35 Burst results for "Nairobi"

"nairobi" Discussed on UN News

UN News

05:02 min | 2 months ago

"nairobi" Discussed on UN News

"No. 126 provinces, the conflict is in strip of interest. 145 territories, we are talking max to between ten to 15 territories where there is conflict. So I think one has to kind of put into perspective because the Monique before, we have contributing contributor to stabilizing the country. And so one can not look at the last mile of the what is happening in these three provinces and say that nothing has been done. Thank you very much. Very good to put everything in context. But let's go back to these three provinces. There is increased attention. There is a lot of anxiety, which is also reflected in the media. And we see hate speech playing there. Particularly in social media, how is actually monusco responding to this threat? Well, you know that the hate speech towards Monaco and incitement to violence as unfortunately led to the loss of peacekeepers and to the laws also of lies from Congolese people back in July this summer 25th and 26th of July. So there is a director so people may think, oh, he's just a social media. But they are direct implication on the ground on lives of people. We are now escalating our ability to be on the digital platform to counter the fake news, misinformation, et cetera, but we also have what I call the responsibility of the host government dealing with the H speech and incitement of violence. And I have to say in part of the portrayal of the media, the government of DRC from provincial level to national level are very clear that they are not total awaiting these speech and incitement to violence. And I know that the number of people have been arrested and prosecution is going on. So I'm not going to enter into all of this. But one has to recall that there is also on the tone of ethnic ethnicity under the H speech in eastern DRC, but it is linked to the history of that part of the country. And we believe that the peace processes that are of the regional initiatives that are ongoing, the Rwanda initiative and also the Nairobi initiative are going to help understand that there are some challenges that need to be addressed in Congo in eastern Congo, particularly with regard to the plight of the population, no job, no security, because of the armed groups, but Nero B is providing a space for that.

Monique Congo Monaco Rwanda Nairobi
"nairobi" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

02:51 min | 3 months ago

"nairobi" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"I started my master's project in Nairobi. In Nairobi. And how it started was this was a very new project. And we were just trying to figure out what's microsporidia is and what it's all about. And what kind of microscopy is in our mosquitos. So it involves a lot of baseline studies trying to figure out if one test works. More efficiently than the other. And there was a lot of optimization in worlds and it took quite a while before we were able to stimulate such tests that would be able to identify these metrics for media. And that was when we discovered that it's actually a new microphone that has not been deployed before. You can know the microbe that we've seen consistently in mosquitos that we are collecting from the field. So during that period of time it can involve a lot of doing, feels like and processing the extraction and sequencing and seeing if it makes it something else. And once we finally found that, this is a new microscopy and then you call it microscopy to envy. So that was the difference before we got into now this more interesting aspect of microscopy that we require microscopy, what is it? And how does it affect those T two? You are also about more deeply about your field work and how the exciting part of it when you are in beta. Yeah, so after oh yeah, after now, once we had to learn how to detect microscopy there and be in Nairobi, we decided to move

Nairobi
"nairobi" Discussed on Live Talk with Dwayne Moore

Live Talk with Dwayne Moore

04:33 min | 5 months ago

"nairobi" Discussed on Live Talk with Dwayne Moore

"And then we flew to Kenya. And in Kenya, we had another U.S. team that joined us, as well as from other countries, Ethiopia and other places. And we had another awesome day. Awesome week. It began with an awesome day as we got to meet up with each other and it's always good to see our team and then led to this phenomenal phenomenal ministry together. Once again, pouring into worse leaders and pastors that came from many parts of Kenya and other countries and also going out with the worship Bible school team as you saw in the video. We just showed you and going into villages teaching children about worship and the gospel and many, I think 99% of the children that they worked with there are team that came from the United States worked with in Kenya where Muslim children, Muslim children. And they were able to go into these Muslim Muslim villages and share Jesus Christ with them. And knowing that those children, the songs they learned, the Bible verses they learned, the truths they learned about Jesus Christ, they would take back to their families. This is the ministry of next several worship, then I'm so grateful to be a part of it. I never want to take it for granted. God meets our needs. He keeps providing for his financially, I mean, it takes a lot of money to do what we're doing, but God always provides. He just so incredibly thankful. One of the things we got to do while we were there, it was a very last thing we did while we were in on this long 6 week tour. It happened in Nairobi Kenya. While I was there in May, back in May, I was in Kenya in the country of Kenya. We were traveling, traveling from city to city to in conferences as we often do. And the lord coordinated it. He did it all. We had nothing. To do with it other than just being faithful and just trying to walk the trail. And some of the very places we were in with some of the leaders in these churches that were hosting us in conferences, I didn't know it.

Kenya United States Ethiopia Nairobi
"nairobi" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

02:41 min | 5 months ago

"nairobi" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"I wish you could have seen you in primary school. I was so confident that I was going to this school. Can I start against me? And you know when God says, this isn't for you. It's this other part. Then it just happens that even if everything on the factors show that they could lead you to point a, if God has said it's point B or path B, that's the one that you're going to. Find yourself in. So that's how I got myself. I found myself in the girls and how I dropped out of the mood girls to get to my girls because I had so let me just take a seat of water. Okay. So because I had gotten really good maths in my primary designations and you also form one after the first time, that's when a lot of parents pull out kids from different high schools to switch, you know. So I was lucky enough to get an opportunity at my girls high school Nairobi. And that's where I did all of my high school. I think at some point you know my aunties are uncles would make fun of me and be like, are you still sticking it out? I thought you know I would, again, be homesick, but then it was pretty easy for me to enjoy my time in my girls because it was in Nairobi and additional bonus to eat is that my dad used to work in congruent, right next to the school, it was like a ten minute walk from his office to my school, and he would always come every week and probably leave a note with the secretary just to encourage me. And you see, no, that's all the motivation you need. It would be like a quick update of what's being at home or at home and then he would put in an encouragement or a vast that would see keep strong, all praying for you. You've made us proud. You know, and then it would be like, I stopped by just to say hi. And usually when we would get the notes is so they would put like in the dining room in the dining hall, they would put a list of people who need to go to the secretary to pick

Nairobi
"nairobi" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

The Vulnerable Scientist

04:24 min | 5 months ago

"nairobi" Discussed on The Vulnerable Scientist

"Okay, so the main reason why I moved schools from Linux to my girls was actually it's very petty when I talk about it, but I used to get very homesick and this was the first time I was in school and now I don't know what I had in my mind when I thought of Buddhist schools because I thought probably you know when you have sleepovers with your friends or your kids it's always fine and but then you need my parents just me off at me more and then I realized I'm all alone and then being introverted. Now I have to start making new friends how do you even start? And it's very daunting and now this is the getting out of the conflict zone when you are not ready and it's yeah and the thing with lemurs it was sort of on a hill and if you look out when you're going to the dining hall, you can see Nairobi city you can see cases see and you can all pretty and you're like my parents are somewhere out there and I'm all the way here in this cold is also very, very cold. And every time I would go for mules or especially during dinner when the lights in there will be all out and it's also beautiful. I will feel terribly homesick and miss my friends and after the first time I just talked to my parents and I told them I don't think I can be able to go back to lingual girls because it's affecting me mentally. I haven't met any new friends and I just need to get somewhere else. So then I sometimes feel bad that I had to leave my parents go to through looking for schools for me, but then like I had done really well in my primary school exams so it wasn't really that much of a hassle. I like that was to say the max. If you want to.

