35 Burst results for "Nafta"

The Importance of Self Compassion

Therapy for Black Girls

04:58 min | 5 d ago

The Importance of Self Compassion

"If there's anything we can use right now and in the coming months itself compassion. Today I'm joined by Dr Kristin Nafta about the many ways of compassion. He can be a helpful to us to get through these difficult times. Kristen is currently an associate professor of educational psychology. At the University of Texas at Austin. She's a pioneer in the field of self compassion research conducting the first empirical studies on self compassion over fifteen years ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic. She is the author of this book self compassion the proven power of being kind to yourself released by. William Moro. In conjunction with her colleague Dr Chris. Germer she has developed an empirically supported training program called mindful self compassion, which is taught by thousands of teachers worldwide. Dr Nefyn I chatted about what self compassion is how is different from self esteem, how it can be helpful in mediating difficult emotions and her favorite activity for practicing self compassion. If anything resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share with us on social media using the Hashtag t BG in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Chris and I'm really really excited to chat with you. Self compassion was are yellow collective book club choice for last month. So it feels very timely for you to be joining us for this conversation. That's great. Wonderful. Happy to be here. Yeah. So I wonder if you could start just by talking with us about what self compassion is in what it isn't right. So the easiest way to think of what self compassion is simply being a good frontier self I saw in. Terms of how you relate yourself. Especially when you're struggling, you're struggling because you feel inadequate made a mistake or just when life is really difficult that you treat yourself with the same type of kindness warm care support concern that you would nationally showed two good friend, right? Most of us don't do that most of us go if we talk to our friends where we talk ourselves who would have no friends I in. So really self compassion is just turning that around and doing a u-turn in being kind ordered to ourselves. Now. Some people get confused about this they think. To ourselves me being self indulgent being lazy being selfish that actually that's not passionate right so so if you want the technical definition of compassion is concerned with alleviation of suffering. and. So in your self indulgent or you're lazy or you know you're helping yourself in your naturally getting your suffering, you're actually causing yourself more problems in the long run. Also, the word compassion comes from the Latin Pasha means to suffer an income means with. So. There's an inherent connectedness in self. Compassion is a sense set while everyone's imperfect everyone struggling. You know it's not just me, and this is what makes up compassion different than somebody Mike self-pity. Self Passion US remember that this is part of the shared human experience. You know it's not just me. To say that especially in today's times whenever I say that some people think this is like a coded version of all lives matter. Right. It doesn't acknowledge that some groups suffer more than others. Absolutely do the amount of suffering is different. The source of suffering is different. All people in all groups do not suffer the same way, and so we need to acknowledge that as the human experience. And yet every single individuals especially when it comes to relating to their own suffering, their own suffering is if you're paying. If you treat your own paying with kind of a kind caring response. You will be able to turn your attention outward more effectively. So it really sounds like you know sometimes we hear this conversation around like Grief Olympics are paying Olympics right where we're trying to say like, Oh, my heart is bigger than your heard, right? Yeah. Exactly. It's not like that York saying that my pain is bigger or smaller you recognize people's pain different is very important. I think especially nowadays you we have to recognize. Those. Who structural reasons pain of all people is not the same. And yet was self compassion. We can treat our own pain as worthy of a compassionate us. We're just saying that, hey, I haven't paying I haven't perfect and I'm not the only one very simple outweigh. The reason that so important is because if you get into self, pity was made for me like victim mentality fx not helpfully

Dr Chris Kristen Dr Kristin Nafta University Of Texas Associate Professor Austin Dr Nefyn William Moro Mike Self-Pity Latin Pasha York
Google's Nearby Share goes live

All About Android

05:01 min | 5 d ago

Google's Nearby Share goes live

"I'm Jason. Howell. And I'm Ron Richards. And I'm a very flustered, Florence I on today's. Days in it. Street. They're not only in the android world, but just like in life. It has been a three time and honestly I do feel like after a couple of weeks of like slow Android News, all of a sudden, the past two days like I could not keep the plates spinning. I, was like Whoa and this and this. and. It's not because tomorrow. Me and James Nafta to get up early. Wait this way me and Jason have to get up early. It's going to be regular time for you. There's a Samsung, event. Yeah. It's GonNa be nuts like seven am and mind you like as I've said, many times at this point, he probably sick appearing me say my podcast studio station is in our bedroom. So it's basically like kicking failure, the roof before had so that I can make sure that I'm up at ready for seven. Am Call to follow Samsung News which there's going to be a lot. So I'm definitely looking forward to, but what a week from Samsung to Pixel, which we'll talk about later. This is a big. I mean. We've got so much phone news happening right now. It's kind of ridiculous. I mean, it's really weird after what has been a quiet summer like it is just like it went from zero to sixty late yesterday after job total. Good. which is Kinda normal riot. Usually, it seems like about the time of the the note event is win this next phase of the phone season kicks in, and then at this point, we don't hear from Google until like Tober, but this time that's different. Anyway, we're. We're spoiling the the the ending here or at least the middle. Before, we get there. We've got some news to talk about taking us to the news. please. We have a week purchased doesn't even violence? Say it. I don't blame them at all. I, don't blame me at all burke. Let's get into the news like we said it's been head-spinning these past couple of days. We'll get to the pixel stuff in the hardware blocks of stay tuned. We haven't forgotten about that but I off. One of the hotly anticipated things all summer in the world of android. In fact, a couple of weeks ago. When Dave Burke from android. From Google and Android was on the show, he teased that nearby share file sharing aspect of android would be rolling out soon, and soon is today how about that? So, basically, if you're familiar with IOS airdrop this airdrop for android. It's file share between ANDROID devices. You can share files, images, links, etc. Through fast transfer process. You can select your visibility determine who can see you and share with WHO and who can't It does work off line, which is fascinating. Transfers by either Bluetooth, Bluetooth L. E. Web RTC, or peer to peer Wifi, whichever is fast as and you can check out hands on android episode twenty, one for deep dive into the new feature, which I'm sure we'll get you as Jason goes deep into file sharing with nearby sharing. Jason. What is your experience in nearby sharing? Is it? What is it living up to the hype? I. Think, Yeah. I think in in my experience with it and try and I should I should stay that really I've only used it around the time when I was creating the hands on android episode. So I haven't found myself in a situation since then or like I needed to use nearby sharing to send a file to myself and I certainly haven't found myself in a situation where I'm sharing directly like with my wife like quite frankly we're not going anywhere. So we're just here. Why, don't you just send her files Willy Nilly because think about it. That can be fun. We have nothing going on right now, and you know your everyone's stuck at home and you know. Why not send her random files, sent her gifts in memes through the nearby share and. Response like I. think that's a good idea. I'll ask her to set it up because it would be weird if I just set it up and started dropping are things that suddenly appeared out of nowhere. It up and it'll be it'll be a nice way to kind of lighten the load on weeks such as this one but. was going to say about nearby sharing is in my time playing with it. For that episode hands on Android I tested transferring a good amount of files, large files, small files, and yet it works pretty seamlessly. Just kind have to do the work in advance of setting it up to say, Hey, I, trust this person's device, and then if you happen to have your device near near an that person's device at any given point, you can get a little notification. Notification. That says, Hey. So and so's nearby and it makes it really easy for you just tap and share directly to them because you've all you both already kind of open those gates to say, yes, this is possible.

Jason Samsung Dave Burke Google James Nafta Ron Richards Samsung News Howell Florence Willy Nilly Tober
Trump's tanking in the polls

Campaign HQ with David Plouffe

21:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump's tanking in the polls

