35 Burst results for "Nagasaki"

The Big Red Button

Why It Matters

06:28 min | 3 weeks ago

The Big Red Button

"I'm gabrielle. Sierra and this is why it matters today a look inside the rules for nuclear launch in the united states and the risks of giving one person so much power. Hey i'm alex bill and i name is abigail sto thurston. Bell and stow. Thurston are both experts at the center for arms control and non-proliferation an ngo that focuses on nuclear security. This means they spent every day thinking about how to prevent nuclear war. Okay so the only person that is in charge of launching a nuclear attack is the president. There's no stopgap. There's no other people he asked to consult. There's nothing else just his decision. Yes so there's no requirement that the president consult with anyone they can and our command and control system is designed so that he can get in contact with advisers that he wants to speak to but no requirement that he consult with anyone before we go any further. Let's get our terms straight. There are two kinds of nuclear strikes retaliation. And i use. The details are complex but both are essentially what they sound like. Retaliation involves responding to a nuclear attack with a nuclear attack. I use means being the first to use nuclear weapons in conflict. Neither of these scenarios requires the president to consult with experts. So if the scene with the big board and the president talking to all of his advisors doesn't need to happen. What actually does need to happen. The protocol for launching nuclear weapon is highly secretive but the main components are known. Could you walk me through. How a i use nuclear strike would go down. It basically starts with the president deciding that he wants to use a nuclear weapon. He can decide this because he feels like an attack is imminent on the united states. He can decide it because we're in a conflict and he wants to use a nuclear weapon to end the conflict you know basically escalate so far that the other side will back down or it could just decide. He wants to use a nuclear weapon their issues surrounding whether or not it would be a legal order. But i think in the heat of the moment you're not gonna have a bunch of lawyers running into the room saying i don't think this is legal. He actually has a direct line to the national military command center. This facility run by the pentagon is ready at any minute of the day to receive a launch order remember. The president is the commander in chief of the military. All he has to do is pick up the phone. Indicate the target and the number of weapons he would like to launch. He has something called biscuit which is a little card that has launch codes on them. Someone verifies that is in fact the president giving this order. The order goes out and within five minutes from the president deciding. I want to launch a nuke to nuke in the air. That's how easy it is terrifying short amount of time and terrifyingly easy today and you're relying on the person who has the authority to know and have thought through all of those consequences. We take it for granted that that person will have thought about that before they do it. There's no checker balance to make sure that that presidents in the right head space has thought through everything has talked with our allies. None of that's there and has it always been this way. So historically commanders did have the ability in the eisenhower administration at the beginning of the nuclear age to use nuclear weapons on their own authorities. Should they not be able to get into contact with the president and then it was in the kennedy administration that we really solidify the idea that it should be the president and the president alone that the consequences of nuclear use is so massive that it really should be a decision at the top level. The idea being that. The american public would always electa relational and straight thinking president and And so that's why. This sort of very undemocratic process develops was a bit of a nuclear monarchy. So the idea was that this one person who was elected by all these people would have the wherewithal to make the right decision in this situation. Yeah it was theorized that way but not everybody always agreed with it. In fact during the height of the cold war there was a lot of debate about whether or not this was a good structure and it kind of went to macab places at times where somebody was positing that. Actually you should have the launch codes in a pill inserted inside of the heart of military attache and the president would actually have to kill that military attache to get the codes and be able to kill hundreds of thousands of people. Obviously that was not an actionable plan by theorists at the time is sort of making the case about how much you're putting on the shoulders of one person and whether or not that's a good idea when it comes to a weapon that's capable of flattening cities and and beyond the stakes surrounding the decision to launch a nuclear first strike are as high as they get and since the attacks on hiroshima and nagasaki. No president has done so in an ideal world the president would think and hard and hear a wide range of opinions before undertaking a first strike but when it comes to the other nuclear scenario retaliation the president would not usually have the luxury of time for retaliation you have to be able to decide and execute the retaliation and a very short time. Lsu you risk being wiped out neutralize before you can do. so this is richard vets. He's the director of the saltzman institute of war and peace studies at columbia university. An adjunct senior fellow here at the council he's served on the senate select committee on intelligence the national security council and advised three cia director's. How short is that time. Well that depends on where you are between india and pakistan which right next to each other could be almost instantaneous. for the united states and russia the Time was generally thought to be once. The missile age began about twenty to twenty five minutes list for the united states depending on various technical details.

Alex Bill Abigail Sto Thurston Center For Arms Control And No National Military Command Cent Thurston United States Gabrielle Kennedy Administration Sierra Bell Eisenhower Administration Pentagon Nagasaki Saltzman Institute Of War And Hiroshima Senate Select Committee On Int LSU Columbia University Richard CIA
How The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Affected Energy Industry In Japan

All Things Considered

08:05 min | 4 months ago

How The Fukushima Nuclear Disaster Affected Energy Industry In Japan

"On your it's not easy to get rid of nuclear power. Okawa is right. Taking apart. A nuclear power plant is not easy day CI has been in the Decommissioning process essentially since the disaster. And that means every day over 4000 workers stream into the plant, clocking in To tackle a vast array of problems. The radiation levels here are much lower than they were nine years ago. In most areas of the plant, you could walk around without special protective gear down by the reactor's, though the ones that exploded levels are still high, and visiting time to them is limited. Kozo Takahashi are TEPCO guide takes us down to see them, bringing into stark reality the challenges that TEPCO has faced here since the disaster. Crews of workers are bustling around in full protective suits. Takahashi points out each reactor, each with its own set of problems. He says a new robot had to be invented to get to melted fuel in one another had to be essentially rebuilt just to take it apart again. And then there's the problem of waste your time here at GH Eve, huge amounts of water pumped into the damaged reactors every day to keep them cool. In the end result is more than one million tons of that water piled up in storage tanks contaminated with radioactive trillium. Storage space is running out, and the Japanese government is considering dumping it all into the ocean, much to the dismay of local communities worried about environmental impact. This is all just a taste of what it means to decommission Daiichi, which will take an estimated 40 years and nearly $200 billion to produce no electricity. At all. The rest of Japan's nuclear power program isn't faring a whole lot better by 2011 nuclear power produced nearly a third of the nation's energy. But after the disaster, the Japanese government imposed new safety regulations that took every nuclear reactor off line. All 54 of them, and the Japanese public largely wants to keep it that way. Anti nuclear power sentiments friend rapidly after Fukushima. It was a very Great sense of betrayal. Alexander Brown is an Australian researcher in Japan. He studied the anti nuclear power protests that took off in 2011. He says that betrayal came largely from the fact that Japanese people had been assured that nuclear power was safe that no accident would ever happen. So it was much more than just about Ray, you have to pull out all the specifics of the accident itself. Huge protest broke out in Tokyo, tens of thousands of people marching through city streets and bright costumes, banging drums and Cymbals. And, of course, chanting the main slogans. Just give that one time we opposed nuclear power. The's big protests continued for months and spread to other cities. And even now, there's still protests everywhere. They're smaller, Brown says. And maybe not quite so eye catching, but it's sister and it's not going away. Which has left Japan in a kind of energy conundrum. With all those reactors offline, a lot more coal and natural gas had to be imported energy prices have gone up. As have greenhouse gas emissions. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his party have been pushing hard to restart the nuclear power program promising safety But needing to bring down costs and tackle climate change. The government on YouTube keeps saying you could apply the cheapest parcels. People don't trust it anymore. Tatsuo Suzuki is a former nuclear engineer and now professor at Nagasaki University. He says that the disaster and Fukushima made people completely rethink the cost of nuclear power. In broader terms, the social costs ofthe separation in the family. Losing the land losing their jobs. How can you measure all these impacts estimating the risk of nuclear power, But Suzuki says the choice is still a difficult one. When you factor in climate change and needing to reduce the use of fossil fuels, he equates nuclear power with a strong medicine that also has a potentially strong side effect. So which you will choose You may have to choose the nuclear power eventually means Clement chain is absolutely event for the world so the world may have to take medicine on nuclear power. But we have to very, very careful. And you have other choices. I would recommend the nuclear policy last Japan doesn't have a lot of other choices. Slowly, A handful of nuclear reactors in the country have restarted passing new safety regulations. Many more are held up in court battles as local governments refused to take the risk, and even more are slated to be decommissioned as utilities give up on them altogether. Back in Fukushima near Daiichi nuclear worker Kazu Okawa stops the car. And gets out to look at a site. He never thought he'd see tons of radioactive topsoil scraped from the Earth during the cleanup efforts being piled high next to the road. This is in Futaba, his old hometown, where much of the land has been slated as a storage site for this contaminated soil. Okawa says he'll never come back even if evacuation orders for the town are eventually lifted. Another guy who wants to live next to this. This nuclear waste. He shakes his head, almost in disbelief that I thought nuclear power was safe. Isn't thought it was 100% safe. But now, like a lot of Japan, he doesn't want anything to do with it. I'm afraid of nuclear power. In one moment it devastated our home is your home and now, Ochoa says he's 100% against it. Cat Langsdorf NPR NEWS Fukushima, Japan

Japan Fukushima Kazu Okawa Japanese Government Alexander Brown Kozo Takahashi Tepco Daiichi Tokyo Youtube Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Suzuki Ochoa Tatsuo Suzuki RAY
Sheryl Sandberg On Facebook and Elections