Nairobi city
"nairobi" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

Homo Sapiens

04:39 min | 6 months ago

"nairobi" Discussed on Homo Sapiens

"It has come to a really safe and time of UK. I would love if you would help me. In honoring all the people that are a part of our community. But I love my lover to suicide 7 years ago. This year, but you know what? I know he is watching and I know he is smiling and I know he wants you to be dancing and I know he wants you to be living and I know he wants you to be loving. I tell you what who has brought someone with them who is very sexy and masculine. I don't care what they were assigned at birth. I don't care. Are you loving up your boy right now? Treasure them. Defend them. Support them. Who has brought somebody beautiful and feminine with them today? I don't care. What they were assigned at bud. I want you to celebrate their femininity. That's strength. That's an ass. They're intelligent. They're sexiness. We need a doctor. We need an answer for the women here. Let's give us a big woman after. What you got for me, DJ? Hello, I'm Vanessa. And I am here representing rainbow mind and mind in the city, hanging off from forest. How have you found speaking with people today? So the guy I was just hugging there was a guy from Nairobi who experienced conversion therapy 20 years ago. We are campaigning for the banning conversion therapy. Mind has campaigned for many, many years against the beauties of power around mental health services and the way that mental health services can continue to perpetrate power in structures and fairness and discrimination and so we are continuing to do so both in the way that we support people, but also in the campaigning voice that we give to national government. And so the conversations that we've been having here with people, you know, people have been curious about their own mental

UK Vanessa Nairobi national government
"nairobi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:13 min | 6 months ago

"nairobi" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They have incredible repercussions. After the 2007 elections, more than a thousand people were killed in ethnic clashes. The last time around in 2017 dozens were killed. One of the big slums in Nairobi, mothers whose children were killed in 2017, created a room of remembrance. They embroidered their children's name on a huge fabric banner, Kelvin, Martin, lameco, mama Paul as she calls herself, pulls out her cell phone. She shows me a picture. This is your boy. Yeah. How old was he? He was 23 years. Amid violent post election protests. He headed to the hospital where his wife was giving birth, and before he got there, he was shot dead by police. She doesn't have the feeling to vote again. I think what happened, killed her, part of her body. Even after the incident, she had to throw away her voting card. When a balloon lost two sons in 2017, one of them was shot in the face, his body left strewn on the streets. The two politicians who sparked that violence in 2017, the president and his former arch rival are now best buds. They only say sorry to each other, but not to the people who are fighting for them. The people who are voting for them. Alu man is now raising her grandkids alone without any help. And just on the horizon next week is another election that has already spawned violence. Why do Kenyans still show up to them? Every time they have a rally here, it's full of people. So because you get the money, you go there knowing well after they'll go home and buy a maze flour. By a certain food, I'll buy clothes for my family. It is like a job now. Politics is a play they are not proud to take part in. But life is hard in Kenya, so taking a handout from a politician might keep you from going

lameco mama Paul Nairobi Kelvin Martin Kenya
"nairobi" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:18 min | 7 months ago

"nairobi" Discussed on WBUR

"To apologize a lot. Yes, I think it was a mistake and I apologize for it I think in hindsight it was the wrong thing to do. We also heard about the global reaction to the political shockwaves in Britain. BBC monitoring, Beverly ocheng is in Nairobi Kenya and spoke to Ebola mosquito on our newsday program about the reaction across Africa. While there's been a mixture of awkward silence from African leaders themselves who haven't quite reacted to the news, even though Boris Johnson was recently in Kigali for the Commonwealth summit and part of that awkwardness may have to do with them waiting to see who comes in and whether they're incoming government given all the resignations will still uphold bilateral agreements. There has been more vibrant reaction in the press this morning as well as on social media. Brian Johnson was trending for all of yesterday's everyone was closely watching the developments. There were humorous reactions around what will happen next, who should be mediating this crisis in the similar way that people would be mediating crisis in African governments. It sounds like the leaders of reticent, but many people are talking individuals. Yes, yes, definitely. There was our tweet by Kenyan satire is Patrick Goddard who satirically said that Rwanda has offered Johnson asylum. And this is a job at the controversial migrant deal between the UK and Rwanda under Johnson's leadership. In Kenya, there are two leading newspapers that have Johnson's resignation on their front pages, daily nations, headlined simply reads Boris falls and it has articles and about three pages dedicated coverage to this. People daily's frontline front page said Boris calls it quits. And then they South Africa's cape times that says, Johnson's colossal fall from grace. The humorous angles of it will also taken by daily monitor, which has an editorial cartoon of Johnson hanging onto the UK flag, a bunch of phone on the ground, and it says the ego has landed. You left a fair few comments beneath this clip, Jeffrey in Zambia wrote Africa doesn't care much about Boris Johnson, Berlin in Malawi added bojo has no salt here, maybe in Ukraine. Angela in Nigeria thinks the lesson we in Africa should take from the resignation is that no one is indispensable. Banks are those videos explaining why Boris Johnson fell from power

Ebola mosquito Johnson Boris Johnson Kenya Patrick Goddard Kigali Nairobi Rwanda Brian Johnson BBC Africa Britain UK Boris South Africa bojo Zambia Jeffrey Malawi Berlin
"nairobi" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

JOHN16AND12.COM

03:52 min | 1 year ago

"nairobi" Discussed on JOHN16AND12.COM

"Arm watch and i gave all that money also and and to the leader of this group because in the morning it the first day in nairobi at the hotel Breakfast ice. I will sit there. Talk to to the people. We eat breakfast than only my voice. I lost my voice. It's it didn't it. Go down more and more more until it was. I couldn't talk anymore. And now i fold at. I like guy my bone devos fold as a had. My face down on the floor i was it was the spirit. Did go out from my bolden and left that about. These has nothing with the spirit to do. So my body was like that than those men and lay hand on me in prayer for me and some the i went my spirit went back to my bolay Didn't know that in that time. But i know it today that the spirit a it wanted to be on its own without my body but when they lay hand on my body they. I don't know if i have told you about that that you hugh make a staple of foundation that person it's be glue into the earth when the lay hands on it. If the person is gone in the spirit like i was my spirit was out from my body so who and then they Me they manifest state spirit in inside my body again. That's what they did so they it might spirit didn't go and is it may be could have happened that i died my boat. They died if they have not lay had on me and manifests state the spirit inside my body and then when i i was Drive we drive him. We drive the too many churches different churches and the when i was preaching in those churches the whole time i four down on the floor because because the spirit wanted to preach but it does need my body.

nairobi hugh
"nairobi" Discussed on The Journal.

The Journal.

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"nairobi" Discussed on The Journal.

"At the nairobi airport wanda found out her pay would be less than she was promised and if she quit she lose her visa and be in saudi arabia illegal in after learning. This watch tried to back out told. Her contract had already been sold so to back out. She would have to pay the agency and she didn't have the money. If i had the choice to revoke this contract or to refuse to sign it. I mean it would have been so easy for me but the fact that i was told i should refund their money yet. I had no money. It's just they. Just i you politely to go because you've already gone so far with the process so there's no turning back when wanda arrived in saudi arabia. She says her passport was confiscated and she was forced to work for an abusive employer. Is he's calling me anymore a dog. It's always shouting always shouting and swearing and insulting and there was a lot and eats. Non stalk temperatures can go as high as one hundred ten one hundred and twelve degrees fahrenheit. It was really hot..

wanda saudi arabia nairobi
"nairobi" Discussed on How to Money

How to Money

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"nairobi" Discussed on How to Money

"In every single story i could say this is why you read her. Pay so much for healthcare. It's because of these games. It's because of this type of deception that's in the industry that your deductibles are so high. You can't afford them. Your premiums are so out of control. You can't pay for them and this is why we have right now. One in five americans with medical debt in collections. I mean this is a crisis situation. And so when i found that i could really angle the stories that way. Even though i'm writing about something that seems so boring. I mean my story is we get picked up lots of page views. Lots of interest. I'd get lots more letters and emails not letters. I'm not getting letters in the mail postcards. Cowherds things coming in over the over the wire but you know what i mean i mean i got so much feedback from readers that i just continued to dig in and dig in more on that subject and the word crisis. I think it's overused. But i think it's actually appropriate in this when we're talking about the healthcare system and marshall in your book you actually talked about one of the best experiences that you had in the healthcare system but there was like this. Twist this ironic twist in your story that that awesome experience wasn't here in the united states. Can you kind of tell us how that went down. Yeah you took away my punchline though by by giving the exact wall. So here's here's here's how it happened my wife. She unfortunately has gotten migraines her whole life and so we were traveling. We're actually in kenya where we used to work there. We did christian youth work in kenya for three years so we went back and took our kids back there in two thousand nineteen and this was right before i got the book deal actually to write this book and unfortunately my wife had a migraine and it was after hours and so we couldn't go to a doctor's office or urgent care clinic so we had to go to the nairobi hospital. Which is the big hospital there in in nairobi. And you know here in the states if you go into a hospital emergency room i mean you're just bracing yourself for like these surprise bills.