"Anzalone, welcome to campaign HQ David Blah always good to hear your voice. Yeah, you and I met I back in Iowa back in the eighties, not to date ourselves, but the answer. Let me start with this. Let's talk about swing voters for minute. Obviously Joe Biden is doing. Incredibly well in public polls I'd assume he's also doing well in your own polling correct. Yeah I think that it's fair to say that. We're seeing a lot of what the public polls are showing that you know. This is in some ways I. Mean you've seen you've been through a lot of presidential campaigns, and as you said, we've been in this together for over thirty years, so we've seen a lot of historical data and quite frankly what we're seeing right in the public bowls and internal is. Is pretty historic right, so let's start with what we might consider. The Swing Voter Side of the ledger, and then we'll talk about some of the turn out registration targets, so you know you have been part of campaigns world. We Lost White Seniors by twenty points. We a static. You guys right now. white seniors or tied of which means with seniors overall your head. Talk about that like why is that? How much of that do you think it'd be maintained over the next fifteen weeks? I think that there's a couple of things you know. When we take a look at swing, voters There's actually like four really important groups that. You know everyone wants to compare how Biden's doing public Poland's with Hillary but what's really interesting about key group set of moved from sixteen. Is that Biden's not only doing much better and leading in most polling with Voters over sixty five, but he's leading with suburbanites. He's leading with independence, and he's leading with college voters, and so those are like four really important groups that not only did trump win, but is you know Romney won right and so listen? These presidential candidates. Have Different coalition I mean people like to talk about the Obama coalition in. It's important. But Biden's coalition, GonNa look different and clearly part of this started in two thousand, eighteen where we saw suburban women Super White Women College Educated Women but also college educated men really move. I mean take a look at Gretchen Whitmer who is a a a client of ours in places like Oakland County Right She also wanted to Comb County Reagan Democrats which is interesting, which also biting one in the primary, so we're seeing these swing. Voters these groups that Biden is bringing around that is different than the coalitions that we've seen. Seen in the past while at the same time narrowing margins within the Republican base with white voters and also rural voters, and keeping on par with our democratic base, right with young voters in women, and so You know when you, of course you know two thousand eight you. You saw this I. Mean when you are moving, and you have a moment, or if you sustain that moment, you tend to do well almost everywhere, meaning that even in the Republican base voters, rural voters and things like that, you tend to narrow the margins, and they're on margins. In tough places. Is just as important as doing well in some of these other swing areas. Now just specifically unseen Yars I. Listen, you know we see trump's jump rating just getting worse and worse on handling the coronavirus eppendorf pandemic clearly seniors Vulnerable the most at risk, and I think they're reacting directly to that risk in terms of feeling like he didn't get serious enough. He didn't listen to medical experts. He didn't have a plan and now with the kind of the surge feel like he's put his head in the sand and I think it's just cost him dearly with that largest age bracket the motor sixty five, and over the last Democratic presidential candidate to win sixty five and over. Is Al Gore so that Kinda gives you an idea. Of! How important this is! Yeah, reminded. Every election is its unique beast so on whether it's seniors suburban voters, you mentioned both college educated women and men Joe Biden right now, doing extremely well. Two questions for you John Do you think he's close to his ceiling there and the job really for your campaign is to maintain those numbers. Do you think there's room to grow? And secondly just how durable do think it is? Do you think that some of these voters are already locked in and is going to be really hard for trump to dislodge them? You get a feeling that where we are today. is very difficult for trump and listen first of all we should say we. We all have a collective PTSD right from two thousand sixteen, and so none of us are getting overseas, but at the same time you know you have to acknowledge the good polls because you know, there's a couple of things that are different from where Joe Biden is from past democratic nominees, including Barack Obama and and twelve. In that, he's also at fifty percent. Right at this point in time whatever what hundred four days and you know there's been no Democrat or Republican candidate you go all the way back to two thousand who's reached that threshold and so you know that's really import. The other part is is that Joe. Biden isn't scary to voters. I mean that's one reason he's leaving with independence. And if you take a look at I don't know the NBC Paul I think is is a good example or one of the most recent ones where I think it's the Fox foxhole. We're Biden is actually above water popularity. Naturally trump is underwater, but trump's very unfavorable is at forty seven percents, and binding I. Think is at thirty one. There's win been one thing that I think when they write about Joe Biden in the primary and the general election is the stability of his vote, right? It really hasn't moved that much. I mean trump's has moved down during the primary I mean. We're biden kind of started at the beginning. He ended at the end. It was very stable. Other people moved all around, but Joe Biden was incredibly stable and I think. Think that we're GONNA see that same dynamic here and we have really in the last several months. The Joe Biden's vote has been incredibly stable it's in a couple of points to the fifty percent mark. trump has moved down right and that is that is a good thing but the stability is important for Joe Biden. One is how voters view him and to how voters view trump. You know there was the I think it was the B. Poll that showed fifty percent of voter said there was no chance at all that they would vote for trump, and so your question is you know, will biden's numbers remain stable, and there just seems to be a universe of voter that is completely cut off from trump and it's because of how people you him prior. Let's think about this. Let's dissect prior to the pandemic. People you know we always heard the same thing. Whether it was you know for for Biden. Her for US Senate race for a congressional race. Is that people disliked? His behavior is tweeting his bowling. He was a jerk They basically just didn't like him as a human being, but hey, you know it's not like some of his agenda and his policies. They like how he took on. The median shook things up in Washington, DC. Now they're problem with him. Is Not only behavior how he reacted in a protest and things like that doubling down. Of Racism but their main problem is. Is that they feel that he failed the leadership test on the three crises, whether it was the health and crisis, whether it was the police brutality protests crisis, and now the economic crisis, which is hurting his economic numbers, and so they're now viewing him His biggest problem isn't just his behavior which they haven't forgotten. It's his lack of leadership or his mishandling of these crisis, so three and a half years in their judging him president. President. They're not judging him as a personality. That is his biggest problem right now, and you know I don't think that you know that's going to change. I think that we have a couple more crises potentially coming very soon, college kids and K. through twelve kids start going to school and mid August and you know it's GonNa be It's going to be really a a really tense time. I think it's GonNa. Be a problem for a lot of communities, a lot of states, a lot of holds and that is the problem. They're going to squarely put. On trump because he didn't take this series at the beginning, you didn't listen to medical experts. He didn't have a plan. And that's a problem I mean. We have more crises coming quite frankly. Yeah, now that's that's a great point and your point about his very under favorable I mean if he's sailing into voting time in late September and October with forty seven percent, unfavorable lombardo grounds He's really up against a wall there so John. I, think one of the mistakes. Sometimes you can make whether it's politics. Are Businesses your opponent? Your competition does something puts. Puts out, an ad or new strategy and you know you're like well. That's dumb and of course I've learned like you better. Take a minute and think through why they think it's smart right, but on this suburban thing what what strikes it's almost like trump got a briefing saying you're hemorrhaging the suburbs and he's like Ooh I. Know what I'll say. I'M GONNA say Joe Biden is going to destroy the so like. Do you see any evidence that that tactic which seems to be front and Center for trump, and his campaign now has any chance of succeeding. Listen I think that you know you and I have been through a lot of campaigns, and when you're in a campaign where you're behind, and you're behind eight or ten points, what do you do you just kinda start throwing things at the wall and he tends to throw things at the wall I. Mean You know in one week? He's hitting us on. China I mean all paid TV the next week. He's in his on. You Know Nafta now. Now, he didn't on defunding the police and so they try a lot of different things out right but the fact is is that trump was up on TV in the battleground states for a couple of months prior awesome. You sure what the number is, but I think it's close to fifty million dollars. We never saw the numbers. Move I. Mean you see that in the public calling right? I mean our numbers actually got better. His numbers got worse even though he was on TV by himself and very high levels as well as with his allies, and so you know now. We're on TV. So now we're in a position to you. Know have our own message. Ever Own Voice of voters see what Biden's about What's his agenda and his vision and again we don't see any deterioration a matter of fact, if the last ten days are any indication and again we don't you know. We don't get over our skis on this but the. The. Number of polls have showed this in double digits. is a good place to be. It doesn't mean that we're not gonNA work hard doesn't mean we don't take anything for granted. We know that we just gotTa fight for every vote and we know that it's going to get closer because that's what thing, but that's just. The natural physics of presidential races but I think that again it goes to the opponent meaning Joe Biden. clearly isn't Hillary Clinton. You were talking about very unfavorable in two thousand sixteen. Trump's very unfavorable was forty seven percent, and Hillary's was forty five percents, so there was a lesser of two evils dynamic. Going on, you always see this kind of analysis of what they call double haters, people who dislike both candidate. Well you can't call them double haters this time because they are. They hate trump, but they just kinda just like Joe. Biden are they dislike politics? Right is so his very unfavorable with that group is you know literally I? Think it's a quarter of trump's, and he wins that group by forty plus points depending on the pulled that you see, and that's actually really important again. They don't see Joe Biden scary. They see him as a compassionate relatable. Guy you know they keep the fact that he's lunch Pail Joe and he's a guy. WHO's GONNA look out. For Working Families and he is, you know someone that one. The trump and their allies throw punches. you know they? They're not sticking like their sticking and past presidential campaign. Right, so I WANNA. Talk about filling in the blanks on Joe. Biden, what you guys have started to do, but I want on I. WanNa talk about battlegrounds from and so you made an important point. which is you know when you've got momentum? Momentum in a campaign particularly national campaign. You see you see you see progress everywhere. It's just not in a particular state or region, so I a couple of questions one. Are you seeing with swing voters in particular? Are you seeing the same strength for Joe Biden in the south in the Midwest and the West and I guess secondly I would've thought. Let's say ninety days ago hundred twenty days ago, trump's floors, floor and battlegrounds. Forty six. It looks like it may be lower. So what do you think is I? Mean I agree with you that you know when you see a poll right now. That shows Biden fifty forty. You know the other ten percents gotta go somewhere. And you know probably more of that comes to trump it goes to you guys because you're bumping up against a pretty pretty good and healthy ceiling, but I'm curious kind of what where? Where you see both, is there uniformity in terms of the movement across the country and secondly kind of? Where do you see trump's floor now? Yeah, well, I do think that there's again. We you know you can talk about Joe Biden's feeling, but really when you look at it, historically all the way back to two thousand is just presidential candidates ceilings I mean there's not a lot of presidential candidates who've gotten over fifty percent. Who won right and so the fact that we're in this divided country and there are third party. Candidates who siphoned off universe. Hopefully it won't be as much as two thousand sixteen, and we don't think that it will be but the ceiling is is is almost as close to fifty or a little above for almost everyone right I mean that just kinda historically has how it's happened. Happened in the battleground states like you, you say whether it's Michigan Pennsylvania Wisconsin Florida Arizona I, mean he's having trouble getting to the mid forties right I, mean he in places like Michigan and Pennsylvania in Wisconsin in the real clear politics or the fivethirtyeight average of polls, he stood at forty, one and forty two percent now Florida in Arizona and in North Carolina or Kinda GonNa Act like Florida. And North Carolina in Arizona, they're they're always going to be tighter. Right I mean like Scott Ours no always says Florida tight and that's true now we haven't. You in a lead that's above the margin of error. That hasn't happened very often. That, you and I have done enough Florida. politics polling to know that that is a state that tends to tighten up again. I think that we have. An advantage there because of how we're doing with seniors, and we're competing David I. Mean you know it's like this campaign is going to look a lot like you to you like two thousand eight because of where we're competing? The balanced expansion. In the media markets in Florida, well, where do you WanNa? See I mean I. Remember Two thousand like it was yesterday we were. We were up on TV at high levels. Competing with McCain wear Panama City Talahassee. Jacksonville Gainesville, we were fighting the fight in the panhandle. Right and you know. I mean protect protect I four and all that type of stuff. You GotTa do well Miami Dade Palm Beach etc, but when you see a campaign competing against the Republican in the Republican areas That's what you gotTA. Do to win a place like Florida, and a lot of campaigns often have to make the cost benefit analysis, or make the bad decisions, and this campaign, because it's been under great leadership and the reason, a lot of money gives you the ability to run the race. You need to run to win, right? So I want to just ask you quickly third party because you mentioned it and you live through this horror in two thousand sixteen, where trump could win states like Wisconsin with forty seven point two percent of the vote because the third party vote share was. Higher than historical averages right now in your research and it seems to be true in public research. You're seeing that those numbers may revert more to two percent or less that we've gotten used to write, and that's huge because your ceiling is higher than trump's. I would guess at this point right and so I think that I think that this is how I look at that and you know I mean when you pull when you add third party candidates two point, they always get more on the pole than they actually do on election day right I mean. That's just kind of the dynamic, and so you know you have to. You have to test things a bunch of different ways. But I think there's one thing that we all kind of instinctively know that in two thousand sixteen. There were how a lot of voters Bernie voters etc. WHO stayed at home? WHO VOTED FOR GARY? Johnston voted for Jill Stein and ninety nine percent of them who vote did one of those three things were ninety nine percent. Sure that Hillary Clinton was going to be president, and so they were doing a protests about. those voters now know what's at stake. And they're You know their their enthusiasm. If you will to get vote or get, trump out of office is incredibly high. It's an incredibly intense, and so I think that that dynamic and quite frankly Bernie Sanders and his campaign and the Joe Biden and his campaign have worked together on a plethora of issues. will make the dynamics here much different so we don't see that bleed, and and internally we see we see that you know. Joe Biden just has better with Bernie Voters Than Hillary Clinton did in two thousand sixteen well does tighten up. That's going to be such an important dynamic. So, You mentioned You know the Biden campaign. has a very expansive electoral map again. Something we might not have expected months ago. and you know those are pretty weighty decisions. You're involved in those decisions with General. Molly Dylan and Donald other leadership in the campaign, but John when you think about the places that look now plausible. Not Win them, but you know Georgia in other poll out in Texas today publicly had Biden Upright one Ohio Iowa those are likely not going to be in. My view is two hundred seventy electoral vote, but do you think there's a scenario where you could get surprise? Where maybe you don't win in north, Carolina and Georgia, or is there really a stack ranking on these states? Well as you know, there's always a stack ranking and you were at the you know. Know Genesis in two thousand twelve of analytics right, and so there's a there's a lot of simulations things that you know you and I didn't learn about growing up in this business and there's and there's tipping points, states and things like that. I think that at the end of the day again. The leadership of this campaign is incredibly focused and disciplined, and you can see where we're buying TV. It's public and it's always you know reported on. You know we're very focused on the six battleground states, and you know until you know, they move on to another state. We will be focused on those six states in a very disciplined way, because that is the ball game I think that what's difficult for trump is that he's not only communicating in those six days. He is playing defense right now in Ohio and Iowa, so he is spending a lot of money in Ohio in Iowa. Just protecting himself he's also up in Nevada right, which I don't understand, but you know, right. Right and so she's the one that is actually expanding a lot of money. and I can't say in an undisciplined way. He is in trouble, so he has to expand his hip protected. He has to expand but right now. the Joe Biden campaign is very disciplined and very focused and you know will there be expansion states. You know there's a big map on the wall just like there is you know in two thousand, eight and twelve and sixteen, but you gotta be careful, and you have to be very analytical about doing that.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Hillary Clinton JOE Bernie Voters TA Florida President Trump David Blah Iowa Romney Al Gore Ptsd Gretchen Whitmer Bernie Sanders Poland Senate
Trump, Lopez Obrador visit is about trade, but politics too

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:18 sec | Last month

Trump, Lopez Obrador visit is about trade, but politics too

"President Trump will be welcoming Mexico's president under his Manuel Lopez Obrador to the White House today to celebrate a new North American trade deal. The U. S. Mexico Canada Agreement replaces the 19 nineties NAFTA deal that effectively eliminated tariffs between the nations. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is skipping the meeting.

President Trump U. S. Mexico Canada Agreement Manuel Lopez Obrador Justin Trudeau Mexico Prime Minister White House
White People Talking About Whiteness

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:52 min | 2 months ago

White People Talking About Whiteness

"Guys many, if not most white people don't think of themselves as racialist race, we might tell ourselves is a reality for people who have different skin colors than ours Black People Hispanic people, Asian people, Indigenous People, etc, but of course white is a race. Quick important side note here. Race is not a biological thing. It is socially constructed. Sadly the white people who seem to have most clearly grasped that white is race or white nationalists. But now it is time for the rest of US white people to actually see whiteness and to talk to each other about it. This many people in the racial justice world would argue. Is the key first step toward white people engaging fully in creating a more equitable society. My guest today is Eleanor Hancock. She's the executive director of group called White, awake which employs and I'm quoting here educational resources and spiritual practices. To engage white people and I'm quoting here again in the creation of just and sustainable society an quote. Eleanor was recommended to me by seven Selassie, who's one of the court teachers on the ten percent happier APP, and was on the show last week, and really powerful episode which I recommend you check out. In this episode Eleanor, and I talk about why this work is so important. Why so many white people resist it? The barriers white people face when they actually do begin the work. The role of meditation, and the problematic aspects of white woke kness in the discussions here we go eleanor Hancock. Nice to meet you virtually. Thanks again for doing this absolutely. So I'd be curious to hear how you came to this work. How and why you can't? I would star with just a little bit about my background and the different stages in my life that have led up to it. I grew up in West Texas. kind of a mid sized city very conservative environments. I'm solid GENENTECH's so I, didn't I was we had an integrated public school system? But that said there's I think a lot of kind of just default segregation that happens socially so I developed awareness of the differences that folks of color the differences of their experiences in the united. States in particular verses, my experience as a white person that began to happen for me in graduate school. It was a variety of different circumstances that led to that. One of them like. Having a roommate that was reading the autobiography of Asada Shukor, and just realizing I, knew about I knew about Amnesty International and that there could be folks who are imprisoned for political reasons, but I it was shocking to me to realize that was something that happened here in the United States, and then the other thing is very influential to me to jump in I. Hate interrupting my guest, but it might be worth explaining a little bit of a Sasha core in that back story just oh! So she's. Part of the Black Panthers and during this entire time period where the FBI. was, targeting civilians through their coin tell pro program and a lot of just extreme aggression on many different levels, including the outright murder of Fred Hampton while he was sleeping in his bed at night, and it was a really it was a political assassination, and during that time period they were able to capture Asada and create these charges against her that kept her in prison for a long time and. She escaped to Cuba. All of that history I would really encourage people to read about that. You can look up quantel pro and the FBI and understand. The destruction that occurred to a lot of the movements that brought a so much during the sixties, the fifties, sixties and seventies the ways that they were destroyed. And part of what happens when you infiltrate and destroy a movement from within is. All only harm it. Externally you create so much paranoia and violence within that then people also began to destroy one another in different ways, so in terms of my own. You know just how I came to this work I try not to Belabor the story too much, but I was in a series of classes and graduate school with a Chicano professor who was teaching performance our, and this was in the late nineties and I really. Learned a lot about what at the time we would have simply called identity politics through art. So. Yeah, being part of those performance art classes for the entire time. I was in graduate school, was really an eye opener that was also during this apetit Easter rebellion, and so we were all just starting to get online, and that was part of it was incredible about that time period. APETIT ZAPPA of southern Mexico, who are indigenous people who had risen up against their own governments specifically in response to Nafta the North American. Free Trade Agreement. And there are a lot of aspects of my world view that developed during that time period, and then as I lived in my life. You know I have a biracial daughter. Her father's African American during the time that we were married I had the privilege of spending a lot of time with his family and developing strong relationships with them, and experiencing myself as the minority I think that that's a unique experience that not every a lot of people don't have that opportunity to be inside of somebody else's space racially speaking and have to understand their norms and their experience and adapt to that. I think that's a really valuable experience.

Eleanor Hancock White United States Apetit Zappa Asada Shukor Genentech Black Panthers FBI Quantel Executive Director West Texas. Selassie Mexico Fred Hampton Cuba Amnesty International Professor Murder
SpaceX COO On Prospects For Starship Launcher

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

05:58 min | 2 months ago

SpaceX COO On Prospects For Starship Launcher

"The other none any value. Yeah Yeah do you have in Napa as a development partner speed you up or slow you down you think at some is some technology areas audibly they. They're they're out. I think US along in other areas. I don't WANNA say they slowed us down because we had to get a Yes for them to they. Yes right and so we had to do analysis that we work with down through the design process and through the analysis process. And then the reading. Nine Still I. I don't really want to characterized slowing US down. We ended up being extremely thorough because of the partnership without. So maybe we would applaud. Faster on Nafta not been working with US Open. Many many. They wouldn't have been successful so I'm not sure I would do things any differently. As far as it might be different technology choices like we started out with our with cre dragon regarding to come and then ended up being really really really hard. And NASA wasn't sure how they were certified that so not only wasn't technology hard would have been difficult. Nafta is more audible with parachutes. So you know they just been using them for things so we now know how to promote of Liane a rocket bobby many times in south so when we got our down now and so we'll the let's quick versus starship. Three years in we decided to pull the and not be that in sleight.