WSJ Tech News Briefing

26:19 min | 5 months ago

Sheryl Sandberg On Facebook and Elections

"Last week John spoke with Facebook Coo Sheryl Sandberg Zoom Call, and we've got their conversation for you as an extended show today. John Obviously people know Sandberg as Facebook, Coo. But what else should they know about her? She's very well known in the tech industry, but also in in circles of leadership in advocacy for women in leadership minorities, leadership But yeah, the most visible role she plays as the number two to mark facebook in that has been enrolled. That's been developing over more than a decade and prior to that, she was a in early employee at Google and played role in the Clinton administration as well. Of course, there's been a lot going on facebook and we've reported on it along the way, but they're kind of always as. So. Why talk to San Merck now it's been particularly busy summer and there was a lot to talk about on the call. You know you've had this advertising boycott. You've had a lot more questions about their willingness to police hate speech and and make sure that civil rights are being protected on the platform You've also had this run up to the election and a lot of focus on small business and what they can do during a pandemic both to stop the spread of misinformation and help small business stay afloat. Cheryl's also well known for her foundation Leinen, and at the time that we talked, it was a black women's payday and Kamala Harris had just been tapped as the vice presidential candidate for Joe Biden. Leinen had just done this study that pointed out some things that are fairly obvious. But maybe we didn't realize how cute the problems really are, and that was related to advancement opportunities for minority women in Business both leadership management opportunities just their ability to move forward in their careers. Here's what she told us the data's incredible right now, men are doing a lot to men are doing an average of fifty hours a week of childcare and housework. That's something. We've never ever seen before women doing an average of seventy one. And Black Women and women of color doing even more that GOP is twenty one hours and single mothers, many of whom are of color but single mothers of all backgrounds are doing twice as many hours per week caring for elderly or sick relatives as well and doing a great majority of childcare and we know that all of these numbers hit women who were core hit poor families harder than wealthier families across the board. But even amongst the elite, what you almost always see is the average woman even if she's working full-time is doing a lot more in the home than the average man and that is a big part of what happens to us in the workforce. Until we get to a quality in the home, we're never getting to a quality in the workplace and that has become even more urgent with coronavirus. These are all important issues to the Wall Street Journal, we cover these things all the time we've been covering them aggressively and comprehensively, but we could only manage to get so much in today's episode. So with the issue at hand is clearly. The election and facebook's huge role to play. They're given what happened in two, thousand, sixteen and expectations in the twenty twenty and that's the part of the conversation we wanted to share with listeners today. Thanks John. A couple of things. We should note here this was a video call. So it's got that feel to it and it was recorded last week we've got that conversation after the break. Robotics, artificial intelligence augmented reality. The future is here listen to tomorrow today with the Wall Street Journal's future of everything the podcast that takes you to the frontlines of science and tech and shows you what's coming next. Look ahead. What do you hear? The future of everything from the Wall Street Journal Subscribe Wherever you get your podcasts. I want to set the context of you know of the problems and our criticisms aimed at your company, not just Sheryl Sandberg the executive, but the user of facebook is well I I. I have to assume that you're not just running a company that you're using the product. The company faces a Lotta Chris the you know. The the frustration about incentivizing the you know spreading misinformation allegedly incentivizing that extremely provocative in hateful speech that that gets through and get seen sometimes gets pushed up in our news feeds. The suspicion facebook is still a place for unwholesome characters and actors can manipulate the system in use misinformation to get results that they're looking for etc.. Nah Not. Not so much yet about the solutions that you guys have put in place in the learnings but how do you feel today about facebook is a place against the backdrop of those criticisms so we do face a lot of those criticisms and anytime you have a platform as large as ours you know three billion plus people on it many many of them daily. We have huge responsibility. And I think that is a responsibility that we really had to grow into. When I look at this election, we are a different company than we were in twenty sixteen and we are going into this election in a very different place in touches on all of the issues that you you're talking about. So let's go back to answer your question to twenty sixteen if you think about the election in two, thousand sixteen. We obviously had systems in place to defend against attacks from other states. But what those normally or thought of what we thought of them I think everyone of them was. People with hacking steal your data, remember the DNC emails remember Sony. That was basically what state actors did, and we've had very good systems in place in great defenses there what we completely missed in two thousand sixteen was not going in and stealing your stuff. But was going in and writing stuff. Fake host trying to get audiences to believe things in ways that you were representing. That's what happened with Russian interference and we completely missed it. So did the FBI. So did every government of the world? That is just not true when you think about the election in twenty eighteen and you think about being election today. We now understand this threat and are deeply engaged in working on it, but we're also not on our own homeland security has a department on miss the FBI has a task force on this in two thousand sixteen we call these groups coordinated inauthentic behaviour. So coordinated authentic like we saw the Russian fake posts in twenty sixteen, we took down networks we'd never heard of it twenty seventeen we took down one. In. The last year we took down over fifty. We now do these. So often at people used to write stories, we've Allah publicly. No one even does does that mean we're going to catch every single thing I will never claim that we will always have every single thing the services big. But does that mean we're in a very different place going into this election Absolutely. And one retake really seriously. We're also trying to get even more proactive on the good like on facebook there's things they're stopping the bad stopping the hate stopping interference with there's also promoting the good at, and that's something that I care a lot about mark as a lot of Bob. So we want yesterday. So it's perfectly timely to talk to you about it, our new voter information center and what that Information Center is a one stop shop where you can go to get accurate information on this election. That's never been more important registering to vote who's eligible that stuff's always hard. But in this election with corona virus and holes potentially closed getting accurate information is even more important. So We'd put this out. It's modeled on our coronavirus center where we put out very definitive information really helped people get the right answers. Now anytime people post about voting on facebook working a link to this center. We're also trying to be as ambitious as we can. I'm a woman I'm I'm owning the word ambitious, but it's ambition by my company. To Register people. So in the last two elections, we registered two million people to vote. which is very large, but we've put out pretty audacious goal that we're GONNA try to help register four million people for this election cycle, which I think would make it the largest effort of its kind by were invasion and were really. We're really proud of that really excited about it. So we I sit here John Taking, you take the criticism when we deserve it very seriously. We take our responsibility very seriously atop to show work every day trying to stop anything bad we gotTA learn quickly bad will always try to get ahead but also trying to use our platform in our services for the good. What do you do as the user? Something on facebook doesn't along there. Do you just pull the red phone out and make a phone call or are you pensive about that and thinking about emits broader context at it needs the nuance as market said it's very hard. To directly police the content and and just hit the button? Yes. So look it is hard to directly police the content. We know that it's very hard to pull heat down. It's very hard to find it and identified. That's why we've invested so much think our standards are the highest not the lowest I think our enforcements the best, but that doesn't make it perfect. You know as a user I actually don't remember seeing something that violated our policies and most people have not most people hear about it or it gets pulled into press and they see it now. I've certainly seen things I. Disagree with I have some family members whose political views I do not share. You know I have some ice stuff about fuck I disagree with. But in terms of my actual experience of seeing real hate yes I would pull I. Don't have a bat phone, but I would definitely take a screen shot in forwarded. Personally, referred infant I haven't had that experience or know how many people actually do see content that violates the rules is there a way to kind of measure that? Millions of people report content millions of not not all of it is actually violated with our standards but millions of people go through that process. In fact, we released our latest community standards enforcement report, and it gets to exactly what you're asking what that shows. Is All the different kinds of content we take down how much? How much violence? Were Nagasaki and it shows what percentage of it. We took down and found ourselves or someone reported to us. And that's where the progress on hate I think really becomes clear when we first did this report years ago, twenty, four percent of the hate we took down, we found ourselves which meant that seventy, six percent of the time someone had reported it to us. That's not a good experience. Our latest report we put out this week were at ninety, five, ninety, five percent of the hate that we take down we are finding before it's reported. That means five percent of what we take down is still being reported to us, which is still alive on facebook. So we have our work cut out for us, but clearly a significant improvement over twenty four percent just a few years ago and it to really the investments we've made in systems in AI in. Huge teams to monitor that's gotten us. There are your standards tough. Enough I mean that's something that we know is a sticky situation because everybody wants what they find to be offensive police in. As you said, sometimes it borders on my own bias is what I don't WanNa see. But when you look at the standards, where are you guys at particularly because they have in freshly criticized and there's rolling dialogue about whether whether you're going to get tougher? Where are we met? Her students are very tough but they're not as tough as some people would want them to be or they're not as comprehensive as some people would want them to be you know one person's opinion. One person's free expression could be another person's he. We work really hard on these definitions and were very public about the our entire standards are publicly out there including most to the material that the people who use inside their references that were very public about them. You know for the most part, we've always been a very protected society and the criticism has always been on both sides I'll give you an example that was very hot for a while was breastfeeding. We don't do pornography, we don't do breasts. In some parts of the world, a new woman who's naked from the top would be on the front page of every newspaper, and there are people that really believe in breastfeeding. It felt that we were suppressing their free speech because our computer systems were picking up any time. You saw a nipple of any kind even if it was a breastfeeding picture so we've worked more nuance there, but I think over the course of time, people have found us to be very strict on the standards. There are people out there that think are hit standards aren't strong enough. We are continually evaluating them continually making improvements. But I think a lot of people think our standards are too hard and so we try to be as transparent as possible. We try to evolve to meet ongoing things that are things. We'd never heard of no one ever heard of years ago. That are brand new movements that are hateful and there are things that some people find offensive that we do leave up because we think three