in a deniau genes that then overtime epidemiology. That also came to me a tool set and a set of ideas that belonged to and we're a service of a system that Not only structured by racism. Right like us. Stephanie mentioned beginning at the heart of what we're talking about today But also was instrumental in structuring it and and creating and maintaining that And so then what that meant for me. Somebody who was studying it was that i was really drawn initially to infectious disease epidemiology Because you saw so much like an equity And also just they kind of racialized ideas about populations being generated around who's sick. Who's not risk of people who are not sick from those. Who are you know. So all those racial congregations And then moving into what we call behavioral. Fb and the idea that people's behaviors and they're like and and you know people's behaviors and their own actions can be connected and related to their health. So there's a potential for some sort of empowerment right to what i am. I think you know today like loosely. and specifically your social epidemiologist. Somebody who wants to study the distribution of disease and disease related factors In populations and communities on basant understanding systems structures in power

Medicare Benjamin Day Stephanie Nakajima Dr Beata Amani Charles R Drew University Of M Ucla Center For Study Of Racis Disease Disease BEN United States CDC Stephanie Infectious Disease
"nakajima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"nakajima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And a nuclear power plant operator have appealed a landmark court ruling. The ruling holds them responsible for the country's worst ever nuclear accident. The 2011 Fukushima meltdown was triggered by a huge earthquake and tsunami. But as NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul plaintiffs are concerned that justice is being delayed once again. Cheering broke out outside the high court in the city of Sendai, about 60 miles north of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant last month. Too many people surprise the court's ruling held the central government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, which runs the plant equally responsible for the accident. Plaintiffs argued that scientists had warned the government in 2000 to that a major tsunami could hit the area. The court said in its caving verdict that the government failed to take actions. She'll sort of Colonel when you go on go The government, despite its position is regulator just let TEPCO do Is it pleased and let it put off safety measures? It was gross negligence, and it was an attitude Unbefitting a regulatory agency. That was Takashi Nakajima, paraphrasing the court's verdict. He's a leader among the nearly 3600 plaintiffs in the case. Sendai Court or did the government and TEPCO to pay them $9.6 million in compensation double with a lower court had ruled three years ago. Many people in Nakajima's community near Fukushima fled their homes. He says he filed the lawsuit. Basically, just to say, Give me back my former life. I was in a horny. Imagine how you would feel says if suddenly you get into a situation where you can never go back to your hometown because there's a risk of radiation. Nakajima runs a supermarket. But he says that fears about radiation and waters near Fukushima make it impossible to sell the local fish in which he used to take such pride. That's even more. The fishermen need him because they've been eating them for a long time, he says. And they're tasty. But their sons and daughters in law tell them that their grandchildren should not eat them. This is a situation which divides many families. Judges in the Sendai verdict appear to have been especially sympathetic to such hardships. The Osaka, a law professor at Tokyo University in Tokyo, explains Sendai Cool, hunky doesn't mind okay. The Sendai High Court judges actually visited the area and issuing the trial before the decision was made. It's very unusual that judges truly understand going hardships. The victims are experiencing some plaintiffs in similar lawsuits. Have not been. His fortunate is Nakajima and have lost. Professor Masafumi Okamoto, professor of environmental policy at Osaka City University, says the Sendai verdict could change that thinking the next course side a little bit. This's the first time a decision recognizing the government's full responsibilities they made at the high court level, he says, although it was partly recognized by a lower court. It's very significant and it'll clearly influence future decisions. That's why many observers were not surprised when the government and TEPCO appealed the verdict on Tuesday. Plaintiff Takashi Nakajima hopes that the Sendai court ruling will eventually pave the way for the shutdown of all dangerous nuclear power plants in Japan. But whether or not the ruling stands will now be up to Japan's Supreme Court to decide. Anthony Kun. NPR news soul This is all things considered on Sean Carlson earlier this week, we have a story about President Trump pulling his support for the Gateway commuter rail tunnel under the Hudson River. We'll spend some time now on the plan by Democratic nominee Joe Biden for that same tunnel and infrastructure in general. He's proposed spending $2 trillion on roads, bridges, tunnels, transit and green energy. If elected president, so here to tell us some details, including how he plans to pay for all of it is Laura Bliss, a reporter for Bloomberg City Lap. Hey, Lord, Welcome back to W. C. Thanks so much for having me so this do trillion dollar promise. It's not just about infrastructure. It's also about climate change. Can you tell us what the connection is? Absolutely So. Biden's plan, which was released in July, maps out spending $2 trillion over the next four years to significantly expand the use of clean energy across transportation, electricity and buildings on DH. That kind of is mapped out across a suite of proposals that would Increase jobs, strengthen the nation's infrastructure and also tackle climate change, and that really is at the core of some of the most aggressive and specific targets in the plan. Which includes achieving emissions free energy by 2035 nationwide and upgrading four million buildings of the next four years to meet the highest standards of energy efficiency. And there's also a heavy emphasis on how these plans would tie into ideas about racial justice, and the plan often kind of goes into how pollution is disproportionately impacted. Communities of color. That is quite a list. Is it pie in the sky? How realistic is it and has the Biden campaign said, where the money will come from to pay for? Yes. Oh, sort of part of the course. But you know these campaign proposals there. Stop the tide of details about how this plan would necessarily be paid for. The Biden campaign has pointed Tio this corporate income tax rate hike that he's proposed separately as being part of that. Revenue source. There's probably still some additional amount of stimulus money that would have to go into it. So you know a little hazy on those those funding details. One way to pay for this would be to raise the federal gas tax right. It's already source of transportation spending. But the tax rate now for listeners, it hasn't been increased. Since. 1993 is this whole situation a third rail politically. It is very much a third rail politically, There is not a lot of interest on either side of the political aisle on something of that tax rate. You know, there's also criticism that gas tax, which by the way is funding our highway trust fund, which pays for most of our roads and transit systems. This country, which is Almost always on the brink of insolvency. But there's critique that you know, as more of us are driving more fuel efficient vehicles that we should be looking at other ways of generating that muddy so back to Biden's plan here, how have people responded to it are their criticisms of it? Yes. So I think there is a high degree of satisfaction on the left that the Spider plan has accelerated the timeline of some of its clean energy targets. There was a Earlier infrastructure plan from last fall that the campaign release that was a little bit less aggressive on the right there. Certainly a number of Republicans in Congress who criticize this plan, it's just, you know, another boondoggle that would cost a lot of energy jobs right me. Think about it. This plan is calling for this major transition to zero carbon pollution from the electricity sector in 15 years. Currently coal and natural gas accounts for about 60% of the country's energy, so that would be a pretty major transition. So Biden when he was here a few years ago, he praised the Gateway project. So does he mention it in his plan? I don't believe the plan mentions the Gateway Project specifically, although the Gateway project is mentioned in the Invest Act, which is a major infrastructure authorization bill that was passed by House Democrats this summer. So Laura President Trump has made big promises on infrastructure, but he hasn't really gotten very far. Can you talk to us? Why not and will bite and run into the same problems? Yeah, it's a really important question, right. We're still in this very, very, very partisan political environment. On one level. I think that President Trump has kind of struggled to deliver on those original promises that he made on the campaign trail and then routinely throughout his presidency. There's this long running joke about it always being infrastructure Week. Not a lot happening, and then in Congress. The House actually recently passed a pretty significant infrastructure authorization bill, but the Senate has not taken up that Bill. So there's no guarantee that that would necessarily change much if I did won the presidency Laura Bliss or reporter for Bloomberg City Lab. Thanks so much, Laura. Thanks for having me. WNYC supporters include Sweeten a renovation service that can upgrade homes for the remote work in school lifestyle, matching each project with general contractors while offering guidance and financial protection. Moran s w e TN dot com Thes.