United States Nafta Napa Liane Partner Nasa
Bernie Sanders slams Joe Biden on trade before Michigan rally in Detroit

NPR News Now

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Bernie Sanders slams Joe Biden on trade before Michigan rally in Detroit

"Bernie Sanders is campaigning across Michigan. This weekend the state with the most delegates available in Tuesday's democratic primaries Quin Kleinfeld her of member station W. d. e. DT reports sanders is fighting to regain momentum. After Joe Biden Super Tuesday victories Bernie Sanders surprise win. Over Hillary Clinton in Michigan's primary four years ago jumpstarted his campaign now sanders again enters Michigan trailing arrival this time Joe Biden but sanders says working families in Michigan. Know Him and his record far better this time around. They know that I did everything I could to defeat. Disastrous trade agreements like NAFTA and Joe Biden's supported those agreements which ended up costing US millions of good paying jobs. Decimated areas like Detroit Michigan while Sanders is focusing on Michigan Biden campaigning and other states holding primaries next week and waiting until the day before the election on Tuesday to hold events

Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Michigan Quin Kleinfeld Hillary Clinton Nafta United States Detroit
Sanders says Biden should be nominee if he wins delegate plurality

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

01:05 min | 5 months ago

Sanders says Biden should be nominee if he wins delegate plurality

"Well Bernie Sanders indicates of Joe Biden has a plurality of delegate some votes lead heading into the democratic convention he'll give up his White House run in twenty sixteen he fought Hillary Clinton to the end CBS is ed o'keefe on the campaign trail this idea that we do not a movement look at the results look at who's showing up former vice president Joe Biden is calling his campaign a movement well senator Bernie Sanders acknowledges that his movement has struggled to bring up new voters I think that will change in the general election but I am gonna be honest with you we have not done as well in bringing young people put profits ahead of next week's critical primary in Michigan a state president trump won by just over ten thousand votes Sanders is highlighting his differences with Biden Michigan was decimated by a terrible terrible trade deals nafta P. anti all with China which cost our country some four million good paying jobs Joe voted for those terrible events fighting did vote for nafta but the former vice president says he believes future trade negotiations should include input from labor and environmental

Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Hillary Clinton CBS Vice President Senator Michigan China Nafta White House Ed O'keefe President Trump
Bernie Sanders campaign hatches comeback plan

All Things Considered

04:57 min | 5 months ago

Bernie Sanders campaign hatches comeback plan

"The democratic presidential contest is quickly becoming a two candidate race former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg suspended his campaign today and endorsed former vice president Joe Biden that's after Biden's strong showing last night super Tuesday Biden currently holds a delegate lead over Vermont senator Bernie Sanders who had this to say earlier today no I haven't seen the latest delegate for help but my guess is that after California's thrown into the hopper it's gonna be pretty close that we may be off by a few Biden may be off by a few but I think we go forward basically neck and neck NPR political correspondent Scott Detrow is with the Sanders campaign Inver in Burlington Vermont hi Scott A. R. F. so tell us what else Sanders said at that news conference today that we just heard a snippet of he really clarified what we've been hearing from the Sanders campaign for the last week or so and that is they are going to focus going forward on sharp critiques a former vice president Joe Biden's record particularly his long voting record in the Senate here's what Sanders said today Joe Biden is somebody I've known for many years I like Joe I think he's a very decent human being John I have a very different voting record a job when I have a very different vision for the future of this country and Joe and I are running very different campaigns and take Sanders as where he does personally like Joe Biden but he sees issues is very fair game and he is going to be criticizing Biden's track record his vote for the war in Iraq is vote for trade deals like nafta for for a bankruptcy bill that is very unpopular with large chunks of the democratic base he's going to be doing that a lot going forward and this morning the Sanders campaign announced that they are featuring these these issues in ads that they aren't going to be running soon that nafta vote on an ad that runs in Michigan and Biden's past position of wanting to rein in social security in Florida very on point topics for those two states yeah what did Sanders say today about voter turnout because for months he's been promising that he can turn out young voters infrequent voters and so far that just hasn't happened it hasn't happened at all this is something he says that every single rally and it's the big argument he makes for why he's the more electable candidate the Joe Biden he was pretty blunt about the fact that so far it has not been what he's wanted to see have we been as successful as I would hope in bringing young people and the answer is no we're making some progress but historically everybody knows that young people do not vote in the kind of numbers that older people voted I think that will change in the general election but I am gonna be honest with you we have not done as well in bring young people put process it is not easy and this is an interesting evolution to this argument before Iowa New Hampshire Nevada in particular Sanders was promising if we have the biggest turnout this primary or caucus has ever seen we will win now the argument from him and some of his his circuits as well it's coming just not until November Scott let me pay you to the Biden campaign a lot of late deciding voters broke for biting in the past several days how can this campaign keep up the momentum for the next round of states ahead it's it's hard to have fifteen point so shifts over the course of the day going forward but but certainly bite and is hoping to continue to have that energy that increased vigor that you've seen on the campaign trail in the last few weeks or so I think one thing he has going for him is is the next few sets of states to vote a Mississippi and Missouri next week those are the types of states biting could do well in Florida and Ohio after that on March seventeenth I think next week Michigan is the big showdown not in terms of delegates but the symbolism in the narrative this is one of those states that trump flip to win in twenty sixteen and Democrats need to win back to Michigan Wisconsin Pennsylvania there has been a year plus conversation about which Democrat is best positioned to win those states and Michigan is the first state which offers a real life chance of which which Democrat do do voters there want to see as the nominee as I mentioned today's big news is Mike Bloomberg dropping out and endorsing Biden what is that likely to bring to the Biden campaign beyond money which I'm sure the campaign is hoping for I think the biggest question is how quickly Bloomberg converts his campaign it's just some sort of bite in aiding super pac as much as Mike Bloomberg himself disappointed on the campaign trail he had really polished advertising that just inundated the United States of America that's something that job but it has been lacking in he's been vastly outspent by a lot of his opponents if Bloomberg is on the air quickly with ads for Biden that could make a big difference and Elizabeth Warren's team says she's assessing the path forward does she have one it's really hard to see how it's really hard to see it especially after coming in third place in her home state trailing Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders that's something that many candidates don't come back from Sanders was asked today whether he's talked to Warren he said they had a conversation earlier today he spoke very carefully when answering that question he said he's going to leave her to make up her own mind in the race if he does get out though I don't think it's a guarantee that the bulk of our supporters would go to Bernie Sanders all right NPR's Scott

Mike Bloomberg Joe Biden New York City Vice President
Designing Alexa Skills in Canada with Ben Fisher of MagicCo

Alexa in Canada

09:07 min | 5 months ago

Designing Alexa Skills in Canada with Ben Fisher of MagicCo

"You know. I'm I'm Ben Fisher and I I'm a CTO A lot of startups here in New York work. That's the attitude here in New York The technical capacity and Also did kind of the start up. Send building products but Started Magic Oh As a place for a lot of the Disaffected advertising community and technical people to To gather to do cool stuff for brands And we kind of have focused in the last four years on voice You know and it's really amazing to see you know the community and how things are how things are developing in the global nature of these devices and stuff like that. So Yeah that's that's kind of who I am. I we. You know the company's in Dumbo you know has some distributed people and I live in Dumbo as well And we're glad to be talking to you so amazing and so the the company said you've been doing voice for about four years. Is that how old the company is or the company date back prior to that now? It's the company's always four years old. It's interesting 'cause there's you know. Even two thousand sixteen early two thousand seventeen. There was interest even in Canada. You know around Alexa Google Tons of tons of interest But no one ever did anything and no one really every clunk all we had was just kind of an informative call. No-one no-one took the action. You know it was pretty bad back then but People were interested in in. You know some people who are leading edge you know some companies like Obama and stuff like that. I mean they. They were prepared to do something. It's interesting how it's become a part of our lives now Where it goes from interest actually doing something right right. And so when did you? When did you think you saw that shift when when people in Canada were started? We're becoming more when that happened from being interested to talking action. How long ago do you think that was roughly well in the? Us and people get stuff did stuff in two thousand seventeen in the US. We we started getting. Us You know serious. Reuse projects around that time ended up two thousand seventeen than two dozen eighteen. It really started picking up. And that's when we started developing a real business around this in Canada for US. At least it was really late. Two thousand eighteen that people started signing onto signing onto projects and and all over the place. So what I don't WanNa say signing on but You know th they were they were considering purchasing right. And maybe that took a little longer but That's really when we started seeing at least. Yeah that that doesn't doesn't totally surprise me because just just given the history of the fact that like Alexa and the voice technology big companies have really been in the states for about two years or so longer than Canada than that. That seems to make sense so Yeah no that's great. And so you've had a lot of experience now in terms of developing these voice applications our actions or skills. Whatever you WANNA call them depending on the platform. Can you give us just some examples of things that you've worked on? I in the states maybe just to Kinda give us an idea. The breath of the stuff. You worked on a number of talk more about some of the Canadian stuff. Oh yes sure I mean. Now we work on you know different Business models that we call them right. Some of them are running. Omni channel campaigns for brands whether using Alexa as a as a as a distribution mechanism Other companies are using it. As a you know something that's a little bit more of a product per se not really meant to be part of a campaign only and You know our client list ranges from hospital for Special Surgery Here in New York to Try Bond Yogurt to illy coffee to energy empowered companies like national grid the Air Force as a client. Now I mean there's a we work a lot of different industries. Energy Financial Services. Consumer product could healthcare. You know we have a pretty list of clients and that's one of the things we really liked here. We tell people that they like travelling like travelling and meeting different cultures because all these different organizations are very different right. I mean totally different. Some are more loose than bic. Pen Right is actually Client to you know. That's very different than like Chess S. So I mean you have to like learning about people's problems and what who their customer is and how to help them so Yeah we're pretty diverse. That's great that's great and and our and you said you're on the Omni channel Sir you're covering essentially all the major Companies or platforms. That are out there. Yep Yeah we cover You Know Samsung Alexa Google beyond that we also go into the into the TEX category What that means. Is You know chat. Bots that are connected to these voice assistance you know Kinda Kinda coexisting And we're on twelve different platforms. Something on the chat world Including China and put it we chat. So that's Kinda that's kind of an interesting because we started as a voice thing but a lot of people saw the connections there and we just kind of built that capability and have some cool technology. Additional stuff. Coming out actually. That's that's A piece of Chat Technology that that's kind of advanced. I can't really talk about it right now. But it's so so. All of our systems are becoming more integrated and and somebody really application from from just voiced other places. That's great that's great. Yeah yeah so I'm curious now. Let's let's let's talk a little bit more about Canada and I think this is a unique at this stage. Because they're they're not a lot of agencies that are really focusing on the Canadian market per se. Like like you guys are so maybe you can talk a little bit about. How did you break into the Canadian market with this and And then you know an example of something that you're doing in Canada with the skills and that sort of thing. I'd love to hear a little about that sure. So we find candidates to be a pretty robust market. I mean you know when you add up Google home. You add up the demographic makeup of Canada And the Alexa. You know who what's going on there. I mean the numbers are sure you know about this but the growth curve essentially at Canada right actually outpaces the US growth curve in terms of you know how fast Alexa Google home are being adopted. So there's a lot of Potential. There's a lot of installed devices also interesting. Is You know you have the Quebec market? That takes French. And you know everybody else's English or created English if that's I don't think I don't know if Canadian English is actually setting in terms of language but it's a set of determines location settings right But but yeah I mean It's pretty robust. The real kicker was you know working with Reebok on their global campaign when we were launching Canada and some of the some of the regulatory things around some of the more highly regulated industries wherein So I mentioned we're in financial services we're in healthcare. We're an energy and power. You know those are highly regulated industries. So when you're deploying a skill in the US for Canada there's there's actually legal differences that one has to be aware of and it's interesting because the most of this certification teams that Alexa and and google sort of Amazon and Google are also aware of those. And so you know. I was surprised that that I thought it was a little bit more closer. In terms of regulations specifically around sweepstakes right in the case of Reebok and and what kind of disclosures you have to give to that sweepstakes that's one case and there's a lot of other privacy at at and other considerations especially in banking And healthcare which are two areas that we are working on in Canada their version of HIP I think there's there's some there's some overlap with some language NAFTA but that recently changed to the US Mexico trade deal so there's a lot of regulatory considerations and highly regulated industries. And that was that was one thing that the big deal right. I mean because they won't let you deploy it could take months or something. So that's that's a blocker but feature wise you know there's some I think some features that aren't available in Canada that are available the US. But it's funny because all what we found out through data analytics and we're tracking. Who's we are giving people the option to be tracked to to to learn about who these people are so our clients can better serve them. They change where they're located right but people say they're in the US a lot of time. Ten to twelve percent of the of the Reebok. Sneaker dropped were where people actually in Canada who's who said there in the US. You know that kind of threw things off right so we had to do manual verification of of WHO? These people are aware that whether addresses actually were we were caught off guard by that and Yeah I don't I don't know exactly why I mean I guess you know. I guess it isn't a feature feed but like I can t I can speak to that but I know that there are a lot of that will really address to the to the United States just to get access to the in the US skills because we just don't have some of the actors in and some of the

Canada Alexa United States Google Reebok New York Ben Fisher Dumbo CTO Barack Obama Omni Energy Financial Services Chess Special Surgery China Quebec Air Force Mexico Amazon
Zach Burks: Adoption On The Way Through Non-Fungible Tokens