expression in having that too is critically important in a lot of situations sodden. You're thinking on your role as an information broker during corona virus. How did that? I emerge and how did you deal with that at facebook given? All of the things that the most elite elite medical personnel don't know in yet. Here you are with the responsibility of not disseminating misinformation that may cost people's lives or fan pandemic. So our policy on misinformation is we don't take down we send it to third party fact checkers if it's marked as false or partially false, we dramatically decrease the distribution we market this has been marked false or partially falls and we linked to more information that often can tell the whole side of the story. Even, before Corona virus, we had an exception to that, which is information that was going to cause imminent harm and that policy really came out of other parts of the world. Misinformation was leading to death or imminent harm. The Corona virus we took the stand to things we said we're not going to have information that will lead to imminent harm. And we're going to rely on health experts. We are not decided there was no decision made by your marker anyone on our team. This is true about coronavirus and this is not because we're not experts but we partnered from the beginning with local health authorities the CDC the. H. Show the you know the health ministers in different countries to make sure that we were taking down misinformation. No matter who posted it up would also give very accurate information out and I think sometimes in these discussions, we forget that there are two sides. Of course, we need to take down at least marcus false things that are harmful, but we also have to use our services. To, get out the information people need. So governments like the UK, government local governments when they needed to get messages to their citizens, they've turned on us and we've been I think a very effective way of getting messages out. Interested. In in several high profile advertisers including some that I shot from it said, we're gonNA take a break and it wasn't just facebook it with social media have companies come back and what what are those conversations and like I know. The effect on the bottom line may not be what well understood you do rely. So heavily on smaller and middle sized companies for revenue but but it was a huge moment, a big headline where where are you guys at conversations are they back? So advertisers are starting to come back not but a good number are coming back have come back in process. Look those conversations were really hard John because normally. If someone is boycotting you or is protesting you want you to do a whatever a is in. You don't want to do it. That's not the case at all here the boycotters and the advertisers didn't want hate on facebook and we don't want this book Sosa. I think we had completely aligned goals and we have challenges in enforcing that. So again, we just released our enforcement report. We were at eighty nine percent of finding hate we take down ourselves. Now we're up to ninety five. That's an improvement and we know we have we have further to go. We also do have some notice agreement with people on what hate is we tend to take a broader swath of allowing some information that we think it's free expression to stay on so that people can have dialogue but in terms of hate, I think the real issue is that there's a fundamental misunderstanding of our service out there that we need to do a better job correcting we don't want. Hey. We don't benefit from hey, we don't profit from hey users don't want to see it. Consumers don't WANNA. See it. Advertisers don't want to be next to it. So the the narrative of facebook is leaving pay because they WANNA profit for. That's just just you talked about voters earlier and the initiatives that you're putting your proactively being part of a solution is what I hear you saying. But Marquez said very recently with this electric this unprecedented situation and I'm I'm guessing given your. Your half glass full mentality it's an opportunity but what's at stake here for facebook I? Mean we're all GonNa Blaine facebook if things go wrong and a certain candidate decides to use the platform and you're not taking down information with speed or at all is it a noble no-win situation here or what's at stake for this platforms ability to prove its productive place in this discussion? So we all know that there's a lot at stake for the selection full stop. There's more concern in confusion about how to register to vote what is valid I think there's more concern around misinformation around any kind of coordinated attacks. I think we're going into this election in a totally different place than twenty sixteen and interestingly, I think our track record in twenty eighteen was actually fairly good when people talk about things facebook missed in an election getting upset at us for things that are almost always talking about twenty sixteen you almost never hear about twenty eighteen and there have been hundreds of elections around the world and to look our job is to get people accurate information to be proactive. We are being much more proactive around. Pushing out information in this election and we have or have been before, and that is modeled on what we did with Toronto virus. We are taking that approach doing everything to get rid of the bad. We are doing everything to get in front of people the accurate information as well. And then we want to make sure that people can use the prop. One thing that's worth really thinking about is how many small people small people running for smaller offices. Are Using our platform provisionally when we're in social distancing and can't campaign. That's right. So how do you advertise to? No one's ever heard of me. I'm running for State Senate or I'm running for school board and I want to do it cheaply and efficiently we allow that to happen and we're proud of that role replied. There are you prepared I mean thinking about four more years of questions regarding how quickly you should be policing the president and his tweets given the thus far has a track record that trump is definitely more aggressive with platform Vice President Biden ever has been he trump wins. You're already in a in a in a situation where you guys are have been accused of dragging your feet on or taking a less aggressive stance against him. How do you think about that in a world where we might see four more years of that? It's our. It's our job to have clear and consistent rules. That, we apply in a fair way globally and I know we are very focused that we should be very focused on this election. There are important elections all over the world with people on different sides, and so we have experienced not just in the US cycle, but obviously the hundreds of elections that have happened since since last US cycle and we do we. Get accused from conservatives of being anti-conservative. They look it. Awesome. A see liberal silicon, Valley company I mean, I've been very affiliated Democrat. I remain unaffiliated Democrat other people look at us and they say we're not going far enough and our answer is going to be very clear about what our rules are and working apply them as even handed away as possible we also. Recognize that there should be limits to our power to decide what stays up in. Probably one of the most important things that's going to happen in the upcoming twelve months is the rollout of our content for which we've announced but has not yet come together to play. So for the first time, there's GonNa be a possibility that if you either have something taken down. And you think that's unfair or you take it down or you WanNa leave up in either direction, you can appeal it to the content board in your case much like the court right they'll have more than they can but they'll try to hear the big months. Someone else will decide and that board is independent does not report to mark does not report to me. Were also working with governments around the world. We think government has a very big role to play. Wouldn't it be good if governments to find hate rather than private companies would you be good if governments defined what is a political ad? Not Private companies were working hard to make sure that there are checks and balances and that the government's role is really important not just here around the world. You're not just the Democrat I mean you're you're a friend of the president presidential candidate on the Democratic ticket at an I I don't know the. Friendship, but definitely, it's been noted that the two of you have relationship you've been support I'm wondering if you're kind of jaw drops a little bit about the delicate role that you need to play his business leader given facebook's place in society if you're running Ben and Jerry's, which is much smaller if you're running. Patagonia. If you were running for Motor Company, you probably feel a little bit more free an mistaken to be supportive and to give the porch that you want to feel it all that your your ability to help is checked by your role I mean, my day job is facebook and my nights on Facebook, and then you know I work on my foundation as well, and so it is not my job to be very active in the political process and I've chosen a career that keeps me in business. So I don't wake up in the morning. You know what should I be doing politics 'cause I wake up in the morning with a very big job for facebook I. think that's consistent with business leaders. You know as a woman and as a woman who's long fought for the role of women to have more to celebrate ambition to celebrate what we're reaching for the highest office I'm thrilled to see a woman about to be nominated a woman of color about to be nominated and I spoke out anatomy horse I would do. Of course, I would do that and my foundation has done that as well. Do need to think twice about how supportive I mean it it's not a heavy lifting to be supportive publicly. Meaning you don't have to put in a lot of hours, but like running a news organization, I mean it kind of is a proxy for what facebook has become what we think of as a neutral platform even well, I've said, we're GONNA work with anyone who wins for us. So when I'm asked when you work with trump, if he wins the election, will you work with Biden if he sorry president trump if he wins the election we work with Vice, President Biden. Of course, we don't get to pick. Citizens elect their governments and we work with them, and we work with all over the world and we have to be willing and able to do that. Would you work for President Biden if there was a president Biden, you know I have a long decided I had my time. I worked at the Treasury Department under President Clinton and it was an amazing opportunity. What about the open seat in California right now not interested at all I mean. I really love my job and I really have so much respect for mark and my colleagues. Every day is not easy I don't expect anyone feel sorry for me or any of us we have great opportunities big role to play. We have serious responsibility to get this election right? We have serious responsibility to get hate and you know misogyny off the platform. against, wake up every business, I feel lucky to have this opportunity and I feel lucky to work for someone who is strong and has such conditions as mark. Are you having a guest one final question is the enormity of that task of getting it right. Your back and forth about what that looks like all day. But getting it right as a business challenge. Also, when I say this, I wonder if you are amazed at the trajectory of the importance of this as a public trust, almost as a is an institution and we aren't just considering a business but has a responsibility to society. Is there one? That outweighs the other giving you have shareholders, others, or is there is there a way to balance those two things at the same time? These things that people think are in conflict sometimes, but I really don't think they are we need people to trust our service we need people to trust that we're GONNA make content decisions not for profit on either side. But for the right for the right reasons and to doing the things that need our responsibility to protect elections takedown hit, they don't trade off against the business. They're important to drive the business. Now, there is a resource tradeoff rehiring engineer. We can put them on an ad program to build rags ads we can put them on safety we can put them on security. Of course, we have resource trade-offs, research trips of my time reserves tradeoffs mark if you look at how do our jobs and you compare it to for years ago, Mark Myself All of our senior leaders Chris Cox who just came back. Incredible. Chief Product Officer Mike Shrimp for our incredible. CTO We all spend a lot more of our time on the protection of the community. Then we did five years ago but I think that is super important and for a while we were playing catch up and I think all of these things work together. There's not a trade offs. We have to absolutely meet our responsibility and build our business and without meeting our responsibility, we're not going to build Turkishness. Kyi No your plane to grab people from. What you go Thank you for your time. It's always nice talking to and. Until next up. On.