kenya migraines marshall united states nairobi hospital nairobi
"nairobi" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"nairobi" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Nairobi there And in a few minutes on the program will be hearing about that wonderful match. There's going to be between two teenagers and 18 year old and a 19 year old at the US Open. Who would have believed it just a few years ago. We'll be hearing that in a few minutes, but also we've been getting quite a few text James about him. Genesis. We played their music talking about the reunion and people have been reacting. Elliott in Ireland says morning You've ruined my day by playing Genesis can't stand them but not have one, and I didn't have. But now I have one of their song stuck in my head for the rest of the day. Sorry about that idiot David in Brussels. Never like Genesis. Don't like him any better now we have cheered one person up, high bowler Charles in Berlin says. I think I'm not alone in being a Genesis and news day fan hope that's true if it is, plus 4 +47786 2050 85. Yeah. Now, let's talk about vaccines because we've been hearing this morning about the US trying to get more people vaccinated and we'll be hearing about that. A little bit later hearing from South Africa. But now we had to the United States to hear about memorial events and observances will be need to be held to honor the victims of the September 11th attacks on the 20th. Anniversary of that terrorist attack. Nearly 3000 people were killed when suicide Attackers hijacked US passenger jet and flew them into New York's twin towers. Both of the 101 110 storytellers collapsed and the entire world was changed by that attack. But nowhere more so than lower Manhattan, not a Taufik takes a look at how lives of the Children, first responders and victims. Families was shaped by that day..

New York David Brussels James Elliott Charles United States South Africa US Open Berlin two teenagers Nairobi Genesis Both Ireland September 11th Nearly 3000 people twin towers first this morning
"nairobi" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"nairobi" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Affecting at least two million people. The president of her Kenyatta has declared a national disaster. Northern parts of the country have received less than 50% of their average rainfall in these areas that are intermittently affected by drought. It should be pointed out. The BBC's Mercy Duma in Nairobi, explain more We are looking at 12, arid and semi arid counties. Kenya has 47 counties and these are counties or regions and the northern and northeastern parts of the country. These origin's that have always been the ones affected by these droughts. And what are you seeing now is we're seeing reports are getting reports of people losing their livestock in Dad's and you know, on local and social media. We are seeing photos of carcasses on dry riverbeds. Initiated animals and now this pastoral communities are choosing to migrate in search of pasture for their animals and water for themselves and also for the animals. When the country declared a national disaster requires a pretty strong response. So what the authorities going to do? So when the president made that announcement, he said that a more comprehensive plan is going to be rolled out in terms of food handouts, and that So basically at this point, the government is just looking to channel more resources towards the affected regions and persons and the president just asked the relevant agencies to help assist those affected areas, including giving water and relief for distribution. So, in essence, more money over the next few days or maybe weeks are these purely Kenyan resources? Or is the government looking abroad for help as well? In 2017, the president again declared the drought at that time, a national emergency, and at that point, he asked for assistance, even from the international community. He didn't mention this. But because we're seeing this going going to be an extended thing, and most probably to go towards the end of the year, especially if the rains fail in October towards dissemble. I'm seeing a situation where definitely the government will have to ask for help from the international community from you know, institutions and organizations like the Red Cross and all that. Over the years, we've not had the capacity as a country. As much as this has been recurring, to be able to really cushion these people as a national or on the people in the areas most affected in Tucano where it is. What are their demands? What do they want the government to do? These people according to their bosses, or the county heads who made the president first of all Their immediate need is livelihood support. So they're looking for, you know, relief food to the most vulnerable and they're looking at cash transfers programs to start immediately. But the most pressing need, I think for most of them who own large herds of livestock and animals so that they need the government to buy the weak animals from them in an optic program instead of waiting for the animals today. And they feel that this will help offload animals before they become emaciated and lose their value die and enable the pastoralist to at least get some capital from their livestock and support families with cash. But for those who we've spoken to have seen on social media, I think What they need in the long run is just a system that will, you know, help cushion them from the repeat effects of the drought hasn't food security being in theory one of the priorities of this government for many years now and yet we find ourselves in this situation here. Indeed, gyms it has been. It is so unfortunate that we have had, you know, irrigation schemes coming up, but they never take off all your seeing scandals. And you know somebody misuse the money that was supposed to set up an irrigation schemes to help these people come up with a system to help them be able to generate food even when things get tough. I would say. Unfortunately, for the most part, this government even the previous government, it's It's just all talk, but no one really put into practice what they're talking about. Message to our reporter in Nairobi. There And in a few minutes on the program, we'll be hearing about.

Nairobi 2017 Red Cross October BBC Tucano 47 counties less than 50% Kenya Mercy Duma Kenyatta semi arid counties two million people today 12, one end few days Kenyan
Reflections on Urban Data, Analytics, and Collaborative Urban Development in Africa

Future Cities Africa

02:30 min | 1 year ago

Reflections on Urban Data, Analytics, and Collaborative Urban Development in Africa

"She's a postdoctoral research at the university of bit vodkas round. She's a town planner and researcher on african cities with a particular focus on the role of policy in shaping urban few just in africa meriem. Welcome give us a brief introduction to your background and your academic interests of originally from nairobi kenya and now bit state joins us bikes african. So i'm trained as a town planner from the university of nairobi in kenya. And then i came here to join his bug so up in here for a few years on through expanding my knowledge and research on cities. That's my background. In academic interests really have been on not just town planning this of projects of city building and especially how public sector planning and policymaking trying to achieve beto aben species for for all who live in it. So it's it's a research policy. Research on urban growth in the different dynamics that shape to development especially in africa in my focused in has been the two cities are of lived. In which is narrow be enjoyment on the topic of preparing for future cities. What is getting growth. This proactive town planning in city management. In which countries have you seen success in africa internationally from the data on african abundance which is sort of projected to drive most of the evidence in the next few decades it it. It looks like we are going to have a lot of cities and mega-cities in africa. Presently we have maybe. Three mega-cities bug is projected to grow in the next few decades but they abandoned in africa is also being driven from the smaller towns in secondary cities that have a population of say quarter million and most of ny liberal most of the discussions are about how this growth to be managed and traditionally. We have this sort of formal proactive systems. Town planning that attempt to prepare setup the rules of about how it is to grow before the city's urbanites but what you've been observing boy especially in african towns and cities more organic formal growth and development that is known necessarily planned which then creates this economy. Were to sit out for more planned a good city or ideal city and informal and planned by the to need to correct and i think what we can begin to look at his

University Of Bit Vodkas Africa Kenya Beto Aben University Of Nairobi Nairobi
"nairobi" Discussed on Negotiate Anything

Negotiate Anything

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"nairobi" Discussed on Negotiate Anything

"Who want to learn more about the work we've done in the past and it's a great refresher if you'd been the listener for a long time enjoy. I'm thanks for joining us today. Hey thanks for having me on really excited to be on. Yeah yeah man. I'm excited to have a meeting. It's been a while since i've actually seen it was good to see your base again. How would you tell us a little bit about yourself. And once you do sure my name is humphrey recoil. I live in nairobi kenya. I worked for a company called cross-boundary which is an investment firm that's really mission driven and impact focus and it's focusing focus really on harnessing the power of capital to make a return and lasting impact in frontier markets. And so a lot of that's in africa but really globally honestly. And so what i do cross boundaries. I'm on a team called cross-boundary energy. So what we focus on is financing mini grids. So if you're not familiar. With what mini grids are. They are these. There's there's actually standalone electric systems that are able to bring power to communities that don't have electricity so thank you have a community. Think about three hundred houses off the beaten path. A mini grid. Company will come out there. They will end to to build a mini grid. They'll bring solar panels. It can be other technology but typically solar solar panels Some batteries for storage backup generator for for to make sure have twenty. Four seven power put polls on the ground wires meters on people's houses connect them and all of a sudden. They've built a mini version of the utility grid. That the that you might be used to. And those are the those three hundred houses or their customers and then they go a few a few miles down the road and do it again and so these things these things really have the potential to make a huge impact on.

humphrey nairobi kenya africa
"nairobi" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

People's Pharmacy

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"nairobi" Discussed on People's Pharmacy