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

11:26 min | 6 months ago

Zach Burks: Adoption On The Way Through Non-Fungible Tokens

"ZAC. Books is the founder of mine table up with me today from Singapore might thank you so much being on the show. Amen Thank you. I appreciate it. I worry as we look those starving first of all your background because I know that this isn't the first thing that you've involved in the spice. When did you get in and if you could take a walk through as to what it is Brought you to this point. Yes so sorry on the nights of read that wrong of putting in the mental mental. Like you could amid stuff so it. `Bout about my background. I've been in Crypto since two thousand twelve got into Bitcoin at about five bucks. It was quite a while ago. Actually think back on it. I can't believe how long it's been And then I got. I got into software development and started working as a contract developer on Syria. Back in late. Twenty fifteen twenty sixteen And make a long story short. Basically did that for a bit and I saw This Erc seven twenty one standard. Come out and this came out along after the first. Nf she did the scene and the first NAFTA was this thing called crypto and I remember seeing these crypto punks and thinking about like. Oh that's cool. It's like a little Avatar and there were limited. There's about five hundred or some small now and you can go through pick whichever one you wanted and then claim them and about a week short and Like I found a week after it came out so there were none left that I liked that. I wanted to claim so I never thought that was the first example of a non fungible token on the botching and when I found that it piqued my interest. A little bit still fairly new. We didn't call. Non fungible tokens at that point. It was just kind of this. Avatar project Then this game came out called Crypto kitties and. I'm sure a lot of people familiar when it gets enough. Keys and Crypto kitties and funny funny enough story. I was Actually the first person to make money on Crypto kitties because at the Hackett on a day war but they came out. The idea was kind of like earth out of Day were live streaming and I was washing California and they said hey could game go to like Beta dot dot com or whatever and So I'm sitting home and I'm being a while a game on. We've never seen this before. I WanNa play SAR win. Sort OF PLAYING THE GAME. And there's only like twenty other people because you know. It was at a hacker on everyone's busy accurate and work in their own project. I was just seeing their home. Spamming the spamming over and over in Taiwan and I went to the prizes and Benny the founder. I was trying to claim my eat surprise. Who was like? Oh Man. I'm so happy Wendish. Were you out in the heck. Come down to the booth by the balloons and we'll chat. I'll shake your hand and I am in California right now and He he wasn't too excited about that because this is in Canada's or their Akhavan was and that was how he's GonNa hit the scene and that's how I really got up close and personal in a teasing from that point forward All my focus was on. Nf T- From Development to research to the ecosystem I have a paper published with the I. Tripoli on using our contracts blockchain teased out Within a supply chain for food traceability and and so since Krypton kitties really been focused our MP's and came up with the idea for miserable because that's all there was a lot of problems with impedes Mainly like you know managing those entities for example. You know if you go to your wallet with your ears. He Twenty Tokens. It's very simple for you to transfer them rides. It's made for that but The Wall it's you know at the time warp made for an keyser's only like one wall at the at collectibles on their We made a manager which leads any wall interact with their NFC's and work on most the NFC is out there as long as they're not like to custom Just like ears twenty two and that was the start of of something groups a little bit of background. So you've been around I mean that's that's remarkable blind. Bitcoin BECCA five dollars. We'll donahue you bought a bunch beheld. Yeah well unfortunately of course you know back when it was five dollars. No-one held it. We bought it to to spend it. Yes I spent a lot apply spent about About one hundred. Fifty Bitcoin Buying things that I probably shouldn't have and looking back on that now thinking somewhere around three four seven million dollars about seven hundred fifty thousand dollars And slapped my head thinking wow. I can't believe I've spent that much twenty on the stupid things I've thought but I kept a bit and it's a it's been good. I've been able to live and work on my own projects. I haven't had a job for quite a few years now and So it's been next. Well well done so. Let's back into that and if you will because I'm hearing a lot more about it than an inmate. I mean I think there was the travis and JAL from the bag. Crypt type PODCAST. We're also talking about that recently and suggesting that it was going to be somewhat of a breakthrough and a real sort of rubber hitting the road for twenty twenty. Being non fungible Tokens It seems to be getting a lot of momentum from a lot of people respect. So can you tell me why? So many people talking about non fungible tokens in. And why it's going to be something that's used and something. That trump is going to benefit table and the spice and who will benefit from out so our question. But what is the tree breakthrough here using Non fungible titans. What is it that we're looking at? Yeah and you know back podcast. A great example. I was actually just on a call with Joel yesterday. talk with him about his. Nfc's and seeing how we can help them out and the thing is is this why. It's got the potential to be such a breakthrough adoption building kind of token devices because their use cases for inept. Keys are so massive. It can go from something like a ticket or proof of listening to your podcast. You know for example in this podcast you can say hey go to this. Lincoln claim I N T and if you have you know ten of those in a tease from ten different podcast. I'll give you a free a free class or free less than or access to my course an fifty and accusing him. They'll give you free access to the conference so speaking out or whatnot and so that's just one example of how you take something and it can be modified and changed to fit almost any use case from games to attendance to financial markets Inept he is can be used to be able to take real estate We've seen real estate be used quite a bit within a piece where You know you take. A House is represented in shares in the. House are keys because you gotta you gotTa remember without the difference between the NFC. In years she twenty is that in your she twenty. I can send you have. I can send you a quarter. I can do zero point two size of of any token but with an years. Seven twenty one an nf. Chea- it's non hundred meaning one of the things that can't be divided right so if you think of a trading card like Pokemon or baseball card. I can't give you half of that car. I can't rip it in half and give you half that right if you're thinking of a Cat. I can't give you half of my cat. I can only give you my cat right and this is really cool off of your capital. Absolutely I guess yeah. I would be a very good cat owner. So the thing is is is. This gives us this new kind of functionality where you can take something like shares in a company and you can create you know whether it be financial shares for an actual company or whether it's shares in real estate or whether you do something like say token izing your files and this is what we're working on right now is to allow people to create a file and then have represented on the blockchain. And the reason we do this because you create a cycle of continuous engagement for something that used to be like one time and so we go back to the example of your podcasts by giving. Nfc Insane if you collect Tennessee's Will give you a coupon or we'll give you a discount your free. Something Is Is incentivizing engagement. Where normally it's very hard to get engaged for listeners? Podcasts or for say celine some thoughts or graphic design work Normally people by listen to purchase it and they never go back they never interact with the seller. The podcast stir anyb- but by having enough teas you get dying gauge and this increases the the seller or the podcast persons customer engagement rate and this also increases their revenue increases their profits and ashes one example. It's it's literally endless of the use cases for NFPA's I think one of the most interesting would be you know something like identity or food traceability right so an NF key could also be passed. Or now I don't know if you should necessarily your passport on the blockchain because the public and everyone would be able to see your passport if there was a way to include privacy into this. Nafta then it could be used from like a government agency to issue some sort of identity documentation or could be used to issue a permit saying that you are able to do something or the D. to your house or your driver's license and all of these use cases are really fast. That's why died crypto Joel and Travis. They think the two thousand twenty is going to be the year of the tea and you know we. That's not necessarily new right. Twenty nineteen first of the year of teas. And that's something that mental is working on is. We're we're trying to find these problems that we see in. Why enough keys having gained mass adoption yet? Now we're trying to address. These problems raped. One of the things is Kinda complicated. People think non fungible and make. I'm never I never heard that word until you know until I found the nonfederal tokens and then I had to learn about what that is. Oh a dollar it's fungible You know a a beer bottle. That's not fungible And so that's you know some part of it but the other part of it is the complications of if if you're trying to do a video game item and you're targeting video game players these people they don't. They don't have crypto wallets. They don't WanNA learn about blockchain they don't WanNa know about immutability and how transaction worse they just they just want their scan. It just went. They're done you know they just all whenever I and these are some of the problems that were for example when our when our marketplace Abou- everything will be able to be done with a credit card. If you've never had big corner a theorem and you don't have a wall. It won't

NFC Founder California Joel Travis Singapore Zac. Books Baseball Syria Developer Bitcoin I. Tripoli Hackett Canada Donahue Taiwan Keyser Lincoln
A Decade Of Adventures With Professional Volleyball Player Marisa Field

9INE POINT Started With A Dream Podcast w/ Jacolby Gilliam

09:21 min | 6 months ago

A Decade Of Adventures With Professional Volleyball Player Marisa Field

"Though. Morita the question of when it comes on when you're younger than athlete will. Your bigger during the goal is to achieve. Actually I was just thinking about this. I used to have this like. I don't know way back when when you had like. Msn Messenger thing or ICQ like those instant messaging things on your computer like my little bio thing was like pro volleyballer end like it was kind of a joke. 'cause like I didn't even know what that meant at the time. Just like yeah. That sounds good. Like Appropriately but had no idea like how it was going to get there what that bed so I guess I was always like kind of an idea in the head but actually was kind of a nerd in high school actually was planning to be a chemist I went to university with the intention of that and volleyball took over my life so okay so when you say you're going to be him if like how do you feel that working out like Nafta type stuff like why can't we be wasn't entirely sure but I just chemistry high school. I started my first year at college in my hometown. Action with the intention doing or years volleyball but graduating ending chemistry after the whole course life change. That's awesome so so you had your MFN bio theme Pro Volleyball Claire. So when you wrote that in life started happening had you start thin are i. How can I make this reality? Yeah I think Actually like I was just trying to remember when I started playing volleyball. I think I was about while which is crazy now to think about says while is actually been two decades now. I've been playing volleyball thirty. Two ounce so yeah. It's Kinda crazy but I think the starting kind of jump off point for me was when I made team be see from. Abc and I made that provincial team when I was like or teen I think and Is your calling you very raw. Was the word they used for Terrible but I jumped really high back then. I guess I'd potential so they took me and I didn't interview That year the year after something for them I think it had something like one day. I WANNA wear like a maple leafs on my back in fourteen candidate ahead said that Ben in nearly no like what it took to get there but eventually became a path so dover I know there's Tony was the have the application you know. They say. I want to be in Olympia and I WANNA don't own and do all these things. People atoms dry. Yeah like you can't do that to. How did you keep your mind? That like may laugh at my drain on a chase them all like originally when I started playing volleyball. I didn't even really WANNA play Bible like I started dance when I was like three years old. So I dance all the way up until the end of my high school. And my mom had kinda like encourage Mir Gently pushed me to play volleyball and at the time like basketball. More which is binding workers like ended up deciding basketball's too much running for me so I ended up. I was doing all three things. That was dancing. Anos playing volleyball and basketball into high school and then I can window basketball and then faced out dance. Bowling Ball's seemed like a better future option to go with so I started college. I graduated sixteen so a super young and I had offers to go to other schools like in the states and other Kadian universities ended up wanting to just stay home and I had really good the program at it was actually called back in but it's the UCLA now University of British Columbia Okanagan so that was in Colona and the coach was Steve. Manual was one of my mentor coaches still to this day. He kind of had a big role to play in my progression volleyball. So after my first year there recruited to go to U B C in Vancouver with Doug Rhymer in his team and it was kind of scary. Move to consider and I went to a two years with Steve Cohen than ended up making a transfer to UC Vancouver in coober into the it's called CIS fact then it's like all changed Old Sport now like a Canadian University system so I ended up going there my third year and after my first year there. I actually got invited to try out for the national team so just kind of like crazy because after my first year. Ub See a lot of the players on ABC. Were playing on the national team or not was. Kinda like became more of a realistic goal. I guess you'd say and I was like you know maybe after a couple more years like chance tryout and it was just kind of a really strange process how I ended up getting a tryout and then ended up making it and as when I was nineteen and so things just took off from there. Wow so he graduated at fifteen Lloyd. just win for team into transitioning to the next level. Yeah so like when I started I was still kind of didn't really have the idea like my first year. I was like okay. I'm going to chemistry and whatever tall Canadian still pretty nerdy. Still Pretty that. I think when I got recruited to go to the CIS and go play for a UPC IN VANCOUVER. That was kind of like okay. Maybe things can kind of progressing go ahead and they gotta also the gentle nudge from my coach. There Steve Manual. That you know you can stay here but basically I'm kicking out because I want you to go play at the higher level and Sierra potential so that was kind of Mike Start off point in the program with Doug Rhymer Jesse Knight was coach at the time and they really Hannah propelled my career in and getting me onto the national team and then I ended up finishing up two more years with. Ub See we won two national championships back to back. Actually and then they went onto win for more after I graduated in a row but Selena was kind of the start of my national team career when I was nineteen and then just retired from that like a year ago. So I'm relying on your La- calendar something you said if you ride a story about your journey it will be. I believe instead a decade of venture. But when you when you wrote that in your mind what we've thinking it's just kind of funny actually because I saw graduated from U B C in two thousand nine and then a number of the national team and then went to play pro for my first season abroad. Enso's like the two thousand nine going into two thousand. Ten was my first year in Europe. I was in Spain and the Canary Islands with my teammates Page and it was just like my funniest stories of life and pro. Come from this season it was just like so ridiculous in so many ways home at Christmas. Like almost didn't come back but when back and finish it out and yeah just finding those kind of the start of my career so the last decade now as I go back and forth on wrapping up in this decade. But yet it's just been. I've been all over Europe late in the Philippines. It's been ten years eleven years with team Canada and yet it's just been a lot of adventures all over the world so I think that sums it up for me your password. Kobe just ridiculous. I've had to in that time. Also pretty full of awesome so going back to the volleyball in making the kind of play with higher compensation had you again was an adjustment to your mentality how you approached the game or the always the same I think definitely I mean developed. I think even from kind of a young age I had like sort of athletic discipline instilled into me. If you from LIKE DANCE. Three in that was like a very disciplined Pity so I think I just always kind of had that. I think that's just part of my character. Personality is kind of like the athlete mindset but definitely like as I progressed higher up in levels that kind of became more of like my dreams once I made team Canada became okay analysis become an Olympian and so that was the focus and that sort of worked towards a win to two Olympic qualifiers A. Twenty twelve in two thousand sixteen. Very narrowly missed the twenty. Sixteen qualification end. So that was pretty heartbreaking but that was kind of the goal that was like why played volleyball was always to hopefully get to the Olympics. One day and that was Kinda what fueled him what. Push me through a lot of difficult times for sure and persevered through a lot of things and a lot of crazy seasons abroad in Europe pro. And and all that but Yeah I think that was always. My dream unfortunately didn't happen but had a lot of a lot of adventures along the way trying to get

Volleyball Europe Vancouver ABC Basketball Doug Rhymer Canada Chemistry High School Morita Selena Steve Manual Olympia BEN Mir Gently Bowling Ball Steve Cohen Colona
Managing Stress with Adaptiv Featuring Dr. Marissa Heisel