Facebook John Taking President Biden Wall Street Journal Sheryl Sandberg Google President Trump GOP Leinen Kamala Harris Twenty Twenty FBI San Merck Black Women Cheryl COO Clinton Administration Information Center UK
Ship leaking tons of oil off Mauritius has split apart

The Boom X Show with Darol Tuttle

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Ship leaking tons of oil off Mauritius has split apart

"Environmental groups warning the damage could be irreversible. After an oil spill from a Japanese ship. ABC is Yoon Hee Han the M B Y Cascio has split into after running aground your Mauritius on July 25th after days of pounding waves. The ship's hull began cracking on August 6th and started leaking 1000 tons of fuel. The government declared an environmental emergency, prompting thousands of volunteers to make oil barriers from Fabric, sugar cane leaves and even human hair. This past week, the vessels owner Nagasaki Shipping pumped most of the remaining 3000 tonnes of fuel out of the ship. But the Mauritius government now facing pressure to explain why it didn't empty the rest of the fuel, immediately, the prime minister blaming

Yoon Hee Han Mauritius Government Mauritius Nagasaki Shipping Prime Minister ABC M B
"nagasaki" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Demonstrators clashing with security forces and riot police met with a gust. Crowds storming government buildings, documents raining from the windows protesters demanding accountability from officials. Not just for this tragedy, but decades of corruption and mismanagement. Hundreds of thousands of people are homeless. As a result of the explosion. Over 6000 people were injured. Today marks 75 years since the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Nagasaki, which killed 40 to 80,000 people. At 11:02 a.m. Local time. In Nagasaki survivors, city leaders and others held a minute long moment of silence for the loss. The mayor calling for world leaders to work toward a nuclear weapons banned the dwindling survivors of The Nagasaki atomic bombing, along with survivors of Hiroshima, which happened three days earlier, still suffering due to cancer, Other long term effects of radiation discrimination and trauma. Protests continue in Jerusalem, calling for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to step down over his corruption trial, a lack of adequate response to that country's covert outbreak and plan to annex the disputed West Bank. All of this is Netanyahu is refusing to sign the new budget per his agreement with coalition partner General General Benny Gantz that could bring down the new unity government on August 25th and trigger another Israeli election. That would be the 4th 1 this one in the middle of a pandemic. ABC store Donna Miller, a new record.

Nagasaki Prime Minister Benjamin Netany General General Benny Gantz United States Donna Miller Hiroshima ABC Jerusalem partner West Bank
Nagasaki urges nuke ban on 75th anniversary of US A-bombing

WBZ Morning News

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

Nagasaki urges nuke ban on 75th anniversary of US A-bombing

"City of Nagasaki, marking the 75th anniversary of the U. S atomic bombing on August 9th, the city's mayor and a dwindling number of survivors Calling on world leaders to doom or to bring a nuclear weapons ban. It was at 11 02 AM Nagasaki survivors stood in silence, marking the moment in American B 29 dropped a £10,000 a plutonium bomb. Dubbed Fat Man. More than 70,000 were killed three days earlier. On August 6th, the US dropped a bomb on Hiroshima in the first ever nuclear attack, killing 140,000 people. Japan surrendered on August 15th marking the end of World War two. Many survivors of the two bombings developed cancer and other illnesses from exposure. To radiation.

Nagasaki Hiroshima United States Japan U. S
With dwindling survivors, Nagasaki marks 75th anniversary of US atomic bombing that killed more than 70,000 people

77WABC Programming

00:13 sec | 5 months ago

With dwindling survivors, Nagasaki marks 75th anniversary of US atomic bombing that killed more than 70,000 people

"City of Nagasaki marked it 75th anniversary of the U. S atomic bombing, the city's mayor and a dwindling number of survivors urged world leaders, including their own to do more work toward a nuclear weapons ban on

Nagasaki U. S
"nagasaki" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:52 min | 5 months ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Attendants seems to be words at every other year, excluding anniversary years, our numbers airhead people, People are tired of being at home. You know this is this. What this rally start about his freedom. The sheer numbers raised. The prospect of this year's rally could spread the virus in the state with no special limits on indoor crowds, no mask mandates, and AH governor who's eager to welcome visitors and their money. Governor Gretchen Whitmer has met with presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden to Democrats May with the vice presidential search say Widmer remains in serious contention that Biden has continued to build their relationship. Both the Biden campaign and the governor's office have declined to comment. Although flight records show a charter plane left Lansing's capital, reads International Airport 5:33 p.m. last Sunday for Delaware's coastal airport. And returned 11 16. That same evening. Biden is also seriously considering California Senator Kamala Harris and former President Barack Obama's national security advisor Susan Rice. The Japanese city of Nagasaki has marked it 75th anniversary of the U. S atomic bombing with the mayor and dwindling survivors urging world leaders including their own to doom or for a nuclear weapons ban. At 11:02 a.m. The moment the B 29 bomber boxcar dropped a £10,000 plutonium bomb dubbed Fat Man. Nagasaki, Survivors and other participants stood in an minute of silence. One or more than 70,000 killed. The August 9th 1945 bombing came three days after the US dropped its first atomic bomb on here, Oshima The world's first ever nuclear attack that killed 140,000 people. Less than one week later. On August 15th Japan surrendered, effectively ending World War two Coming up after traffic.

Joe Biden Governor Gretchen Whitmer Nagasaki Senator Kamala Harris Barack Obama International Airport US Lansing Susan Rice Japan Widmer Delaware California advisor President U. S
Nagasaki urges nuke ban on 75th anniversary of US A-bombing

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Nagasaki urges nuke ban on 75th anniversary of US A-bombing

"The Japanese city of Nagasaki has marked it 75th anniversary of the U. S atomic bombing with the mayor and dwindling survivors urging world leaders including their own to doom or for a nuclear weapons ban. At 11:02 a.m. The moment the B 29 bomber boxcar dropped a £10,000 plutonium bomb dubbed Fat Man. Nagasaki, Survivors and other participants stood in an minute of silence. One or more than 70,000 killed. The August 9th 1945 bombing came three days after the US dropped its first atomic bomb on here, Oshima The world's first ever nuclear attack that killed 140,000 people. Less than one week later. On August 15th Japan surrendered, effectively ending World War

Nagasaki Japan United States U. S
That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | 5 months ago

That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin Of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau Chief Mario United States
Hiroshima bomb: Japan marks 75 years since nuclear attack

Rush Limbaugh

00:42 sec | 5 months ago

Hiroshima bomb: Japan marks 75 years since nuclear attack

"Atomic bomb dropped by the US on this day in 1945 in back ceremony owing to the Corona virus outbreak. A bell rings in Hiroshima to start a moment of silence at 8:15 a.m. A time when the U. S launched the world's first nuclear bomb attack 75 years ago forced our mayor of Hiroshima, urging world leaders to commit seriously to abandoning nuclear weapons. The bomb killed an estimated 140,000 people and was followed by another attack on Nagasaki before Japan surrendered. Ending World War two Simon Oh,

Hiroshima Simon Oh Nagasaki United States Japan U. S
Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

Mark and Melynda

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

Hiroshima: Atomic Blast That Changed The World Turns 75

"In Japan move to bring in a moment of silence 75 years to the day after the U. S dropped the first atomic bomb mayor of Hiroshima, urging world leaders to commit seriously to abandoning nuclear weapons. The bomb killed an estimated 140,000 people and was followed by another attack on Nagasaki before Japan surrendered ending

Japan Hiroshima Nagasaki U. S
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 5 months ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