"We walk up to the front desk. And to my surprise the guy says before him even talking he's printing up an invoice and it was an invoice for twenty dollars to pay for the examination for my wife. I could not believe it. Of course i happily pay the twenty dollars right away. We go to the back. I'm like okay now. The doctors gonna ask for the mri because they always think that my wife is having an aneurysm. Even though this happens all the time we go back and the doctor says well looks like she needs some fluids and maybe some pain medication and i was again amazed. He didn't he didn't suggest any type of mri scanner brain. You didn't overreact. And then i was like okay. He says you can get your drugs on your way out of the hospital. I was like okay. This is where they're gonna get us. This is this is the pharmacy. Everybody knows about spread pricing and markups on drugs. And we go to the pharmacy and it's like thirty bucks and we get the drugs that we need and we walk out the door and i just thought to myself i. I've never felt so cared for by a hospital but the punchline is this the hospital was the nairobi hospital in kenya in east africa. And so this was not an american hospital was our experience overseas and this was our experience actually in the developing world and so it made me realize hospitals in the united states. They could give us the prices up front. In fact they're required to now by the federal government's price transparency rule starting january first of this last year hospitals are required to provide prices to patients in a spreadsheet on their website and about half of them are complying which is good but about half of them are not complying but now it is our right is patients to get this information and when it showed me as you know kenya which is a country we love my wife and i actually were in full time ministry before i was in journalism and we lived.

aneurysm nairobi hospital east africa kenya federal government united states
"nairobi" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"nairobi" Discussed on KCRW

"One report found that more than a million girls here on the continent may never returned to school because they got pregnant during the school closures. I was in Kibera here, which is one of the big slums in Nairobi and I met so many people who have been out of jobs for more than a year. I met so many parents who don't have the money to send their kids to school, and because there is no prospect of a vaccine anytime soon, they're depressed because that means that life will not get back to normal. I mean, it means that they won't get jobs. Their kids will not go back to school. And analysts. I've spoken to say that it will take years to heal that kind of societal damage. I mean, one sort of silver lining to this is that so far, many African countries have missed the worst of this pandemic. There just haven't been as many deaths here, as there have been in the West. Portrait of the second summer of the Covid 19 pandemic from three continents. We've been speaking to Rob Schmitz in Berlin to Peralta in Nairobi and John Otis in Bogota. Thank you. Thank you, Mary Louise. Thanks. Thank you. Don't know that.

Rob Schmitz John Otis Berlin Nairobi Mary Louise Bogota Kibera more than a million girls one One report second summer more than a year one sort of silver lining years slums Peralta Covid 19 African
Kenya Orders Closure of Two Refugee Camps and Gives Ultimatum to UN Agency

BBC World Service

01:25 min | 2 years ago

Kenya Orders Closure of Two Refugee Camps and Gives Ultimatum to UN Agency

"Kenya has ordered the closure of the country's largest refugee camps and given the United Nations 14 days to come up with a road map to do so. Only half a million refugees currently live in that the dab in Kakuma refugee camps, most of them from Somalia and south Sudan, respectively. Countries which are of course, still unstable. We could speak now, if the BBC's Kenya correspondent Fernando Monte who joins us from Nairobi. Hi, Ferdinand. We've been here for 4%. Suddenly, this is not the first time the government's made an announcement like this is a lizard third time. The first mentioned about 2017 when they all had be concerns about that. That particularly being a place where terrorists to recruit people to then conduct attacks in king about that here. The high control the unconstitutional for the government to close the come, which has mostly people fleeing the unrest in Somalia, Because can you also had international delegations? The government sitting the appeal in 2019 again said that and they came to an agreement with the United Nations to do what Linda repatriation but that hasn't seems to work. So now again, they into that secretary say that this time there will be no move for further negotiations on they want now. Not just Kakuma crossed, not just adopt coast but also Kakuma, which would affect at least close to half a

Kakuma Fernando Monte Kenya Somalia United Nations Sudan Ferdinand Nairobi BBC Government Linda
Redefining Africa's Smart City Narrative

Future Cities Africa

01:50 min | 2 years ago

Redefining Africa's Smart City Narrative

"Is my guest today on fiji cities. Africa is research at the urban real estate research. Unit at the university of cape town look has particular interest in urban innovation and sustainability in african cities. Welcome give us a quick tour of your background and some much highlights. I don thanks for having me on your show as you said. I research at unit. I'm also just over a phd arizona state university in the us and it's in innovation and global development and my background is in other management and stint The last couple of years might research activities have largely been sainted around cities in africa. And how they harnessing technology is development. So if your recent work in africa with regards to cities on technology to support him development and city government objectives. What are some specific examples. That stand out to you and what else. Some of the key lessons learned this this. This quite varied application of the smarts the concept across the continent. I think by and large. It's a has primarily been around smart satellite cities which is a growing phenomenon across african cities. Basically developing smart technologically advanced cities on griffin next to existing cities. So if you look at he could land on this technology city and toxicity in kenya. Nairobi would also the different typologies. Such as what we say cape town which is a more kind of embedded approach of basically using technology to said the marlboro and comprehensive objectives and at nairobi. During this

Urban Real Estate Research University Of Cape Town Fiji Arizona State University Africa United States Griffin Nairobi Kenya Cape Town
Gunmen in Nigeria Attack School, Abducting Dozens and Killing a Student

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Gunmen in Nigeria Attack School, Abducting Dozens and Killing a Student

"Nigerian troops are searching for forty two people kidnapped during an attack on a boarding school in the northwestern part of the country. Npr's ada peralta has details. Witnesses told local tv. That gunmen stormed a boarding school. Inisia- states on wednesday. The government says the attackers killed one student and abducted more than two dozen others. The identity of the gunman was not immediately clear but the islamist group okla haram has often carried out these kinds of kidnappings in northern nigeria. Two months ago gunmen kidnapped. Three hundred and fifty schoolboys in about one hundred schoolgirls of nearly three hundred kidnapped by boko haram in two thousand. Fourteen are still missing in a statement. The human rights group. Amnesty international says education is under attack in nigeria. It said quote. No child should have to choose between their education and their life. Npr news nairobi.

Ada Peralta Okla Haram NPR Nigeria Boko Haram Government Human Rights Group Nairobi
Humanity's planet-shaping powers -- and what they mean for the future

TED Talks Daily

04:34 min | 2 years ago

Humanity's planet-shaping powers -- and what they mean for the future

"I work at the united nations and for the past couple of years. I have served as the head of the un's development program when i walked into the headquarters in new york city many years ago. The first thing i noticed was a sculpture standing outside under the flags of the nations of the world. It's called the knotted gun and it's still stands today to me that sculpture symbolizing exactly what the un was created to do seventy five years ago to build peace out of the ashes of war war. That had been defined for so much of human history as the struggle of nations against nations are the kinds still raging countries like syria and yemen that the united nations works to end every day. That's what i imagined that. Not a gun to represent but now another kind of war is brewing. One that increasingly defines the twenty first century with a dominant risk to our own. Survival is ourselves a few years or even months ago. If i had suggested that we're all at war with ourselves. It may have felt strange especially when according to so many metrics humans are on average healthier wealthier and more educated than any time in history. We have more knowledge. More science more choices today than the founders of the united nations could have ever imagined but somewhere along the way we lost our balance in fact think about this. Scientists are considering whether for the very first time in human history. Instead of the planet shaping humans humans are knowing shaving the planet it's called the anthroposophy and represents a new geological era today. Humans literally have the power to alter the atmosphere and the biosphere in which we live the power to destroy and the power to repair. No species has ever had that kind of power before within humans have achieved incredible things together from closing a giant hole in the ozone layer preventing nuclear proliferation to radicalizing smallpox. But we have also taken the earth and all the people on it to the brink. It's not the rational fair what we're doing today. One third of all the food produce on the planet goes to waste. While one in ten people go hungry inequality has become extreme twenty six people on the same wealth as half of humanity based on recent data today seven million people die from air pollution each year about seven million trees the very things that keep our air clean. Cut down every few hours. We spend over ten times more on fossil fuel subsidies alone than we do all. Investments in renewable power prolonging our common habit like a drug running through the economy's veins. You don't have to be an economist like me to know that these numbers just add up that our economic paradigm is neither sustainable nor equitable climate. Change rupturing inequalities record numbers of people forced from their homes by conflict and crisis for all of our power. These are the weapons we have built less tangible than a gun but just as real just as deadly at an epic pandemic and this year for the first time in twenty years global extreme poverty is projected to rise and global human development. A measure of the world's education health and living standards is set to decline for the first time since the measure began thirty years ago. Covid nineteen has not changed the future yet but it has revealed these deep flaws in our present bringing clarity to the fact that ending. This war against ourselves is not about tradeoffs. it's not about choosing between people trees between poverty or progress. It's about choosing to do things differently. In the midst of tragedy the pandemic has also given us a glimpse of what peace could look like where we can see the snow of a mountain for the first time because the smog has cleared. That's what happened in nairobi. My home of many years and one of the city's appalachian plummeted as human activities slowed down