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

08:09 min | 6 months ago

Managing Stress with Adaptiv Featuring Dr. Marissa Heisel

"Today. We're excited to sit down with Dr Morris Heisel a chiropractor era proctor and a midwife to talk to her about using adapted to manage stress versa. Thank you so much for taking the time to sit down with us and talk about this really important topic. I know this is something that a lot of people deal with in their everyday life and we WANNA make sure that we're giving them the best resources that we can to help them manage this this summer. So why is managing stress so important first of all thank you so much for having me on. This has been a topic of huge importance to me in my professional life long before I even was new of dough. Tara was Indo Tara. You know the reality is that about two hundred sixty four million people. In North America America experienced stress on a regular basis. We know that stress Cortisol levels in our body rise. That's something that I saw regularly. Even even in my chiropractic practice I had left midwifery and gone back to Chiropractic and I was doing testing of patients and I and I had a lot of pregnant women in my practice who were showing incredibly significant signs of stress and when I dug into that a little bit one of the things that I learned is when women are extremely stressed during pregnancy they tend to give birth to children with a lower threshold for stress. meaning that it takes far less to stress those children out and at the same time I was is as I was seeing those women. I was also seeing children from a very young age. Some fairly a significant I would say symptoms and signs of being stressed even at the age of three and six and definitely once they were in school and so even before. I was Indo Tara. I was really thinking about how we can go about addressing these things because the impact so many people so significantly and that is incredible. It's really impacting in every aspect of your life every aspect of your body and what kind of effect does that have on our day to day lives as we go throughout the day. What kind of effects are we seeing being? We're seeing things like impatience avoidance procrastination. It's constant worrying what would be called catastrophes and even and what we really want to see is an adaptability based on the needs of that moment and that day so if something feels stressful we would respond to it appropriately in a healthy way and then be able to to relax and settle back down again. But in a stressed brain we really don't see that adaptability we start to see an inability ability almost to shift back into relaxation. And that definitely is something that I want to avoid. I think everyone wants to avoid. We want to have less stress. We WanNA avoid those uncomfortable. Consequences that come with stress. Those impairments that we can encounter when we have a lot of stress going on. I know one of the things that a lot of people worry about is finding natural solutions to these things. We don't WANNA add more toxins indoor body or more strain on our body by introducing unnatural solutions. So what are some natural ways we we can go about reducing stress. They are quite a few things that we can do. I mean it starts with even a little bit of physical fitness or exercise in a day and by that. I don't mean you know having to run a marathon having to go to the gym even but even walking can be extremely helpful getting back out it into nature into the the healing nature of the healing ager box you understand echoed side rounding ourselves being close to through the trees. All of that will help any form of meditation. And we're North American unless we're in certain cultures. Perhaps we're not familiar with meditation taste or it feels really challenging but wasn't really simple way into that even is breath. Follwing are breath and it doesn't have to be anything fancy it can literally be closing our eyes and breathing in slowly and breathing out slowly and really rounding ourselves feeling our feet on the floor. Our hands in our laps laps dropping our energy down in our bodies because one of the things that happens when we're stress is if you could visualize stress it would almost like a whirlwind going on in somebody's head and we need to remember that we have a body in those and breath is one of the things that really helps us with that. You know interestingly even nutrition plays plays a huge role in this there was a massive connection between gut health and brain health and if we are eating really poorly choosing a lot of processed food eating a lot of sugar. We're not going to be affecting good healthy brain chemistry in the way that we can be and so I would say getting back back to that more natural lifestyle now. One of the challenges with that though is when we're feeling really stress those things that I just described that sound like they should be simple. Polk do not feel simple all that feels really challenging the thought of getting outdoors and getting outdoors in the snow. Somebody would be like. It's too cold or Ryan trying to breathe when you're feeling super stressed is one of the things that becomes even more stressful for people. And they don't understand that if they can just stick with it for thirty a seconds it starts to shift that brainwave pattern that they're in it starts to shift that state of alarm that were in and we start to be able to get into shaft our brain chemistry and settled down but that is where we can bring in a water ridley beautiful solutions to help us. When we're we're in such a stress state that even doing simple things feels like it's too challenging? I love that point that you brought up of sometimes even these simple things face. Lisa like an insurmountable mountain and we just don't even have the energy or the capacity to do those simple things even though we know they might help us. So Oh shifting then into the essential oil side of it doe Tara has created this new adaptive line that they released last year. So what does the adoptive line do to help promote relaxation. So what I know about. His goal and developing adopted was that it was to provide tools for people to be able to manage the stress in in their lives in the moment that they're experiencing it. So it's it's when we're in that state bringing hint NAFTA USING IT opening a bottle applying it jusque ask smelling. It even helps us in that moment that were that were experiencing with stress so that we can the word use pivot so that we can hit it in that moment moment and find the tiny little opening or the space that we need in order to be able to stop to regroup to breathe to to settle into our bodies. He's again and shift out of that. State immediately. Adapted was really developed to help support our ability to return to calm and balanced state when we've been thrown off-course adaptive provides us with that that complementary or synergistic palate between both the oil blend and the capsules that we can and shoes from to really support us in a way that we most need to be supported. And you're absolutely right and like you mentioned with the adoptive line. There is the oil blend. There's the the touch roller for topical application. And there are the capsules that you can take internally which gives it a lot of that versatility and makes it work for everyone in the way that they we need mercy. Can you tell us a little bit about the oils. That are in the adaptive blend of course so adoptive oil blend has a number of really a beautiful oils in it. It's made up of wild orange which we know as that uplifting joyous oil lavender which we all know is a we know what is a comming oil copay which has such profound effect spearmint which is also uplifting Magnolia at which which I love to think of as a really hurt centered blend rosemary. NEURONAL E-I and sweet gum which is new to Tara and the beauty of all of those voices that some of them are uplifting being and some of them are coming but it helps to support. Imbalance is really whichever way that we need

Tara Indo Tara Dr Morris Heisel North America Cortisol Polk Ryan Lisa
Iowa caucuses results are in but chaos and confusion reign as no clear winner emerges

The News & Why It Matters

09:33 min | 6 months ago

Iowa caucuses results are in but chaos and confusion reign as no clear winner emerges

"AP has declared officially after so many days of waiting eating That there is no winner. They are unable to declare a winner of Iowa Democratic caucuses because of irregularities in this year's process and the tight emergent between Pete Buddha judge and Bernie Sanders now. This comes after The Democrat National Committee Chair. Tom Perez has already dad. We need to re canvass. We need to go back and count all you know all of the paper Th th the paper trail everything because it's too close to call. There are too many questions we gotta start over Pat What are your thoughts on this tobacco. I think we've already left behind. Have we got New Hampshire coming up in a couple of days as we might as well. Just forget it this year. Yeah I mean nobody's going to really be able to have the bragging rights here because They can both claim victory. Sort of Bernie is already saying he won the initial Vote and Buda judge one the one after that and and it's kind of like I think it was two thousand twelve with Rick Santorum where we found out a week later right that he won when they thought it was. Who Was it Romney or they thought somebody else one yeah and it turned turned out? Sanatorium did and so he never really got the credit for that I mean he never really got any momentum going or anything for that because it was too late this. It's going to be as well. I think we're wins. Josh Pat points out you know. Historically the person who wins does get that momentum going into the New Hampshire voting and no one's going to have that now. How do you see that playing out yet? So need silver at five. Thirty eight had a pretty good column on Tuesday the night after this total crap show unfolded where he basically. We said that. Even if Iowa does get you know what together. It's never going to be too little too late. It's already too late because what happens. Is the boost. You get head. Is You go on national television that night and you're able to declare victory as someone who was very active in the Cruz campaign. Two Thousand Sixteen. I remember Ted's victory speech in Iowa very well and he got a bump out obviously didn't take them all the way but it did help so no candidate is going to be able to claim that this year and I think there are serious questions about the Avocados process going forward. I mean I'm actually longtime defender tender of it. I happen to like the caucus process. I participated in and I to me. It kind of embodies all that Alexis de Tocqueville famously looked at America everyone kind of game together and like like they're doing their civic duty in a very fundamental level. It says it's much more engaging process and the privacy of a ballot box clicking lever so I'm long time defender but having said add that if the Iowa Democratic party can literally not tabulate the votes to give us what the party apparatus needs. I think there are very serious questions but I will going forward. So whoever ends up the winner and perhaps we'll never know. It seems to me quite possible. It will be the last winner but I will caucus what do you think trial in. Good clear even at we don't know winter. The the clear loser was Joe Biden. Who by all accounts came into distance? fourth-place talk about the former vice president of the United States coming in Pretty low in an in a state that he he should have carried or at least come into the top two and we were just talking a little bit earlier that there has never been a nominee of of either party Who has placed below second place in both Iowa and The caucus in the New Hampshire primary. So if Joe Biden doesn't get his act together and at least place in the top two Next week in New Hampshire. There's really no precedent for him to become the the party's nominee. I mean how incredible would that be that. There's been all all this talk about Joe Biden and we could be looking at him dropping out within a week or two. He's done I mean I do a weekly election. Newsletter for the daily wire comes out Thursday's you can describe bribe. LP DUCK LP dot daily wire dot com slash. Get election wire so I said Yeah. I'll talk to folks about. Yeah but I mean I guess I basically said stick a fork in Joe Biden. He's done I don't see it at this moment. He's fourth place in Iowa. He's not going to get any better in New Hampshire that so-called firewall in South Carolina which the the campaigns been touting for months maybe a year on. Then it's already dissipating. He's four or five points. The most recent poll there if he goes fourth-place in Iowa third or fourth New Hampshire. He's probably not GonNa Win Nevada because again it's a caucus state caucus eight does not play well to his campaign apparatus. He's going to go over three in the first three. That firewall Julia Florida already saying he's not he's he doesn't have a very good apparatus in Nevada. He doesn't have have a good organization on the ground there and he's not looking good right now. Now we obviously see judge with a little bit of momentum going into New Hampshire sure You know let's let's pretend for a second that's already played out. Buddha judge gets the gets this boost and suddenly Buddha judge is the person that we're looking got running against trump in the general just UC. That is that going to be a problem for trump. Do you think or do you think trump could handle it partly I I do not. They blew judges a particularly scary general election for trump I actually think Bernie Sanders. Despite being as radical as he is a more formidable generally Bernie Sanders and trump. Have this weird crossover appeal read. They're both kind of burn it. All down anti-establishment counter cultural in their own unique sense figures. I think they actually she probably a appeal to a lot of these similar. kind of rust belt's More antitrade Anti Nafta style voters would adjudge. There's just so much material for trump come to work with their and he's so young he's so inexperienced. I mean a lot of you are these conspiracy theories that he's like a CIA agent. It's kind of sketchy. We don't really know exactly what he was doing. There's just like he's too USA by happy but he's what he's thirty seven years. Old Trump could torture in the debate. I think he's the mediocre mayor of a town one-seventh the size is of your average congressional districts I I mean E it's not serious I was telling somebody from Miami. Yesterday I was making like a reference in terms of like how how big South Bend is compared to like some of the small municipality down there and it's just really ridiculous and I I totally agree with Josh. Not only does does Bernie Sanders. Had I think the strange crossover appeal. I also think he can activate people who otherwise don't vote just bring a lot of people out of the woodwork to show up to vote so I think I think I think president trump is in a very strong position heading into November. But it's going to be very interesting to see what Democrats do you at the convention because it would. There's no clear front runner. I don't think that the powers that be. You're convinced that Buddha judges is strong and the clearly do not like Bernie Sanders so we may. We may be going into broke. Invention Pat. Do you just to play. Devil's advocate Josh. Do you agree with Josh. That Bernie would be formidable candidate against against trump. Because it's because the just put it out there you know. I agree with what you're saying that they kind of have this same anti-establishment feel but it's so hard to vote for for someone like Bernie wants US radical change people's lives are good right now. You know you have the economy that trump touted during the state of the Union. You people are working on It seems so unlikely to me that people would say yeah. Let's change everything. Let's burn down when it's working for the majority of two and especially since Bernie as a socialist list. My hope is that this is still America and we're not quite there yet. Another young people who were there that think socialism might be a great alternative to capitalism. Something I think this shows the greatest difference you can possibly show going into an election a guy who's overseeing a great economy for for four years and who is a hardcore hardcore capitalist and a socialist curmudgeon. WHO's seventy eight years old? I mean I think that's a great economy That that trump could exploit whereas does with Buddha judge who I don't think is that strong either And it seems like you don't go from South Bend Indiana mayor to President of the United States. Although there was a country where can happen. It's here thank you. Don't go from reality. Show host president if that happened but Budi judge has has one other thing going for him and that's identity politics and you've got to be a little bit careful with him because of what you say and trump isn't careful and he could run into trouble I think. Yeah I mean my concern with with with Buddha judges his his youth and I think he could definitely use that to his advantage. But it is as far as Bernie and socialism. I mean like Josh like Josh Nine you as well like we were born in in in an era where like the Cold War is like a distant memory the most people of Dr Generation. Wow we have no recollection of what socialism even is the here it. There's like some scary S. word but they don't exactly know what it means. They don't remember the bread lines in the former Soviet Union or or the Eastern Bloc states countries and and they're not learning it at school either so when you call someone a socialist. They'll think. Oh Yeah it's like the Norway pavilion at Epcot They're completely disconnected from it. So have to be the baby. Maybe boomers who understand that and don't vote for for Bernie Sanders hopefully still will we like the the people have educated on it. Yeah

Bernie Sanders New Hampshire Iowa Donald Trump United States Pete Buddha Joe Biden Josh Iowa Democratic Party Tom Perez President Trump Josh Pat America Rick Santorum Alexis De Tocqueville Soviet Union Buda Romney CIA
Predicting the 2020 Oscars The Big Picture