Marketplace

05:18 min | 5 months ago

Hiroshima survivors worry that world will forget

"Exactly 15 minutes past eight in the morning on August 6th, 1945 Japanese time at the moment when the atomic bomb flashed above Hiroshi MMA Miss Yoshiko Sasaki, a clerk in the personnel department of the East Asia, 10 Works had just sat down at her place in the plant office and was turning her head to speak to the girl at the next desk. That rather ordinary sentence is the opening to the extraordinary August 1946 New Yorker article titled Oshima. It was published a year after the United States dropped the first nuclear bomb on that city, a year in which the U. S government had gone to great lengths to conceal the human devastation caused And to depict the bomb as a conventional humane weapon. The writer of the Peace John Hursey, uncovered a very different story reporting on the ground in Japan, author and journalist Leslie Bloome chronicles foresees work and the reaction to it in her new book, Fallout. She joins me now from Los Angeles. Leslie Bloome. Welcome. Thank you. Start with Who? John Hursey Wass and how he came to be the one to tell this story. Oh, John. Her see was a young World War two correspondent who had covered action in different theaters throughout the war for Time magazine. And like many war correspondents, then he was pretty supportive of the U. S military. And he even wrote an almost overly complimentary wartime bio of General Douglas MacArthur and That the U. S military knew him entrusted him would be an important factor in my story and how he eventually got his story about Hiroshi MMA, and I don't want to give away too much. But I will say that how he got in was by being the perfect Trojan horse reporter, The perfect Trojan horse reporter. You've hooked us where we're intrigued when I got there. He didn't report this out as a war correspondent. He focused very much on ordinary people on he picked six of them. Why did he want to tell the story in that way? Well, I mean, the fact of the matter is is that the bombing of Hiroshima was widely reported when it happened, and it was reported as a very big end of days. Story mean there were pictures of the mushroom clouds that were released in pictures, the landscape devastation. But there were no pictures that were released or no stories that were released about the human toll that it happened on the ground there, and the government was really going to enormous lengths to cover up the reality of theater. Tomic aftermath in Hiroshima, Nagasaki They were very concerned with as the former secretary of war, put it, not being seen as having outdone, Hitler and atrocities. So her C and his editors at the New Yorker magazine became determined to tell the story from the point of view of survivors. You know, these are among the on ly humans who have ever experience what it's like to be on the receiving end of nuclear attack. He ultimately picked a widow with young kids, a young female clerk to medics, a priest and a minister with with a young family, and his idea was to create a sense of empathy. In his readers with these individuals, because, after all, not everybody could understand the physics of how the bombs works or visualized. You know, an all out nuclear attack that anyone could relate to being a mother or a father or colleague or doctor who's going about their everyday business. One catastrophe strikes I wonder if you would give us a sense of just one telling story of what he did find when he was there What it was that so shocked American readers who had no idea what was unfolding in Japan. One story that particularly resonated with him. He interviewed a young female clerk who was in her company when the bomb was detonated. This's the clerk I mentioned in the intro exactly one of the most famous introductions in journalistic history, and when the bomb exploded over her factory bookshelves fell upon her, and she was nearly crushed to death by books. And he thought How ironic it was to have somebody nearly crushed by books within the first moments of the atomic age, and literally when he was leaving here, Oshima and standing on the surprisingly intact train station platform, he thought that he was going to have to write about that line. And that's one of the incidents that most resonated with readers. So August 1946 The New Yorker publishes. What was the reaction? Both in the United States and around the world to this story. Well in her sees own words. The reaction was quote explosive mean, I try not to use that word in my book for obvious reasons. But he did, And the article was simply titled here, Oshima, and it comprised nearly the entire contents of the August 31st 1946 issue of The New Yorker. It's sold out immediately. You're even black market copies of it going for, you know, astronomical sums. It was syndicated in its entirety, and this is a 30,000 word story in newspapers across the country and around the world. And editors and reporters and readers were enraged. They were horrified by the testimonies in her sees here, Oshima, and they also began demanding to know what else was the U. S government withholding from the US public And then, when President Truman was asked by a reporter if he had personally read it, he retorted. I never read the New York ER. It just makes me bad. But the fact is, is that the government had been put very much on the defensive. That said, You know, they didn't want to look like they were on the defensive, but they were and they had to scramble to try to reclaim the narrative.

New Yorker Magazine Oshima Leslie Bloome United States Hiroshi Mma Reporter Hiroshima Japan U. S Los Angeles John Hursey Wass East Asia John Hursey Miss Yoshiko Sasaki Douglas Macarthur Time Magazine Writer
How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

Science Magazine Podcast

06:53 min | 6 months ago

How Hiroshima survivors helped form radiation safety rules

"Now, we have contributing correspondent Dennis normal. He wrote this week on how seventy five years later. The survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki have transformed understanding of the effects of radiation exposure on health. Hi, Dennis Arthur we're talking about study. Now. Run by Ari are asked, which is the Radiation Effects Research Foundation this is a very long-term study as I mentioned almost seventy five years. Years and included many many survivors over one hundred thousand. How exactly did this study get started all those years ago? Virginia's Harry Truman authorized launch of the study was in nineteen, forty, seven. They were pretty much should have a full team on the ground in Yoshii Nagasaki. By nineteen, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred fifty. The US Navy realized that there would be a bathroom studying the acute impact and. And the long term impact of what happens to humans when they are subjected to the detonation of Tom These survivors involvement in such a long-term study has yielded an amazing array of results, important results for health for anyone who's exposed to radiation and work or an accident. What are some of the key findings from this work us? Not just one study. They actually have a collection of different studies. Studies, they have carried out the most notable one. Is this enormous life span study where they have as you mentioned one hundred twenty thousand people who were enrolled at the outset? If you put together the combination of number of participants and the length of the study, there's probably nothing else like the RRF in his predecessor ABC city simply gathered data on how radiation has long term effects on health. Health of those who were exposed to radiation the Rif previously ABC gathered that data mix epidemiological connections between the amount of radiation. Someone gets and their risk of developing cancer later in life, other or decisions take that data and data from other studies as well, and they turn those into recommendations for the amount of exposure that people should be allowed to get if they are patient for medical imaging. Imaging, or if they are, the technicians were if their nuclear pact workers this gives away how old I am, but I went to the dentist pornography child. You sit in the dental chair and the dentist would real office machine thick x rays of your teeth, and those were go bouncing all over the room these days for dental x Ray. They put you in a special room which shielded technician. Technician is wearing a badge to track how much radiation he or she is exposed to. You're also wearing that vest to protect your organs from straight X rays all those recommendations shielding around the x ray rooms, dosimetry badges with technicians, where and the vest the patients where they all grew out of basic data that was produced by the long term studies by RRF INC with the survivors we talked. Talked about how this research got started very soon after the bombings, US government, Edna Japanese, government, and boasted research with survivors, but with different purposes. How are they different? Hauer their intentions with the studies different. The ABC was very much an American stony when the ABC's got started was so under America's occupation, and the Japanese scientists had difficulty publishing their observations amount of information that was released Japanese. was very much controlled by the occupation of Nargis, so there were real restrictions on what the Japanese scientists could do, but that initial collection of data by the US groups was over within a few months later there was a decision to set up a long-term study of the effects of radiation and at that point yet. Of the Japanese scientists in the American scientists were pretty much aligned. You mentioned in the story that the survivors weren't treated by the US scientist when they were involved in the study. Initially, that's right. Basically for political reasons, the decision was made that the ABC said he would not offer any treatment to the people who were being examined by the ABC physicians. They concern was that if the ABC city which at that time was very much? American funded American. If. They offered treatment. It might be taken as an admission of culpability in their condition, because misunderstandings and friction between the survivors, many of whom believe that they would get some help for doing with their illnesses with their injuries. Yeah, why would a survivor become involved in the study? If they weren't going to get treatment, even decades later if that was the history of the study. Initially. There was a hope that they would get some sort of medical benefit from participating in the study, the didn't get zero. In particular children that were born to survivors got medical checkups that there would not have received not been part of the study later as one of the survivors told me he has continued to cooperate with the study because he hopes that it will help the world recognize how devastating, the effects are of attack using atomic weapons, and so that is what motivates him to continue to cooperate. It's not clear whether there are. Are Health Effects for the offspring of survivors, but this survivors children are obviously concerned about their health. Can you talk about about this tension with the scientists say is that their studies so far have not identified any affects the question is. Are there no effects or are statistical data simply not detailed enough to spot affects the friction arises. Is that some of the children of the survivors? But we've that they are facing health issues that are not faced by big response were not subjected to the. It's on bond radiation, so the children what? As survivors as second-generation survivors, and they now have to court actions going forward, try to force the the government to recognize that the children of survivors should be recognized, says survivors as well, and that should also be entitled to medical support it just as their parents are

ABC Radiation Effects Research Fou Technician United States Abc City Us Navy Yoshii Nagasaki Dennis Normal Dennis Arthur Hiroshima Nagasaki ARI Virginia Harry Truman Tom These Edna Japanese Rrf Inc Hauer Nargis
Special Guest Reveals Top 5 YouTube Traffic Secrets