Joe Biden Takashi Nakajima Sendai Court Sendai Tokyo Electric Power Company Laura President Trump Sendai High Court Fukushima TEPCO Laura Bliss Congress professor reporter Japan Supreme Court Seoul
"nakajima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"nakajima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Japanese government and a nuclear power plant operator have appealed a landmark court ruling. The ruling holds them responsible for the country's worst ever nuclear accident. The 2011 Fukushima meltdown was triggered by a huge earthquake and tsunami. But as NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul plaintiffs are concerned that justice is being delayed once again. Cheering broke out outside the high court in the city of Sendai, about 60 miles north of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant last month. Too many people surprise the court's ruling held the central government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, which runs the plant equally responsible for the accident. Plaintiffs argued that scientists had warned the government in 2000 to that a major tsunami could hit the area. The court said in its caving verdict that the government failed to take actions. She'll sort of Colonel when you go Oh, God. The government. Despite its position is regulator just let TEPCO do Is it pleased and let it put off safety measures? It was gross negligence, and it was an attitude Unbefitting, a regulatory agency. That was Takashi Nakajima, paraphrasing the court's verdict. He's a leader among the nearly 3600 plaintiffs in the case. Sendai Court or did the government and TEPCO to pay them $9.6 million in compensation double with a lower court had ruled three years ago. Many people in Nakajima's community near Fukushima fled their homes. He says he filed the lawsuit. Basically, just to say, Give me back my former life Rising. Ah need. Imagine how you would feel says if suddenly you get into a situation where you can never go back to your hometown because there's a risk of radiation. Nakajima runs a supermarket. He says that fears about radiation and waters near Fukushima make it impossible to sell the local fish in which he used to take such pride even more. Fishermen eat him because they've been eating them for a long time, he says. And they're tasty. But their sons and daughters in law tell them that their grandchildren should not eat them. This is a situation which divides many families. Judges in the Sendai verdict appear to have been especially sympathetic to such hardships. The Osaka, a law professor at Tokyo University in Tokyo, explains hunk. It doesn't mean you can t the Sendai High Court judges actually visited the area and issuing the Trial before the decision was made. It's very unusual that judges truly understand going hardships the victims are experiencing some plaintiffs in similar lawsuits have not been. His fortunate is Nakajima and have lost Professor Masafumi Okamoto, professor of environmental policy at Osaka City University, says the Sendai verdict could change that in, you know, taking any next? Of course, this's the first time a decision recognizing the government's full responsibilities they made at the high court level, he says, although it was partly recognized by a lower court. It's very significant and it'll clearly influence future decisions. That's why many observers were not surprised when the government and TEPCO appealed the verdict on Tuesday. Plaintiff, Takashi Nakajima hopes that the Sendai Court ruling will eventually pave the way for the shutdown of all dangerous nuclear power plants in Japan. But whether or not the ruling stands will now be up to Japan's Supreme Court to decide. Anthony Kun. NPR news soul

Takashi Nakajima Japanese government Sendai Court Tokyo Electric Power Company Sendai High Court Sendai Fukushima Supreme Court Seoul Anthony Koon Japan NPR Professor Masafumi Okamoto Osaka Tokyo University Osaka City University Tokyo professor
"nakajima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"nakajima" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Japanese government and a nuclear power plant operator have appealed a landmark court ruling. The ruling holds them responsible for the country's worst ever nuclear accident. The 2011 Fukushima meltdown was triggered by a huge earthquake and tsunami. But as NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul plaintiffs are concerned that justice is being delayed once again. Cheering broke out outside the high court in the city of Sendai, about 60 miles north of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant last month. Too many people surprise the court's ruling held the central government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, which runs the plant equally responsible for the accident. Plaintiffs argued that scientists had warned the government in 2000 to that a major tsunami could hit the area. The court said in its caving verdict that the government failed to take actions. She'll sort of Colonel when you go Oh, God. The government. Despite its position is regulator just let TEPCO do Is it pleased and let it put off safety measures? It was gross negligence, and it was an attitude Unbefitting, a regulatory agency. That was Takashi Nakajima, paraphrasing the court's verdict. He's a leader among the nearly 3600 plaintiffs in the case. Sendai Court or did the government and TEPCO to pay them $9.6 million in compensation double with a lower court had ruled three years ago. Many people in Nakajima's community near Fukushima fled their homes. He says he filed the lawsuit. Basically, just to say, Give me back my former life Rising. Ah need. Imagine how you would feel says if suddenly you get into a situation where you can never go back to your hometown because there's a risk of radiation. Nakajima runs a supermarket. He says that fears about radiation and waters near Fukushima make it impossible to sell the local fish in which he used to take such pride even more. Fishermen eat him because they've been eating them for a long time, he says. And they're tasty. But their sons and daughters in law tell them that their grandchildren should not eat them. This is a situation which divides many families. Judges in the Sendai verdict appear to have been especially sympathetic to such hardships. The Osaka, a law professor at Tokyo University in Tokyo, explains hunk. It doesn't mean you can t the Sendai High Court judges actually visited the area and issuing the Trial before the decision was made. It's very unusual that judges truly understand going hardships the victims are experiencing some plaintiffs in similar lawsuits have not been. His fortunate is Nakajima and have lost Professor Masafumi Okamoto, professor of environmental policy at Osaka City University, says the Sendai verdict could change that in, you know, taking any next? Of course, this's the first time a decision recognizing the government's full responsibilities they made at the high court level, he says, although it was partly recognized by a lower court. It's very significant and it'll clearly influence future decisions. That's why many observers were not surprised when the government and TEPCO appealed the verdict on Tuesday. Plaintiff, Takashi Nakajima hopes that the Sendai Court ruling will eventually pave the way for the shutdown of all dangerous nuclear power plants in Japan. But whether or not the ruling stands will now be up to Japan's Supreme Court to decide..

Takashi Nakajima Japanese government Sendai Court Tokyo Electric Power Company Sendai High Court Sendai Fukushima Supreme Court Seoul Anthony Koon Japan NPR Professor Masafumi Okamoto Osaka Tokyo University Osaka City University Tokyo professor
Landmark Court Ruling In Japan Holds Government Accountable For 2011 Nuclear Meltdown

All Things Considered

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Landmark Court Ruling In Japan Holds Government Accountable For 2011 Nuclear Meltdown

"The Japanese government and a nuclear power plant operator have appealed a landmark court ruling. The ruling holds them responsible for the country's worst ever nuclear accident. The 2011 Fukushima meltdown was triggered by a huge earthquake and tsunami. But as NPR's Anthony Koon reports from Seoul plaintiffs are concerned that justice is being delayed once again. Cheering broke out outside the high court in the city of Sendai, about 60 miles north of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant last month. Too many people surprise the court's ruling held the central government and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, or TEPCO, which runs the plant equally responsible for the accident. Plaintiffs argued that scientists had warned the government in 2000 to that a major tsunami could hit the area. The court said in its caving verdict that the government failed to take actions. She'll sort of Colonel when you go Oh, God. The government. Despite its position is regulator just let TEPCO do Is it pleased and let it put off safety measures? It was gross negligence, and it was an attitude Unbefitting, a regulatory agency. That was Takashi Nakajima, paraphrasing the court's verdict. He's a leader among the nearly 3600 plaintiffs in the case. Sendai Court or did the government and TEPCO to pay them $9.6 million in compensation double with a lower court had ruled three years ago. Many people in Nakajima's community near Fukushima fled their homes. He says he filed the lawsuit. Basically, just to say, Give me back my former life Rising. Ah need. Imagine how you would feel says if suddenly you get into a situation where you can never go back to your hometown because there's a risk of radiation. Nakajima runs a supermarket. He says that fears about radiation and waters near Fukushima make it impossible to sell the local fish in which he used to take such pride even more. Fishermen eat him because they've been eating them for a long time, he says. And they're tasty. But their sons and daughters in law tell them that their grandchildren should not eat them. This is a situation which divides many families. Judges in the Sendai verdict appear to have been especially sympathetic to such hardships. The Osaka, a law professor at Tokyo University in Tokyo, explains hunk. It doesn't mean you can t the Sendai High Court judges actually visited the area and issuing the Trial before the decision was made. It's very unusual that judges truly understand going hardships the victims are experiencing some plaintiffs in similar lawsuits have not been. His fortunate is Nakajima and have lost Professor Masafumi Okamoto, professor of environmental policy at Osaka City University, says the Sendai verdict could change that in, you know, taking any next? Of course, this's the first time a decision recognizing the government's full responsibilities they made at the high court level, he says, although it was partly recognized by a lower court. It's very significant and it'll clearly influence future decisions. That's why many observers were not surprised when the government and TEPCO appealed the verdict on Tuesday. Plaintiff, Takashi Nakajima hopes that the Sendai Court ruling will eventually pave the way for the shutdown of all dangerous nuclear power plants in Japan. But whether or not the ruling stands will now be up to Japan's Supreme Court to decide. Anthony Kun. NPR news soul

Takashi Nakajima Japanese Government Sendai Court Tokyo Electric Power Company Sendai High Court Sendai Fukushima Supreme Court Anthony Koon NPR Seoul Japan Anthony Kun Osaka Tokyo University Osaka City University Tokyo
Canadas Single Payer Prevails Against Privatization Attempt

Medicare for All

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Canadas Single Payer Prevails Against Privatization Attempt

