5 Burst results for "Nagy kurth"

"nagy kurth" Discussed on Start Here

Start Here

07:24 min | 2 months ago

"nagy kurth" Discussed on Start Here

"It's monday may seventeenth. it's been a year. What do we do with our faces. Again we start here. Days after groundbreaking decision from the cdc cities states and companies are still scrambling figure out how to regulate masks. The cdc may have gotten the science on this. But i don't think they got the social science but for individual americans. These adjustments might take even longer it. Looks like a war in missiles fly like a war families wiped out as they were sleeping in. Their beds are growing calls for a ceasefire in israel but this could still get worse and infrastructure. Sounds like of wonky word until the bridges start falling down. How did you not see that on your angel inspection in twenty nine hundred eighteen twenty twenty. How a small piece of steel was able to shut down the fighting mississippi from abc news. This is start here. And i'm brad milkey. This episode of start here is presented by uk. G when your employees feel supported your business becomes more than a place of work it becomes a work of art and uk. Jeez hr workforce management solutions in. Help you create your masterpiece. Uk g of purpose is people early on in this pandemic. There was a sense that you could be overly cautious. We recommend that people who are sick. Wear a mask. We'd recommend that people who are around someone who's covert positive wear mask but do not recommend general public whereas masks protective mechanism. The cdc said hey obviously people want to keep themselves safe but lacking any evidence that masks work people putting their fingers near their mouths right now scaring their neighbors well then came guidance. Saying some of these supercautious measures were exactly right wherever mask at all times. When you're outside a lot has happened since then we understand more about how covid nineteen spreads are case numbers have gone way down and most importantly we have extraordinarily vaccines. Are you ready to take it. On absolutely as a result you once again live in a country where a bunch of folks might be gathering in a gym or church masks off brave again and if they are vaccinated. They are totally following. Cdc advice is it time now but this weekend gave a lot of people their first taste of that new life. Their trial run and after a year of masks. Not everyone felt comfortable. May not enough people needed for me to really feel safe. I would still wear a mask at any store with around people because you don't know that someone's vaccinated. They could just pretended found. Should i change my habits today. What about tomorrow. Should i wear my mask just so other. People are nervous of me if a store wants to keep my mask on. Should i put up a fuss. And most fundamentally do. I trust the cdc about what is safe enough. Step into this brave new world now. Abc's and flaherty who covers federal agencies and nagy kurth writer for partners at five. Thirty eight maggie. Can we start off the can throw something out at you. Just so. We're all totally clear if i'm fully vaccinated and a family member wants to come over. Who is just refused to get vaccines. He swings by the house according to the cdc. I could invite him over. I could give him a hug. We drink beer like the whole thing. I mean that is. That is what the cdc saying. Yeah i mean it. What you are comfortable with is a different question to sort of have and those questions may also be different answers depending on who else is in your family right like i am fully vaccinated but i have to unvaccinated children and no. They're not so we're not going to go hang out with unvaccinated family members in a completely like no masks situation because they can't get it yet they're too young. So what sort of situation you have with your family like ends up mattering a lot. And a lot of the cdc guidelines have really been written down as though you are a single individual living on your own and not always the case but if you are vaccinated what they are saying is that you are protected like there's enough evidence now to say that you're extremely unlikely to be getting anything or passing it on to anyone else even if you've got us difficult pass it on to somebody else that chances go down and down doubt right and flaherty. How surprising though was this guide. I'm thinking about over this weekend. How surprising was this guidance. To people outside the government it was surprising that people inside the government. brad. I mean this was the big shocker of you know. I can't even think of anything as shocking as this. The way houses they only learned of it on wednesday night at least nineteen of the twenty four states that had mask mandates now announcing plans to adopt the cdc guidance or scrap mask requirements entirely. Right after the cdc announcement hits you see a lot of confusion among the governors. There's there's a lot of. Hey we're just gonna stay where we are for now after looking at the new guidance from the us cdc. We thought they were going to stick with the mask. Mandate the next day we heard. Okay wait no we're going the way of. Cdc we will be lifting the mask. Indoor mask mandate as well. The major chains like walmart costco and trader joe's making masks optional for fully vaccinated shoppers starbucks. We heard they were going to stick with the mask. Mandate they were reviewing it. And the next thing you know they're going by the way of. Cdc i it just became this kind of confusion about who was going to do. What and where. The state of pennsylvania has adopted those guidelines into its mask mandate while philadelphia health department has not made an announcement on if city guidelines will change and all within the same location. I mean you could be living in a county and you would have to wear your masks. Maybe some places but not other places and that was really what i think became so difficult with this decision. They're jumping the gun for sure. I mean last week they tell you everybody must wear a mask and now two days later. They're saying take off your mask. I don't trust any of it what we've been here at supermarkets where it's now optional to wear a mask and so what do you know one out of ten. Shoppers are now wearing masks. Even though statistically we know ninety percent of people at these supermarkets aren't vaccinated so are people hearing. Hey it's optional. And thinking great like. I don't want to wear masks anymore. It's open season. you know. I think what people have to realize is that the. Cdc may have gotten science on this. But i don't think they got the social science of this. They didn't seem to realize that we have been conditioned for four hundred and five days to put on these mass. That we weren't just protecting ourselves. We were protecting others. We were protecting the most vulnerable. And it's like we finally get on board and then the reality was. They have a lot of evidence. I mean there was a study of five hundred thousand healthcare workers across half the country that found you know. This is what maggie was talking about. Even if you are exposed to the virus if you've been vaccinated you're not gonna get sick and you're not gonna pass it on to loved ones who are unvaccinated that it was a slam dunk. That's all the cdc can do. The cdc can go out there and say you are safe. But they weren't thinking of how americans we're going to see this which is wait.