Marketing Secrets

07:01 min | 10 months ago

Special Guest Reveals Top 5 YouTube Traffic Secrets

"Jomar Folio Joe. How're you doing what's happening? Hey glad to be here for that. Awesome intro man. This is the first time we live interview on the show before which is which is really exciting. I love comic'll boards in the back. So dead man just waiting for the two club exit. Come in the mail to even out the set so it's GonNa be awesome. Joe One last Last week he said he got one which is pretty cool so all right so obviously. We don't have a ton of time but a lot of questions for you. So inside of the Traffic Secrets Book is a whole chapter on Youtube traffic. And most of it I pull from you because you are. The Guy who on our team is doing stuff and And you've done such an amazing job and so most of the things are are there from you and so This is kind of to teach people about what's happening inside the book but also just get them to know you and understanding Youtube. So why do you think different than all the other platforms? That are that are out there. You instagram facebook twitter. Take all of a sudden like why is youtube like why are you so passionate about you too? You know so. It like a facebook instagram. And see a of people like it's very It's sometimes easier for them to build a big following on facebook or instagram. The kind of go to youtube and they struggle a little bit. And it's because you to isn't just a social media platform. It is a social media platform. It's also a search engine where people are searching for certain certain topics searching how to do something but you also have to do with you too is not only put up content that engaging that people wanNA watch that has value but you also have to add kind of a story element to it in the one thing that you don't want to do and I see people do. This is kind of repurpose. Your content like say you have constantly putting up facebook and instagram. Our podcast in you like you distribute to all these different channels. If you put on Youtube a lot of times you're going to find. It's not going to get that much traction and think about youtube like this like when you watch you to be set like you guys are out there and you're watching. Youtube. Why do you subscribe to a certain channel? You're going to subscribe right. Maybe you'll they're showing you how to make money online or how to grow your right. But there's a ton of videos on there that talk about like how to go to your instagram channel. But it's like what makes you subscribe. WanNa Watch somebody. It's going to be their personalities can be the way the engaged with you and it's going to be the way the content comes across so what. I would say for Youtube. The differences is treat you to like. It's its own thing. Make videos just for you to try to approach it not as a marketer but as a creator not you're gonNA sell anything but that you're going to like build your audience and you following. Yeah one of my favorite things about Youtube is talked about in the book a little bit like every every social platform. I'd say facebook live like we're doing right now. It's happening and then like it'll drop. It'll be here for next couple of days. It'll drop down the news feed and eventually disappears. Nobody'll ever siegen whereas youtube is like the only platform where you create something and then it grows over time because not just social social and it search and that's why it's so it's it's different 'cause you create something if you create the right way then it sits there and to grow throughout time as opposed to everything else was seems to diminish over time and so it gives at least for me. Who's WHO's creating stuff. It gives me more incentive craigslist. It's nice because it lasts beyond the moment whereas facebook live. Is there for a moment? Then it's gone where youtube it can last for for forever. I mean like. We talked about earlier. Overcome Nagasaki Videos overcoming pornography addiction? Like they still get hundreds and hundreds of US every single month. We don't even sell the product anymore which is probably sad. Because you're an affiliate making money when I know that video. I think I think you're screech out when you were doing. The bucket has hundreds of clicks on their in what it does the content builds on each other. So you put the video video out three years ago in if you keep putting contin out. It's like you're gonNA keep getting lead you're going to keep getting people subscribing watching your stuff like you said yet just doesn't disappear is built on up into the question. This is off the questions that you sent me as pre questions. I'm excited about this one. I hope that's okay. I'm GonNa put you on the spot a little bit but I think a lot of times. People think youtube strategies like okay. I've got to make the most perfect video in the world. And you look at companies like dollarshaveclub drive for example Where they made this video goes crazy viral and then built the company up and then he sells to whoever sold for a billion dollars right. And so we're like okay. I've got to make the perfect youtube video and my people stress about and because they never actually make something at all versus like you told me book example talked about the strategy like Gillette or or other things like that we talked about that because that's a strategy that more people like me can actually do of not like going to make the perfect video instead. It's looking at it a little bit differently. We talked about how how how led to their strategy. How we can use that as well. Yeah so so. Here's thing when you guys are starting your Youtube Channel. Think of it like in the first thing you WanNa do is really go deep in unique whatever you're doing like so for example. Gillette what they did was. They didn't go out there and say well they did. They try to make a viral video like dollar shave club in a flat rate. So what they did was they said. Listen we want to dominate for the keyword? How to shave because people that watch how to shave videos by our product right to the shave your head how to save your back at a shave your legs right needed. All these videos that got hundreds thousands millions of US and they were very targeted to their subscribers. So the thing I would tell people is figure out what your knee. Shas figure out. What you're you're going to go after and go deep in that niche handle like the way you explained the whole blue ocean strategy and expert secrets Because you know the one thing you don't WanNa do is go and look at someone has a million subscribers and then follow what they do right so like say you're doing because you know they've already been established they already have a huge audience. Say you're doing Amazon. So you WANNA do is go through. Amazon. Say Okay. Make videos on Amazon Amazon. Fbi on Amazon drop shipping on Amazon affiliate and they go through hit every every time anything that would searching for Amazon. You WanNa make a video on and it doesn't have to be a perfect video like you said it just has to be engaging enough to get to get retention but doesn't have to be this high production video but we don't want to do is you don't WanNa make a video on Amazon video on how to make money online. Then make a video on procrastination and then they video on the current right you you want. You wanted to. If you're just starting like you want to create like this this is traffic lean. That Youtube knows okay. When Joe put the video out it's going to be on Amazon and then the then they'll start showing your video for more to more and more people that search like the Amazon stuff and then you could expand out there

Youtube Facebook Amazon Instagram Joe One United States Gillette Craigslist FBI
Pope in Japan voices concern over nuke power, meets victims

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Pope in Japan voices concern over nuke power, meets victims

"Pope Francis is calling for nations to rethink that reliance on nuclear and reach wide agreement over discarding nuclear weapons he in the pharmacist told political leaders destruction line created by the atomic bomb in Hiroshima and Nagasaki must never take place again in human history the pontiff says history teaches us this complex and misunderstandings between peoples and nations and find a valid solution is only through dialogue he wants you quick question dealt with on the multi lateral plain with nations capable of creating brought international consensus and action I'm sure most of this month

Pope Francis Hiroshima Nagasaki
"nagasaki" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Visited Nagasaki he's in the country for three days millions hitting the roads and taking to the skies this holiday week may have their journeys complicated by bad weather David Roth is a forecaster for the National Weather Service our system within the developing upper trough across the west start spreading moderate to heavy snow from northeast Colorado Wallace northwest Iowa southern Minnesota in northern Wisconsin this would be on Tuesday more storms could hit the southwest Pacific Northwest in upper New England this is CBS news rocket mortgage by quicken loans home is so much more than a house it's the home of your dreams and for thirty years they've been making it better rocket mortgage push button get mortgage sixty eight degrees here at three oh three I mark Willis news radio ten eighty KRLD one of the stories we're following for your friends and family of mark cal Ellis junior gathered outside of Alan high school Saturday morning remember the life of the sixteen year old was shot and killed a week ago at a house party in Plano one of his friends telling NBC five that everybody loved Alice who was always smiling but the sales were shot after a group of people were told to leave the party who then returned and fired into the hole in the thirty two hundred block of peach tree lane since send two people have been arrested in connection with the incident at Alice's Alan high school teammates carried his number thirty seven Jersey as they ran onto the field at a T. and T. stadium for Friday night's playoff game against Rockwall mark calluses wake will be held at one community church in Plano that's gonna started five this evening and will run until seven tonight as funeral is Monday at eleven AM Hey parkland hospital police officer was arrested earlier this month and charged with sexual assault an arrest warrant says that cave on gamble an employee of.

Plano AM Hey parkland hospital T. stadium NBC mark Willis CBS Colorado assault officer Alice Nagasaki Alan high school New England Pacific Northwest Wisconsin Minnesota Iowa National Weather Service forecaster David Roth
In Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Pope Francis calls for abolishing nuclear weapons

Techonomics

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

In Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Pope Francis calls for abolishing nuclear weapons

"York pope Francis has celebrated mass of Nagasaki one of two Japanese cities hit by the US in the nineteen forty five atomic bombings hope Frances demanded world leaders renounce atomic weapons saying their mere possession was perverse and indefensible he said the stockpiling of nuclear arms decreases security waste resources and threatens humanity with catastrophic destruction the pontiff also denounced what he said was a dismantling of nonproliferation treaties Nagasaki's mayor called the pope's condemnation of nuclear weapons of the side of the atomic bombing that devastated the Japanese city at the end of World War two a powerful

Nagasaki United States Frances York Pope Francis
Pope urges abolition of nuclear weapons at Japan's ground zeros

The Daily Dive Weekend Edition

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Pope urges abolition of nuclear weapons at Japan's ground zeros

"Thousands of Japanese Catholics attended Sunday mass with the pope Francis baseball stadium in Nagasaki Sunday afternoon hours earlier he laid a wreath at the memorial for the seventy four thousand people killed when the U. S. dropped a nuclear bomb on the city at the end of World War two NSSF your phone see that he called on world leaders to put an end to the stockpiling metallic weapons urging them to reject the heightening climate of fear mistrust and hostility encouraged by global nuclear

Pope Francis Baseball Stadium Nagasaki
Pope in Japan says world must rethink reliance on nuke power

WBZ Morning News

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Pope in Japan says world must rethink reliance on nuke power

"Hearing for pope Francis as he arrives for Sunday mass and Nagasaki the pope laid a wreath of flowers at the memorial for victims of the nineteen forty five U. S. atomic bombing that claimed the lives of tens of thousands of people in this city also during the visit of pope is calling for nuclear weapons to be completely

Pope Francis Nagasaki
"nagasaki" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Areas of the city, even so Nagasaki witness, the same horrors as Harris Shema the instant obliteration of everyone and everything within a half mile of the explosion, the bright light and heat and the massive fires all in all an estimated forty thousand people or a third of the city's population died in the aftermath of fat man's explosion. But the blast wasn't the worst of the damage beginning about a week after the bombings people who had been in or near hero Shema in Nagasaki began exhibiting strange symptoms of an unusual medical condition dubbed disease X or the atomic plague patients blood wouldn't clot. So they bled to death from minor injuries. Others watched their flesh rot away seemingly healthy people would begin to feel ill and. Then dropped dead of no obvious cause and the best doctors in Japan were unable to explain what caused the strange illnesses based on prior testing United States. Scientists knew that the bomb would emit radiation. But they had never end -ticipant at the radiation would be enough to cause sickness or death. They believed anyone close enough to the explosion to receive a lethal dose of radiation would die from the blast. Well, before they could begin exhibiting the symptoms of radiation poisoning on August, twelfth nineteen forty five in anticipation of imminent, Japanese surrender groves issued orders to form Manhattan project, atomic bomb investigating groups. These groups comprised of Manhattan project engineers, and physicists would travel to hear a Shema and Nagasaki to study the results of the atomic bomb explosion, the terms the United States had offered the Japanese included. Allied occupation. Until the Japanese could offer convincing proof that they were completely d materialized and the investigating groups would work with those occupying forces while Manhattan project. Researchers had already conducted tests in the desert. This was their first and only chance to review the aftermath of bomb's explosion in a city where people lived on August seventeenth. The first investigating group arrived in Nagasaki. They spent about a month examining the physical damage of the atomic bomb. Typhoons delayed the hero Shema investigating group who didn't arrive at their destination until September twenty sixth and only had ten days to gather data in order to be compliant with their orders for a prompt report. Both investigating groups determined that while ambient radiation in and around here. Shema and Nagasaki was elevated. It was still within a safe range visits to hospice. Settles demonstrated that there were no cases of radiation poisoning. Among people who had arrived in here Shema or Nagasaki after the bombs were dropped as for those who had been in the cities at the time of detonation, the evidence of radiation poisoning, was unavoidable and sobering. Based on the reports they received general groves decided to cover up evidence of the so called atomic plague reports from the Manhattan project, atomic bomb investigating groups were classified photography and video recording in and around here, Shema and Nagasaki was banned when a Japanese film crew recording footage for a film reel arrived in Nagasaki on October twenty four th nineteen Forty-five the US military officials occupying the city ordered them to stop recording and confiscated their footage around that same time. The US army deployed a cameraman named Lieutenant McGovern to record the. Aftermath of the hero Shema and Nagasaki bombings and send the footage back for review among officials posted stateside McGovern combine the Japanese newsreel footage with his own original shots destroyed buildings. The sick the injured and those suffering from the atomic plague the finished project clocked in at nearly three hours. The officials who viewed the movie determined its content top secret and classified it. So it would not be available to the public a member of mcgovern's crew. Herbert Suzanne would later say, quote, the government could not release the film what it showed was to horrible. And quote, the footage wasn't declassified until nineteen sixty eight after the Japanese government spent over a decade pressuring the US government to release it that year a film scholar named Eric barn. Oh, found the old footage in the national archives. And edited. Down to a sixteen minute short that screened at the museum of modern art in New York City for the first time, the American public was able to view firsthand the effects of the atomic bombs that had been developed and dropped twenty three years earlier in nineteen forty five newspaper articles in.