United Nations Yemen Syria New York City Smallpox Nairobi
"nairobi" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"nairobi" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"You Sleep on. Hi, It's Nairobi, Ron and Pete Carter. Each of us leaves differently on our back stomach aside, and we all have different body types. That's why Icardi's furniture and matches his office. So many different matters. Choices from nature dressed Temp, repeating beauty rest black. Should I comfort Dillon and more But the most restaurant in restorative night's sleep Chop Cardi, South Attleboro Swan's the route to West Wall South Cockney Commons Mattress locations everywhere in cardio com. Turning off the tree holidays are over. And now it's time to accessorize shop. Carty's financially mattresses for accessories for every season Express yourself decorate your living space and style and in budget with beautiful tabletop accessories, florals, lamps, plants, trees. Small on and more. Bring your room colors together and complete the look of any room with five by eight area rugs for just 2 49 99 decorate for the change of the seasons and not just with sweaters, old boy. If you're struggling to pay the mortgage making home affordable is a free government resource that could make it easier call 888995 hope or visit making home affordable dot golf brought you by the U. S. Treasury, HUD and the Ad Council one with brand new windows for your entire Home. Go to free windows 123 dot com and enter rez calms $36,000 window Give away These aren't just any windows. These air rescue on premium triple pane windows. You're stronger than double pane, extraordinarily energy efficient and backed by a 50 year transferrable warranty. We've given away windows every year since 2004. Now it's your turn. Go to free windows, 123 dot com Take 30 seconds An answer from your phone Right now. That's free windows 123 dot com Last year was a brutal wake up call. Prove.

Manure for Enlightenment

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:40 min | 2 years ago

Manure for Enlightenment

"Mall. Thanks for coming on my pleasure. Dan great v. here. So let's start. I'm sure you're not surprised that i'm going to start here with your personal story as i understand it. A big landmark in your personal and contemporary of development was going to prison. Can you tell that story. Yeah absolutely. I'll try to relatively briefly so yes that was A really important time for me. I spent fourteen years in federal prison. How did i get there. I was one of those baby boomers that came of age in the sixties kind of classic angry young man graduate from high school in nineteen sixty eight completely. Disillusion daily naked justifiably or not. That's what was going on with me. Both families up but a lot to do with the cultural stuff. All the assassinations and so forth and i grew up in the midwest roman catholic up being basically good family but we out her issues. Alcoholism and things like that. There was quite painful. Sixty eight was one of the multiple two issues culturally in this country. I just went headlong into the counterculture went off to a big state university but really majored and drugs and rock and roll and antiwar politics and any other crazy again bombed in. But i'd always been a spiritual seeker. In fact my family always thought i was going to go into the priesthood early on or something like that so i'd always been as brutal secret. I continued that all along. And so i ended up eventually leaving the country. I just became so alienated. I in part to get away from the drug culture house and baldin and partic- nixon was reelected. I i just wanted to get out and also was on this search for something authentic. I remember at a time in my childhood when i felt really plugged into reality things. We're very ribbon. Really been magical and that kind of just gone away at some point and that's probably a normal developmental process. But i never made peace with it so i was always hungry for that looking for that and you know the drugs were some mirage of that but obviously with a lot of baggage and if you got a hole in your gut indicative propensities that can take you down a lot of twisted roads. So i did leave the country star traveling as an ex pat throughout latin america. And and that was very transformative time. I've spent a year living on a sailboat to another guy night a small native both that we learned how to sail and kind of an incredible life for a while and just living off the ocean literally and and then sold. The boat continued to south. American and i had some notion about getting to prue and finding something magical there and had nothing to do with drugs. I don't know where. I got the idea but i did get there and did. Discover something quite magical. They're just environmentally. There was some kind of real magic in the environment. And unfortunately the first time i came back to the states. When i ran out of money. I had to come back and work for a while. I couldn't bring them with me. So i realized you know it was still environmental and anyway this went on and eventually at near the second time i fell into or may choices rather engaging kind of small time cocaine smuggling originally just i was i had a connection and i would purchase something for people who are coming down and smugglers and i can make like a thousand dollars and live off that for six months down there so i continued like that for a while eventually got involved smuggling myself to come back to the us. And you know that kind of path remained intertwined. While before i could pull it apart. But when i came back for the us for was to go to nairobi university. I'd been trying to practice on my own for a couple years. High mountains impro- in a little place that bay remote valley up above the sacred valley. The incas and i zeroed in on the tibetan buddhist tradition reading the few books that were available at that time. And and then when i someone actually showed up at my house there with a copy of rolling stone magazine in nineteen seventy four with an article about that first summer session. It was kind of legendary in boulder at neuropathy vendor open institute and when i saw trump firm shades name i just knew i had to go there and so i did and went. Got my master's degree there. It was very intense. Contempt would've or clinical contemporary psychology program. And that was very transformative in the process. I became a student but i kept his other shadow. Part of my life a secret for quite a while from teacher from everyone i would disappear once or twice a year. I was able to live outside. The system continued to pursue my interest and so forth and my marriage was falling apart. I kept those problems at bay with money. And so i had all this cognitive dissonance and when i was traveling with my teacher which i was very fortunate to some develop that relationship and travel with him a lot as one of his primary attendance and when i was on retreats and i spent about half the year and retreats programs are traveling with him and then i was leading a very sane life and now go to this completely crazy life back and forth and before i could tease that apart i ended up earning my way into what originally looked like a thirty year. No parole prison sentence

Dan Great Baldin Partic Midwest Nixon Nairobi University Bay Remote Valley Latin America Neuropathy Vendor Open Institu Rolling Stone Magazine United States Boulder
Interview With Wanuri Kahiu

The Trip

04:49 min | 2 years ago

Interview With Wanuri Kahiu

"Why is that such common question. What is that breakfast question. i would have for breakfast. Had part ahead Sarah millet porridge with spice were Cattleman cinnamon brown sugar and Yeah and but the. The partridge flowers made from millet mood for millet. Which gives it and then they and then they sour it somehow so it's like sour millet porridge and then i like to put coconut milk and spice in that sounds like porridge is usually this just bland. That's what it's supposed to be. Sounds like you're going to opposite direction. Gosh no. I discovered porridge of been discovering parche. All my life. I think it's a process of continual rediscovery honestly like my grandmother's purchase. The best part in the whole world was a best best best best best partridge and then i lived in mombasa for awhile in the night i tasted the part in mombasa and that was the best and i started feeling guilty about liking another party. More than my grandmother's really. Did you have a chance. you're still with us. I'm sorry you can even taste it. You couldn't even get her on board. You can do and also a little bit like mombasa. You're still living out in mombasa or you're you're here full-time based was what was that dalliance with the coast. I've always wanted to live at the coast. Feel like the coast is just a super magical wonderful. Can't i can't even explain mombasa's just it's beautiful. It's one of my. It's like going to the coast dismal. The ken coast is my happy place. All is has been in the indian ocean and the beaches and the coast on on the south coast of the northern. The most beautiful beaches anywhere. I've ever seen Right let's go. Yeah we're gonna so we have mambas where it's at. This deanne is where. It's at. So i just i try and spend as much time as possible so for a while. I thought i could live there. I was just like you know. I can live anywhere. Move bats while you can live anywhere. I mean you can in theory but you but but you can't is super small. It's like It's it was small. It was small for what i needed to do. So i was constantly like jumping on like an extra flight to just to get out of mombassa into opportunity into life and work. Yeah i'm going to pull a thomas friedman on your i i was talking to my cabdriver right from us saying the same thing everybody. He grew up with those living in nairobi. Now it's nice and there's no jobs. But that's i mean. La maybe is an exception. I don't know like a all of the people. There are trying to make it not nice but they. You know beautiful places. Great beach never have good jobs. There's never enough you're to go back to some godforsaken place like new york to get your work done okay. So attlee whenever people say where you from like visiting la and people say where he from. Mo's like the east coast the true your coaster. No because no because yeah kenya's the other east coast and you from the great lakes. That work no i was. I don't know isn't this Right so you're an east coaster kenya being on the east coast in but not like a proper east coast would still be mombassa again. The default how far back to your born raised in nairobi. Yep But then became hopping on a flight to get into life you. You hopped out pretty young young university even before that the last two years of high school i did them in the uk was there. Like that's when. I realized i was black. Hard thing to figure out here. I didn't know i didn't know it. I am like now i hadn't heard of it. I wasn't having race conversations with my parents. I'm having race conversations with my children now I just it was just it. Wasn't it wasn't a thing. Tribe was a thing. And we're trying to get over that and you know but race wasn't a thing i remember i had a white auntie and jews lake. You know like different. It's just like the odd person out. Wow you know. That's just because she was different.