"I, Benjamin. Day. And I'm Stephanie Nakajima. And this is Medicare for all. The podcast for everybody needs healthcare. Today. We have Dr Monica debt who is on the board of Canadian. Doctors for Medicare and Public Health and family physician. Nova Scotia, we're thrilled to have her on today to talk about historic legal challenge to the Medicare program that was just heard by the Supreme Court of British Columbia and spoiler the victory delivered by the court to the country single payer system. I cannot wait to hear about this welcome Dr Dot and I'm just curious before we get into the topic. I mean. You're a family physician, but how did you get involved with? Felt the need to get involved with? Health reform. Protecting the Canadian universal healthcare system, but also trying to expand it and improve upon it. Here Hi. Thanks for having me on your podcast I'm really excited to be here. I've been a family physician about ten years. Now, I've worked in a range of settings from big cities to to mainly though northern. Towns across Canada and I've always been in settings where I've very much appreciated. The fact that my patients have access to healthcare wherever we are whether it's a small town or a big city. You know there's there's variations of cross across the country, but fundamentally, all of my patients do not need to worry about. Physician and hospital care. They do not need to pay when they come see knee or when they get to the hospital they know they can count on that care and that's always been really important to me. I also work in public health in very much care about health policies that. Benefit the health of a community of population and absolutely access to to healthcare is a fundamental determinant of Health I. Think it's something that I wanted to support in a in a everywhere I can in one of those ways has been through involvement with Canadian Doctors for Medicare for about the last ten years. and GM or Canadian for Medicare A as a nonprofit organization we've existed just over ten years and our. Fundamental goal is to maintain an improve our single payer publicly funded healthcare system in. Canada. So we want to maintain that single payer but at the same time know that there's there's always things we can do to make it better, but we can do that with a single payer system. So that it might be a bit confusing for our listeners. To hear that the Canadian single payer healthcare system is also called Medicare since we have a program called Medicare that only. Available for seniors sixty, five and older Whereas Canadian Medicare is of course. Accessible to everybody from to cradle-to-grave. So can you just talk a little bit about how Canadian Medicare works are there are there physician networks? Can you ever lose your coverage? Are you allowed to just out of the system or pay to jump the queue? So we do color our health care system Medicare in Canada at the same time when it actually is it's a series of we have provinces and territories, and so there are thirteen provincial and territorial health insurance programs across the country. So every province and territory is responsible for delivering care. Under the umbrella of what's called the Canada Health Act, which outlines the core principles of of Medicare and Canada and one imposes is universality but really it's a a series of health insurance plans that everyone is covered for primarily for physician and hospital services. So for example, where I work I see patients I build my provincial health insurance program I get paid in that way I cannot bill a private insurance program for for my services. Because it is publicly funded. I'm not allowed to then go in and bill a private insurance program. So for the pieces that are covered publicly through universal system, you cannot buy insurance to go see a physician or go to a hospital privately you need to access it through the public system just as as everyone else does we do have some of our care about thirty percent that is privately paid for either through supplemental insurance or through. Private payment, and that covers pieces like dental care some medications, physiotherapy other allied health professionals, and to be honest it's a gap in that we don't cover some of those pieces, but the vast majority of of care is covered under our public system.

Medicare Medicare And Public Health Canada Family Physician Dr Dot Stephanie Nakajima Canadian Doctors Benjamin Supreme Court Of British Colum Dr Monica Nova Scotia GM
"nakajima" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

06:41 min | 1 year ago

"nakajima" Discussed on Revisionist History

"You have d day and and where we go ashore northwest, Europe, you have the invasion Marietta's in the Pacific, the the final break breaking of the Internal Defense Line of Japanese the fall of the Tokyo government because of that. So it it all that stuff happens in that same month. Throughout the summer and fall of nineteen, forty, four, the navy built massive. On each of the captured islands of the Marianas, the biggest base contained the largest airport in the world that was on Tinian six runways. The equivalent of three boulder dams worth of concrete. And when they were finished, the military began flying in brand new B twenty, nine bombers, hundreds of them. Final base was no longer a mystery. Four thousand miles farther west with only one refueling stop on the way. Lay The island of Saipan. Less, than four months before. It had still been in the hands of the Japanese. To head up the newly created, be twenty nine strikeforce known as the twenty first bomber command. The military brass brought in a high priest of the bomber Mafia a brilliant young general named Haywood Hansell. Haywood Hansell, came from an aristocratic southern military family. His great grandfather was a general in the confederate army, his grandfather, a confederate officer. Hansol's father had been an army surgeon who came to dinner in a white linen suit and a Panama hat. hensel himself was skilled denser a poet and an Aficionado of Gilbert and Sullivan. His favorite book was Don Quixote he felt a connection with the night tilting at windmills. He put flying I Paulo second and family a distant third once the story goes early in his marriage he heard a baby cry and turn to his wife. What's that sound? That's your son she said. He liked to carry a swagger stick like the English army officers did. As a child he was nicknamed possum because of the narrowness of his face. The name stuck. On his final mission as a pilot, a bombing run over Belgium hensel entertained his exhausted crew with rendition of the popular musical song the man on the flying. Trapeze. This is the most famous version. Eddie Cantor. He float through the air with the greatest of the this daring young man on the flying. His Action Dot. Graceful. All he does clean and my love was stolen away. I wept of all the bombing fundamentalists to come out of the Air Corps. Tactical School Haywood Hansell was the truest believer the idealist. Airpower intelligently and surgically deployed could bring any enemy to it's knees. The first operation against family was call San Antonio Won. It was coordinated with joint Jesus Staff Strategy, which may be timing extremely important as a matter of fact we will go. The trump dangerous standard of fallen on his operation when Possum Hansel takes over in the Mariana in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, he says to himself what is the critical vulnerability of Japanese war economy? What can my new twenty nine attack? The answer to him is obvious the Japanese aircraft manufacturing plants which are almost entirely concentrated in a few factories in and around Tokyo in particular the Nakajima Aircraft company known as Subaru today. Nakajima made at least a third of all Japanese combat aircraft. Engines. Hansel said, let's hit Nakajima and will cripple the Japanese fighting force. The newsreel Ronald Reagan narrated is all about that first attack by Hansel a Nakajima. Six hours later through the clouds. They saw. Boji. Here, comes a modern samples. Phosphorous bombs. And flack. The B twenty nine's traveled fifteen hundred miles from Marietta's skimming over ocean at several thousand feet. As they approach Japan, they climbed twenty five or thirty thousand feet out of harm's way. They turned it Mount Fuji then came in from the West over Tokyo. Here, speaking over aerial shots at the city. Reagan lays it on thick. Within a radius of fifteen miles of the Imperial Palace live seven million Japanese. People we used to think of a small Daddy. Polite. Concerning themselves only with floral arrangements and rock guards. The cultivation of silkworms. But. It isn't silkworms and it isn't imperial palaces these men are looking for. In the suburbs of Tokyo is a huge number of aircraft plant. Well, but what are you waiting for? Like I said, he laid it on thick. That first mission San Antonio one was hugely symbolic proof that Japan could finally be reached. But was it a success is a military operation. After the war speaking to cadets at the Air Force Academy Hansel tried to put a good face on things. The operation what? Special Coverage. Show it could be. A very. Dull. Issue at the time. The operation wasn't as good as we have liked. was to say the least an understatement none of the bombs dropped by Hansol's B twenty nine's actually hit the Nakajima plant. So hansel tried again three days later same thing. Hansel sent mission after mission. A one of his last attempts he went back with seventy two B twenty, nine's. They missed the plant and hit a hospital. Haywood, Hansell couldn't solve the problem because the problem was much bigger than anyone at the time understood..

Possum Hansel Haywood Hansell Tokyo Nakajima Hansol Nakajima Aircraft company Marietta Ronald Reagan Imperial Palace Japan confederate army Tinian Don Quixote Eddie Cantor Europe Mount Fuji Pacific English army San Antonio Won Saipan
"nakajima" Discussed on Medicare for All

Medicare for All

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"nakajima" Discussed on Medicare for All

"Right here, this is not about politics kiss. Health. Emergency can't wait brought up theoretical face about better. Well never ever thought the. We have been. Reporting Daily! In, this matter of Camp Ross. And that means you have a right to come to my house and conscripts. Believe in slavery. I, am Benjamin Day? AM, Stephanie Nakajima and this is Medicare for all the PODCAST for everybody who needs healthcare. Including all the K pop fans all over the world who came together to sink trump rally. Yes for those who haven't heard. Trump headache coronavirus rally in Oklahoma. And a bunch of young people filled out fake reservations so that he ended up with an empty stadium. And it turns out, they mostly from south. Korea where they already have single payer healthcare, those lucky bastards. So today Yellow Lucky! We have a really special guest Marc Duds Ick the national coordinator of the Labor Campaign for single pair. Thank you mark for joining us. It's great to be here Ben and Stephanie. Thanks Suit. Could you just tell us first? How did you get into the single payer movement? Wow well. I was the. President of a union in the union called the oil chemical. Atomic Workers Local Union in New Jersey. That had about. Forty different. small chemical and pharmaceutical plants under contract. and. In the nineteen eighties, we began to see that and we were having more and more of a struggle on. Bargaining for health care for our members, and We, actually invited. David Himmelstein to speak our district council meeting in Nineteen eighty-eight when Jesus of the single payer. Yeah I think this is not long after they actually launched php the Physicians for National. L. Program, and You know I gotTa say when I first saw David show up I was like man. Who is this hippy doctor? What does he know about healthcare But you know he really framed. The issue. You. Know made us made me think about you know..