brad milkey walmart ninety percent tomorrow starbucks last week wednesday night four hundred monday may seventeenth one today Abc cdc nineteen spreads israel five hundred thousand healthca brad nagy kurth twenty four states five
"nagy kurth" Discussed on Start Here

Start Here

01:40 min | 5 months ago

"nagy kurth" Discussed on Start Here

"Online. Take other people off line and keep rolling so instead this other places that demand that natural gas so there's a lot of natural gas going to heating and there was not enough natural gas left for some of those power plants. God and so then. This is a wakeup call. i just wanna just. Who exactly is a wakeup call to. Yeah well i'd say it's definitely a wakeup call to the people that are running the electric systems because some of this is gonna have to be about like your infrastructure upgrades. I wrote a book about the electric grid about a decade ago and One of the things that i learned from that is that our infrastructure electrical infrastructure. All over this is very very old. Documents obtained under the freedom of information. Act show that before the campfire. Pg new the forty nine steel towers the carry the electrical line. The failed needed to be replaced entirely. There's a bunch of houses in america. That are still operating a knob and tube wiring. Because there's not a big incentive to spend your rennovation money on something like that if it's still working on intel it catastrophically fails alaska minneapolis. Minnesota boston new york. They'll lose power when it gets cold because they build their facilities differently. The question is are we willing to do that. And it's the same thing with the grid as a whole and again we're talking about catastrophic events that also means that in a shifting climate when you might be catastrophic weather events smushed even closer together. It's even bigger deal right. Nagy kurth there in minnesota. By the way what are we talking about. Here is in positive. Territory. oh no it's actually. It's great today. It's like ten degrees. And i went outside and i was like all okay.

america minnesota ten degrees today Nagy kurth forty nine steel intel One a decade ago Minnesota boston new york alaska minneapolis about natural gas
"nagy kurth" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"nagy kurth" Discussed on Science Friday

"And give doctors a better ability to sort of track. The movement of the Oregon in transit. So they would know exactly where it is at all times. And that matters for a couple of reasons, I it because those organs lose viability the longer it takes to get to recipient, but another part here is that the organ donor system is currently undergoing some big changes that are likely going to make longer distance transplants more common. This is something I read about it fivethirtyeight a couple of weeks ago. These new rules for liver donations took effect this week, and they are aiming to be distribute. Organs from parts of the country that have more donor organs to parts that have fewer donor organs, and they're pretty controversial rules. So the state of Kansas is currently considering a Bill that would keep Kansas organs for cans, for instance, and kidneys are probably the next thing on the list. That's going to get these rule revisions after the liver ones have taken effect. So we could someday be looking at a future where somebody in New York City is getting a new organ from rural Pennsylvania delivered via drone. Wow. And I guess you you really have to have great confidence in a drones ability to do this. Not just you know, it's not a loaf of bread you delivering here. Right. I mean, obviously, there's a lot of testing to go before people are going to feel comfortable doing long distance trips with these things, but they were done using multiple pilots following this thing very closely. And as the researchers pointed out in some ways, it's a little bit better than sending it in a truck or a plane because you knew exactly where the thing is. It's it's a lot more easy to track it as it's moving. Could we could we have an organ donor war breakout between the states here? Oh, we could that is that whole bit is a whole issue in another it self where what you have is some parts of the country have higher rates of donor registration and some parts of the country have higher rates of donor need, and those do not necessarily match up real well Nagy Kurth Baker senior science reporter, fivethirtyeight, always a pleasure to have you. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having made. Now, it's time to check in..