Mombasa Sarah Millet Parche Partridge Deanne Indian Ocean Nairobi Thomas Friedman Mombassa Great Beach Kenya East Coast LA MO New York UK
Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:30 min | 2 years ago

Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

"Ehthiopian prime minister this morning has ordered his army to move on the capital of the tigray region in the north west of the country. This decision came after his seventy two hour. Ultimatum ended for tigray leaders to surrender. The central conflict here is between the new government of ethiopia and the old government of ethiopia. An aid groups have been sounding the alarm about a humanitarian situation that is deteriorating quickly. Tens of thousands of ethiopian refugees have fled the fighting into neighboring sudan. Npr's ada peralta is following this unfolding. He's in nairobi Good morning eater. Hey david let's start with his offensive. I mean the prime minister had been warning about this. It sounds like it's happening. Now what do we know. Yes so prime minister. Abby acclimate who won the nobel peace prize last year. He says that the last chance for this war to have been resolved peacefully has now closed and he says his troops are going into michaela to try to flush out the leadership of the left. The people's liberation front and he says that will try to do everything to protect civilian lives but michelle is a big urban densely populated city. Think of something. Like saint louis and and even the government has admitted that any fighting will result in civilian deaths in abbey's military has warned that they will use heavy artillery and that the left has said that they will defend the city so this war which has been going on for about three weeks now. Hundreds have already been killed. Tens of thousands have fled as you said and this will no doubt Be the most consequential battle so far. I know this is an incredibly frustrating situation for a year to try and cover this all but impossible to get in there and actually see what's happening firsthand But you know there's been weeks of fighting around the capital. What are you hearing about the conditions on the ground. It is hard to report. But i think we can safely say that there has already been Some pretty gruesome killings that the international community is saying could amount to war crimes We know for example that in a village near the sudanese border there was a huge Massacre videos from there have shown family members crying over bodies of their loved ones in the middle of the streets and the government's human rights commission sent a group of investigators there and they say that more than six hundred people were systematically slaughtered. They say that they were killed with machetes. Their houses were set on fire. They say that militants tied ropes to their necks and dragged them to death. The government commission blames a youth militia aligned with the rebels for this but the refugees fleeing into sudan say that it was the militias aligned with the government. Who did this. So we know with certainty who committed these atrocities but what we know for sure is that civilians have already suffered terribly in this conflict. Got it sounds like it. And what about these tens of thousands of people who are fleeing where they going. What are they facing so they are going into eastern sudan will. Carter is based there. He's a humanitarian with the agency norwegian refugee council. And let's listen to a bit of what he's been. Seeing many of total stories of happens not tillery and strikes and parts of western tigray region which is where most of the refugees we've seen have come from and of past couple of weeks. I guess troop movements militia movement through their this season. They've really fred for their lives. Are you suddenly and there. Was this one woman who spoke with who who had fled across the border and her story released stood out. Here's what happened to her. When the conflict began she was pregnant. Nine months pregnant when this broke out and have given birth on the way to the border crossing and had no one around that she knew it's women seeking safety stopped to help her deliver thankfully. There was no complications with the delivery and charges alive at the moment at least sleeping next to everyone in a big communal tent. So david i mean these are the kinds of situations and stories that show you just. What a tough humanitarian crisis. This has also become really What sounds like an awful situation. A dangerous one with a lot of people life. A lot of people's lives at stake

Ada Peralta Ethiopia Abby Acclimate Tigray Sudan Michaela Nairobi NPR Government Commission Saint Louis Abbey Michelle Government David Human Rights Commission Carter Fred
As Ethiopia's conflict rages, ethnic targeting turns deadly

PRI's The World

01:42 min | 2 years ago

As Ethiopia's conflict rages, ethnic targeting turns deadly

"Ethiopia's northern tegray region has already left hundreds of people dead. The concern is that it could mushroom into a regional conflict threatening neighboring countries. The rule tell him a condie reports from nairobi. Kenya tensions between government under prime minister ali. Ahmed and the semi autonomous northern state of tigray have been simmering for months last week. They reached a deadly boiling point. That's why an according to abi security forces from tigray attacked ethiopian government troops. The isn't as secure but but the last week against other men and a woman in uni. Four of the northern command was kid out while they were at their most vulnerable and that the gemma's and among suze taught with the peace that was obvi- speaking on thursday one week into military operations launched against the tigray people's liberation front or teepee al f nazi governing party in the region. The was once a powerful force in ethiopia and politics for but that was before matt came to power in two thousand eighteen. The prime minister says the military offensive. He ordered is entirely justified. The federal government had every right to deploy forces and they use force in order to hand those implicated in corruption and gross human rights violation if ups is made up of different states centered around ethnic and linguistic lines each granted certain amounts of autonomy under the constitution. Tigray leaders say prime minister abi has been infringing on their

Tegray Tigray Condie Ethiopian Government Ethiopia Obvi Tigray People's Liberation Fro Nazi Governing Party Nairobi Ahmed ABI Kenya Gemma Matt Federal Government Prime Minister Abi
Latest On A Military Conflict In Ethiopia

All Things Considered

03:39 min | 2 years ago

Latest On A Military Conflict In Ethiopia

"Prime minister, Maybe Achmed won the Nobel Peace Prize. And yet less than a week ago, he launched military operations in the country's northern region. Now that conflict is threatening to turn into an all out civil war. NPR's later Peralta walks us through what's happening and later to begin. Give us a sense of why the prime minister had won the Nobel Prize. He changed everything in Ethiopia. I mean at home, he ushered in a raft of democratic reforms, and then he also made peace with Ethiopia's mortal enemy, Eritrea. During his Nobel lecture, he talked about how he fought in that war, and he called it the epitome of hell. Let's listen to a bit of that speech of Sin Brothers slaughtering brothers on the battlefield. I have seen all their men, woman and Children trembling in terror under the really short ofthe bullets and alterations. You are makes for betterment, heartless and savage mint, he says. War makes for Bitterman heartless and savage men and when I became to power, people on the streets of Ethiopia told me that he was sent by God and now He has started this new conflict in the same part of the country where this war between Ethiopia and Eritrea happened and his air forces now bombing targets in his own country. What's the cause of the conflict? And at this point, how bad is the fighting? So it's complicated because, but it's essentially a power struggle. Document came to power in 2018 after huge popular uprising, and one of the things that he did was dismantled Ethiopia's ruling party, which had run the country with violence and brutality for almost 30 years, the guys who ran the show, where the TP left the Ti Guy People's Liberation Front. And they were sidelined. Since then, Abby has accused them of destabilizing the country by stoking ethnic tensions. Abby's allies have accused them of assassinations, including one attempt against Abby himself in last week. The government says that the TPLF sent forces to attack a federal military base, and that's when Abby ordered his army into the ticket region. Now how bad the fighting is, has been hard to report because the government has shut down phone lines and the Internet is often the region. I'm still waiting for a visa. Reuters, which does have reporters on the ground eyes reporting, hundreds are dead on each side. Sudan State media has also said that many refugees have started fleeing to their country. So it's serious. What are the TV I fighter saying at this point, it's It's a lot of bravado. They're calling the government dictatorial and treasonous. And those are the same words that the government is using against them. And they say that they're open to talk. But at the same time, you know, they also say that if they're hit hard, they plan on hitting back Justus hard. Either. We talked about the threat of civil war. How higher the stakes here they're huge. Some analysts say that this could be like Yugoslavia where Ethiopia breaks up in Ethiopia, by the way, is The second largest country in Africa by population, and the conflict also has the potential to draw in Eritrea and even Sudan, and if it's protracted, it can really destabilize the region that is already super vulnerable. And we can't really think of thiss as just a regional government against a powerful federal government. I mean, this is really one well armed, well trained military against another well armed, well trained military in a really fragile A place in Africa. That's NPR's ater. Peralta speaking to us from Nairobi. Thank you. Thank you. A