Stephanie Nakajima David Himmelstein Atomic Workers Local Union Benjamin Day Marc Duds Camp Ross Korea Oklahoma Physicians for National Medicare coordinator President New Jersey Ben
Longterm Care in Denmark vs the United States

Medicare for All

07:54 min | 1 year ago

Longterm Care in Denmark vs the United States

"I'm Benjamin Day I'm Stephanie. Nakajima this is Medicare for all the PODCAST for everybody who needs healthcare except for the corona virus freedom fighters. They are really stand out to American values and God and so And this is actually related to the top. We're GONNA TALK ABOUT TODAY. because You know one of the one of the most shocking things in the US is that Somewhere between probably fifty and sixty percent of virus related deaths are happening in long term. Care facilities So these are you know. Nursing homes assisted living facilities. These are really wear. The hot spots and outbreaks are taking place and Part of this is related to the really terrible horrible. No good very bad. Long-term CARE system we have in the United States Well one of the two of us Stephanie. You have actually managed to escape Our our system and you're getting like an incredible window on the Danish long-term care system. Do you want to talk a little bit about it? Sure so last time I mentioned in the podcast that I was in Denmark. And the reason I'm here is not the best under the best of conditions. My husband who is Dane. His father who lives here in Copenhagen is really quite ill And he's been in the hospital for many days and you know with Karoon virus happening and everything it was. It's the exact wrong timing for him. Be Ill And so we sort of rushed over here. writes about the beginning of the corona virus pandemic And we've been here sort of helping him transition from the hospital into Rehab and then finally Land to an assisted living facility as living facility. So I've been sort of like a firsthand experience with the Danish long-term Healthcare System And I've been so impressed really just with how well everything is. Coordinated how How many resources there are for people and also just quality of the facilities the quality of the flat. He is going to be in and the the cost. It's only going to be seven thousand per month. Which is like just over a thousand dollars for This beautiful seventy meters flats with greenspace on the front of the back and then also in addition to that he'll be getting home help however many hours it is determined. He is needed as well for free. He's not bankrupting. The family for long term care it. There is a time where we were. We were looking at each other making on. I would just like tears in our eyes like I can't believe this is all you know working out for us and everything so so yes so. We a special guest Here today this is the first ever so exciting who is an expert on? Denmark's long-term healthcare system to give us sort of this personal experience and I want to hear more about it from the structural standpoint so I'm going to welcome our guest John Vista. He's professor at the Institute of Society and Globalization at Roskilde University here in Copenhagen Denmark and request has published on the long term healthcare system in Denmark as well as other areas of Danish social policy. So welcome professor crest very much happy to be nice to meet him so we have a lot of questions and we'll talk a little bit also about the US experienced but could you just kind of For folks who are not familiar with what long-term care is and what it covers Could you just give a very basic definition? Yes so so long. Term Care is about take off people who cannot take care of themselves so we would be frail people and what we're talking about. Today are people who are elderly. Who are frail so people who are unable to take care of themselves? They would get various types of support or so in the case so some of it will be homes like. Stephanie mentioned that her father in law moving into a home that is for made for elderly and I think it was together with staff associated with the home and he will have to pay rent so he would pay about a thousand dollars per month for this flat but we all pay money for our housing. So it's not like it's not like long term care is fine is actually not means. Tested needs tested. So you get long term care if you are needed independently of your financial situation then some of it you have to pay for like the red for the flat and for some practical help with laundry and shopping and food services so beside the home home care as a homes like institutional care and practical care. It can also be rehabilitated. Let's imagine that you elderly person at you have fallen then you will get a rehabilitation helping you to get back on your feet and to undertake daily activities Again vacuum. At what have you so we have been attention. Physical training assisting daily living activities. That sort of thing and the final thing is that you will also get a visit. A seventy five year will get once a year by a person who would come and ask you how you're doing and if you need any help to get paid life well that is such a contrast with what we have in the US. So I don't know if it's the same in Denmark but in the US also People with disabilities regardless of their age are in need of the long term. Care support except And so here in the US. A lot of people think that Medicare which is are sort of universal system for seniors sixty five and over would cover long-term care but it actually does not Medicaid. Which is our program for low income. People covers long-term care so if you Are in desperate need of long term. Care if you're just really not able to carry out daily activities like bathing and a shopping and going about the house You cannot get support. You don't qualify for nursing home or help in your own home unless you become poor. Enough to qualify for Medicaid. So it often happens and these are some of the most horrifying stories we see in the. Us is that Someone becomes disabled or they get older and have chronic disabilities and they they spend down all of their money on long-term care until they become poor and then they qualify for Medicaid and they get public coverage. But I'm assuming this is not how it works in Denmark. That's not the case. We have a so-called universal system which means basically everybody who I need so if it's locked so the elderly you have to be above sixty five years of age and then you go food at each test where they've seen. How can you such your toes Can you make your own food? These sort of issues. That would be crucial. Perry to it is once name is to increase the quality of life and the second goal is to increase your ability to take care of yourself because we know that Elderly other people. They liked to be independent and autonomous and not have other people to rely on in order to do whatever it is that they wanted to particularly

United States Denmark Stephanie Medicare Benjamin Day Nakajima Copenhagen Denmark Institute Of Society And Globa Copenhagen Professor Perry Roskilde University John Vista
How to keep old MP3s and stream them

Talking Tech

04:05 min | 1 year ago

How to keep old MP3s and stream them

"This is another reader. Listener edition of Talking Sat. Lousy Market Nakajima has a question for me. I'm going to answer Leslie on the phone from Hawaii. How you doing? I'm doing well. Thank you for asking us about your burning tissue while my burning techies you. I've had for a long time and it continues to be a problem. I so many people. I guess if my generation had a massive CD collection. I went through the pain aback in the. I guess two thousand three two thousand four of ripping although CD's to my Mac. And then I had them stored there in itunes which was the best way to manage them at the time. And then when cloud match came out you know the generously allowed you to upload all that music to the cloud and stored there instead of using your hard drive and they would match that with the rice so that you could listen to it on your ipod etc. But then several years later that disappeared and unfortunately for many people like me all that music disappeared too. I only have those recordings and the rights to listen to them on a ancient ipod touch that I have that I have never updated the software on an. I'm trying to figure out now how to seeing that music. Play somewhere else Without having to update the software on that I pod touch. I don't even know if it supported anymore. So that's my question is how do I see what's left in my digital music collection will the first thing I would do is I would plug welfare. I take off the Wifi and I would plug the ipod into your Mac and and in an open up I tunes and try to find the songs and copy them to your hard drive from there. Okay that's good. And what if I keep it on my my my math because that might take up a Lotta space Yeah but you've gotta get it off somehow so do you have an external hard drive or you or USB. You could probably by USB drive one twenty eight Gig for twenty to thirty dollars and had that in there and put them all on there. That's a great idea. And then from there that you can upload them you can't upload them to Amazon Amazon will not let you do that Tammaso Music but you can upload them to youtube and Google play music I did both of them today as a test in spotify says that you could upload your MP threes there as well a really had no idea. Do I need to be paying spotify number two to that that I don't know because I because I'm not one either but You know certainly one of those three will work hand or not And it's a shame about Amazon's really surprised but my question is what. What kind of music are we talking about that? You couldn't get them streaming or do you just not do not subscribe to any of the streaming services. I currently do not subscribe to any streaming service. Typically I've I'm just an old fogy. I liked to listen to the music that I've always listened to you for the most part. And so if I if I'm not trying to expose myself to new things by just listening to youtube in hearing the latest stuff. I've just play my old music and I use that ipod touch in my car so when I'm driving around that that works just fine but trying to listen to it. In my home I am getting a little bit sick of to commercials on Youtube. So I've been trying to figure out a way to do this. That's going to work in my home. It will good luck. Tell us where you listen to. Who are some of your favorite musical artists? The Rolling Stones Stones Sapling kind of a little predictable that way but I like the old music and then I've got a lot of Spanish artists that I like to listen to you from when I lived in Spain so a little bit of rain that my collection. But it's it's all stuff that I love and I listened to the same things over and over again with the with the ipod touch. Let us know how that works