The Big Picture

11:28 min | 6 months ago

Predicting the 2020 Oscars The Big Picture

"The time has come to predict the Ninety First Academy Awards. Amanda how are you feeling about this. I feel terrible as always I just. It's being wrong in public. It's my number one least least favorite thing. It's even worse than being wrong in private. We will closely tally. All of your failures on Oscar night. Because I'll be tweeting at you directly every time you get a choice wrong and then we'll also be rehashing. Those wrong choices here on the big picture live immediately. After the telecast which. I'm really excited about on Sunday night but before that we do you have to We have to pay it to the prediction. Gods and we're GonNa go through all twenty four categories here. Yes we are now. I'd like to preface that by saying as I worm my way through the back nine of illness. My voice may go at any moment here. In which case you're GONNA have to really carry the load cliff booth style okay. I was going to say that. That's just a good summation of Oscar season and at some point to talk myself out and officer does flailing filing in the dark possibly in silence. We're we're we're just trying to get to the finish line. I am hopeful that this will not be an immensely boring. podcast about predicting the Oscars because the Oscars may be boring. I will say this is by far far the easiest year in the history of my life predicting these awards okay. You know what. It's nice that you have confidence does not this and in life. Yes it is now that means okay. That means I couldn't logically see making any other choice that doesn't mean I feel that I am right okay about I guess I feel feel the same way. There were more categories that I could kind of fill in but I there are still so many to get wrong. It's just an opportunity to get things wrong. I can't had over emphasized how much I hate that. Feeling when you would finish an exam in ninth grade at the end of it when you and your classmates your little amend etes would would gather route and chat at the at the cafeteria table would you say. Would you be the person who would say. Oh my God I failed so bad. I didn't know anything. I failed. No okay okay no because I find that obnoxious and also because I had to have like my personal confidence that I was still going to defeat all of them. Were you sitting alone like a sociopath at the cafeteria table. No okay. I had some friends but I don't know we just talked about cross country or something. Well that sounds riveting okay. Let's go back to the Academy Awards. which which is the reason for this podcast? We're GONNA start at the beginning and at the place that we sort of blasphemed earlier on the show which is with shorts. I thought we were respectful. I I want people to go back. And listen and hear what we were saying which is not that they should be cut from the show and not that shorts aren't deserving but it is a different French exercise and I just think the it was interesting to try to get into the mind of what these winners would be because I think you're evaluating on different terms because it's a different type of film so let's just make a separate thing for the shorts and let everybody have their moment philosophically I agree. It's one of the few things about the sort of workaday nature of the Oscars that you and I ultimately agree on. There are three different categories for the shorts. There is best documentary short subject. Best Live Action Short film and Best Animated. We'll start with best documentary short subject. A very few people have seen these movies. I've seen some of them. I'm not going to pretend like I've seen all fifteen. Nominees Germany's shorts category. I just haven't I haven't had the time and I'm a bad person. I have had her but I have seen some of them I've seen some of them as well feel solid about. My choices will run through the the nominees for this first category in the absence by using John and Gary Byung Cam learning to skateboard in a war zone by Carol dicing her life overtakes me by Christine Samuelson. And John. Hatice Saint Louis Superman by Sri Mantra and sign ECON and walk run cha-cha by Lord. I think the overwhelming favorite favored in categories learning to skateboard in a war zone. As my pick that is awesome attack we can move on directly from there. Okay well I just don't think we should really make an attempt to talk about the quality control of these categories stories because we're just not the experts if you expertise are actually a ton of great pieces. I was reading some stuff on wire this week. About which of these shorts are serving which are not. There's a lot of great writing about the shorts. We respect the filmmakers acres. who made the shorts? It's not Medi Best Live Action Short Film Brotherhood by Mariam. Jabbour Nafta football club by the neighbors burs wooden window by Marshall Curry Saria by Bryan Buckley or sister by Delfin Gerard. I'm going with the neighbors Wendo. I want with Brotherhood. Okay that is the that's the oddsmakers favorite Brotherhood is. Yes yes so do you. Is there a reason why you you may may change. Because the neighbor's window is is the oddsmakers like upset favorite. What is that called? When it's the there's a favorite and then the underdog I guess so spoiler well in a group of five I was wondering anyway? It's number two and I think it's been in the conversation it's and it is accessible and and I just really do feel like especially people who are voting on these are sometimes just clicking through and being like oh I guess like this one I like to football club too and I feel like that has a chance I wouldn't wouldn't rule that out yet We'll have to wait and see. The oddsmakers are usually right in the shorts categories but it can't be guaranteed because these are highly unpredictable predictable because unlike a lot of the other words. We'll talk about here. There are not a lot of guild awards that predict these words. This is really the only three categories in which we have no no data to present ahead of what you know sort of what is leading the race. What is leading the charge? So we're flying blind quite a bit. which part of the reason why we're not gonNA spend too much time analyzing final category Gorriak shorts animated short To Sarah by Doria Kusturica hair. Love Matthew. Cherry Kit Bowl by Rosanna Sullivan memorable memorable by Bruno. Colette sister by CK Song Hair. Love is far and away. The favourite yes in this category. Matthew Cherry is very active twitter user. A lot of people know oh him used to work for Jordan Peele and monkey productions is a very short. I will be surprised this one out of all three. I would be the most surprised if it didn't win. I also picked love and it made me cry and under four minutes very effective I two can respond to animated films. Wow Yeah Erica. An incredible transition to our next category best animated animated feature the nominees are how to train your dragon the hidden world. I lost my body clause missing link and toy story for what did you go with. This was a last minute change and I. I don't know whether I should admit this. And the podcast bobby. Cut this if I'm breaking a Balazs but I haven't been advising a close best friend of mine on possible bets possible upsets and close friend. Yeah no it's it's a friend. The you know a friend who listens to the podcast and identified this category. I did go toy story for because I'm trying not to over. Think things but it does seem like it seems like there could be several no spoilers. Actually there's a lot of arrows pointing at clause right now. Yeah clause just won a BAFTA clause one Annie Award Clauses clearly admired tired. Mommy animating filmmaking community I don't WanNa Toy Story. Movies went to movies. Come out. That was kind of my reasoning toy story. Three was nominated for best picture which feels like a thousand years ago but this is truly one of the most storied movie franchises ever. This sounds like a silly thing to say about a toy story movie but it is a fact there have and four films are hugely successful. The characters are beloved ingrained in popular culture. And I genuinely think toy story. Four is very very very good animated film and might might mark the end of a certain period of Pixar because not just the machinations that have happened over the years with Disney but obviously all of the sort of incredibly fraught stuff. That's happened with John. LASSETER over the years in the development stage for these movies. It's just if you look at the Pixar movies that are coming There are a lot of new properties and there are a lot of new voices that are getting to make those movies toy story. Four is old school tried and true early. Two Thousand Steve Jobs Era Pixar. That's where it comes from and and I think they're going to recognize that we could be wrong. We're GONNA find out we're both going to a story for best documentary feature the nominees. Are American factory. The Cave you've the edge of democracy foursome and honey land. What did you choose? I chose American factory as that. I'm not feeling confident. I'm not either but I wanted to die on this hill because I love this film. We gave this film best picture we really did Alternate Oscars about that this morning and I was so happy. What a lovely little title space? That was where we just got to talk about the things we liked terrifically. Well made movie. I think All of the movies in this category are are well-made. I shouldn't be surprised by how overwhelmingly serious every film is in this category every year and how issues oriented a lot of these films are it's been interesting to see. I thought when the nominations were announced honeywood play spoiler spoiler the fact that it has representation in this category and also in the next category. We're GONNA talk about. It's just unusual. That's never happened before. And so that shows a lot of support for that movie. I thought that would play spoiler over the last couple of months. Foam seems to be gaining steam for some just one at the Baptist over the weekend. We'll have to wait and see my my choices also American factory. This is part of what I mean here about saying. This was an easy choice to make because it seems like a logical choice. It's an American story. Also International Scott Got Barack Obama's thumbprint on it which I think is key weirdly meaningful. You know we. We never talked about Kobe. Bryant's passing on the show and I don't think there's a ton of reason to but obviously. Kobe was an Oscar winner. And you know some people love his film but it was a lot easier to understand his film in the purposes of his film that won best animated short. I think it's called your basketball because this was connected to Kobe. Bryant and I think people will actually look at American factory and think of Barack Obama and correlate in the same way like that is how this business works in many ways. So I'm going American factory if you told me Any of these films were GonNa win. I genuinely would not be suppressed. Don't don't bet on this category advice this category also just the nominations itself were a bit of surprise is because Apollo eleven which had been so dominant at so many awards coming up to the nominations is not included. One Nation was also in the mix and is not included so it could go a lot of different ways and I guess my strategy throughout is has been to play it safe to go with the most obvious choice and that's important because it's been like a pretty obvious yes award season thus far but we could easily be wrong. The Oscars always has a couple of surprises as it always does now. I would prefer if those surprises happened in some of the later categories and then some of the earlier categories for the sake of national entry but in all likelihood this year they're going to come in categories like this let's go to best international feature a category will not have any surprises whatsoever. The five nominees are Corpus. Christi Honey Land Les Miserables Painting Glory Parasite Yes parasite will win this award. Award parasite is a winner. This is the not the last time. We'll talk about parasite on this podcast. We can continue to go forward great visual effects. This is the category that I like to call. Sean doesn't know anything I think I get this wrong every year. That's because you always pick marvel movies and they've never WANNA love moral. Yeah congratulations not not Without some questioning questions some of their choices and frankly their visual effects are sometimes not. I've never good

Oscars John Barack Obama Pixar Ninety First Academy Amanda Kobe Jordan Peele Bryant Germany Brotherhood Officer Academy Awards. Louis Superman Twitter Matthew Cherry Football Sean Basketball Disney
Trump Signs Trade Deal With Canada and Mexico

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:28 sec | 6 months ago

Trump Signs Trade Deal With Canada and Mexico

"Big ceremony yesterday at the White House says president trump signed the U. S. Mexico Canada trade deal replacing nafta which president trump called probably the worst trade deal I want to thank everybody for coming coming to the White House so this very momentous historic a joyous occasion it's been a long time everybody said this was a deal that could not be done do complicated too big couldn't be done we got it done the president held a campaign rally tonight at Drake University in des Moines

White House Donald Trump Nafta President Trump Drake University U. S. Mexico Canada Des Moines
Trump signs USMCA trade deal to replace 'nightmare NAFTA'

AP 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 6 months ago

Trump signs USMCA trade deal to replace 'nightmare NAFTA'

"President trump signs a new trade deal with Canada Mexico finally ending the nafta nightmare and signing into law the brand new U. S. Mexico Canada agreement trade experts say the agreement along with the first phase of the trade deal with China will ease trade sign to the sanctions on the country this is a P.

Canada Mexico China President Trump U. S. Mexico Canada
Trump Signs Trade Deal With Canada and Mexico

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

Trump Signs Trade Deal With Canada and Mexico

"Tonight as a candidate president trump regularly slammed the north American free trade agreement or nafta calling it one of the worst trade deals ever made any plans to negotiate a better one if he was elected resident today the president delivered on that campaign promise by signing the U. S. Mexico Canada trade agreement we're finally ending the nafta nightmare and signing into law the brand new U. S. Mexico Canada agreement very special very very special the White House only invited at Republicans to the event even though Democrats allowed the bipartisan effort to move

Nafta President Trump White House U. S. Mexico Canada
"nafta" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:06 min | 8 months ago

"nafta" Discussed on PRI's The World

"The new Nafta deal is done and being welcomed as a win win win really the US rush is it exporting US goods. Mexico isn't exporting goods. Candidates and exploited Canadian goods were exporting goods. Gives the thing about the big trade deal we also known as the US MCA. We don't really know yet how different it is from the old Nafta Air. Lots the bad things that were originally NAFTA STOLNIS deal. The big question is is it better enough to try and stop the damage also in Madrid this week. Climate activists want to know who's taken the lead now that the US is not the EU China cooperation in this context. Because more important I'm Marco Werman those stories and more today. You're on the world I'm Marco Marco Werman. This is the world it took some time but the deal got done Nafta two point Oh also known as the US MCA officials from the US. Canada and Mexico met to finalize a deal in Mexico City where US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer described it. This way. The resolved I think is the best trade agreement agreement in history together. All of our teams did this. And it's something that's going to bake North America richer. It's going to make America. Richard is GonNa make Canada richer. And it's going to make Mexico richer. The deal still has to be passed by legislators all three countries but what does the US MCA a change from. The Old Nafta will have used from all three partners to the deal starting here in the. US Lori Wallace is with Public Citizen and Consumer Advocacy Group in Washington. She gave me her. Take on. Who Wins and who loses with Nafta two point? Oh the winners. Are Ostensibly the Working People in North North America if it works after twenty six years of Nafta we see wages in Mexico lower than before Nafta and forty percent lower than manufacturing wages in China this has drawn a billion. US government certified million outsourced US jobs so the goal was to try and stop. Stop some of that damage so in your opinion is the US MCA better for us. Workers and consumers than NAFTA. It's better than the original Nafta in that. The outrageous investor state dispute settlement system where multinational corporations can sue against domestic environmental and health laws. Does it get unlimited compensation from taxpayers. That outrageous regime is largely removed from Nafta the big open question question is are the environmental and labor standards and their enforcement strong enough to stop Nafta's original sin of job outsourcing the main sticking points for House Democrats were environmental concerns are also labor rights and costs of pharmaceuticals. What specifically were? They worried about. Well the problem with Nafta after dirty little secret is it's not mainly about trade sets up all kinds of rights and privileges for corporations and so the Democrats were trying to get the bad things things out of Nafta and to add affirmative labor and environmental standards that basically set a floor of conduct but again this is an agreement about fixing existing bad agreement. And trying to mealy rate it's ongoing damage. This is not the template for a good modern agreement. It's it's better to have a better agreement than the agreement you know is dreadful but it's outstanding question about whether the new agreement is going to make enough of a difference and and if not I think there's going to be clamoring two or three years to renegotiate again. Laurie Wallich Public Citizen with the consumer advocacy take on the US S. MCA north of the border. The Canadian government is taking a victory lap. Here's deputy prime minister. Christiaan freeland all of us together have finally accomplished accomplished what we.