Shema Nagasaki United States Manhattan Lieutenant McGovern Japan US army museum of modern art New York City Harris Herbert Suzanne groves Eric barn twenty three years sixteen minute three hours ten days
"nagasaki" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"And January second, but we'll be back with a brand new episode on January ninth. And while we're away we ask that you do us a favor, please tell one friend about your favorite park asphalt cast. This will help us out tremendously. Thanks again for listening. At three forty seven on the morning of Thursday. August ninth nineteen forty five three airplanes took off from the island of teen bound for coca Japan. On one plane was New York time science writer, William Lawrence on another was device that Lawrence referred to as the gadget, foggy weather conditions. Forced the planes to divert from Coker instead flying over Nagasaki Japan. They're the plane released the gadget a weapon of mass destruction that the world would come to know as the atomic bomb in Lawrence's New York Times piece he wrote quote out of the belly of the great artiste. What looked like a black object went downward a tremendous blast wave struck our ship and made it tremble from nose to tail. This was followed by four more blasts in rapid succession each resounding like the boom of cannon fire hitting our plane from all directions. A giant ball of fire rose is though from the bowels of the earth belching forth. Enormous white smoke. Rings in quote with the deployment of atomic bombs over hero Shema and Nagasaki in August, nineteen forty five the United States permanently changed the course of military technology in the seven decades since the existence of atomic bombs has shaped the nature of international politics to some nuclear deterrence policies represent an end to traditional warfare and countless lives saved to others a locking the secrets of nuclear weaponry, put you Manitou on a destructive path from which it can never return conspiracy. Maybe coincidence may be complicated. Absolutely..

William Lawrence Nagasaki Japan Nagasaki New York Times Japan New York Shema Coker United States writer seven decades
"nagasaki" Discussed on The Porn Reboot Podcast

The Porn Reboot Podcast

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on The Porn Reboot Podcast

"And every time you realized that your family is out or your roommate us out, you mmediately quit what you're doing online and look for pornography. So in my case, I used to deal with this when I lived with roommates about a decade ago and the moment the door, the front door closed. It was as if something went off in my head and I just became this robot following these automatic instructions, I would go out and do a quick walk around the house to make sure that no one was home and I go through all these rituals like making sure my door was locked making, show the wind, making sure the window blinds closed, getting all the things I needed to watch for Nagasaki and get started. But I was absolutely. Unconscious of this behavior because I didn't know how to identify these sort of behaviors or draw boundaries. So while I was in recovery, I realized that the door closing was one of my triggers, and I learned how to draw boundaries around it for some people. Things like drinking alcohol or using drugs is the sort of behavior that might cause you to watch pornography for others. It's stress, it's loneliness, anger. It may be seeing women dressed the certain way at the gym, but whatever it is for you identify that risky behavior, create a boundary around it and inform your accountability partner. Okay. Step eight set up reminders of people that you care about and dedicate you'll recovery to someone. Now if you are in a relationship, it really helps to remember that you are actually with someone. So I suggest that you dedicate your recover. From porn addiction to someone you care about someone whom you wants to be best self for it could be a spouse..

Nagasaki partner
"nagasaki" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"To science fantastic welcome back to science r is for rocket and f is for your imagination well in spite of all the difficulties he does believe that our future lies on the red planet but how do you turn the red planet into a garden of eden well nuke the ice caps mars has two gigantic polar ice caps that are full of carbon dioxide and water water in frozen form so why not melt them well at first he said nuke mars but then you begin to backtrack when he was criticised and then said well why not have an air burst so let me explain where does the fallout come from from an atomic bomb it comes from radioactive dirt that is sucked into the fireball and also the bomb casing which is vaporized in the process of detonating atomic or hydrogen warhead but you see nagasaki and here's shema those bombs had very little fallout now some people say it means that even after a nuclear war we can recover very quickly well not so fast it turns that yeah they were airburst which meant that their fallout was diminished however if they were ground bursts then they would be radioactive for decades to perhaps centuries to come but because there were air burs in reduced the amount of follow that was stuck into the fireball so let them be evers over the surface of mars well personally i think there's a better way to do it and that is to have solar satellites solar satellites orbiting mars to beam down solar energy that would then slowly melt the polar ice caps without having to radiate mars is it possible to nuke mars.

nagasaki
"nagasaki" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Science fantastic welcome back science b is for a big r is for rocket and f is for your imagination well in spite of all the difficulties he does believe that our future lies on the red planet but how do you turn the red planet into a garden of eden well new caps mars has two gigantic polar ice caps that are full of carbon dioxide and water water in frozen form so why not melt them well at first he said nuke mars but then you begin to backtrack when he was criticised and then said well why not have an air burst so let me explain where does the fallout come from from an atomic bomb it comes from radioactive dirt that has sucked into the fireball and also the bomb casing which is vaporized process detonating a atomic or hydrogen warhead but you see nagasaki and here's shema those bombs had very little fallout some people say aha it means that even after a nuclear war we can recover very quickly well not so fast it turns out that yeah they were airburst which meant that their fallout was diminished however if they were ground burs then they would be radioactive for decades to perhaps centuries to come but because the air burs reduced the amount of follow that was stuck into the fireball.

nagasaki
"nagasaki" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"Weapon that he eventually created was vastly more powerful than even what obliterated russia nagasaki to give you a sense of scale hiroshima was about a fourteen kilotonnes exposure the equivalent of fourteen thousand tons of tnt exploding saint place at the same time the first full fusion test called ivy mike was ten megatonnes ten million almost thousand times larger rocha it evaporated island it was on and that was just beginning in theory you can make a fusion bomb as large as you want the biggest ever detonated was the russian czar bama which was more than fifty megatons of pnt and after a certain point it's pointless to get larger because you wind up listing a larger and larger column atmosphere into into space so it doesn't do that much more damage so even though it promised unlimited power unless he wants to destroy the earth it wasn't that much more effective at doing damage than a few that fishing bomb but at the same time the cold war was getting hot the russians had detonated their first nuclear weapon way before americans thought they could get it thanks in part to a spy operation that penetrated los alamos so a panicked america realized well we have to get ahead of the russians and keep them keep nuclear supremacy so they turned to edward teller's idea of a super bowl as a way of staying ahead of the russian nuclear weapons and as we know the russians caught up very very quickly and it turned into a nuclear stalemate where each side had so many weapons in their arsenal that they could destroy the world many times and i should also point out that when i was in high school edward teller was actually my adviser and he actually sort of divided my career in the early years when i was at harvard however moving on now we have the cold war in full swing and people are now used to the idea that there is a bomb a thousand times more powerful than the here shiama and nagasaki bomb but other people have said well look at mother nature mother nature uses fusion to light up the heavens so now explain to us how mother nature uses the process of fusion not vision to light up the universe yes fusion is responsible for all life on earth sent the.

nagasaki los alamos america edward teller harvard russia fourteen thousand tons
"nagasaki" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on KELO

"Pope francis began the new year praying the world would demonstrate a marked increase in solidarity and welcome for migrants and refugees let's not extinguish the hope in their hearts let's not suffocate their hopes for peace the pope said this week on january first before reciting the angelus with a crowd gathered at saint peter's square for the new year celebration of world peace day and the feast of mary mother of god pope francis had chosen to focus on migrants and refugees and their yearning for peace for this piece which is the right of all many of them are willing to risk their lives in a journey that in most cases is long dangerous and defaced trials and suffering the pope told an estimated forty thousand people gathered in the square on the christmas tree and activity seen pope francis said it is important that everyone including individuals government schools churches and church agencies make a commitment to ensuring refugees migrants everyone a future of peace as 2017 was drawing to a close the horrors of war and people's yearning for peace were on pope francis his mind and in his prayers in an unusual move late on december thirty of the pope had the vatican press office and vatican media distributor copy of a famous photograph from the aftermath of the atomic bombing of nagasaki the photo shows a young boy about ten years all carrying is dead little brother his back the boy is taking his brother to be cremated on the back of a card pope francis wrote the fruit of war in scientists name below his signature the pope explained that the photo was taken by us marine corps photographer joseph roger o'donnell after the bombs were dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki in 1945 o'donnell was assigned to document the scenes the sadness of.