Tammaso Music Youtube MAC Amazon Leslie Spotify Hawaii Spain Google
"nakajima" Discussed on Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"nakajima" Discussed on Rhythm and Pixels Video Game Music Podcast

"Okay and that was the meat channel but played by a piano. Chicken Monkey sheepdog. There's a lot of weirdness Netra and that's the Youtube from the Youtube Channel Cat Piano entertainment which only seems appropriate. So yeah thank you for that. That will be should as if you're singing the song again. Yeah I can't want to hear a bark the happen though. It just would have been in the meal that pause before it gets to that kind of like it sounds a little dancey type section Like A WALTZ. He type section but that pauses always funny the pauses like extra funny. It's just just another moment like just a half little step enough means so funny so yeah I will say I liked it a lot. It made me laugh. I will say weird like vine lie on the show where it will bring on tracks that like this is meant to elicit emotion for you make you feel something make feel. Im- I dunno Moreau Sir Melancholy or joy. This song this is to make you feel melancholy. Kit is nothing melancholy about this jam. This thing here. The somber in the meows those those cats were paying feel bad about bringing Mitchell back on the show to no need to have A whole episode of channel music like a mini episode. Because I don't know how often we can hear the same trial out there now. You GOTTA BE WONDERING. There's a lot The first time I did the scouting network. Scott cover we did the smash grows version of the song I was tempted to find one for many games. But I didn't end up doing that. We could have monitoring but And then this is the Cappuccino and so there's so many more Higher European one. I was really into that semi that was excellent. They just did another one Dark Souls Green Hill zone from sonic two or sonic one. I forget which I yeah. Dark souls very good. It just screams die. You died so my bonus check track. It comes from the game Harvest Moon a wonderful life for the Nintendo Gamecube out. Wonderful came and so was that I remember that so a lot of the music in this game has actually arrangements from other installments in the series. This track is called Marine Jazz. It is composed by mere Yuki Hamaraya. And it's arranged by Diet Nakajima and this is actually the opening theme from the Game Beaucoup Joe Monte Guitar Harvest Moon for girl which was for the playstation one in that game. You play as a girl who is shipwrecked on an island and you are saved by a young boy on the island and then later on you find five boys you have to figure out which one saved you and then. I guess Mary them. So that's the game they tell you. Why don't they just say I am on? Who saved you the cause drama? Anyway this is a really cool track. I really enjoyed it so I hope you enjoy marine jazz from harvest. Moon a wonderful life..

Marine Jazz Youtube Yuki Hamaraya Nintendo Diet Nakajima Mitchell Scott
Medicare for all studies

Medicare for All

08:34 min | 1 year ago

Medicare for all studies

"Am Benjamin Day. F- Names Stephanie. Nakajima and this is Medicare for all the PODCAST for everybody who needs healthcare except for Harvey Weinstein Harvey Weinstein. Oh I can't imagine why you're leaving about it not that cruel. Actually because he doesn't need it any way because he's going to be in prison. I mean I feel like I should say there are a lot of people locked up right now. Who Don't belong there and offer the prison abolition movement But at least let's get Weinstein in there before we yes. He'll have his health care. Although there are major issues with prison healthcare that will not go down that rabbit while now right because there's too much that has happened this week in the world of Medicare for all Especially this Nevada debates. Now you watch this shit in real time It was saucy. What did you? What was your initial takeaway? I watched it later. But it was a bloodbath. Elizabeth Warren with on fire in addition to being on fire Elizabeth. Warren actually shockingly looked at the health plans of some of her opponents. Who Do not support Medicare for all It's amazing how little this actually happened. So let's hear he dubs throwing down with people to teach and Amy Klobuchar at the same time so I took a look at the plans that are opposed to boost judge. There are four expenses that families pay premiums deductibles Co pays and uncovered medical expenses. Moroder judge says he will put a cap only on the premiums and that means families are going to pick up the rest of the cost amy. I looked online at your plan. It's two paragraphs families are suffering and they need plan. You can't simply stand here and trash an idea to give healthcare coverage to everyone without having realistic plan of your own. And if you're not going to own up to the fact that you don't have a plan or the plan is gonNA leave people without healthcare coverage full coverage. Then you need to say so sick. Burn seventy what did you think about? I mean we'll we'll get back to the church but let's focus on amy. Clovis for now what did you think of that epoch? Takedown you know. She was basically just doing the moderator's job here. She says that she support universal healthcare on her website and then to prove it she links to one of her tweets on a rural hospital funding. Bill that's not quite the same as universal healthcare for all in Springfield. That's like evidence of her universal health and the rest of the paragraph says that she believes the quickest way to get to universal. Healthcare is through a public option. That expands Medicare or Medicaid or. Maybe she hasn't decided yet. I feel like can we please stop dragging Bernie for not publishing a financing plan when Lavar doesn't even know which programs? Yeah and Warren later says that this is basically a P- posted note. That's like insert your health plan here and that is legit true She says Kosher has absolutely nothing about her plan. It's not a plan. It's just a I support public option and I think in fact their mostly running on not Medicare for all right. We don't even know what their plans have been because there have been no questions at the debate so far about either boot `age or club. Char's proposals because the media is so obsessed with the question of cost as if that's like the only thing that matters about a healthcare plan and we end up ignoring other crucial considerations like how many people would be covered. And how would access be affected And I think that this is like twenty sixteen all over again when Hillary Clinton skated on on a paper Thin Plan. That got absolutely zero scrutiny. I actually wrote an article in common dreams back in March of two thousand sixteen called the disappearance of Hillary Clinton's healthcare platform and I went through all of the health big national health reporters who basically did not support Medicare for all and we're backing the Clinton plan and none of them in any of their articles actually said what is in Hillary Clinton's plan. It was kind of a collection of weird incremental reforms. None of them were spelled out. Obviously there is no cost analysis. It didn't say how many people would be covered And again she wanted to claim the moral high ground of I support universal healthcare but had no plan actually get there same thing with Amy Klobuchar and the New York Times endorsement of Hillary Clinton that year actually they cited specifically her healthcare plan. As being one of the reasons they were endorsing her and they said specifically that it was a realistic plan. Even though it wasn't a plan at all and they don't know what's in it. Yeah and you know I in a way. I'm proud because the Medicare for movement has so dominated this debate that it's all that anyone really talks about so Kudos to us. But if you want to attack Medicare for all you actually have to have some scrutiny of your plan right. Yeah I want to see you in the next debate. The moderate candidates challenged on whether or not their plans can actually get us to universal coverage because they're claiming they're claiming that universal health care is absolutely goal and that we all share the goal of universal health. Care and I want to see if their plans are going to get us there. What are the odds that the moderator asks questions? We should start a petition gambling pool so we skipped over Buddha chick but let's take him next as sort of a separate issue. I'm GONNA play a quick clip here. It is a plan to solve the problem. Make sure there is no such thing as an uninsured American and doesn't without kicking anybody off the plan that they have this idea that the union members don't know what's good for them is the exact kind of condescension and arrogance that makes people skeptical the policies. We've been putting forward here. We have a plan that the majority of Americans support. Wow that was a lot of righteous outrage Ben. What do you think yeah? So He's referring to his plan here of course And the interesting thing to me. Is that Buddha churches entire line in this is that Medicare for all his divisive right even. Though it has strong majority supported the entire population like almost all Democrats Support. It divides the elites and everybody right exactly divides people making money off the Healthcare System. And those who are being screwed by the healthcare system but he and the reason that he saying his plan is not devicive is because he's mostly pushing a public option And the public option tends to poll higher than Medicare for all. And that's because it doesn't. It's kind of A. It's like a very vanilla reform like a very slight improvements You get like another insurance plan to choose from to buy Obviously that doesn't change things for most people But it's less you know there's less uncertainty it pulls well what he doesn't talk about and we have new polling on this now is that his plan doesn't just involve a public option. It involves enrollment and retroactive enrollment into the public option. So if you're uninsured and you go to the hospital for example you will be retroactively enrolled in a public option plan and then build for it you then have to pay for it afterwards. So Again this is in the same theme of like. We're not actually looking at these plans. The other candidates have come up with and whether they work. Or whether they're totally like batch it crazy So shockingly morning consoles actually ran a poll basking people. I do support a public option plan but then do you support a public option. Plan with retroactive enrollment. Which is the plan. And they found that again. There is pretty strong support for public option. Initially but once you include retroactive enrollment like the Belichick plan does the support drops to twenty four percent right. Well so that is I'd say more divisive than right. Exactly so yeah. I'm liking that. We're finally looking at the alternative zero to Medicare for all and how bad they are. Imagine being billed for several months of premiums all at once a year or a year And you know if you're in that situation it's probably because you were having trouble keeping up with your payments in the first place so I don't think it's going to be that popular with people Struggling his poll says the the premium. You pays up to eight point five percent of your income. So that's going to be a big chunk of change to get surprised build by the government at the end of the year. And that's basically what it is surprised building instead of like a collective health insurance plan that we all are participating