US Nafta Mexico North North America Marco Marco Werman MCA Canada Mexico City Canadian government Madrid Consumer Advocacy Group Christiaan freeland Lori Wallace Laurie Wallich prime minister China Washington Robert Lighthizer Richard
"nafta" Discussed on Front Burner

Front Burner

06:42 min | 8 months ago

"nafta" Discussed on Front Burner

"Hi Adrienne Hi Jamie welcome to you front burner. It's nice to have you here. Yeah it's good to be here okay. So let's do this use Macara I I guess that's how we're pronouncing it smack. I can go with a AH. US MCA. I have to admit I tried to follow this story. Like the old you know iterations of the story all the updates dates and I I found myself kind of falling off of that so I'm really happy that you're here today and hopefully you explain it to me first of all you know why. Why should I care about you smack? I guess the main thing is yeah the actual details of it can be pretty Nerdy and Waukesha specific specifics. Cool I'm I'm into that but yeah yeah some people are But I think you know like the the overarching kind of the the reason it's important is that governs earns over a trillion dollars worth of trade between Canada the US and Mexico and so basically what it did what. When Nafta was first brought into to force and in Nineteen ninety-four Bassi got rid of just about all the tariffs between those three countries which basically meant that it was much easier and much cheaper to trade goods back and forth across all all three countries Bush could bring more jobs and prosperity? We are creating the largest richest and most productive market in the entire world. The stretches five thousand miles from Alaska and the Yukon to the Yucatan Peninsula. It might it might seem like this kind of academic exercise but the basic like like you know some total of it is that it makes consumer products Exactly talking about here just about everything I mean. Cars for instance are one of the the big examples that was one that came up all the time during you know during these negotiations basically you know this made it possible for companies building cars to create supply chains across all three countries. C- you say okay. I can get this part made most efficiently and most Raymond Michalik in right exactly right. So he's like I can get this specialty thing done in Canada. I can get this this other this intellectual property this computer chip whatever Designing the United States I get the frame in Mexico. I can put them all together into a car. And that's much cheaper than say okay. We have to do all of this in Canada or more likely. You know if we didn't have this deal. We we have to all this in the US and then exported into into Canada through a tariff barriers. So Ben we would have to pay a ton of taxes on it and then it would be more expensive for us. Exactly that's right and so the idea is that you know. On top of the the goods being cheaper it just makes the economy more efficient which essentially means as you know overall essentially more jobs more you have more disposable income that you're not spending on that car that you bought and so then you can spend it on other goods and services you know in in Toronto in your in your community That's GONNA create more jobs. Okay perfect and I should say we've been calling it used Bac I use. Mika like the Canadians are also calling it. Cousteau now the Kennedy. US Mexico Mexico Agreement on trade so just for people listening because by all these names you can call it. I guess whatever you want okay. So you know you've just painted a very helpful system that makes goods cheaper for us. But Donald Trump came out guns blazing after he was elected. One of the worst deals ever made by any country having to do with economic development economic undeveloped as far as our countries can why did he think that the Nafta that we had before was such a lousy deal basically he blamed Nafta and trade deals generally for taking manufacturing jobs out of the United States. His argument was that not because of Nafta because it suddenly became cheaper to import things from Mexico that that meant all these factory jobs had left the four Mexico so we let people go we fire fire everybody they make cars. They make products that make everything in another country. They send them into the United States noattacks and he may he may be partly correct in that in the sense that you know traders. It's one of many many different factors including automation. Yeah exactly and just like the general kind kind of globalization of the economy over the last twenty thirty years that have have led to these kinds of shows manufacturing base. What he didn't sort of appreciate was that yes maybe maybe the auto jobs left the US and went to Mexico but there are other jobs that are replaced them in the innovation economy in the other things that people are spending money on because they have the money left over after buying a cheaper car but in his mind all that really mattered? Were these manufacturing jobs and Elson is mind he felt that the the primary culprit and maybe the only culprit your worthies trade deals. And that's why he wanted some basically he on. The campaign trail vowed to either radically overhaul NAFTA or completely to get a much better matter. Deal for America and we'll walk away if we don't get that kind of a deal with the notion that this would magically make all of Seabees factory jobs leave Mexico and come back to the US okay so very negative You know in his campaign and after he's elected and he wanted to clawback Aubrac big parts of Nafta you know they've had a deal for a year. Now what did he generally succeed at doing. First of all he promised just sort of radical a radical. Overhaul of Nafta and you smack it is not that you know you smack. Actually preserves a good probably eighty percent or so maybe ninety percent even of what was in the original Nafta's the basic the basic framework of of no tariffs Free Trade Virginia three countries all that was successfully preserved on by Canada and Mexico at the bargaining table. What what he did get in? US MCA were a few changes. Basically meant to give the US advantage over Mexico and the single largest one was he essentially got a rule rule. Put in that said you know between forty and forty five percent of everything that goes into making a vehicle. Within North America has to come from factories where workers are paid at least sixteen eighteen dollars an hour because Mexican auto workers make about three or four bucks an hour typically most cases that basically that this would give factories in in the US mostly but it also candidate or certain extent advantage over over workers over factories in Mexico and so that was kind of meant Basically Constrain Mexico a little bit you know give us a little bit more of an incentive to to put their plants in the US. Does that make like cars more expensive for US presumably. Yeah it's such a small change in some ways to very specific thing that I'm not sure I'm not sure you're going to see I a massive effect from that. Yes that's the notion that it will it will all to make vehicles a bit more expensive.

Mexico United States Nafta Canada Adrienne Toronto Donald Trump Alaska Raymond Michalik Yucatan Peninsula North America Mika Yukon Ben Bassi Elson Bush Cousteau
"nafta" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Big 98

"NAFTA school. Scene. What's new and next with the Sunday morning news? Nashville is number one for new country. Day starts with the cows. For. Ready? So she's never. Camphor? Gets then. Canner? It scares me. That she dragged. Draft me. Crazy. Amaze me. Dance chances. Tracey's berry. On me. Plans for the weekend. Cain way to go. Juicy changes. Stay on the couch. She falls asleep. Crazy. Amaze me away. Chances anyway. Snow? Hey. Beautiful. Crazy. Easy. Crazy. Crazies phone a. Crazies beautiful. Can be cool seeing that guy the twenty one thousand nine hard country fest over in Texas, Tim McGraw, Danny shea Bobby bonds, and the raging idiots will all be there too. Big eight nationals number one.

tim mcgraw nationals texas nashville nafta
"nafta" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on Latino USA

"The Mexican government has declared diabetes a national health emergency. And it's imposed a tax on soda while. It's trying to improve both prevention and medical care. It's also trying things like this. Super Zuma classes or if you can't make it to class. There are fifteen minute move it sessions, you could do during your breaks at work. There's an ideology there's an understanding of the onset of disease that basically places it as a problem of personal behavior. And no point by the way, do I kind of I think, you know, make a causal argument that NAFTA causes diabetes. But what I what I am trying to point out is that all of these things are happening in the same timeframe, and the explanations that were being handed or not satisfactory. There are also Mexicans who say that NAFTA has actually made Mexicans healthier. What do you say to that? So there's an idea that is quite commonly held among those who see NAFTA's being a really wonderful shift for the Mexican economy. There are those who basically say that diabetes and obese. City are diseases of prosperity. And that if a policymaker needs to you know, assess the difference between diseases prosperity and diseases of poverty that who wouldn't want to die of disease of prosperity, right? So better die of diabetes because that means that you've had a lot to eat and lot of sweet stuff then to die feeling hungry and in poverty, right? Throughout the campaign. I promise to renegotiate NAFTA. And today we have kept that promise the US Mexico and Canada are now in the process of establishing a new trade agreement with incredible new US, Mexico Canada agreement called US MCA sort of just works MCI, but all of these public health issues that we've been talking about they're not a main concern in the negotiations between the trade representatives. Still a leash. Gotta this wants people to understand how something as complicated and as huge as NAFTA can affect individual people's lives. People don't think this has anything to do with them. And they think that it's such an obscure kind of trade deal that Sperry wonky and difficult to to understand how it kind of relates to our lives. And so I think this is one way to get at it. You know that it's. On our plates. And it's in our bodies. Thank you so much for joining us on the USA..

NAFTA diabetes Mexican government US Zuma Sperry Mexico Canada MCI fifteen minute
"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"And this is with both its improvements and it's and it's actual worsening this is another version of nafta this is not any type of reinvention which you know trump would have you believe the rebrand he's trying to make the claim that he has totally replaced nafta this is not the transformation replacement of the napa model it should be called nafta two point oh the question and the test in the end is can we get the additional improvements made so that this agreement its revised version if in the end can be a deal that can stop some of nafta serious ongoing damage so if this were blank slate like with t._p._p. where you either had into agreements where you didn't have a new agreement this agreement would not be something people be fighting to make better necessarily differences we gotta nafta in place it's causing ongoing damage every damn week every week more middle class jobs are being outsource and here's the thing we don't begrudge people in mexico good job the problem is nath is like a machine that turns middle-class jobs into sweatshop job because jobs in mexico pay a buck fifty to two dollars an hour for jobs that folks in the u._s. we're getting paid fifteen twenty twenty five dollars an hour for and by the way it's not just manufacturing i mean the newest thing is like a._t. and t. is putting a big.

trump t. napa nafta mexico fifteen twenty twenty five dol two dollars
"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Right direction also some horrible nafta rules force countries to export natural resources that they wanted to conserve was removed some actual trade rules that allowed a lot of products basically made in china to sneak through under the nafta duty free benefits were tightened up that's important and interesting new rules added that for products to get the nafta benefits a portion of automobiles value has to be made by workers making sixteen dollars an hour or more that's first time that wage levels had been linked to market access that's super important another big fix was a big problem on urano nafta of basically requiring trucks and mexico and canada that didn't meet u._s. environmental or safety standards they had to be allowed on you it's roads back got removed so now the safety standards and also the worker driver that worker driver our safety rules all that stuff can be reapplied so those are important improvements the problem is that the environmental and labor improvements needed to get rid of to at least lessen the incentives to outsource jobs are not yet sufficient and they added new monopoly rights for big pharma so i wanna get yeah we'll get those i want to actually before we get to that what are specifically the new monopoly rights for big pharma so here's what the agreement dead it has it has rules that would guarantee for pharmaceutical corporations that basically forever 'cause trade even generally don't have termination periods the new nafta does have a six year review provisions which is important corporations hate it there is a way that it can be sunset it's not easy to use but the current nafta goes on forever and improvement in the new agreement is there is this review impossible onset but basically lost a country got out there would be forever a requirement that all governments provide the pharmaceutical companies the exact policies now in place in the u._s. that caused the high prices so for instance ten years of what's called marketing exclusivity for what are called biologic medicines those are all the cutting edge new drugs that are used to treat cancer diabetes.

china nafta mexico canada cancer sixteen dollars ten years six year
"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

05:12 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Not all being polio night welcome back to the majority report michael brooks here joining us now is lori wallach she's the director of public citizen's global trade watch and twenty five year veteran of congressional trade battles starting with one thousand nine hundred fight over nafta i did want to say i just because in your bio i mentioned in the office this morning during prep that when i was i think i was about you know about fifteen or sixteen years old i went to my one of my first major protests and it was a world bank i._m._f. protest i think in two thousand and i remember i was probably reading some your articles in the nation and it's talking with you thanks for being here i was only twelve when i wrote those no i know you were precocious you are known as called you the child prodigy of global trade critiques remember that so now you're now yeah i mean i it was embarrassing actually because i said my god she's twelve years old and five years old and her and she's already writing great critiques of the general and on trade and tariffs in the nation now with after getting renegotiated now getting renegotiated can you give us a history of nafta before we get to the renegotiations whereas this trade agreement come from where did it start what was agreed to in the nineties the short version of it is that nasa effectively hijacked the the concept of trade agreements and use them branding to implement set of binding international rules that created a whole set of new rights empowers for corporations and limited government rights to regulate on a lot of things unrelated to trade so when senator elizabeth warren talks about corporate rid trade agreements that is precisely accurate in that prior to nafta trade agreements dealt with cutting border taxes call tariffs on physical goods that would cross borders so any imported product with nasa the corporations who under u._s. procedures had a special insider role there are more than five hundred official corporate advisors to the nafta negotiations and with a closed door process congress in the press and public reluctant out they affectively hijacked that process no one was paying a lot of attention to border taxes fell asleep thinking about it insert a whole different agenda so nafta became this incredibly elegance trojan horse where for instance the pharmaceutical industry inserted new monopolies anti competitive rules in a free trade agreements to give them protections against competition from generic medicines to keep drug prices high who are the agribusiness industries can the rules that that got rid of the policies had been in place for fifty years that said imported food had to meet u._s. standards not anymore under nafta and all the companies that are looking to outsource production to export lua wages in mexico got a whole set of special investor protections and privileges that basically made it much less risky and cheaper to outsource jobs and that whole package got sold as trade and the results that louis have been even more devastating than the coalition of environmental and labor and family firm and consumer groups and progressive democrats who fought in the early nineties predicted so can we just we'll get back to specifically nafta second but i mean this is also part of a whole kind of broader set of global trade regime that were particularly prevalent in the nineties like i'm thinking of of gatt general green and on trade and tariffs but then also very similar to the obama administration pushing t._p._p. and i wanna just put one other thing on the table just briefly because your work i think always showed this because you were an are so good at basically yeah i mean translating technical things that seem really boring but actually big impact on everybody's life and there's this new scholarship from quin slow dane slobodan excuse me and i'm forgetting the name of his book but he his argument is basically that when we say when we accept the neo liberal or nasal lazy fair ideas that they're advocating for less government less interference.

michael brooks twenty five year sixteen years twelve years fifty years five years
"nafta" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"So this new deal has to be signed off by congress. Right. And presumably this is going to happen when a situation where? The Democrats control the house. Do we have any sense that congress is fully on board with this? No, Democrats would say that the deal that's been negotiated. Thus far is a good start. But they are not perfectly happy with the way it is. But President Trump is going to try to force their hand. He told us on Air Force One that he is planning to pull out of NAFTA that'll be germinated. And so congress will have a choice of the US MCA or three NAFTA which worked very well. You go out you into go shit you deals and worked very well. I mean, congress are going to have a choice either way the choice right now is between the old NAFTA. And the new NAFTA President Trump wants to make the choice between the new NAFTA. And no trade agreement at all what's the timeline in in all of this in terms of both win the new US MCA will take effect. But also when you know, the old NAFTA will be out what we do expect that the new. Oh, NAFTA will be considered by the new congress that is a democratic majority in the house and a slightly larger Republican majority in the Senate and the president if he goes through on his threat to announce he's withdrawing from NAFTA that starts a six month clock. So basically that would give lawmakers six months to approve the new NAFTA before the old NAFTA went away and the in terms of win he might sign this thing to pull out of NAFTA. He said it would be in the next short period of time, which is two weeks. It's sort of a Trump language for unclear and you know, with all these trade negotiations. Now, we are kind of getting a feel for what the m of this president is when it comes to trade negotiations. I if you look at the US MCA or NAFTA negotiations if you look at what he's trying to do now with China, if you look at some of the talks he's had with the European Union in each case, the president comes out with. A very strong protectionist threat to tear up NAFTA or impose really punitive tariffs on imports. He creates a lot of anxiety in the business community, and maybe by consumers and our trading partners. Then he takes a step back from the brink. He doesn't go all the way he doesn't make good on all the threats that he that he threw out there. But he makes good on some of them. And then he cuts a sort of face saving deal, which is often somewhat less than what he's promised. All right. Well, that was a lot of broccoli. And you know, who loves broccoli. No. He doesn't stop the late President Bush hated broccoli famously. And I hated it broccoli to when I was a kid, but I kind of like it. All right. Well, that is a rat. For today. We'll be back soon at the very latest by Wednesday with a recap of George H W Bush's funeral until then be sure to subscribe to our newsletter can head to NPR dot org slash politics newsletter to get a digest of all of our best digital stories. I must Mukalla political reporter, I'm tamra Keith. I cover the White House. And I'm Scott Horsely. I also cover the White House. Thank you for listening to the NPR politics podcast.