Ethiopia Maybe Achmed Abby Eritrea Bitterman Peralta NPR Tplf Sudan Government Reuters Justus Yugoslavia Africa Federal Government Nairobi
Nigeria's Lagos shut down after at least 12 protesters killed

Morning Edition

01:47 min | 2 years ago

Nigeria's Lagos shut down after at least 12 protesters killed

"For weeks, young Nigerians have been out in the streets, protesting police violence and a lack of economic opportunity. And then on Tuesday night in Lagos, the military shot at them and killed 12 people. NPR's Africa correspondent Peter Peralta has been following this story from Nairobi. The governor of Legos somewhat hollow tried to calm tensions yesterday, saying he had ordered an investigation into the actions of security forces. I wantto once again. And passionately from detect off my heart, a pew toe active in Eudes. You are Protestants that please. Peace. A A chance. chance. But But the the governor governor also also said said protesters protesters had had not not been been killed. killed. Even Even as as he he spoke, spoke, his his city burned. Angry mobs set the port Authority building on fire. They broke into police stations grabbing furniture cabinets. Setting those are Missy International says it has documented 56 deaths since protests against police brutality began about two weeks ago. Demonstrators. Complaints have broadened to include corruption and the lack of jobs. The protests are the biggest in Nigeria in decades, the rights group says. On Tuesday. The military systematically targeted protesters turning off streetlights and security cameras before they opened fire on a gathering on Lagos is Leckie Bridge. But on Wednesday, demonstrators returned to the bridge and protests erupted nationwide in a number up up in in south south eastern eastern Nigeria. Nigeria. A A small small group group gathered gathered for for a a candlelight candlelight memorial memorial video video mourned and read the names of young Nigerians killed by police.

Nigeria Lagos Leckie Bridge Peter Peralta NPR Eudes Port Authority Nairobi Missy International Africa
Thousands Protest Police Brutality in Nigeria

Hidden Brain

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Thousands Protest Police Brutality in Nigeria

"For nationwide protests to end as NPR's ater parole to reports Thousands have been demonstrating for more than a week to protest police brutality at the protests. Young people have told stories about how officers from Nigeria Special anti robbery squad often demanded bribes. Father, friends and family have been beaten and shot for refusing to pay. President Muhammadu Buhari has announced that he would disband the unit, but the protesters say they want more justice and an end to corruption. After meeting with the president, the president of Nigeria Senate, Achmed Lowen, said the government had accepted the demands of protesters. So there was no reason for them to stay on the streets. Time has come. Stop. Countriesmilitary has also issued similar warnings, but protest organizers say they plan a vigil in Lagos tonight later brought up NPR news Nairobi Negotiators for

President Muhammadu Buhari NPR President Trump Nigeria Nigeria Senate Robbery Achmed Lowen Lagos Nairobi Countriesmilitary
2 Men Found Guilty of Aiding 2013 Kenya Mall Attack

BBC Newshour

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

2 Men Found Guilty of Aiding 2013 Kenya Mall Attack

"Cause in Kenya has found two men guilty of helping Islamist militant stage an attack on the West Gate Shopping mall in Nairobi in 2013 67. People were killed. Ferdinando Monday reports from Nairobi. It's a case that lasted seven years and which the chief magistrate's took over four hours to read the judgment. In the end, Kenyan citizens Mohammed Ahmed Abdi and Hussein Hasan Mustafa found guilty of conspiracy to commit a terrorist act and giving support to a terrorist group. Among the evidence who are phone records, which show the hundreds of compositions between the suspects and more Attackers and testimonies from more than 42 witnesses, including survivors of the raid. Convict's face up to 20 years in jail and will be sentenced on the 22nd

Nairobi West Gate Shopping Mall Hussein Hasan Mustafa Kenya Mohammed Ahmed Abdi Ferdinando
Coronavirus corruption in Kenya: Officials and businesspeople targeted

BBC Newshour

05:07 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus corruption in Kenya: Officials and businesspeople targeted

"Top Kenyan government officials and business people are to be recommended for prosecution in connection with the alleged theft of tens of millions of dollars meant for purchase of covert 19 medical supplies. Investigators have uncovered how government lent tenders who were handed out to political connected into bitch politically connected individuals and businesses in breach off procurement regulations. The BBC's Emanuel Gonza has this report. Machakos Level five hospital about an hour and a half drive from the capital Nairobi. Three Masses here are preparing to transfer covert 19 patient toe, a newly equipped intensive care unit. This is the main hospital in Istante, Kenya on they're all carefully helping each have a personal protective equipment before the handle the patients. Uh, they weren't sleeping next to me here. These are professional 55 years. All we have been with him since when is uh, basically with probably mated. Machakos Conti is a poor region. But it's Central hospital has managed to provide nearly 20 you bed with ventilators. Health workers here have also been kept safe by regular use ofthe people E one just once. We haven't lost a single health care worker to coronavirus. But in many other parts of the country, the situation was very different. Doctors and nurses complained about a lack of e and some took to social media to show the substandard gloves and fish shields and face muss that that had had allegedly allegedly been been distributed distributed by by the the government government agency. agency. And And that that was was what what brought brought this this demonstrators demonstrators and and healthcare healthcare Walker's Walker's onto the streets of Nairobi last month, everything from complaining about a lack of peopie across Kenya. At least 1000 doctors have been infected with the virus so far. Then have died. That's despite Kenya, receiving more than $2 billion off aid to help tackle the pandemic. Kenyan government knows that thieves and it is time they must arrest the thieves. We do not want to die in our hospitals. Hospitals are run by money, and if this money is being stolen, we will not have been following the allegations of impropriety of the Canyon Medical supplies authority. Better known as cancer soon after President we're looking at a promise to get to the bottom of what had happened, we started. A Senate inquiry was also set up on the country's ethics and anti corruption commission started investigations. Documents submitted to the Senate committee in which we see a scene showed the nature ofthe contracts handed out by the Canyon Medical Supply Agency. The government body responsible for buying people. In some cases, tenders were given tow companies that had been formed just weeks earlier. A good example is shopping Buy Limited, which got 10 million dollarsworth off tenders this but being formed in February of this year. Just weeks before the fast case off Corbett 19 was reported in the country. Other examples are companies which are associated with politicians. According to the documents, which we have seen. One company was owned by relatives of a sitting governor. Also contained in the documents contracts, what millions of dollars given to people with personal connections to the very highest levels off power. Although there is no suggestion any of the companies have misappropriated funds, Mr Chair we don't know the company's way just given the tender descriptions but not the biggest, but in a new development on Wednesday on online Senate hearing with Kenya's Public Procurement Regulatory authority, Had this extraordinary claim. So in a nutshell. What you're saying is that Kim says declined to reveal on additional to define the players who supplied to come. Essentially and buy all basic standards. That is the answer. Senator Sylvia Cassandra is the woman leading that inquiry. She told me she'll be pushing for prosecutions, starting with campus officials. Kenyans want prosecutions. We all want prosecutions. We are all Frustrated. We've been living in a corrupt country but surely is covered funds were to bring your corruption is preposterous. You know what I mean? Yeah, it's it's unbelievable. It has to start first. With the management ofthe Kim's these companies. How will they get those jobs? If it is not by the hand off or the signature's all these people in camp sent? That's what it's done. Back in Machakos. Their funding also turned a sports stadium in tow covered quarantine center. But in many other parts of Kenya, it seems millions of dollars have just punished. Resident or Kenyatta's demanded prosecutions. But it's powerful names in the felling line. Kenyans will want to see more than empty promises. And that was Emmanuel Gonza reporting for us from Kenya.