Medicare Hillary Clinton Amy Klobuchar Harvey Weinstein Harvey Weinst Elizabeth Warren Benjamin Day Nakajima Nevada Moroder Clovis P Belichick New York Times Char Kosher
Music & AI with Pablo Samuel Castro of Google Brain

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

11:57 min | 2 years ago

Music & AI with Pablo Samuel Castro of Google Brain

"Am here at nerves continuing my coverage and conversations from the thirty third nerves conference and I am seated with Pablo awesome. Well Castro who is a staff research software developer at Google Pablo. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you thank you very much for having me. This is a real pleasure to be here. Awesome thanks so much. I am really excited to jump into this conversation. You are someone that I follow on twitter. And like we've had these kind of back in occasional occasional back in overtime and it's great to finally meet you in person. you've got some pretty varied interests You spend a lot of time. You're research focus on reinforcement learning. You also tweet a lot about music and arts. Looking at your background you've done applied l. l. stuff at Google on ad from and other things you know. Tell us the story like how to all these threads come together So well originally. I'm from Ecuador and they moved to Canada after high school to to come study at McGill So eventually I did. My undergrad in the navy actually actually did my masters and PhD St at McGill with throwing a pre-cup and garden and so part of the reason why stayed in Montreal and McGill was for personal reasons. I had I was dating someone. WHO's now my wife and I also yes and I also had a band so I've always always been heavily involved with music? I grew up with music. Learning music. Play music so that was very important to me and I didn't WanNa leave that so I decided to make that choice. I know it's not typical thing that suggested to do while you're in the same university but for me. It was more important to to play music so I graduated. Did I finished my PhD at around two thousand eleven and then I moved to Paris post doc and this was at a time where a isn't what we see here with twelve thousand people in this conference. In Europe's didn't have back. Then it was called Nips maybe four thousand people So I WANNA say Nakajima and I was working at the intersection that was very theoretical between between Markov decision processes and form over vacation so I was finding it really hard to find a job because I wasn't former fixation enough for the former vacation community and I was I wasn't reinforcement learning enough for the reinforcement learning. Okay and so after my post doc I I just feared already have two young kids. And if you're that I would speak going post the post stop for too long so I luckily got up from from Google doing applied machine learning and adds an extra said goodbye. Getting at that point I stopped reading papers and faster fast. Then I did a little quick stint in chrome doing a building machine learning infrastructure so backend infrastructure And Brain opened up in Montreal and mark. Belmar are who I had done. My masters with he was he kept in research. He was in decline for a while and he was one of the first people to join brain in Montreal and he put in a good word for me and So then they. They offered me to join them and I jumped up that possibility and I hadn't been following the research. That also is a huge shock to come back. I I mean when I was doing my research. We were all working on Grit worlds and in pretty simple environment because a lot of it was theoretical. We didn't really use deep networks at all for enforcement or any now so it was a lot of catchup trying to to familiarize myself with the literature and how the whole landscape has changed so throughout all this time I always kept with music. I had a a few different bands. Always I've always been performing live and writing music and The other thing is when I started my PhD. I was actually considering doing a PhD with Douglas AC as as well as with During a pre cup in something with machine learning and music but at the time the what was available for music generation didn't really excite me very much Because it was still in the early days and I fear that it would taint my love of music and I just want to keep my music site separate but when a rejoined the research world and I saw with the Magenta team was doing I was kind of blown away by by the quality of of things then. I decided to also start going along that pathway pretty almost I think the day after I joined brain This artists from Canada. He's called David Usher. He's pretty well known in Canada. He approached us wanting to the other. He approached us that he was actually. I had abandoned the nineties called Moist and really popular and and he approached us. He wanted to do an album using like ai techniques and so we just Matton Kinda brainstorm then thing. He gravitated towards the most was lyrics and and So Google who was my manager at the time was Very generous because I had just joined bright. And he's like. Do you want to take this project because I like music as it sure. That sounds fun. I had never trained a language model. We're still trying to figure out all the steep networks because I hadn't looked at that but yeah google that gave me that opportunity and and I learned a ton and that project it's still it's still an ongoing project. So relative to the first model trained with David which we actually made a video out of that like he wrote one of his songs with the first prototype and it worked okay but the model we have now is so much better and I understand all of this language modeling so much better than they did before. And that's just ah that experience kind of showed me to not be afraid of stepping out of because even with reinforcement learning which is the background to step out of that comfort zone and go into two other areas that I'm not as familiar with because they're all interesting problems and really trying to dig into the details. And for me the way I learned the most is actually actually trying to implement some of these models architectures and play around with him because you read about them in papers and you kind of get it fine but until you're actually trying to get it to work for yourself it's that's a whole different experience and I've learned so much just from doing this like jumping from a one to the next in a separate can field and learning about those architectures architecture's but while still maintaining my research and reinforcement learning. Well it sounds like you've landed in an incredible place to do that. Not just kind of the resources of Google and the people that you're surrounded with and have an opportunity to interact with but your role seems to be defined as like advancing research. You know the implementation absolutely. Yeah so I'm a software developer like. That's my official title. There's also research scientists that Google and until recently there was still like most people that are in research wants to be research scientists. Because that's like then you're officially doing science So my like if I had graduated say four years after when I graduated likely would have been applying for research research scientist role Back when I google. That wasn't really a maybe Sammy. Benji was a research scientist but probably about it And so I entered Google ads syringe India and sort of advance my career in that in that track and when I joined Google it was a software engineer. Develop developing comebacks. 'CAUSE engineer you get an iron ringing. I don't have that Initially I was a little skeptical because the official description is your. They're more supporting research. Scientists and so. I was worried that I wouldn't don't have the flexibility to pursue my own research interests. But it's been not at all like that so I lead my own research projects and I still support a lot of people with the engineering aspects of it. Because I've been working on this a lot so I'm more familiar with Google infrastructure and just coating in general And it's been a lot of the major major advances that we see in machine learning the I nowadays a lot of his engineering. So there's of course there's still math and there's still a lot of theory behind it but a lot of engineering and and I don't think it I think more and more it is but Few years ago I don't feel like dot the credited. It really deserved and so living in the sort of intersection of of pure engineering and pure research is for me super exciting because I kinda get the playground in both worlds and learn from both when I've got a a long Melissa things that I wanNA talk to you about but you mentioned Something that's got me really curious. The you know what it means to evolve a language model so you started this project with David And came out with this early crappy language model and have evolved over some number of been like uh-huh Yeah No. It's been like a year and a half it's been or actually it's been almost like two years. I think since we started it but two years calendar calendar wise. But but it's not it's not one of my main project so yeah exactly so it's when I get a chance that I that I work. Yeah so as I said when I started this project I had never trained a language model. I like like I knew what else were studied in school. But so the first thing I did was I actually Andrea Sherr potty has the Yeah this famous blog post host The surprising reliability of of recur neural networks. Something like that thing. Anyway that blog posts and they got his Kodansha Jordan's are played around with it and that was the the Vero model. I'm just over characters and then I started tweeting that a bit and and finding new data sets for lyrics and that initial model that was basically a variant of Parties model was the initial model that I had and so that was okay. They just a milestone like okay was able to train. This actually get it to do what I wanted to do. But obviously was Has All the shortcomings that these types of models do the around around. I mean the the tension is all you need. Paper had come out not not Not Too much before then. And so then I started looking into these attention models and and so so it seemed like the right thing to switched over to to the transformer model and started playing around with that and so the V.. Two model was attention model and it's had various versions of a two part of the difficulty that had with the language with training. These language models on lyric status at is that the lyrics said is not the best in what sense so the tricky thing about these language models is that an end for lyrics in particular is that you're trying signed to get this model to learn English kind of so how how to structure English phrases together but in quote unquote poetic way and to not be boring doing right because you're trying to use it for creative purposes and you don't want it to be boring so we train this model and if you look at it like perplexity scores and things like that it was doing pretty well on this lyric status but but then when you actually look at the output. It was extremely boring so because in pop songs you have lines that repeat often. I mean that's just how songs written so the model would tend to just repeat the same thing over and over and over and It also had certain phrases that would keep on coming back to just had very high likelihood so I wonder if you've talked about this. I say like it's Hanway but the average pop line over the last six decades is you know that I'm the one and That one came up a lot and you can also get you know that I'm the one baby. So that's the average pop line. It was boring and so the interesting thing about working with with with David is that I build variants of these models and nitro him and one of the things he remarked on. Is that It was very nonspecific in the sense that at the nouns that it was using it wouldn't use proper nouns. So would you like me. You he she they since very kind of ambiguous. If you think of Like the Beatles mister mustard polythene pam jude. You know there's all these I mean the fictional characters but they're very canvas and so then you can sort of the ground the song song in something kind of real whereas if you're just talking about him like hey you don't don't even though pink. Floyd has a hate us