NAFTA congress President Trump president US George H W Bush White House NPR Scott Horsely tamra Keith Senate reporter European Union China six months six month two weeks
"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"We are back. Sam cedar on the majority report on the phone. It is a pleasure to welcome to the program, the author of eating NAFTA trade food policies in the destruction of Mexico. She is a professor of Latin American and Latino studies at City University of New York and an anthropologist by training Alicia Galvez. Welcome to the program. Thanks, so much a pleasure to be here. So our obviously, our relationship with Mexico has been in the news trade has been in the news recently, Donald Trump, I guess tentatively renegotiated NAFTA. Just I guess let's just start with the question of why approach NAFTA. And this relationship between Mexico and the United States. From from the perspective of of food and eating. Well, it's one of the ways that trade. That's true us, really, it's it's one of the most direct ways that our lives are impacted by trade deals. Most of us are not, you know, dealing and you know, chips or circuitry or car parts or airplane parts, but all of us eat. So it's one of the best ways that we have to kind of see how these things operate. And so does that particular in terms of our relationship with Mexico? I mean, or is it particularly with our relationship with Mexico? Yeah. It's not exclusive with Mexico, but there's no country that we have a closer relationship to in terms of our food systems. So we get I live in New York City, and you know, much of fresh fruit and vegetables that I eat comes from from Mexico, and if you other trading partners, we also got stuff obviously from Chilean from New Zealand and things like that. But there there is a lot of the produce that gets consumed in the United States is coming from Mexico, and they're consuming a lot of our commodity grain is a lot of corn. And soy, and we that gets produced in the United States is being consumed on the Mexican side in the form both of processed foods and beverages, but also animal feed, which is contributing to, you know, large growth in terms of that the market for for me. So let's give let's go. Go back and give us a little bit of the sort of the pre NAFTA history. I guess and and then we'll go into NAFTA. Because that dynamic of this exchange of food is. Largely a function of NAFTA in many respects, right? Well, NAFTA's really a product of the thinking of Hugh, mainly university of Chicago educated economists who were operating in all three countries. So Mexico's economic policymakers typically have studied in the university of Chicago as have US policy makers, and and as well, I and we have a, you know, Milton Friedman, you know, motivated or an tation towards the free market towards taking down barriers to trade and the interest of the expansion of capitalism that, you know, really comes to dominate thinking about economic development and economic policy and the twentieth century and not thinking, you know, basically. Prefers foreign direct investment taking away any sort of barriers to cross-border trade getting rid of terrorists than subsidies and things like that. So that capital and goods can flow freely across borders that sort of thinking was so dominant that, you know, Margaret Thatcher famously said at one point there is no alternative, you know, this is kind of the bottle that Reagan Thatcher is I'm produced, and we see it, you know, turning into very concrete policy proposals. So NAFTA is one of those policy proposals and the idea is to sort of knit together. Three countries of North America into a single economic market. Unlike you know, other examples, we can think of the European Community that took away barriers to the circular of people. We never really had a serious conversation about taking away barriers to people. But we did try to take away barriers. To goods and capital to try to create a single unified market. And that was where NAFTA came from, you know, and we should say this was a long time libertarian. Policy agenda in many respects, this internationalism. This is one of the things I think that came out of Mont pelerin was this this notion of of bringing down these barriers to capital, and on some level sort of fighting against the sovereignty of nations, at least in this respect. Right. It's and and I think actually we interviewed someone about it..

NAFTA Mexico United States City University of New York professor Sam cedar Margaret Thatcher New York City Mont pelerin Alicia Galvez Donald Trump university of Chicago North America Reagan Thatcher European Community Milton Friedman
"nafta" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"nafta" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"A split. Congress will have several issues to wrangle with including US trade policy and Democrats taking the house majority could complicate those efforts joining us now from Washington with the details is Wall Street Journal reporter will Maldon will the US and Mexico agreed to a rewrite of the North American Free trade agreement earlier this year and Canada came aboard in September. But this is not a done deal and even more. So now that congress is split. That's right and Marie. It's never easy to get a trade agreement through congress. Anybody who tells you that it's easy is probably not seen some of the latest trade battles? So it's especially difficult, though, if a president from one party who negotiated the deal is trying to get it through chamber of congress headed by the other party in this case, the house of representatives, and the house speaker has a special ability to derail what would ordinarily be a pretty simple process where at least considering the agreement, and what are some of the major concerns of Democrats at this point. And what is the likelihood the label to push Republicans on meeting them in the middle? Well, the the interesting thing is that most democratic lawmakers are actually similar in trade policy to the Trump administration. They're a bit skeptical. They want better deals that that favor American workers rather than businesses. And so some of the elements in the new trade agreement were designed to appeal to people like many of the House Democrats at that took over. But the problem with that is House Democrats really want high labor standards in Mexico, especially and this agreement would be an improvement on that in comparison with your original NAFTA, but Democrats aren't satisfied with the enforceability of those new labor provisions. They wanted airtight where if Mexico violates a labor standards or Canada or anyone else that they'll be an enforceable mechanism to hold that country to account and we've also heard from unions on the new US Mexico Canada agreement with the AFL CIO saying it had. Downst- the deal would help working families. How much is that input likely to have an effect here? Well, we don't have the final card yet from the unions. We do have some initial reactions, and they do want more labor enforceability like we mentioned with the Democrats, and certainly the unions in the past have been the key to at least have explained the democratic votes. But some unions are happy the Teamsters got some good things. Other unions may be happy with the deal. But it's it's it's a little bit too early to say at this point and a lot of it depends on politics. You know, how much are the unions willing to work with this administration on something like NAFTA, they did work very closely in the negotiation stage. But whether they got enough to make them fully support the deal is one thing. However, it may be possible to push through the agreement. If unions don't get in the way, and don't actually go out and rally against it. What are we hearing from the president? And Trade Representative Robert lighthizer on the prospects of a deal now that congress is split. Well. No that'll be interesting to see because it remains to be seen. How exactly they'll structure their congressional push. Typically, the US trade Representative is more political figure Robert lighthizer is a long-term trade expert and trade lawyer, and he designed.

House Democrats Congress US Teamsters Mexico Trade Canada NAFTA president Wall Street Journal Robert lighthizer Representative Washington reporter Marie AFL
"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Oh she hit it and now the us has sort of thinking well maybe it was a mistake i should've stayed would have been better fight state maybe the same thing would happen with nafta if the us decides to withdraw but almost all of the companies i advise and the people i talked to foreign investors in in mexico they're not pulling out there not even postponing investment decisions they believe that this integrated global supply chain that we created in north america benefits them and if there is no nafta or if the nafta free trade part disappears they don't care they will continue to produce where they feel it's convenient to do so where they liked the workforce they like whatever it is that gives them the advantage in producing there i want to talk about the politics has come up that mexico is going to have an election on july one you'll elect a new president and you'll also elect a new congress the new congress will be seated september one the president doesn't take the oath baba's until december one one of the scenarios i've heard percolating around washington is that they will get a they're shooting to get an agreement in principle here in mid may unless soon for second it were to happen that would then happen is that they would spend the next two months or so turning that into a an actual greement with all of the commas and semi colon periods and that mr pena nieto who would be the incumbent lame duck president would call a special session of the existing current mexican congress which would then approve the agreement in then what would happen here in the united states is the trump administration would meet a bunch of targets in the counter for notifying congress.

mexico president congress washington mr pena nieto united states north america two months
"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"For that reason this is the whole it's a classic consumer versus specific supplier kind of issue that in trade we know happens that the benefits go to many many people but in small amounts and the costs of some kind of change are concentrated in a vocal group that can make its voice on the other is back to the time to to how long does ambi nafta situation last the thinking would be that we have mexican elections in july there will be us midterm elections in november and presidential elections a couple of years thereafter presumably zombie zombie nafta isn't forever i'm not saying it's a good thing that we have two years or more uncertainty but keep in mind that trade deals are made for the long term and political cycles come and go so i think if i were an investor in north america depending on the region and the sector and so on i still think this is a very good market to be investing in if i want to be selling products in canada us mexico and the facts bear the south jim because for example in mexico over these last fifteen months sixteen months of the trump administration we opened up our our energy sector years ago and the amount of interest in the energy sector by us companies including others from other parts of the world but specifically us companies is is huge they look at it from the long term they're looking at it for ten fifteen twenty thirty years we will continue to have the existing nafta unless of course the us decides to withdraw in which case it will continue to be enforced between canada and mexico and you'll have a situation like tpp the us pulled out but the remaining eleven decided to have a treaty based on what had been the.

mexico us canada north america ten fifteen twenty thirty year fifteen months sixteen months two years
"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Which is what trump is pushing well let's let's talk about the future of nafta in this my takeaways you're not expecting any rapid movement on a nafta agreements assume that it plays out that way who's hurt more by that the united states or its trading partners canada mexico cyber actually heard a lot of people talking about their fear of ending up with zombie nafta that we don't get a new nafta but nobody believes in the existing nafta the net result of that is that companies postponed making investment in canada in mexico and the united states benefit i think actually president trump may have tweeted words that effect saying that delay serves america's economic interests while they're going i'm sorry from the mexican point of view i think i think that's not a valid argument because given these uncertainties what has happened is the mexican currency together with the canadian currency has devalued which means our exports are more competitive and we are selling more to the united states than we ever have before so much kind of for that visit with mexico is growing strives the value of the mexican peso down which may it more attractive for americans to buy things from mexico which or to mexico or to or to highly recommend being having been there twice this year ensemble nafta i think i think james that is a risk but this two or three things here number one currently this of steel and luminary tariffs are in abeyance and are being held against canada and to an extent mexico until the deal is agreed to so if we don't have a deal at some point presumably the us could come down hard by resuming those tariffs that would not be good for anyone and we wouldn't have nafta either why but i think people in the united states you work in the steel and loan industry say that will be good for them because plants would expand or old plants would be opened up and people who work making steel or making aluminum will get to work longer hours you'll get called that consume steel and aluminum aluminum will be more expensive so you know it's working still you still using aluminum using industries may lose their jobs precisely.

united states canada mexico trump america james canada mexico president
"nafta" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Jobs here in arizona and if without a effective nafta the that goes away but would it i spoke with a chief technology officer for loosened motors who said there closely monitoring the situation but he said there would have to be very severe changes for lucid rethink its entire business model in arizona in other words it depends on what trade negotiators come up with or what a world without nafta would mean for a border state still big unknowns we've never backed out of a trade agreement in this country before so we would be an uncharted territory eric lead directs the north american research partnership out of phoenix he says if nafta is cancelled expect years of litigation tariffs could rise entrusted trade programs could be hampered now all of this isn't to say that reopening nafta was a foolish move lee and most everyone agreed that the 23yearold trade deal could benefit from some updating especially workers dawn schuman is with the teamsters local one o4 in phoenix we spoke at the union hall she sits under a photo of the teamsters general president james hoffa taken about 25 years ago that rally was in southern california to bring out an expose nafta for what it really does than it kills jobs in america and it takes away good bluecollar jobs in american sends them to other countries she says nafta is hollowing out the middle class in america and adding to income inequality and now traditionally democratic union leaders are supporting the republican presidents push to renegotiate the treaty maybe some of that works but a lot of it doesn't and it's time that we bring jobs back to america and it's time that we provide for our own middle class that's very much what president trump has said and that's what he got elected on so was popular among her among the teamsters or no.

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"nafta" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Foreign Edition

"I think that uh nafta withdrawal would would do that well i look this is classic trump righty punches you in the face in any sits back and he sees how you responds to that plunged in the face and that's kind of how i see a lot of his negotiating tactics so whether it's with north korea or here when he's negotiating international trade but then you raised an important point visavis us foreign policy which is that by stitching these economies together and in improving growth and prosperity for all three nations we are increasing our security because the last thing that we want for instance is a mexico that falls back into economic distress were you have thousands of people rushing toward the us mexico border desperate to find work in fact if you care about things like immigration nor illegal immigration rather and you want the wall well you know you should really love nafta because nafta prevents verve hints really the the need for that that wall and so that that's another important aspect tear but in before we let you go uh the president this week in meetings with prime minister justin trudeau a man of the left suggested that if he did get rid of nafta eu we owe the us could just negotiate bilateral deals monaco amano with canada and with mexico separately uh how long would it take to negotiate something like that easy it feasible in in what would happen to the ordinary american in the meantime if the trump white house engaged on such in such a pursuit.

north korea foreign policy mexico president justin trudeau eu us canada white house nafta prime minister
"nafta" Discussed on Tech Policy Podcast

Tech Policy Podcast

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on Tech Policy Podcast

"Every trade agreement no matter what it was negotiated matters for companies whether they're in the technology sector not the first thing you have to remember is that businesses love predictability and certainty and trade agreements like nafta are one of those principal ways that you can provide predictability and certainty and in the trading environment particularly in a market like north america so at nafta the regional nafta did was it made the trading relationships between all three countries crystal clear and enabled us companies the united states canada and mexico to uh form better relationships with one another to trade more seamlessly across borders to really establish a new and innovative supply chains enabled it innovation to take place even if you couldn't conceive of the inner of an internet back then i think just the roots of the technologies that we use today really started even prior to nafta existing so i mean i think there are pieces in enact the regional nafta that were important to the the tech sector one of which is the elimination of tariffs though customs duties whatsoever a dutyfree environment and does that matter for importing parts are things like that um assembling equipment is that the kind of stuff that that we saw is that it was cheaper to buy the the building blocks of processors and things like that that's right just cuts the costs those types of costs out of the supply chains entirely uh which makes it cheaper to.

technology sector nafta north america united states principal canada mexico
"nafta" Discussed on No Jargon

No Jargon

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"nafta" Discussed on No Jargon

"Because of nafta we are now flooding there market with the cheap starchy practically inedible corn that we grow in iowa basically we've supplanted their heirloom landrace coined that they've eaten for thousands of years with a product that is mainly useful as animal feed is corn syrup and corn villers and so it's really not a onetoone exchange um and so even though mexico sought to protect its pointing this tree basically what nafta has met is that the average person can no longer eat that traditional foreignbased diet rich at now is eating more fast foods and so it's really it's it's quite a sinister exchanged that we've seen happen or i want to say that this is a a criticism or critical view of nafta but it's completely be opposite critical view of nafta than the one that were used to hearing most famously from president trump who as oh the united states of epa gadgil uses the of the united states is getting slaughtered phnom bye bye nafta or americans are getting slaughtered meaning people in the united states um but would you to talking about people getting slaughtered eat you've documented actual negative health outcomes in the mexican population is that right that's cracked the us mexican consumers are any a similar position where we have basically been given the task of sustaining the economies of both of our countries by eating the access calories that our economy is producing where does the rubber hit the road what are the specific health outcome differences for mexicans so since nafta was passed diabetes and other diet related illnesses have taken the lead in terms of causes of death.

mexico united states nafta iowa president