saint peter pope francis joseph roger o'donnell hiroshima mary christmas nagasaki ten years
"nagasaki" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on KOIL

"Six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight six over three thirty seven hundred join egg a good example a great example of of mental hopscotch i got something for you if you've been on the internet or view looking around there if seve this santa rosa drone footage okay so you have to santa rosa drone footage and it is the entire neighbourhood santa rosa levelled by this these fires everything looks like it's a it looks like the aftermath of hiroshima and nagasaki it looks like a nuclear bomb because dropped on says a set of rules the neighborhood and so this guy is named douglas throne was noticing something that was out of the ordinary and that is a united states post office worker a postman aim here's white ran driving up and down the street still delivering mail to these homes whose rails mailboxes were still intact now once again his his aides like we were talking about last night you are the trees are still standing the cars have been melted away to houses have been levelled it is like something came through there with a strange weapon and levelled everything down and let the trees stand with the mailbox and stand they did melt but the cars melted everything else was melds into the ground some cars were turned into molten metal but here we have this mailman in his vehicle going up and down the street to the santa rosa neighborhood eddie just looks like something out of we jim we legion where everything is pretty much an apocalyptic mess the maleness get through and that's a pink it was dr bryn who wrote the story about the postman or the called the postman an apocalyptic postman type of atmosphere that's exactly what we got with this picture each of weird eat so bizarre that it alters the brain chemistry and a way i just he makes you i mean it it's almost as if remember we were talking about the predicted programming stuff them the acclamation tight acclimating us for a nuclear war things on the nightly some guy delivering the mail and an apocalyptic setting the ash coming down on of the sky you know the mailman the mail was always get through even in the apocalypse the middle always gets through mm every time i look at things around me and.

hiroshima douglas throne dr bryn santa rosa nagasaki
"nagasaki" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The other side eventually he does find the train station and there's predictably kind of a mob waiting to get on these trains but he pushes his way through gets to the train any sits down and the train leaves to take him home to nagasaki go it he's nagas size going from ceres she daily during nagasaki is going to nagasaki the next day and on an elect with does he find his family he gets to them he finds them at home spends a day swimming in and out of consciousness and the next day august nineteen gets up gets to mitsubishi headquarters he's bandaged up not looking very good and he starts telling his boss and his fellow engineers about this enormous bomb that had exploded and devastated the city and after a minute or so his boss cuts him off and he says that this is complete baloney you're an engineer calculated how could one bomb destroy an entire city and as soon as he finished saying that yamaguchi felt the same flash that he felt in a row shimon followed by that same more for a second time yamaguchi's thought while this was happening was oh my god he thought the mushroom cloud had followed him from hiroshima in a sense i guess he was right it had sort of followed him there and again in that flash gamma rays flood his body they would have created free radicals again and it would have attacked his dna a second time a second time he pulled himself up staggers out of the building knitted collapsed this time any cleanse of a hill nearby he starts looking over add nagasaki which is burning just like euro shimer was three days before and the sky is black with clouds again and he could see wear.

nagasaki engineer yamaguchi shimon hiroshima mitsubishi three days
"nagasaki" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on KOMO

"News one thousand fm ninety seven seven and komonewscomfire did events eyes are editor along with eric hines stories we're following the mayor of nagasaki told me xiatao says that he is proud that the japanese city now has eight nobel literature prizewinner kazu all issue guerrero who is kept nagasaki close to his heart even though he moved to britain when he was five it is debut novel aid pale view of hill's each girl described nagasaki soon after the august knife 1945 atomic attack by the us it killed more than seventy thousand people two bouts before opening fire at a concert in las vegas from a 30second four room of the hotel see would paddock booked a room at a chicago hotel overlooking apart or a major music festival was held that weekend law enforcement officials said today the officials said law enforcement faldo evidence paddock ever came to chicago during the weekend of law palooza the music festival attracting hundreds of thousands of people are now nine sixteen they're going to be able to trace back almost everything that this guy did every move he made and if they don't believe that she's telling the truth here they could have a strong case the girlfriend of las vegas mesh shooter steven paddock was grilled for hours by the fbi yesterday mary lou daily who was in the philippines at the time of the concert shooting returned home to authorities questions about what she knew a lawyer says she had no idea what paddock was planning or that he had amassed a gun arsenal that police have uncovered abc's chief legal analyst dan abrams they're saying the police will be looking at her under a microscope with more on this story of joy to the kobus lied by that's epa taskey who covers the justice department for the washington posts national security team vat thanks for being with us as always we appreciate you joining us cure thank you for having me europe piece along with mark berman talks about the girlfriend of steven paddock who who was an instant two persons of interest in this case not necessarily not necessarily as it relates to the commission.

eric hines mark berman europe washington epa chief legal analyst mary lou chicago britain guerrero xiatao editor the commission dan abrams abc philippines fbi steven paddock law enforcement las vegas nagasaki 30second
"nagasaki" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The core kfi am 640 bill handel here he said nuclear device i it called it a hydrogen bomb which would make it a thermonuclear device i watch a lot of quiz show so i know that one and they're saying and even know i think seismologists around the world are saying this is six seven eight times bigger than the nagasaki bomb which doesn't make it a particularly large bomb when you think about hydrogen bombs had been tested at bikini island for example but it sure means allied brian sued so weeks a nuclear device i it called it a hydrogen bomb tom which would make it a thermonuclear device i watch a lot of quiz show so i know that one and uh a slightly bigger abomb was going to be tested protests number and what happened on saturday morning was that the north korean party it could a particularly large bomb when you think about hydrogen bomb that have been tested at bikini island for example but it sure means allied brian sued so winning what was described as an hbomb and there was a huge hole in the nonproliferation and defense intelligent networks and and world for about four hours and it was good lord what is this thing this is the fate anyone can make this number shoe shop and then around eight thirty p m our time saturday night exactly at noon and one second in north korea just to make sure it wasn't you know an earthquake and kim jongun sent that message that it was noon and wondering what was described as an hbomb and there was a huge poll in the nonproliferation and defence intelligent networks and and we know this from the richter scale in southern california that oh five is ten times bigger than a four and a six is ten times figured on a five so the north koreans proved that they created something that with an order maggie two bigger than an abomb so there's no debate about this that this guy tested and hbomb now may not be the thing that was pictured saturday morning a may not be the thing that can that they wanna fit on on on a couple of a missile but it was the largest explosion that we know this from the richter scale in southern california that far live is ten times bigger than a four and a six is ten times bigger than.

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"nagasaki" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Bombs that took out nagasaki and hiroshima so this was a big explosion if they don't behind regime weapon yet they will soon i think mike morrell headed about right when he described the paucity of options here but i also think that the trump team taste tested for the first time with this they may not fully agree that there are no military options you hear members of the team talk about military options that they think they have they agree they'd be horrible they agree there'd be a lot of of blow back to it but i'm not sure they're persuaded that this point that military is off the table margaret what are you hearing is happening at the white house today the president tweeted what's next that's right and the president's two tweets on this subject were interesting because the first one was pretty measured you could call it a general kelly h r mcmaster tweet and the second one we've pretty quickly intel's south korea's weaken says china but the presence of church this morning and then he will convene a meeting with his national security leaders and i think at that point the resume these conversations that have been ongoing i mean this is the idea that there could be a test like this has been known and predicted all summer but to come so soon after the firing fury comments suggested either a test of what president trump will do next to test of how china will react maybe both so they'll go right back today in huddle at the white house to discuss these options while nancy we know that the secretary of state's and making calls he talked to his counterpart in south korea but when we talk about disconnect within.

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"nagasaki" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Channel says a senior producers solicited sex in exchange for a paid job at the network the declaration by accidental college professor caroline heldmann came as part of a lawsuit churches former fox consoled and what he fraser made numerous unwelcome sexual advances on heldmann and other women who appeared on

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"nagasaki" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"nagasaki" Discussed on WTVN

"Destruction and that's the uh the the the heroux sherman nagasaki nagasaki tight bomber or the firm oh nuclear bomb what concerns you the most about all this robert they are but what really bothers me is we're doing a tour so there's a destructive us off before this thing could be fixed it would be of your among other things if you're wandering to stop you know an of people from building nuclear bombs it as we talk before the if you want you have the nuclear reactor very easy to build a nuclear bomb feel reprocessor and get a bomb feel to get the bombgrade plutonium in that and the you you have to you have to stop sowing these nuclear power reactors all over the world do you have we you know the the un actually claims would all nations seven inalienable right the own nuclear reactors george that's in spain and we did it all out of greed and we were the ones with did it we invented all the stuff and then we sold as fast as we could do the nations of or the world i i think there's something biblical will that my feelings are talked before for fulfillment of biblical prophecies for where we are and it's it's it's the original fend this covetousness of screed and that's got us kicked out of the garden of eden left the uh and we can change we have the better we have the what lincoln called bettered her better introverted nature that we can we can change we can choose to be better and for reason the food or you know almost publicly tragic we've refused to do so so far what kind of a world we have if we lose one or two american cities and there is going to be eventually some retaliation we will find out who did it all the or booed whoa one of the problems with best one area with the one or the the new keno one through the is simply unbearable you cannot you cannot tolerate a second nuking and you have to assume of one foodies knew that they have they have to boss right or three nuke they have four boss you have to film there's more bumps and the most likely scenario is that we.

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