Google Canada Montreal Software Developer Research Scientist David Twitter Pablo Europe David And David Usher Castro Ecuador Mcgill Nakajima Navy Belmar Paris Douglas Ac
"nakajima" Discussed on VelociPodcast

VelociPodcast

12:14 min | 2 years ago

"nakajima" Discussed on VelociPodcast

"Core question. I was recently fired from a company. My old boss just contacted me asked me work. Work related questions. Should I respond. This is a really good question so I don't WanNa make fun of it too much the real way to answer this though is how is your relationship with your old. Oh boss because sometimes you get fired and it's not that your boss fired you. His boss did is he. Didn't want to. So maybe you don't want to to screw over your old boss. Because they were a good person but at the same time if you had a negative relationship they might just be trying to take advantage of you because they fired you even though you were necessary to the company so they'll only thing you need to remember as you are not obligated to do anything that's number one. You don't work there anymore. They have a problem. That is actually not your problem. If you like your old boss you WanNa help melt respond. Tell what he needs to do. But I honestly would only put a minimal amount lot of time into it is the second option. Is You hate your old boss and you give them incorrect or difficult to understand. There's that he can't do and that's Kinda screwing him over a little bit because they fired you. They screwed you over a little bit. So that's sort of tit for tat. The one thing I would probably consider more than anything else is charging them for your time so this would be consultancy. They're asking you for information about work they want you to help them The way this works in business is if you use my time you have to pay me and a Lotta people. Don't think about it that way so it should I do a favor. Should I not do a favor. But you're not doing them a a favourite. You're working for them so I think what you should do is give them a price for your time so X.. Amount of dollars per hour. So whatever you made at the office I would say you make twenty dollars an hour. I would say I will answer these questions. At a rate of twenty five dollars per hour but at a minimum of one hour what you're establishing now is yes. We don't work for you. I don't work anymore but yet my time is valuable so if you want some of my time you have to pay for it and that to me is how business just works. That is fair now. I would bet more than anything else that if you say I will answer these questions for money they will stop asking you but they can't say you did anything wrong can't say you mistreated them where you were unfair. All you said was my time is valuable. If you want my time you have to pay for it. which is how business works so if that boss ever says to someone in your industry on this guy you know? He doesn't help people out in the story gets out. You can say OH I. It was more than willing to help the company they just had to pay me for my time and then it would become pretty clear that they were trying to take advantage of you. You lay down down fair and honest ground rules. They could accept it or they could not. That's up to them. But you gave them the choice. And you don't get screwed out of your personal time because to me. Personal Time is actually the most valuable time because anytime you spend answering their questions is time. You are not spending time looking for a new job because you've got a fire so that time is now incredibly valuable because what you're talking about is the time you should spend looking for a job because they stopped employees so when you look at it that way I actually think the rates go up even higher so whatever it is you're getting paid before one point five times minimum is what you should get paid for doing work for them now core question. Why does some intelligent people lose all interest in academia and while well? I don't claim to be an intelligent person. I did lose interest. Nakajima's some may be. I can offer some insight as to what bothered me or why I lost interest because the first problem was what was promised to me and what actually I was delivered. And we're not the same so the promises of academia were never kept so when I was in grade school I was told that in high school I would have have more freedom of choice to choose my courses and that would give me sort of a better sense more ownership over my education now in high high school. You have a couple of electives. So you're basically picking between generally binary choices. It's study French or study Spanish or study this this maybe which which branch of science biology chemistry or something like that. You want to study But if you look at it you're not really. It's a false choice. You're not really getting a lot of actual choice there air it. You still have to study a language you still have to study a science. Let's say I don't really have a problem with that. But they made it sound like it was going to be much bigger than that. It was then I was told. Essentially the exact same thing university will be more vigorous eating. I'll be more thrilling because I'll be choosing everything I WANNA study. I will be with other people who wanNA study the same. They have the same passions. What I got to university I started with English schluter? 'cause I really like reading. But honestly that was his deepest. My passion went. I didn't really know what I wanted to do. I had vague sense that I wanted to be a writer of primarily fiction. But I didn't know what to do with that yet so I got to university. They told me I had to take a science a science class. If if you were taking the ones that just fulfil the requirement I think the options were like geography and it may be oceanography or something like that And it was full. The class was full of people who didn't want to be there. But you had to do it. It was requirement that I had to take several classes like that so already that feeling of you know deciding what I'm going to study is diminished. It's not gone but it was already like I have to do this. This is what I'm paying for. 'cause this is the secondary thing I paid for my own education and so I felt like why am I being forced to do something that I don't WanNa do that. I have no interest in if I paying because it's different when you're at school and taxes paid for at least in Canada Yeah you don't really get a say over it you have to study ABC. I did not find the other students particularly engaged. Gauged in a lot of stuff I found that in my English degree. A lot of students didn't even read the book. We were supposed to write an essay. They just you know read summaries. They watched a movie They pick their way through it so they didn't care about reading literature. They were there because I think they needed a degree to keep their parents. Happy stuff like that there was an astounding astounding number of students. Who took English literature? Who'd never really read the material? I was a fairly avid reader so reading the material was the problem. My problem was ready. ESSAYS BECAUSE ESSAYS ARE FORMULAIC ORG LAIC. It's always thesis points support conclusion and that is not particularly creative. I believe I've told told the story of the on the podcast before about the first time I tried to get creative writing an essay so I had written for year. Let's say essays you right maybe one or two week for all your classes and they all follow the same formula at. It's incredibly boring. That's maybe the part that most intelligent people gimmel frustrated with his university for the most part is really boring The passionate teachers are rare. They don't really exist. The passionate students also rare they don't really exist and I found that writing essays over and over again with stifling any sense of creativity tippety I had so I wrote what was called a medic essay and instead of presenting to ideas or or comparing and contrasting them. I wrote a a little dialogue between two characters. Each character represented one point of view. Having a fireside chat. I wrote it trying to try to copy the style of maybe like an eighteen hundreds vocabulary so it was all very creative and I showed some friends because I was actually quite proud of it and they all thought it was really impressive. They all thought it. It was interesting it was fun to read. They got the main idea really quickly It was engaging in so I headed that in and I gotta see I think I got a C.. Because clearly clearly done some work so I went to see the professor. I asked him what the problem was. And what he said to me and this to me defined university. He wasn't what I was expecting. Now if getting something you didn't expect is bad then. I had been lied to about what university was his. I was told you know you challenge your teachers and they will respect that. I found that for the most part be true. You try to be creative and think outside side the box and you'll be rewarded for that never will admire it. I found that to not be true So for the remainder of my time at university I just wrote the formulaic essays. Essays often with significantly little thought put into them Not trying to get to creative just you know right what they wanna see. Ray Repeat things maybe they said in class or just write something really standard and dull and for that I was rewarded significantly with as but I found that by the end of the four years of university my a writing style in my own opinion had been diminished. I now when I sat down to write a creative project started writing an essay because I'd been trained to follow these steps and that is not interesting. It's not fun and it's not improved me. It's actually made me way worse. I argue strongly strongly that I would have been better served by just having four years to do whatever I want in a library so read whatever I want study whatever I want and then right right things on it. I bet you would have gotten crazy. Incredible creative works as a result but the reality is university he is a system and some people see the system and they exploited and do very. Well they usually go on to be academics. Other other people see the system and I find it oppressive I and that would have been in the camp I went into and I really should've spent far far less time in university and I have come to the collusion that most arts programs in universities are essentially a waste of time. You'd be better served by just exploring those artistic things on your own creating your own opinions expressing yourself in your own way and not following the rules they lay out for you so. Academia is good for academics but most intelligent people actually aren't academics. And that's one of the misnomers. Lot of academics are not intelligent people. There are people who understand and thrive within the system system. So the problem is broadly. We think people who are in academia are smart. That's an equivalency where he I don't think it is. I think people whose who thrive in academics. The Democrats just thrive within that system whereas a lot of the most creative and intelligent people. I've met didn't do as well in school or didn't get much out of it because they would have been better served by doing something else. Certainly I am very down on university unless you're doing a science degree because I think science is something you have to study. You have to be guided through. You need that class time but whatever you get to an artistic endeavor I think what you really need is some something more in the frame of mentor program where it would view maybe two or three other people and one teacher and you explore things together but then it would still rely on the teacher being a good teacher. So in that instance. If you've got a bad teacher now you'd be in the same boat with the same problems probably even more so because you're getting more attention from this person that you don't think it's very teacher but I assume if that was the system you could change teachers of it came down to it. What I really found was what I was promises that university would help me? Bring out my best to make more creative and what it did was the exact opposite. Listen and that is why I think. Many people are disillusioned with academia the loss of loss of loss of podcast. The philosophy podcasts. Hey sexy friend. He's making me bitch. Thank you for listening..