Kansas Nagy Kurth Baker Oregon New York City reporter Pennsylvania
"nagy kurth" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"nagy kurth" Discussed on Science Friday

"Faster and give doctors a better ability to sort of track the movement of the organ in transit. So they would know exactly where it is at all times. And that matters for a couple of reasons, I it because those organs lose viability the longer it takes to get to recipient, but another part here is that the organ donor system is currently undergoing some big changes that are likely going to make longer distance transplants more common. This is something I read about it fivethirtyeight a couple of weeks ago. These new rules for liver donations took effect this week, and they are aiming to distribute. Organs from parts of the country that have more donor organs to parts that have fewer donor organs, and they're pretty controversial rules. So the state of Kansas is currently considering a Bill that would keep Kansas organs for cans, for instance, and kidneys are probably the next thing on the list. That's going to get these rule revisions after the liver ones have taken effect. So we could someday be looking at a future where somebody in New York City is getting a new organ from rural Pennsylvania delivered via drone. Wow. And I guess you you really have to have great confidence in a drones ability to do this. This is not just you know, it's not a loaf of bread you delivering here. Right. I mean, obviously, there's a lot of testing to go before people are going to feel comfortable doing long distance trips with these things, but they were done using multiple pilots following this thing very closely. And as the researchers pointed out in some ways, it's a little bit better than sending it in a truck or a plane because you knew exactly where the thing is. It's it's a lot more easy to track it as it's moving. Could we could we have a an organ donor war breakout between the states here? Oh, we could that is that whole bit is a whole issue in and of itself where what you have is some parts of the country have higher rates of donor registration and some parts of the country have higher rates of donor need, and those do not necessarily match up real well Nagy Kurth Baker senior science reporter, fivethirtyeight, always a pleasure to have you. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having made. Now, it's time to check in..

Kansas Nagy Kurth Baker New York City Pennsylvania reporter
"nagy kurth" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:06 min | 2 years ago