Kenya Machakos Nairobi Emanuel Gonza Senate Kenyan Government KIM Government BBC Theft Istante Machakos Conti Central Hospital Senate Committee Senator Sylvia Cassandra Canyon Medical Supply Agency Canyon Medical Coronavirus Kenyatta
Interview with Rough Translation host Gregory Warner

Inside Podcasting

04:57 min | 2 years ago

Interview with Rough Translation host Gregory Warner

"Hi and welcome to the PODCAST Brench Club podcast. My name is Adela and I'm the founder of PBC today. I'm so happy to be joined by Gregory Warner host of NPR's report translation a podcast about the things that we're talking about in the United States are being talked about in some other parts of the World Hi Gregory thank you so much for joining us today. So rough translation is a favourite among many podcast ranch club listeners, and we've actually included episode in a listening less. We did last year called looking for love but for those who aren't familiar with their show, can you just give us a little bit of an overview? Sure sure. We'll. Our tagline is. Stories from far of places that hit close to home. Our original tagline and season one folks have listened back that far was things we're talking about how they're being talked about in other places but both those ideas are. Sort of around the the idea of we're going to tell stories that. Take place in some other. Maybe, some other countries, some other culture that's but but it's GonNa feel close to home. It's GonNa. It's GonNa hit you in some way it's it's not that we're specifically telling non-american stories or it's them and us but just we're gonNA take you places but it's going to feel that it's GonNa hit you personally got it. Yeah. It feels familiar but it's a from like maybe a different perspective. Yeah. So I'm curious about your background and how the idea for the show came about. Sure. So well, let's see so. Terms of my radio background. So I went to Salt Salt Institute for Documentary. Studies that was my. First taste of radio I worked in some local worked at a local station called North country public radio. Up in very northern New York and then after that, I went to Afghanistan So which was not as much of a leap as you think because I went from one very rural area to another very rural area and the stories of actually quite similar in terms of the story of the economy as well as the story of. Loneliness and and and all that. So I spent I ended up spending about two years on and off in Afghanistan. Let's see that was from. Two thousand. Six to two thousand eight. And then I left for a number of reasons. But also because that period two dozen sixty, thousand eight was was you could do a lot of reporting then. That that you just couldn't that was a lot harder to do after two, thousand, eight kidnappings it started in a massive way and then I was based after that in in Rwanda, and also some in Kenya, an eastern Congo. So we spent some time in in Africa again as freelancer and then came back to the US started working for marketplace as a staff reporter kind of learned. Later the art of grabbing tape and making a same day story, which is when I ended up getting the job at NPR's the international correspondent in in Nairobi. Sort of it is a you have to use fast twitch muscles but. What's Nice about that job is that there was also a lot of potential for storytelling feature work. and so he was in in Nairobi actually actually in Ethiopia that I came up with the idea for this podcast country that you've lived in. And it. It came about I mean came up through a number. Probably the simplest story is that I had done a story for for radio lab on their on their episode call translation and it was it was an episode about an incident that I watched that I I was I was actually following the secretary of state then John Kerry he gave a speech and this Ethiopian reporter in the room stood up and asked the question. I remember that episode yeah and Yeah it was. It was like this very brief I mean honestly the whole incident really the question and the answer which was at the end of this conference which I mean in the story we talk about how this there were all vetted questions until this one guy got up because carry decided to be generous in this one moment anyway. So this guy asked this question but. It was it was such a mistranslation around this one word and because of this one word. Secretary Kerry seemingly. Totally. Misunderstood the question answered it. In this way that was very unsatisfying and the guy ended up taking a quite a great risk to to ask this question on Ethiopian state TV. For nothing but it was this opportunity to learn about this one word serious, which has such a different meaning in east Africa.

Gregory Warner Nairobi John Kerry United States Reporter Adela Afghanistan NPR Salt Salt Institute For Docume PBC Africa Secretary Founder Rwanda East Africa Ethiopia New York
Joss Stone launches 'A Cuppa Happy'

podnews

02:57 min | 2 years ago

Joss Stone launches 'A Cuppa Happy'

"PODCAST host Red Circle has launched a new automated ads platform that makes it easy to buy host read ads on thousands of podcasts. We've simplified the buying experience in what has traditionally been a very fractured market CEO. Michael Cayden. Congratulations to the pod fest global summits who claim that they've just hit the number that sets the Guinness World Record for largest virtual podcasting event in a week, here's a fun Friday facts for you. The Guinness World Record for the largest glass of orange juice was set by podcasting robed greenlee way back in June one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, it measured two thousand three hundred thirteen litres. Here's a TV report from the day. This is. The huge glass of orange juice from the Florida, citrus people, and this is rob. Greenlee tells you give a message here with this big glass Oj don't you? Yeah. Our messages to drink more orange juice drink more issue's defaulted Poltrak have released that top twenty US podcasts for July twenty twenty surprisingly cereal has risen from below the top fifty up to number eleven because of the publicity surrounding the New York Times purchase of cereal productions May. Occur. Only measures participating publishers. Semi box is a new podcast studio setup in Nairobi that lets anyone record a podcast come in record within twenty four hours. They'll send you a finished version to share with the world according to an interview with Polar Roca. Timber media has interviewed me show Yussef the producer of the missile Obama podcast Gaffey is now integrated into headliner to allow you to add stickers and gifts to any social video you make of your podcast and Hey James it's me Alexa. EXA wants to know another thing my masters at Amazon want you to do in your podcast according to their terms and conditions. Let's talk about incontinence three. After if you mentioned incontinence products in any advertising in your podcast, whatever it is, they won't tell me then you can't have more than three ads every day, but I'm just appalled Kosta. How would I know how many ads people have heard and sorry I can't help with that point and thank you tearing Newsham a CO founder of ignificant noise for becoming our latest personal support with grateful for many personal support zoo. Help US produce poured news every day you can join eric at news dot net slash support Any podcast news happiness. What is it? How do we find it at? How do we keep it once we have? Singer and Songwriter John. Stone. has launched her own podcast at copper happy which launched on Monday featuring interview with illusionist Darren Brown and smokescreen faked priest is the story of Father Ryan Scott who was accused of swindling millions of dollars over thirty years new from neon hum media. It launched yesterday,

Red Circle Greenlee New York Times Michael Cayden CEO Polar Roca Florida Darren Brown Nairobi Alexa Newsham Kosta Barack Obama Amazon Ryan Scott John Producer Co Founder Stone.
Pulling down statues of racists? Africa's done it for years

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Pulling down statues of racists? Africa's done it for years

"News new campaigns in the U. S. and Europe now following Africa's lead on colonial era statues as we hear from Charles de Ledesma Queen Victoria Cecil Rhodes king Leopold statues honoring these leaders of colonial rule have been pulled down over the years in Africa often countries won independence all new generations said racist relics had to go examples include a boisterous a student led campaign pressed by the university of Cape Town to remove a statue of roads and one of the statute of Britain's Queen Victoria not downtown beheaded in twenty fifteen but on the bundles in Nairobi Kenya now they have to step two lies next to explode in a downtown

Europe Africa Cape Town Britain Queen Victoria Kenya Charles De Ledesma Queen Victo
Pulling down statues of racists? Africa's done it for years

Mike Gallagher

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Pulling down statues of racists? Africa's done it for years

"New campaigns in the US and Europe following after his lead on colonial era monument street Victoria Cecil Rhodes king Leopold statues honoring these leaders of colonial rule have been pulled down over the years in Africa often countries won independence all new generations said racist relics had to go examples include a boisterous a student led campaign pressed by the university of Cape Town to remove a statue of roads and one of the statute of Britain's Queen Victoria not downtown beheaded in twenty fifteen but on the bundles in Nairobi Kenya now the headless statue lies next to explode in a downtown square

United States Europe Africa Cape Town Britain Queen Victoria Kenya Victoria Cecil Rhodes