Nakajima Canada ABC Ray
Your hopes for next iPhone

Talking Tech

03:29 min | 2 years ago

Your hopes for next iPhone

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com create and publish a stunning website all from one powerful platform go to wicks dot com to create your very own professional website today. That's w i x dot com in. Stay tuned after the show to hear you can take advantage of wick special offer for talking tech listeners smaller informed factor actor longer in battery and more secure privacy controls now. These are just some of the highlights of your responses to my question. What new features do you want to see in the next phone as you know apple will unveil its twenty nineteen twenty twenty lineup tuesday at a precedent at its campus in cupertino with models that are not expected had to be radically designed before we go on any further. I'm jefferson graham. You're listening to talking tech and here's what some iphone customers would love to see quote longer battery every life smaller models less expensive models more easily accessed privacy widget so you can switch off all microphone and camera access on apps when not in use that's according to leslie morgan. Nakajima quote wish apple had alphabetical capabilities to find my apps. It would be so much easier. Samsung sung had years ago unquote barbara ammon quote options turn off popoff dialog box listing every nearby wi fi so i could walk down the street st listening to podcast without a constantly getting in my way unquote scott marcus finally pete halverson battery life battery life battery every life apple has not disclosed the features of the next iphones but analysts expect the titles to be iphone eleven iphone eleven pro an iphone eleven pro max with the pro all models offering three camera lenses similar to the samsung galaxy s. ten and no ten phones. The third lands is expected to be an ultra wide angle which will help get more people people in the shot for your selfie at the event beyond the iphone apple's expected introduced the fifth edition of the apple watch with this year's model offering sleep tracking tools and it will also be touting suffer upgrades for the iphone watch ipad and computer all of which will be released in september readers any hopes and dreams teams for the next apple watch. I'm jefferson graham to hear from you on twitter where i'm at jefferson graham. You've been listening to talking tech. Please rate and review the show. Wherever you listen to online audio be that that spotify pandora apple podcast stitcher you name it. I'll be back tomorrow with another quick hit from the world attack. Talking tech is supported by wicks dot com if you're ready to build your own website. There's no better place to get started. Wicks dot com whether you're promoting your business showcasing showcasing your work opening your store or starting a blog. Anyone can create a professional website with wicks. You have the freedom to start a site from scratch or choose a designer made it then customize it to suit your needs and if you need to get online fast just answer a few simple questions and wicks will instantly build a personalized website just for you complete with design images and text choose your style change the layout and add any features. You need like an online store or booking system. Now's how's the time to tell your story which dot com can help get started today and build a website you'll be proud of and if you go to wicks dot com and use the coupon code talking and you'll get ten percent off when you're ready to go premium. That's wicks dot com code talking for ten percent off any premium plan.

Apple Jefferson Graham Samsung Cupertino Nakajima Spotify Leslie Morgan Twitter Barbara Ammon Scott Marcus Pete Halverson Ten Percent
"nakajima" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"nakajima" Discussed on ESPN FC

"They were so, so lifeless and against Argentina than against Scotland felt like they hit a gear that the Scottish simply could not contend with is this Japanese team good enough to beat to push this team Kate. Gosh, they're they're movement is enviable off the ball in that game against Scotland. They were pulling Scotland all over the place. It improve. They've gotten better each single half. So just matters. If they're going to go for it or if they're looking at the bracket and be like none. We want to be on that side. And so we see Japan dude in twenty twelve in which they purposely did not play their best players and came out not really trying to win a game in order to get on the right side of bracket that they thought they could win in advance and it worked for them. So there is nothing that makes me think that, yes, they're gonna show movement will know by their starting lineup. Who they put out if they put out a bunch of people to have less than two cabs amongst their starters? I'm exaggerating. I'm not being disrespectful. I just don't have their team sheet in front of me in the moment. But if they don't play don't start you a Bucci, that's assigned for me that this is a team that maybe is okay with going on the other side of the bracket. Yeah. And I'm looking at the two brackets right now. Right. If you the runners-up out of group, d you drop into the bracket, that would not have likely where we know it's going to have France likely the United States, and very potentially England. Right. Right. So I mean you know, you would being if you win this winter's group Dego in, but I think. There's a very definite strong bracket and weak bracket in this World Cup. I think it's, it's really setting up like that. You understand why Japan would wanna go the other route for me. I'm with you. I mean, this is all when you talk about Japan to me, it all comes down to tuck choices the managers choices right? Like Bucci start Nakajima..

Scotland Bucci Japan Kate Argentina Nakajima France United States England
"nakajima" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

03:30 min | 3 years ago

"nakajima" Discussed on Motor Sport Magazine Podcast

"You know, already owes sort of you know, you'll day on the front row and I had a couple of decent races. Earlier. I should have won an Istanbul and Kazuki Nakajima took me out with handful laps to go. And then he apologized profusely afterwards. But it didn't really help. And I think you know, we'd had a couple of other decent races. So I I knew we were getting stronger as you went on and as know already you. So you don't you're on the phone. The grade you feeling the pressure and then Bernie a flat show up and Bernie says you better win this. All right. Yeah. Dietrich's my bus. We're going to watch the race together. Yeah. No. Fortunately, I it was it was a good way. I I still remember clearly, you know, coming up to the sauce, and I thought of a managed to get the ties manage the times a bit more than Andy suit check. I remember thinking if I just give myself enough of a gap on the run down from LaSalle storage. I can be flat through all ruse in in this live stream and not lose too much, downfalls. Because at that time, you know with the old was a first generation GP two-car on race tyres race feel it wasn't comfortably flat in the studios. Flyer. If you will in clean, it was a comfortable, and I made sure I got a good toll through I. And when I went up to lay coma thought like day on the outside, and I'm just going to break late as I could. I I still remember the, you know, every every frame of that that. Part of the lab together for the lead. And there's only three or four laps to go. And one of the first people I saw after the race was our friend, David Tremaine, you know, obviously, one of the best journalists and only say that you can do, you know, he's he's somebody that a whose opinion I greatly respected. And I remember him coming to me after I sing. Yeah. That was that was a proper move well done shop, and he's also another okay. Yeah. Thanks. But yeah, no very very good memories of that day. I mean. You hochenheim g. But I mean, you had some Monaco two thousand nine lumping away with spring rice. Now, did you break the coward? Cub it so remind me driveshaft broke hit something. No, no, no, no, not a Mark on the wheel rim. Not gonna tell us. Nothing now remains probably the biggest disappointment of my career. You know, we as you say I gotten got into the lead of the start passed Maldonado who was a bit of a specialist round money. Was quick than any category crush to every other circuit. But Monica cat. But you know, I pulled three seconds on him. And we had pulled nearly twenty seconds over jerem d'ambrosio, Nicole can bug and people that who would in the train behind, and you know, we were gone into the distance. And that stage, you know, past said to me says that point I thought I'm just going to settle for second and equally I was going, right? You know this. I'm happy with the pace, no risks. And couldn't believe it. I came out of entre nos onto the south finish straight. And it just it. Lost driving overtime. What transpired was that? I was with a new team ocean racing technology, and it.

David Tremaine Kazuki Nakajima Istanbul Bernie Nicole LaSalle storage Maldonado coma Dietrich Andy Monica cat twenty seconds three seconds