"nagy kurth" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Day today, depending on where you are further inland. Highs into the seventies fifties and sixties along the coast peninsula, currently sixty two degrees here in San Francisco at member supported K Q E D public radio. This is science Friday reflejo bit later in the hour, some digital estate planning and had one US coming company is planning for the potential havoc wrought by climate change. But first back in two thousand eight paleoanthropologists exploring in a Siberian cave found a single Hamad finger bone DNA analysis of that bone had researchers to say the fine Mark the discovery of a new kind of ancient human lineage separate from the enter tolls, and homo sapiens that lineage became known as Denisovans after the cave where the finger bone was found this week. Researchers announced another Dennis have in find far away from the original site. Joining me now to talk about why that is important and other stories from the weekend. Science is Maggie Kurth. Baker senior science reporter at five thirty eight nice to have you back again. Maggie. Thanks for having me. Tell us about this phone. What's what what's important about this new bone find? Well, so the interesting thing about the discipline species is that it's really been something that we know primarily through DNA analysis. So scientists can tell you a lot about this genome, but not about what Denisovans looked like. So the data really increased significantly this week with this job own find it tells us a little bit more about their appearance because it lacks the chin, for instance, and has these particularly big teeth that are different in shape and size from those of Neanderthals and modern humans and really any other known hominids, and the other thing that's really important about this is that finding this job own into bet helps back up this previous DNA research that had found that a mutation. That's common in modern thebenz, probably originally came from Denisovans. So this mutation is interesting. It's associated with making it easier to breathe at high altitude and this. One hundred sixty thousand euro job own shows that the Denisovans were they're living in the Himalayas at least one hundred twenty thousand years before homo sapiens, and they were adapting to their environment in a way that they'd eventually pass on to us, and that was fifteen hundred miles away from the original find is in that significant. Yeah, that definitely is. Also, it means that they were spread out over a pretty big chunk of Asia. Okay. Let's move onto news this week about a scandal involving aluminum for rockets. Yeah. So these two unmanned missions to space failed because NASA contractor was falsifying the results of materials testing. This Justice department investigation. Just got published that found that this aluminum extrusion company had deliberately altered certification test results between nineteen ninety six in two thousand fifteen trying to make it look like the materials it produced met NASA specifications when they didn't and the scam resulted in Tucson. Satellites failing to reach orbit ironically because they failed to fail rather than failing themselves. So these these were things that were part of the payload fairing, which is kind of like this clam shell shaped housing that protects the satellite during launch then opens out, right? Those to it's supposed to separate and fall away, and in both of these launches it did not separate and follow away which meant that the rocket way too much. And then the whole thing fell back to earth and disintegrated, and if actively wasted about seven hundred million dollars know, this is something that the Justice department and NASA have been investigating for a long time. The company involved got banned from government contracting back in two thousand fifteen but this is just the first time the results have been made. Public sounds pretty interesting. Let's move on to a story that we covered a few weeks ago. We talked with trimmer, Adam Reese, about attempts to measure, the Hubble constant it seems to be really a lot of that going on in the news. Yeah. So the Hubble constant is kind of an interesting thing. It's this idea of trying to get a hold of the rate of expansion of the universe. And it is one of the key tasks that was proposed for the Hubble space telescope back when it first launched in nineteen ninety. So over time the Hubble space telescope has been using these observations of the distance between certain kinds of pulsating stars to narrow down its estimate of what this Hubble constant is and get a little bit closer and closer to what we assume as an accurate number. They had what happened this week is that they came out with a new revised estimate and this one they think is narrowing that uncertainty to the point that it's probably accurate to within one point nine percent. But some things you talked about before there's another way to measure, the Hubble constant and that other way is studying the cosmic microwave background radiation. So essentially like the leftovers of the big bang, and that's produced an entirely different estimate of the Hubble constant and this new constant that the space telescope, researchers think is the most accurate one. They've ever produced is now. Nine percent faster than the constant as measured by that cosmic microwave background radiation. So we've got this pretty big difference. That would make the universe. What younger if it's or older or something? At the same time. I don't know. Let's let's look at our hands. And just let me fascinated with the universe. Because they both be right. I mean could there be new physics here? Atom reset as well. Maybe there's no physics. We don't know about. Maybe we're both right, right. That's the really interesting thing is the existing cosmological models suggest that these two things, you know, should match. But nobody knows yet. Why they don't? So maybe somebody's got something wrong. Or maybe what we have wrong is our cosmological models to to to to to to. Can't do good twilight zone music. Finally, there's there's a story about a delivery system for transplanted organs. Tell us about that. Yeah. So a life saving kidney made a three mile journey from donor to transplant recipient via drone this week. And that is a first for organ transplants. It's part of a test case demonstration at the university of Maryland. But the researchers are hoping the technology could someday make organ delivery faster and give doctors a better ability to sort of track. The movement of the Oregon in transit. So they would know exactly where it is at all times. And that matters for a couple of reasons, I it because those organs lose viability the longer it takes to get to recipient, but another part here is that the organ donor system is currently undergoing some big changes that are likely going to make longer distance transplants more common. This is something I read about it fivethirtyeight a couple of weeks ago. He's new rules for liver. Donations took effect this week. And they are aiming to be distributed. Organs from parts of the country. That have more donor organs to parts that have fewer donor organs. And they're pretty controversial rules. So the state of Kansas is currently considering a Bill that would keep Kansas organs for cans, for instance, and kidneys are probably the next thing on the list. That's going to get these rule revisions after the liver ones have taken effect. So we could someday be looking at a future where somebody in New York City is getting a new organ from rural Pennsylvania delivered via drone. Wow. And I guess you you really have to have great confidence in drones ability to do that. Not just you know, it's not a loaf of bread you delivering here. Right. I mean, obviously, there's a lot of testing to go before people are going to feel comfortable doing long distance trips with these things, but they were done using multiple pilots following this thing very closely. And as the researchers pointed out in some ways, it's a little bit better than sending it in a truck or a plane because you know, exactly where the thing is. It's it's a lot more easy to track it as it's moving. Could we could we have an organ donor war breakout between the states here? Oh, we could that is that whole bit is a whole issue in another it self where what you have is some parts of the country have higher rates of donor registration and some parts of the country have higher rates of donor need, and those do not necessarily match up real well Nagy Kurth Baker senior science reporter, fivethirtyeight, always a pleasure to have you. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having make now it's time to check. Check in on the state of science. Is.

NASA Nagy Kurth Baker Denisovans Maggie Kurth reporter Justice department US San Francisco Kansas Asia Dennis Hamad Himalayas Adam Reese New York City university of Maryland